36 Burst results for "Oregon State For University"

Fresh update on "oregon state university" discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

00:52 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oregon state university" discussed on Switch4Good

"I wrote plant based muscle along the way with shredded begin bodybuilding than i wrote an e book scarlett how to build are successful begin brand which is just an e book but it was so fun to write and it's two hundred and thirty two pages still substantial and then of course the plant based athlete which you dossier featured and you contributed so much to is coming out next year. We'll definitely talk about that. I wanna go back. Did you not think you could probably gain make all the gains. You mentioned well. I don't know if this diet. I don't know like how. How do i know. I'll be compassionate. So that when you were introduced to bodybuilding rethinking. Oh wow this is going to be soon be challenging on a plant based diet. Well no i i. I wasn't sure i could do anything athletically on a plant based diet. This was so new to me. This is nine hundred. Ninety s. no internet on the internet came out the next year within six or twelve months later or at least public internet for people regular civilians. And so i wasn't sure at first so i asked my sister. I mean can i can. I still get adequate calories and protein. I don't know what words i use back. Then but she said robert listen at the end of the day. It's not that you need meat for protein or milk for calcium or eggs for whatever whatever provide you need those sources of nutrition. And it's so you need to get protein. Carbohydrates fats vitamins. Minerals amino acids all of those things but she also said Some of those really. She said not only. Do you not need animals to get those. Animals are not even often the best sources of those and so. I had to learn that later on and i did. I performed well all those years in highschool my sophomore junior senior year i was on the number one ranked soccer team in the state of oregon number. My teammates went on to go play professional soccer around the world. I was on the number two ranked cross country team in the state Those runners went on to do great things athletically in their lives. And i and i made those teams. I worked hard. I was involved in a lot of other sports recreationally. But i was pretty good at like tennis. And track and field rideaid every single event except for four. I think i was throwing javelin shot put. Discs was running to hurt during the hurdles. The three thousand meters fifteen hundred meters long. Jump triple jump. I did everything and when the dow bryant award for my school For being a you know a multi event athlete and that was all field by plants. And then. I went on to run cross country in college at oregon state university in my hometown for a year. And so. I knew that i could perform so when it came to bodybuilding..

Scarlett Plant Soccer Robert Oregon Tennis Oregon State University
"oregon state university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:54 min | Last month

"oregon state university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"On CBS. This is the moment I used to think of electricity is something that happens through a wire circuit. But in the world of computer chips and display monitors, electricity flows through thin layers of material. How thin down two layers of atoms. I'm Jim Messner. And this is the pulse of the planet. I'm about to release the vacuum on the atomic layers Deposition system in a laboratory. Oregon State University with Sean, You're A former graduate research on We use this system for laying down ultra thin layers of various materials. Reason we would like to have ultra thin layers of various materials is because In a lot of devices. We ultimately need to be able to control how the electrons move through the device. So the atomic Claire deposition system can be used to lay down materials that are called semiconductors or other materials that are called medals you might think of these layers of materials is ultra thin Elektronik sandwiches. Any sandwich requires first a base layer of bread. In this case, we're going to use a conductive material such as a metal and then in the middle, we're gonna have an insulating layer on top of that. We then have another conductive lair. So by using the atomic Claire deposition system, waken deposit, insulating or semi conducting layers in between two conducting layers. Ultimately, this sandwich makes what's called a thin film Die owed device. We're depositing layers that are on the order of 10 to 15 Anna, meters thick. So this is in the range of most viruses as faras size..

Claire Jim Messner CBS Oregon State University
"oregon state university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | Last month

"oregon state university" Discussed on KCRW

"Protect your Medicare coverage vote for President Trump Stepien says they have a secret weapon. Though more than 2.5 million campaign volunteers who connected with 10 million voters last week alone. We're actually running. A real campaign, you know, campaign with voter campaign with events. We like our plan. We're still knocking on doors. Still making phone calls were working the polls if it's pretty intense, A Del Amico is a super volunteer for Trump in Florida, putting in about 40 hours a week at this point I caught her on her cell phone driving between a pole watching shift in going to set up for an Ivanka Trump event with her towns Republican club called a bunch of members and I should look, we need to put up 1000 chairs and you come out and help and they go absolutely. Campaigns are always boasting about their volunteer armies there get out the vote efforts, and it's always impossible to tell if it's really is good as they claim. It's even harder to make comparisons now because of Corona virus. What is clear based on polling and where the candidates are trying to compete is Trump has a narrower path to victory. Or, as the president said in a recent rally, he has to run the table under dramatically different circumstances than he did four years ago. Tamara Keith NPR news Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented Ah lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control. The largest and now, second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific northwest Erica Fleischman as a professor at Oregon State University, so historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio, unfortunately, continue happening as climate continues to change, Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans because wildfires will keep happening at times and in places.

Jonah Pots President Trump Stepien Mike Morgan Trump Ivanka Trump Colorado Erica Fleischman Tamara Keith NPR Colorado Division of Fire Prev president NPR Tio Lauren summer Oregon State University Florida University of California Merced director professor
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | Last month

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

John Batchelor

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Power 5 Conferences Are Moving Towards Canceling Fall Sports

"Two of college football's power. Five conferences have cancelled their fall sports seasons due to concerns about the virus. Click. Nevel tells both the Big 10 and Pac 12 leaving the option open to play football in the spring. But all fall sports are postponed. Dr. Doug Ackerman with Oregon State University, says help risks associated with Kobe, 19 played into the recommendation not to play specifically the cardiac, you know, side effects of Of potential covert infections that we don't know enough about. And so we became more concerned about that. Medical experts were advised by both conferences and university presidents. I'm

Football Dr. Doug Ackerman Oregon State University PAC Kobe Nevel
Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

Mark Mason

06:55 min | 4 months ago

Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

"With us. Dr. John Wade CI, the professor of the Global Health Programme, professor of health system and policy program. And the director of the Center for Global Health College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. And Dr CI Welcome back to the Mark Mason Show. It's my pleasure to be back with you. Well, I'm glad to hear your voice again. I always use you is kind of our update into the really world of Corona virus. What's really going on and a lot has happened since we last talked. On that the virus seems to be more prevalent than ever. But we seem to be learning to live with it. I suppose one of the virus limits we can live with. I mean, we won't like it. But can we get by at this rate? No. We add a to high rate a TTE this great, many, many stay or counties there. Health care for city would not be able to 15 we We have to bring down because most European and Asian country at much lower levels, so they are able to lead you much higher level of activity, which we still cannot. And so if we maintain this high level or pandemic, it will hurt both our economy and people's life and health, and so we had to do something to bring it down to a much lower level. Wow. I don't know how we do that. The governor's talked about maybe travel restrictions. Is that one possible thing we should seriously look at where maybe people from high incident states are are not allowed to come where they if they do. Come there, quarantined. Well, it is. It's It's a good idea, in theory, but in practice will be very difficult to implement. Because he had to send lots of people to monitor to supervise and that costs money. So are you thinking another lock down or slow down? No, no, I think for the last Upfield. Early June, We duty our 2.5 months left town. And we see the serious impact on Mike, honey, and I don't think al economy can sustain more locked down. What we need to do is to learn how to live. Save it. How to operate our business. I work safety and one particular major. Uh, I know the difficulty but that's very critical measure, not just Oregon. But slowly, 90 states we were not able to implement and that is one of the biggest reason we are in this high level off epidemic. So remember in my early and Evi I mentioned that there are three step process. That's important. The first step is contact tracing. The second step is testing and so We're not doing a superb job, but we have the great improvement compare with March or April in term of the first step. But we still fail on the last step that is after the testing. What do we do with the confirmed cases So far, we only isolate people with moderate to see via symptoms. And completely neglected people with mild or no symptoms, and the latest studies, said just people with mild to know Simpson. They accounted for about 80% of total infection. But this 80% of total infection also, if we don't contain them, they also contribute to about 70 to 80% of new infection. Just think about this way. We pay attention to the Penta pus it with more moderate to severe symptoms contained them. But we let the other 80% continue to spread the virus free tea, and it will be a miracle if we don't have. Ah, hi. Hi. Cases continue to be in this house. How did we get more testing? I mean, we can barely my doctor tells me that he has no more tests because they've shipped him off to Florida and Texas and other states that need him. That's a problem I was comparing with Beck in March or April, Wright had done better dimension. We're not doing a super job during the testing as well, Well, I'm with you on the testing, and they and the containment. It's just a question of Why aren't we doing it? There are multiple reason one if people are still resisting the idea ofthe isolation and quality scene and the other financial Many Asian country. I don't know much about European country mediation country like Taiwan, they when they have a mandatory quarantine, isolation, government pay for the costs and company people. The example of Taiwan in their quarantine and isolation. Everyone who and the quarantine everyday received about equipment to certify us started per day for 14 days. So people who need to be quarantined need to be compensated because they lost income and we're not able to do that. I know we're on our financial crunch. So it's both financial reason but also political social reason, because people are not waiting. Yeah, I would have to be afraid, though. Doctors at the AA liberal Mike what would fake Corona virus just so he could sit at home for two weeks and get paid by the government? But there's you know, there's the question of you gotta have the test and it's got to come back positive. So I'm with you. I think a lot of listeners were with you test and contained testing contain, And maybe that's what they should be trying to come up with. In the way of money in Washington, D C right now, the World Health Organization says We should not expect a miracle where a vaccine is concerned. Are we being spoon fed in folded a cure A vaccine, If you will make may not be what we think it's going to be. So that I have some reservations because we still know ability to about the vaccine because there's no effective action available yet. I think I just saw the news. Russia has a plan to have a effective action by October, and we don't know how safe it is, but I think they're waiting between safe and effectiveness. For the U. S. I think the earliest might be the beginning of next year. And I cannot say anything about how effective it is because we haven't seen that yet. We don't know yet, but most likely given the nature of the disease, even an effective vaccine. The immunity may not last very long. If the image can last up to a year. That would be wonderful, but most likely will be somewhere between six months and 12 months. That means we may need to do more than one dose of

Center For Global Health Colle Oregon Professor Taiwan Corona Dr. John Wade Ci Global Health Programme Oregon State University Director World Health Organization Corvallis Penta Beck AA Mike Russia Simpson Washington Florida
Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

The Pilot Network Podcast

04:30 min | 4 months ago

Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

"Flights thirty fifth anniversary and and we fly exclusively commercial now. So all of our patients in all of the families that we serve fly commercially and but that always that that wasn't always the case So when we were founded back in nineteen eighty, five we started as a as a nonprofit and with with a group of this network of private pilots and and it was only with these private pilots on donating their time, their money, their their planes that that these patients would be able to travel say from. Las. Vegas to Los Angeles writer. Las. VEGAS TO STANFORD University for treatment. So. So with our thirty five anniversary of this year, we we've really wanted to sort of celebrate that Celebrate our pilots that that that started this. Entire. Journey. At. Miracle flights and and actually played such a pivotal role as we're starting to brainstorm with Rachel and Matt. From forgoing about how we might activate some of these The. Celebration and really create some ideas and we were thinking about, Hey, what if we actually gifted some of these amazing time pieces to to these private pilots that actually helped us all those years ago. So so our team. Contacted one, a gentleman His name is Dave and and he's actually a Las Vegas resident. is now eighty years old but dave helped. So many of our patients fly back in the I guess it was like the early nineties nineties. And And what we thought would be a good good ideas. If we connected Dave, the pilot, you one of the patients that he flew all those years ago and there's a patient. Her name is Jessica and Chm actually. Has A has a disease called arthri posts and it's an orthopedic, a condition where the the limbs don't necessarily form on the way their intended to and and she her first flight would dave. Back in nineteen, ninety, five and nineteen, ninety, six was Was To Seattle, at Jessica was like two years old Ohka and again day flew her a number of times and when we reached out to Dave and said, hey, we want to do this little reunion. He could. He was just so excited began this is he's eighty now. So you know he's getting up there and he was just so excited to connect so. In the pandemic times we connected via zoom and they had this wonderful reunion where Dave was able to see Jessica who is now walking and anyone who knows a typical diagnosis a of of Arthur guideposts you're you don't walk. You're you're pretty much confined to a wheelchair, but Jessica is walking she she's a college student at the at Oregon State University. And it was so incredible to see them re reunite of the resume, and then we were able to present Dave with with the awesome a Tornado watch as some kind of symbol. Of thanks and and obviously celebrating partnership so it was lovely to do that values are first Reunion that we were planning on doing other ones. In Togo has just been so generous that they really wanted to get into celebrating other pilots as well. So a few things that we actually have in line of for for activation coming the next few months actually going to. meet up with an air. Force. Pilot Air. Force. Vet Who who used to be a pilot and SORTA surprised him with the tour going watch. He's actually been supportive miracle flights for a long time as well and as our kids fly you know our kids are still flying an Algebra Algebra accident short with they're going to surprise their pilots that are actually flying the the commercial planes flying on. Now they're gonNA surprise those pilots with some with some Togo and watches as well. So we have a law planned, but it's it's such a amazing partnership really to celebrate. These families, these pilots are so instrumental in helping these families.

Dave Jessica Togo Vegas Los Angeles Stanford University Writer Seattle Oregon State University Rachel Ohka Matt Arthur
The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:19 min | 4 months ago

The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

"Today is a really special podcast is an amazing guests that we have that takes us back to the time when the tenor towards genetic engineering was very different back around the turn of the Millennium I. Guess is the turn of the century two two. It was a little bit different field before the Internet really took over the defamation of scientists and career assassination, and those opposed to technology took on other means to solve their problems. At least to. Agitate and we'll talk about that today in an event from two thousand and one and we'll talk more about that in a second speaking with doctor, Toby Bradshaw A. He's a professor emeritus in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate you being toby. It's a pleasure to be here. Yeah this is really an interesting point in history and I remember when this happened. And in a kind of kind of fell into the background a little bit, but let's set the stage if we go back to two thousand and one. What kind of work were you doing in Merrill Hall at the University of Washington. Since the mid nineteen nineties, I have been working on the genetic adaptation and growth in hybrid poplars. They're fast growing tree. News all around the world, but heavily in the Pacific northwest up to produce. Hebrew products primarily so I was involved with. The early molecular genetics research, including M Gino Mapping. And ultimately identifying traits that were responsible for faster growth, which I had a basic interest in, but which of course the temp companies had a commercial innocent. And where you're working with genetic engineering, or were you really just dealing with hybrids myself? I was only producing hybrid poplars through traditional cross pollination methods that have been used for centuries in in poplars around the world I was also collaborating with Steve Strauss. At Oregon State University on some preliminary work to genetically engineered trees, four different growth form to produce more would in a smaller land area, but I myself had never still have never a genetically engineered a tree. And really the facility that you were working at. It isn't on the campus, right? It's it's the center for Urban Culture and what are the kinds of things that were being done there well. It is technically on the UW. Campuses at the very periphery separated from the main campus by the Union Bay Natural Area A place for I enjoyed bird every day on my walk to work, so that was a nice interlude. Of every day, but the other kinds of work that we're going on at the Center for Urban Horticulture included a restoration ecology primarily for wetland restoration, understanding a plant succession after the eruption of Mount Saint Helen's in nineteen eighty was conservation work for rare plants, going on so rare plants in Washington be propagated for reintroduction into the wild, and that was a particular focus of my colleague I'm single ride card who you will hear more about later and the graduate students in Undergrad who doing their own research, their work on a wide range of topics, including for example how to? Have, urban gardens produce more food for people who otherwise might not be able to afford a fresh vegetables, so it was. A typical horticulture center I, think it most universities where there was a mix of basic research applied research in outreach up to the public in the form of extension. And, so it doesn't sound like this was the you know the the center of the universe of Monsanto or something I mean this sounds like a really practical extension oriented center that had significant roles in community, and and and even just in the regional agriculture's that's. Is that more what it was about yes? Oh, the University of Washington is not a land grant university. It's not an agricultural school. School, in the focus at the UW has always been a basic research and the center. For urban horticulture included in its mission, some applied research and quite a bit of extension and outreach up to the public, so in that way it was different from much of the rest of campus in its mission, but by no means is the University of Washington on any kind of center for plant biotechnology now. It isn't now. Yeah. Good basic biology know basic science and a lot of really good plant people there, but it's Can you give me a little bit of sense? Outside the University of like two, thousand, zero, two, thousand and one, what was the environment like a genetic engineering in your perspective and in your area of the country? What was really happening? Then in that environment, it was an interesting time. The first genetically engineered crops that were planted on a wide scale, had only been in production for less than a decade, so as a relatively new technology on the commercial sector, perceiving though scientists and people who keep up with science for familiar with the progress of genetic engineering. How it was eventually applied in agriculture, get caught a lot of the general public by surprise, and as everyone who's familiar with plant biotechnology knows that can sometimes lead to misunderstandings. And worse at the the first inkling that I had that anyone might be opposed to the kinds of research that I was doing was just a couple of years before in nineteen, ninety nine, when Seattle hosted the World Trade Organization meetings and I had some of my. Poplars. That were growing in pots out in the back forty behind the. Urban Horticulture. Cut Down by vandals during those WTO protests mean. As often happened to these kinds of things at my mind. The damage done to my plants was fairly minimal. Because these are poplars. Cut Him off. They just re grow the we. That's how we actually propagate them through cutting, so it had zero effect on me, but at the same time they went through and cut down all of the older seedlings that a colleague of mine was growing for re, vegetating streamsides in Alder. Don't re sprout after being cut-backs. Again it was one of these ready fire. Aim moments for an activist who really didn't understand. Even the species of trees that they were looking at i. mean did a lot more damage to someone else's research than to mind we might. Research was essentially funded by the wall critics,

UW Urban Horticulture Center For Urban Horticulture Toby Bradshaw Oregon State University World Trade Organization University Of Alder Professor Washington Pacific Merrill Hall Department Of Biology Steve Strauss Union Bay Natural Area M Gino Mapping Mount Saint Helen Seattle
The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:13 min | 5 months ago

The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue

"The It is feeling an open sky and ocean and chemistry today geeking out about the color blue. From American public media. This is marketplace tech I'm Ali would. So it turns out. It's very rare to discover new color pigments, an oregon chemist, a major breakthrough in the science of color. A decade ago, he discovered the I knew blue pigments in more than two hundred years, and just about a month ago, that pigment was cleared for use in commercial products that as it happens, are actually more energy efficient as paint and surface colorings, and now that same chemist is pushing color science forward again. Oregon public broadcasting just burns reports. Matsu Superman is a scientist versed in serendipity. The happy chance occurrence the lottery of the amazing, many of the importance, scientific discoveries come by accident. Clearly a pot of boiling science serendipity was in play a decade ago when his Oregon State University lab discovered the new pigment which would be named union men blue. He was looking for new materials to use an electronics, but what came out of the furnace was something else entirely I couldn't believe it. I was shocked because the samples Gimmel, so blue paints made with Yin and blue or highly heat reflective in the formula has been licensed for use. Since that Discovery Mayan has focused on the chemistry of color. He and Brett dual who just got his PhD started experimenting with a mineral called Hip night, which is mostly found in meteorites, and they tried adding a little bit of cobalt to make another blue pigment. We didn't expect it to be as intense as it was. The formula for cobalt blue made without hip night was discovered about two hundred years ago, but paint made with the pigment comes with health warnings because it can be toxic, this new color could be less toxic because it uses a fraction of the cobalt. Cobalt was so low. Giving off the same color essentially. It was a little surprised moment followed by an a Ha moment like an hour or so later dual says materials are also cheaper by a six, but it's still too early to know. If night blue will catch on with manufacturers, the labs discovery is only a few months. Old David Waller is with the Color Pigments Manufacturers Association, representing. That produce colors for paints, coatings and plastics. He says the adoption of new pigments can take years certainly room. To add something new because some older technologies have been phased out regardless of hip night, Blues Future Ma Superman Ian is continuing his search for color every day. Walk into this chemistry building. I don't know what I'm going to discover. I have some ideas I have some goals, but once you enter the lab. Put things together. You don't know what's going to be. This is the exciting part what we do and the next big color challenge ahead. We'll be red.

Cobalt Color Pigments Manufacturers A Oregon ALI David Waller YIN Oregon State University Scientist Superman Ian Gimmel Mayan Brett
"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Coast range there's a disabled vehicle but most of the roadway is blocked off highway one oh three about two miles south of in Masterson K. E. X. traffic now KQ weather so we're looking at some rain showers maybe some hail maybe even a thunderstorm popping up to finish out your Monday temperatures in the upper forties around the metro area showers overnight lows around forty showers likely again on Tuesday with I get a slight chance of a thunderstorm indicate to weather center on joint from the financial studio visit cleared P. dot com today you know sometimes thousands Trusteer financial crimes to secure their financial future F. D. dot com today what's on the show today we literally have six hours of information we can cram into three forty so stick around we got a weekend's worth of developing information on corona virus we have so much to talk about including does vitamin C. protect you from corona virus you know we spoke with the doctor at Oregon State University long before the phrase covert nineteen was was even coined and now we have hospitals around the country reportedly using gas what vitamins see how effective is it really and should you be taking it that'll be a two oh five this afternoon more warnings from the nation's virus spokespeople that will open your eyes how history can be our guide and I'm talking about the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen don't roll your eyes there are a lot of similarities.

financial crimes Oregon State University K. E.
Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:18 min | 11 months ago

Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

"Breeding network. Tell us about it sort of genesis and I think I in its creation story. There were peppers involved right. Yeah tell us about sore. Yeah so I worked for Oregon. State University Here in Oregon and I work on a project recalled novick which is the northern organic vegetable improvement collaborative and that is a project that's led by Oregon State University but also includes the organic Steve Alliance. That's up in Washington but works nationally University of Wisconsin at Madison and Cornell University so at each of those institutions there are breeders that breed at least part-time specifically for organic farmers. which have very different needs? A lot of the same needs a lot of gardeners I believe and and also and so so what we've done in this project project as Taking a lot of the breeding lines that all these different plant breeders are working on their specific organic systems and trial them on a lot. A lot of different firms all over the country to see how they perform On organic farms. And we compare them to varieties that we no are gonNA perform really well on farms. We also test out new varieties that come out. You know you open up your seats. How like right now? At this time of year we opened the seed catalogs catalogs and as farmers it's like. Oh Wow. There's always new varieties. Are They GonNa do well for me are not everyone's thinking that right So we trial all those And this one year we were trailing these sweet peppers so kind of like a roasting pepper. The ones that Corner Detoro they call them That are pointed me too. That are really nice for for have stick wall for roasting and we're trying to find a variety that would perform really well here in Oregon where we have You know we have short season. We have Also we have evenings at get really cool. Where a lot of times on the east coast like they say well but warmer so so we never really know a variety to perform really well? So we're looking for that And so we knew exactly what the farmers wanted out of a variety but And we're finding that out. We're doing all this work on the farms. But then I had the question like well. What about what they taste like grow great? They don't taste great then. That really isn't that helpful to the supermarket and gotten a really nasty. Exactly what do they really taste. Like and You know uh-huh as researchers we get stuck in this thing where we're like okay. Well let's just bite into it and give it a one two nine rating but I didn't really want to do that because mostly I didn't trust myself I know like I'm one person. And what do I know about what you know. How great a peppers when the taste or not and also to be honest? It's hard for me to be unbiased because I'm out there in the field. I'm looking at all of these and I really want to choose varieties That perform really well for farmers so I wanted to remove myself for the from the question. Right and so I asked a lot of chefs that I knew. I work at a farmers market in Portland Oregon at that time also and I asked a bunch of chefs to get together and taste them with me and they tasted them and they basically started identifying the different things that they liked about does peppers that went beyond just the flavor but actually the shape and the size right because practicalities of structure that make something in the same way that a piece of meat or fish or whatever is or isn't appropriate for a particular recipe or or you know a method of cooking that's right it's like exactly yeah. Yeah and he's thinking about waste to like hijacked and seeing the kitchen all these things that are very important and we I and I thought. Oh my gosh are the parameters that are actually creating these new varieties of tomatoes peppers of everything. Do they know. So what this was wealth of information that the shafts and other value added You know if someone's making hot sauce or something or just the end user. Do they a spend enough time interacting with them to understand what the knees are right right so you wanted to plug these these participants who were working around these same vegetables but not together yet. You plugged them together and made culinary breeding network exactly. Yeah started You know organizing these events wants to bring individual these individuals all these different stakeholders and Arthur system together which has extended into the public? Because we all are you know stakeholders orders and the food system. Yeah so so you have this interesting perspective because you're working with all these leaders. Many of whom we gardner types hypes don't necessarily hear about one of their writers who may not even know who breaded or developed it but you're you're interacting with all of these people as all the stakeholders and you have the chefs and produce managers managers and all these other approach fires and and farmers and seed growers and breeders and so forth So you get to see and hear about a lot of things that are kind of coming down the pike or or that are getting their starting to trend even before we gardner see them in a catalog may be so like from your instagram. which is at culinary breeding network? I know some of the crops that you especially love and I mentioned the Ridichio the intro so tell us about that one for instance and is that something that you all ever talked about among this group this these steak steak. Oh Yeah Yeah Yes well I could go on forever. So you're going to have to cut me off. I'll just say shush me. I I think at all well so I am Sicilian and I grew up With a lot of food and a lot of Italian food so this is something that has just been something thing that we consumed but it is not a crop or a vegetable that has consumed much in the United States but working with chefs There is an appreciation for different flavors. Other than sweet. I mean this is something that we see all the time. Plant breeding is the trend keeps going toward breeding sweeter and sweeter things but there there you know there are earthy masses in earthy nece and their bitterness and all these things that actually should be appreciated. I feel like in vegetables. So there's that kind of culture food culture kind of side that I really like about radio but additionally it is something that is very important and the Pacific northwest as well as where where you are in the North East to be Consuming for individuals. You know the public to be consuming. Because that's what we grow in these areas in the winter. We cannot grow lettuce. This is what I see a lot of times like in the farmers market setting is all these people come out and support farmers and the height of the season. When of course everything is so wonderful fola tasty why would you go to the grocery store And farmers markets and a lot of areas very plentiful. So it's convenient. You can go there but as soon as it starts here. Are you know it starts raining. And it's cold. It's not so nice to go to the farmer's market people go back to the grocery store and they're buying lettuce and cucumbers from places that are very far away. Yeah so I really want people to eat things that are grown here all year round so we have a campaign called winter vegetables. There's a website you wanNA restful dot dot com ridiculous part of that so With the Ridichio then one of the flavors that you get from it is the bitter. Not Sweet you were just talking about Sweden vegetables being something that a lot of people breed for and so forth and it's more cold tolerant so it can grow at a time when say lettuce can't even in northern areas And I would say from the pictures picture on your instagram. The even though it's the leaves of their the they look like flowers so beautiful and they're all these sort of lavender and Mauve move shades and modeled and just beautiful beautiful. Do grow it in your Home Garden. Yes I do actually Yes it's very rewarding. It's exciting exciting. It's it's kind of like I think I've always loved growing garlic because you plant. Yeah and it's like you don't see it and then all of a sudden you have this wonderful thing that you pull out the ground well ridichio you grow and you can harvest the leaves and eat the leaves but it heads up and it can get a lot of frost damage on the outside and get really slimy and you think Oh God you know. I've lost it. It's it's done and then you get out there and you start pulling off. These slimy lease and you get down to just a hidden jewel rally little head. That is beautiful and perfect. Yeah do you have any favorite variety seat one. Tell us about real quick. Oh sure Well I so one thing I wanNA wanted to mention this one of the reasons. Also that hasn't been grown a lot is that it hasn't been a lot of resources for a seed So uprising seeds does have have They have several They they love radio yeah they do have several and this year. I think it's the first time that they have released. The is so Tina we now and that is one. That is a pink until people are really drawn to the beauty salon called. Yeah roasted over Netto. And there's several varieties of those but that's a really beautiful

Oregon Oregon State University Washington Cornell University Madison Corner Detoro State University Portland Novick Netto University Of Wisconsin Steve Alliance United States Pacific Northwest Gardner Tina Arthur
Scientists Find Caffeine, Xanax, And Cough Medicines In Donor Blood

Tom Sullivan

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists Find Caffeine, Xanax, And Cough Medicines In Donor Blood

"Scientists have found traces of caffeine in the anti anxiety drug Xanax and samples of supposedly pure blood to have been used in transfusions two scientists at Oregon State University bought eighteen samples of what should have been pure human blood from a number of different biomedical suppliers all eighteen tested positive for caffeine thirteen tested positive for Xamax and H. showed traces of over the counter cough medicine the scientists say their findings indicate that much of the blood used for transfusions and research is

Caffeine Oregon State University Xamax
Carcass of giant blue whale brought to surface for study

KYW 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Carcass of giant blue whale brought to surface for study

"The carcass of a giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years is being hauled the surface so it can be reassembled and then studied and put on public display Oregon State University says the dead whale washed ashore near gold beach Oregon in twenty fifteen it's extremely rare for a blue well to wash ashore intact the creatures can be like that two school buses scientists removed fifty eight ones and it's flush them place the bones in the water off Newport Oregon so scavengers pick them clean the university says the three hundred sixty five bones were brought back to land Thursday including some eight foot long

Oregon State University Oregon Three Years Eight Foot
Famously Fickle Felines Are, In Fact, Clingy

60-Second Science

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Famously Fickle Felines Are, In Fact, Clingy

"Considered dogs to be overly attentive and cats. Well a bit more aloof. But a new study shows the cats can become attached to their humans. And we'll turn to that person for comfort in times times of stress the findings per in e journal current biology although kitties are a popular pet more people own cats than dogs here in the. US There are few few studies that examine how the furtive felines feel about their owners. There has actually been relatively little research into the cat human bond especially when we compare it to the number of research studies with dogs in humans. Kristen Batali a post doctoral scholar at Oregon State University to explore the Cat Caregiver Connection Battalion or colleagues colleagues turned to a test. That's been used to assess bonding behavior in puppies apes and even infants the researchers would show a cat and its owner to an unfamiliar room and leave them there for two minutes. At which point the owner would depart leaving the cat on its own. We know that in human infants attachment behaviors toward their parents. It's our heightened in response to a frightening or novel situation so in this case the experience of the cat being in the novel room alone. Axes are strange. The situation in allows us to observe the cat directs any attachment behavior to the owner. When they then come back to the room when the owners returned battalion company would observe their reunion and they saw the feelings displayed a variety of categories says some cats greeted their owner and then they returned to exploring the room while periodically Riyadh going back to their own? Ah for attention. These kids are apparently secure enough in their relationship. Let's some quick reassurance. Was All they needed before continuing to pursue do their perusal of the room on the other Pau some were real scaredy. Cats other cats behaved in an insecure way in excessively clung to their owner side. And then there were the cats that lived up to their reputation for supercilious stand-offishness other cats avoided their own are when they return to the room. These securing an insecure patterns of behavior are actually the same as what we observe between dogs and their owners and even human infants in their caregivers. In all three of these populations nations the majority of individuals are actually securely attached to their caregivers indicating similarities across these species. Although snubbing is generally considered classic classic conduct the majority of cats in the study around sixty five percent actually use their owners a source of security one could even describe right. Those cat human relationships as Don. Thanks

Cat Caregiver Connection Batta Kristen Batali Riyadh PAU Oregon State University DON Sixty Five Percent Two Minutes
OSU study using mutant flies finds blue light from phones, computers may speed aging

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

OSU study using mutant flies finds blue light from phones, computers may speed aging

"A new study is suggesting blue light is speeding up the aging process K. of BK's Brian shook has the details researchers at Oregon State University announced its findings Thursday in a study linked to prolonged exposure to blue light coming from smart phones computers and other household fixtures it says the blue light wavelengths produced by light emitting diodes damage cells in the brain as well as the redness during the study on fruit flies the insects exposed to blue light had much shorter lives than those kept in the dark it also found if given a choice the flies avoided blue light all

Oregon State University
Oregon State study says wind turbines threaten migrating bats

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Oregon State study says wind turbines threaten migrating bats

"A study by Oregon State University concludes the hoary bat faces an uncertain future because its numbers have declined by two percent each year in the study and author writes bats can be killed by collisions with propellers and buy a barrel trauma which occurs when bats fly through low pressure zones created by spinning blades of a wind turbine the sudden change in pressure causes bath lungs to expand faster than the bats can exhale resulting in burst vessels that filled her lungs with blood according to the study hoary bats often fly into danger zones because they're sophisticated sonar capabilities can't detect pressure

Oregon State University Two Percent
University study says wind turbines threaten PNW migrating bats

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

University study says wind turbines threaten PNW migrating bats

"A new study says a Pacific Northwest bat that migrate south for the winter faces threats from wind turbines Oregon State University concludes the hoary bat faces an uncertain future because its numbers have declined by two percent per year a study author Tom rod houses bats can be killed by collisions with propellers and by beryl trauma which happens wood bats fly through low pressure sales created by those spinning blades their sonar capabilities can't detect drops in

Oregon State University Pacific Northwest Tom Rod Two Percent
Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Farmland Also Optimal For Solar Power

"Arrays raise with desert's but the extreme heat can curb solar panels potential. It's like your laptop or your home computer. If it over heats it slows down so there's this tradeoff between having a lot a lot of fun like in a desert but if it gets too hot the efficiency of those panels drops oregon state university ecological logical engineer chad higgins his team is interested in where photovoltaic panels should be located in order to maximize energy production in addition addition to moderate temperatures in sunlight they found the conditions for the most efficiency include low relative humidity and gentle wins that enhanced transfer of heat from the panels by analyzing satellite data for these four factors they created a map of potential solar panel productivity for different land types around the globe coming out on top agricultural crop lands and you think about it for a minute and it kind of makes sense what is agriculture but taking the funds raves and and converting it into a form of energy that we consume so there's this sweet spot where you get a lotta sun but it's a temperate temperature and that is where you get the maximum productivity and that's also where plants thrive other factors also favor croplands solar agricultural tre lands tend to be closer to population centers where there's a market for electric rather than way off in the desert their cultural lands tend. That'd be flat. They tend to be already disturbed so you don't have as many ecological conservation worries higgins team thinks that agriculture in solar can complement each other paving the way to a more sustainable energy future the researchers estimate that installing photovoltaic panels on just one percent of croplands worldwide would be enough to meet all of humanity's global electricity needs the study is in the journal scientific reports higgins hopes hopes the research will inspire collaborations between solar companies and farmers to feed the world and power it to a prospect that should brighten anyone's day. Thanks for

Chad Higgins Oregon State University Engineer One Percent
To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:48 min | 1 year ago

To get broadband to every American, you need to know the rules in all 50 states

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by guideline over seventy. Five hundred growing businesses have chosen guideline for its modern retirement plan that automates the heavy lifting involved in offering a 4. Sign up and get your first three months free visit guideline dot com for details and by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation Evan Lyle Rush enterprises surprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it. The future of mobility is going to be decided right here in the state is a planet dot com to find out why that's P.. L. A. N. E. A._T.. Dot Com if you WANNA get broadband access to every state you gotta know the local laws from American public media yeah. This is marketplace tech demystify digital economy. I'm molly would the digital economy as we like to call it over here depends pretty heavily on access access to the Internet and that is still not a solved problem here in the United States over thirty percent of Americans don't have access to broadband Internet which is defined as twenty five megabits per second or higher. That's according to research released Tuesday by the N._p._d.. Group the Pew Charitable Trusts has an initiative should've broad-band definitions like in Alabama for example broadband speed is defined as only ten megabits per second. If your network is busy that's barely fast fast enough to stream net flicks and hi. Def Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Initiative for Pew Charitable Trusts. She told me state policy is a huge deal. When it comes comes to expanding broadband access state policy matters because lack of access to broadband is a national issue but it is felt at the local level and states states have taken a pretty aggressive approach to closing gaps in access particularly over the last five years we've seen a significant uptick in legislation since two thousand fifteen eighteen <hes> and what we can take away from this is not only do state policymakers see and feel that immediate urgency <hes> lack lack of broadband access? They're saying it's important to things like education healthcare and economic developments but they're also saying this. This is what we want our state to look like they're setting goals and then they're laying out a path and a framework for how to achieve those goals. Let's just dive into some of what is in the tool. Some of the different approaches does that states are taking like. Could you give me an example two totally different approaches that states might have taken so going into this research we knew that states <hes> face similar challenges oranges and increasing access to broadband <hes> but we learned that there are also taking similar approaches but adapting them to their needs. That's really where those categories came from. Those groupings things <hes> if you look at goals for example <hes> you have states like Minnesota and West Virginia where they're statewide broadband goals are focused. I'm border to border universal coverage thing you look at a state like California <hes> that has a goal to connect ninety eight percent of the population in each one of its roughly fleet twenty regions. How do you hope that a tool like this can help close the digital divide in terms of broadband access while this tool is actually the first step in <unk> are ongoing research on how states are addressing gaps and broadband access so for us this was about understanding that fifty state landscape of broadband deployment laws ause and it provides the basis for our next level of research which is a deeper examination of how states are addressing those gaps in access. What we hope so is that <hes> users will be able to use this tool to learn what other states are doing and how they're actually doing it. Katherine dewitt manages the Broadband Research Search Initiative for the Pew Charitable Trusts. We've got a link to that new tool and some analysis about spending per state at our website marketplace tech dot Org <music> for some related links so this tool is super new obviously and Pew hopes that policymakers and local governments will jump in and start creating some more analysis and comparison and of course. They'll be publishing their own pieces. The first one that I mentioned there is about how states let's fund their broadband projects whether it's grants or loans or general fund kind of things or some creative funding apparently Illinois makes Internet service providers providers pay into a special offer called the digital divide elimination fund and it uses that to pay for broadband buildouts and in Virginia a legal settlement. Element with tobacco producers is paying to build more Internet. Look I'm not saying this isn't a little walkie over here but it is interesting. Also I gotta be honest. I'm still hung up on that ten megabits per second in Alabama and probably some other states too. I haven't made it through the entire tool yet but Alabama's regulation also says I._S._P.'s can call their upload at speeds broadband at one megabit per second so basically if you're at home trying to upload some photos to facebook or anything to the cloud ever you'd be doing that at speeds ten times slower than the slowest four G. Cell Phone connection set it and forget it because it's GonNa take all night now. The speed question is so controversial that even though Pugh is using the twenty five megabits per second speed guideline which is set by the Federal Communications Commission Network congestion usually means actual actual speeds are nowhere near that fast and again a four g phone connection is faster than that on the best providers. It is such a big discrepancy that while Pew says says twenty one million Americans don't have broadband Microsoft put out its own map of high speed Internet access back in April. It said the real number of people people without appropriately fast Internet access for today's economy is more like one hundred sixty three million in the United States alone. I'm Hollywood breath and that's marketplace tech. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Oregon State University e campus pushing the boundaries of what's possible in online education a classroom that incorporates virtual reality check faculty members using augmented reality Yup a top ranked university known for Innovation and excellence. That's them see what a twenty first century education looks like at e Campus Dot Oregon State Dot e._D._U..

Pew Charitable Trusts United States Broadband Research Initiative PEW Alabama Katherine Dewitt Michigan Oregon State University Evan Lyle Rush California Hollywood L. A. N. Illinois Facebook
A tailored ride-hail service with special needs in mind

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 1 year ago

A tailored ride-hail service with special needs in mind

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by guideline think your business is too small to offer a 4. It's not join the thousands of small businesses and startups that offer a guideline 4. Guideline is affordable easy to manage and the best part it's it's free to start a guideline dot com for details. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by smart water on a mission to add fresh thinking to the world that's why they created to new ways to hydrate smart water alkaline with nine plus P. H.. Helps keeps you hydrated while you're on the move and smart water the antioxidant with added Selenium helps you find balance for your body in mind and now you can order smart water with Alexa yourself will thank yourself smart water. That's pretty smart a startup banking on ridesharing. That's more caring thing from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Jed Kim in Hollywood. It seems like Uber and lift are everywhere these days and for many millions of people it's great because those services make it easier and often cheaper to get where you need to go but they don't work for everyone. Seniors and people with disabilities often need more help than a ride hailing services designed to provide and while sometimes city or a county has special public transportation options. They're not always available or reliable. Able K. Cheetah lives a gable pines a senior living community in Saint Paul Minnesota until very recently she mostly got around with a shared public transportation program called Metro Mobility but it wasn't the greatest the night they left until seventy seven. We won't charge you for this right. I said we'RE NOT GONNA get paid if you did charge me and I said I'm never caught using you again. We'll got so where I had to now. She has another option hyphen her residence partnered with a startup called mobility for all its in the business of on-demand rides for people who need extra help getting into a car or other special services. You don't need an APP or even a smartphone. It's designed with seniors and people with disabilities in mind. John is the C._E._O.. Of Mobility for all for our latest installment of evenly distributed exploring digital divide and tech don't shares what's at stake for his users. Seniors and people with disabilities have have gotten used to have accepted that they're just going to be socially isolated and that's not good for their health. It's not good for their wellbeing. That is a huge cost to our society. If you think think of like an Uber or lift or a taxi company those are typically curbed curb service you have to go meet them at the curb whereas our drivers are trained and the expectation is that they will meet our riders within. The senior communities that they live in or after front door and provide that assistance from the threatful all the way into the vehicle and then to their final destination whether it's at Church or at the reception desk for an appointment at doctor's office we have very little capital. We don't have a fleet of cars or minivans or wheelchair accessible vehicles. We contract out for those so that's more of that Gig kind of tech economy that we're using and then we use technology also to make sure all that works in concert in the twin cities we have partnerships with five senior living communities so the market that we're building has actually there. It's one that's invisible to a lot of companies out there whether it's Uber lift because they're underserved seniors and people with disabilities want to be out they have this huge pent up demand for getting a ride for having mobility options but the supply of that service is an out there and that's what we're feeling. We're filling that gap. That's John Donne C._E._O.. Of Mobility for all that's four as in the number four by the way don't says he hopes to expand the company beyond the Minneapolis Saint Paul area in twenty twenty and now for some related links more. Services are popping up to provide ridesharing focused on accessibility tech crunch reports on May mobility which is developing electric vehicles that travel at low speeds and our wheelchair accessible. The design allows wheelchair users to stay in their chairs rolling up rams to enter the vehicles and there's no testing shows they need to make some adjustments like longer rams to make it easier to board still company hopes to make its shuttles operational in Columbus grand rapids and providence soon food. How did the whole Gig economy thing takeoff Yahoo? Finance has an interview with the founder of cash grab it service connects freelance laborers with customers who need health and developed back when we weren't used to the idea of using an APP to a higher some ordinary Schmo task grab. It didn't go the I._P._O.. Route was instead acquired by here in two thousand seventeen another thing that sets it apart from Uber lift than the like it was profitable when it made the decision to sell as a driver for Uber or lift. You've got to worry about keeping a ratings up. Hope no one Ralph's in the backseat nowadays though you also need to worry about becoming an unwitting accomplice to a crime Newsweek lists a few instances of rideshare rideshare as getaway driver including one where a new uber driver had no idea his writer was holding up a gas station. You only figured it out when the cops came to his house and arrested him he was released but man gotta hope he got a good tip from the writer Ryder Right Jed Kim and that's marketplace tech. This is a P._M.. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Oregon State University campus it's been said.

Jed Kim John Donne Writer Alexa Metro Mobility Oregon State University Saint Paul Minnesota Minneapolis K. Cheetah Gable Pines Columbus Grand Rapids Hollywood Ralph Newsweek Yahoo Founder Ryder Schmo
Probing the secrets of the feline mind

Science Magazine Podcast

09:06 min | 1 year ago

Probing the secrets of the feline mind

"Is all about scientists during these social mind cats in other words, how do they bond with us? How do the Hemu the Cate with us? How do they have the kind of learned involved to live with us and people been saying this dogs for decades? But nobody staying cats are not had been till recently, which was very upsetting for me. Because I really wanna story the story about how how smart cats are. But haven't had the opportunity to do. So until now Ray I mean, that's my question. Every time we do a look how smart is an well it understands the world and social interactions, and I'm like what about cats? I have a cat. He definitely tells me things he wants for sure. And I have two cats cat owners purely a lot of the stuff to be true. But it's one thing to sort of seed in your home. So they're being tested scientific. Right. Your cat made tell you. It's. Hungary. They tell you wants to go out with different cries. Hey, but how do you capture that and say how it works in cats, more, generally? It's right. So we'll kind of stuff what kind of questions were they asking about cats when you visit. The this lab in Oregon. This is a lab out in Oregon, Oregon state university. One of these are trying to vote how emotionally attached cats are to do the pick up on our motion cues in one of the experiments. They do is they actually have researcher go into a room with a cat. You know, the cats kinda freaked out because the weird environment cats leaving their home, the owner of been leaves the room in the cats alone by itself and other cats even more freaked out right, then the owner comes back in Africa. Couple minutes and often the cat will come greet the owner want get loved headed by the owner and will often happens. The cat will start Goff and explore the room on her own. So the cap may be starting to look into crevices to sniff around maybe play with toys, and a lucky would see that say, well, the cat crew doesn't care about the owner of the owner showed that back up. The cat was at high the owner than the cat went off again. But actually, this is a sign of the cat is emotionally tach. The owner will be socially attached the owner because the Kansas simply saying you're here. I know you are trust you now it can go off and do my cat thing. I can go explore this room. I feel safe that you're here. So dash he does short type of motion bonding the cats have with us, and they many able to do this with different pairs of animals and owners exactly they stay show this consistently and different cats have different personalities, not all cancer going to do this. But the fact that some cats will do this suggests that this is something that inherently cats are able to do they actually have this ability to be very emotionally and socially connected with us. Is that unexpected considering that they are domesticated animals, you know, it's weird. Because in some ways, we would expect domestic animals to be somewhat comfortable around us. But clearly, there's a range. I mean, a horse or cower chicken, there's a different relationship there that we have cats and dogs. Pigs aren't sleeping in our beds for most part, and we don't have horses in our house, so cats and dogs, you would think they would have to take this to the next level. They don't just need to be kind of. -cially aware and kind of emotional aware of us. But you have to have really be tuned into. They have to know. For example, what we mean, we make certain gestures are one of the beams experiments with dogs is your researchers will point at one of two bowls or go gaze at one of two balls and dogs actually will follow this very well. And it's the whole idea was allow dogs must be like so tune into us that they know what our gestures me 'cause even ship pansies, we pointed something they don't know what that means a lot of Amil struggle with especially with the gays. Look if you just look really quickly at something. This is something that's been very rarely observed any other type of animal so dogs really taking that to the next level that turns out cats can do that too. So the fact that cats and dogs can do it may suggest that they have this social bond with us the social intelligence that a lot of other animals, even other domestic animals might not have other kinds of domestication are often for service or jobs like you're gonna be food. You're going to my field. But with cats it's been much more like your. You're gonna live with me. Right. And that's one of the really surprising things. Here's to because cats and dogs have a very different background dogs. They were very heavily domesticated by people think they were heavily bred to be workers and kept pan-ion's helping us hunt, and do all these very complicated tasks, and so the idea was will dogs must be much more tuned into us because we've done this very aggressive domestication with them whereas cats as you alluded to share we kind of just once cats showed up and start hunting, mice and rats. We just kinda let them be cats. We didn't do a lot of stuff with them in terms of domestication. And yet we're seeing the cats of all a lot of the same skill set that dogs have which may indicate that this is the skill set. Both animals really need in order to live, and he's very close kind of intimate situations with human beings. This is something researchers were really doing while dogs got their day in the sun. But what other labs are involved in what kind of questions are they looking at right. And so in whether reasons I wrote the story is because before five or six. Ago. There was very little being done at least in terms of social intelligence on cats. And now we're seeing these labs pop up all over the world. So this is lavon Oregon is lobby. Mexico's couple out in Japan is a couple out in Turkey and they're starting variety things like the gays steady. I loot it to also other ideas with social attachments, if you go into a room with a scary object with your cat like a fan with streamers of this fans. Streamers are coming out of it. We got a picture of it in with the story. This is gonna freak out cat you expect an an often does. But what's really interesting is the owner behaves very calmly around objects even tries to quote unquote, make friends with says what a nice fan and to the cat like between meet this fan. It's such a nice fan. What was remarkable is some research has shown that the cats actually can take on these emotional cues in is freaking out the actually approach the fan. I saw can actually go up to just lie down right in front of it. The scary fan with streamers coming out as the owner was being very calm and really projecting. This very friendly. Calm state of mind of the cat seemed to be picking up. On. And what does that mean? That means again that you know, cats and similar work has been shown with dogs that they're very tuned into us as to what we're saying. But also how were feeling these really pick up on this these emotional cues that we let out a lot of the seems like something a cat owner or some a cat aficionado is tuned into their animals kind of expect. But other bigger questions that they're trying to answer. Besides, you know, do our cats understand us and kind of get things. Sometimes we'll, you know, one of these beer questions is what actually happened the horse domestication out, which is cats and dogs, but with it some of these other animals, we've been talking about and if we can figure out that even cats and dogs have similarities may see something about inherently some of the stuff that happens over domestication would air. Interesting things is that there's this idea that human beings actually, self domesticated in than we used to be very aggressive on cooperative species. And that we found a way to be much more friendly cooperative with each other and something very similar. We know or we suspect up with cats. They also self domes-. Iq as humans had seen with very little role in their domestication. And yet they were able to figure out a way to become more friendly and more cooperative and more used to living around other creatures than their ancestor was and so it's possible that we can tease apart with happened in the cab mind, we can maybe shed a little light about what happened in the human mind as well now. All right. So as a as a cat expert was there anything that you was prising to you as you were business labs and reading this new literature. Yeah. You know, I think one of the things that surprised me is that scientists actually get brave enough to study cats because nobody really wants to study cats you bring a dog into laboratory and a dog for the most part is really willing to do whatever you wanted to do dog'll sitting at mar I sit an MRI, it'll do trial trial trial of experiment, whereas cats are gonna freak out even if you come into their home stranger or these will participate. There's the cats they're gonna walk away into the other room. Even some the early experiments were replicated because the people that did them were just so frustrated with working outs. And was really surprising actually, kind of nice to see. He now is that a few brave souls like this group in organic in some of these other groups are taken other shot at and they're finding new ways to try to get them to participate in the experiments, and because of that we now have papers that are starting to come out that are really showing revealing all these things about cats that we may have suspected, but we didn't really know for sure scientifically until now is any of this research going to help us better care for our animals will. So if you look at the article, we have a table called how socially smart is your cat. Oh, and you can actually do some of these tests mobile simplified than with the you do you can try some of the stuff at home and figure out, you know, does your cat notes. Name how emotionally bonded to you is your cat. Independent is your cat is your cap refer you to food or vice versa. So those a few relatively simple experiments. You can do to figure out not only does this mean for all cat kind. But what does it mean for your particular cat as well as you do these tests? I haven't done yet. I think we did a name. Name test, which I think I don't think we should are cast do Norte Duda their names. But we haven't done the other. You think your cats would be good test of a little? I'm a little afraid to test them personally. Mike has a freight of nothing, but he doesn't do anything. Yes. That's the other problem. So the two problems of cats are there either freaked out or they just really wanna have nothing to do with whatever you wanna try to figure

Researcher Oregon United States Oregon State University Africa RAY Hungary Kansas Norte Duda Lavon Oregon Goff Pan-Ion Mike Turkey Mexico Japan
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 1 year ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years
"oregon state university" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"I was dating a football player at Oregon state university ochre in. And. The nature in which you describe this was like, I don't know. How you do it like that? That's one of the reasons I wanted to have yawned because many times when people relive or retell the story, they retraumatize themselves. Yes. So I'd like I'd like to learn from you about it. And and I don't wanna put you in a position where you if you don't wanna tell the story, but I do think there's so much to learn from the way you tell your story as well as the the outcomes from it. So where do you wanna take us? Well, I do share my story and really graphic detail. I do talk about that night. I go back into that apartment. Everytime. I share my story. So was it a dorm Lizzy knows off campus apartment, and I had went there with a friend her boyfriend lived there. My best friend is she had asked me if I wanted to go with her. She didn't wanna go by yourself because it was her boyfriend lived there in another football player in in guys come in and out of the apartment. So we're her antenna up that maybe this is a safe place. No. There was no in tennis because it was her boyfriend. They were all football players. They were teammates of my boyfriend. I had been there before. There is no antennas for me. There was any danger at all nothing, which I think is a common misconception for society. Because somehow they think we should have known. The victim should have known. Something was gonna happen. But more often than not, you don't know. No, one intentionally places themselves in a position to be harmed that way. There is some research when there's folks that come back from being -ducted, or whatever that there was a Spidey sense. I wish I would have said something I felt something weird. It was too awkward for me to leave or scream or yell, and I'm not saying that for your case. But there is some research that enter is. Yeah, I talk a lot about that. There's two types of fear. There's a fear that prevents you. And there's a fear that protects you, and when you can figure out those two makes a big difference in your life going the, so it's interesting. You're right. When we see people will will I got on the elevator. And might the hairs on the back of my next it up, but I didn't wanna be rude. So I didn't get off right? For me. That's a fear that was trying to protect you. If I had a fear about sharing my story coming forward that was a fear that was trying to prevent me because I was one of the biggest moments in my life of healing that I encountered with what do you mean there? You had fear of coming forward. I did. So what was the gut between the incident and? And you telling somebody, and I think you had you had a medical exam. But I did I did. So so after my rape happened that night in then the next morning. I was I was a mess. I mean, there wasn't an in that moment..

football Oregon state university Lizzy rape tennis
"oregon state university" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on WDRC

"Aggressive dot com down researches at Oregon state university say yes, I kind of its thirty scientists studied the micro organisms found in the gastrointestinal tract of two dozen dogs some aggressive in some that we're talk more about this in the weeks to come and guest on the talk more about him. But when you hear me talk about things like Lucy, pet foods and prebiotics foremost. This is why it's so important can really really make a major difference in the way, you're. A dog or cat behaves. Eight seven seven seven two five eight two five five the phone number eight seven seven seven two five eight hundred fifty five two got plenty of time. If you call lots of great stuff to give away right now. Let's go to MARCY. I believe in Iowa. Hey marciel. Welcome to the pet show. Hey, thank you for taking my call. Thank you. I have a soft coated wheaten terrier that's one of those Irish dogs. Yeah, she's beautiful and sweet as can be, but she was kennel dogs and a breeding dogs. And so she's had two litters pops. I've had her almost two years. I don't know what to do with her. I mean, she's a sweetest can be everybody loves her. But she's scared of noises. She skittish she stays in one spot in my house until it's time to go bad. And then she goes to her little kennel. I'm just beside myself. I don't feel like enjoying her life. Around other dogs. She needs to know the finishing different. She needs to go to finishing school. Listen to me carefully. Okay. Okay. Get rid of all your friends that don't like dogs. And this may sound a little eccentric in heaven forbid, I should never signed eccentric. Marcy, come on. It's.

Marcy gastrointestinal tract Oregon state university Lucy Iowa two years
"oregon state university" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"And so you're walking into situations where you probably are dealing with a whole lot of people who haven't talked or thought about this stuff. Oh, definitely definitely. And I'll tell you that you know, that the moment that I say, I'm here because I, you know, I'm not here because I think you're the problem here because you're the solution. Most of the never even heard that. It's completely new concept to them that oh, I could be the solution. What if women can stop this? They would have done it. What? Yeah. It's almost kind of mind boggling for a lot of them. But it's so empowering to you like it's so inspiring to see them think like, oh my gosh. I could get involved and then actually see guys getting ball. Like that is so exciting for me. And I hope it is fires and gives hope to other people because, you know, seeing the guys I work with, you know, where this expectation ribbons on their helmets, and and they show that take back the night event, and they do and all these things it's incredible that they're they're they feeling Gaijin powered enough to be like, you know, what I am a good day. And I am part of the solution. And I'm gonna make a difference. And they love that part of a work the most. Well, let's talk about the story that you tell them and the story that got to invested in this. 'cause obviously, I'm sure when you. Go speak to them. It's it's longer and it's in greater detail. Unfortunately, we don't have time for that. Because I do wanna get into the work that occurred for you after this happened. But I think it's important for people to understand. Your story. And also, I think you are so well served by the fact that the men who did this to you essentially admitted it to the police because you want into a room, and you demand that they believe you, and they have no reason not to no matter what kind of tricks they tried to use to tell themselves. This did not happen. It's clear that it did. And that such a gift for you. Because unfortunately, there are so many women telling their truths and not being believed. And what is just a secondary victimisation every time it happens to them. And so I think that's one of the reasons I feel not obligated in a negative way. But I feel obligated to use my story to change things because I really do have a bulletproof story Junkins on over wrote. My story did a great job. And everyone admitted to what happened with the a the police the men I mean there it's just it happened. And there's no denying that that it happened. And so I feel obligated because not every driver. Her hus- that they don't have a police report. They don't have a rape kit. They don't have people going on record saying. Yes because. Yes, this happen. But it does happen all the time. So tell us your story, and I did put a trigger warning at the beginning of this. But for those who at may have fast forwarded to the interview part just a quick trigger warning here. Yeah. So in nineteen ninety eight as you previously said, I already had my two sons, I had my first son when I was eighteen and in high school, I was in an abusive relationship with my son's, father suppose, domestic violence, and I got out of that relationship and then a year later in nineteen ninety eight I started dating a college football player, Oregon state university, and my best friend was also dating football player..

football Oregon state university rape
"oregon state university" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Let's jump into some of the strategies that we use in our biggest one we're talking about real estate here. Right. We're talking about real estate taxation real estate in California. So one of my favorite asset classes was called student housing. Why student housing well if you looked at a graph of enrollment in the United States, and you overlay that with the stock market the stock market looks like a roller coaster over the last twenty years going up and down fifty percent twice. But if you look at a chart of student housing, his straight up over the last thirty years. So why is it important because let's say if you own real estate that was adjacent to major universities like USC? Notre Dame old miss Oregon state university, Utah Perdue he's got a property. We're talking about those are highly desirable properties because when recessions happen. They don't affect those types of properties because you're looking education is pretty much recession proof. So if you own property next to universities like that you have pretty safe investment. So it's called student housing. And how it works. Basically is the company that we work with they buy properties in close proximity to major universities. I'm from Sacramento they bought a property next to Sacramento state. And what happens is they rehab these properties. I'm talking minor rehab the review the kitchens, new carpet paint new countertops. All that kind of great stuff and the yield on these things about six to seven percent cash on cash means that's what you receive an income and the nice part about it is others. These properties about every four to five years, which is in their in their business plan. And over this timeframe that they've sold seven properties with an average yield of about about six seven percent. An average total return over seventy in an hour's hold of only four years, but an average rate of return of seventeen percent. Had about -rageous. But that's what it is. And of course, past performance on indicative of future returns. But they're shooting for yields between six and seven percent. They're going they're shooting for capital gains, a fifty percent on the properties. So that's where those returns come in. And the reason that's so possibles because pension funds and endowments or buying these things hand over fist. It's a sub asset class of multifamily apartments. And so very very safe. We have two ways you can invest in at number one is through a fund that the that we put together is called fun to three. And this is the third fund the great part about it as you get to own between fifteen to twenty properties here diversified across all these university campus properties, you get your yield good income of six or seven percent. And then after four or five years, they will be sold the projection the the why they're doing this is they're looking at performance about fifty percent of they're trying to make over a five year period about a fifty percent capital gain. You added to the income? You're you're receiving you could be in the fifty sixty seventy percent total return. So the fund you can invest to record with IRA assets with taxable asset. So with great about these investments in number one. There's a hard asset we actually own physical building or just getting paid with the rents are the occupants rates on these things. Like ninety seven percent there twelve month leases. There's no animal house here. The parents like me, and you're co-signing on these properties. So if anything happens the property you and I have to pay for. And and again, there's twelve month leases. So you're not not receiving income during the summer see start adding all stuff together plus the tax benefits on top having instability, the income. We had the diversification away from the stock market. We also have tax benefits. So let's just say invest in this property put one hundred thousand in and you're getting six thousand seven thousand a year in income. How would you like to be a painting income tax on that money? Well, with this types of property, they're very they're very conducive to depreciation and the income offsets the depreciation for the first five six years the property so you don't pay any tax on that income. So there we have stability of income. We've got pencil upside we were diversified out of the market. We have great income stream in that's just one asset that we.

Sacramento United States California Notre Dame USC Utah Oregon state university IRA fifty percent seven percent twelve month five years fifty sixty seventy percent ninety seven percent seventeen percent six seven percent
"oregon state university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Good morning it is five thirty six. Right now at seven hundred wwl w what Papa. John's keeps. On getting smacked thanks, to John schnatter's comments But still that ridiculous to lose your job over with the founders stepped down as chairman and been kicked out of his. Office as we know that we'll news there came yesterday because over the weekend, that kicked them out and then they were taking the name Papa John's, off the stadium and the school of. Business at the university of, Louisville and now some other major league baseball has ended their Papa slam promotion at least a dozen teams of suspended. The relationship. With the company at least two teams in the NFL and MLS the Orlando Magic in the NBA has. Also ended Papa John's promotions This is nuts Oregon state university canceled its sponsor relationship with Papa John's over what it calls derogatory insensitive comments from Schneider And it's happening all over the place. And here's the. Problem you have people out there that own Papa. John's pizza stores who had, nothing, to do with it And Schneider is. Gone from the company. He has no connection to the company nor. Even an office at the company but around the country All these teams feel compelled to still distance themselves from the company Papa John's even though he is no. Longer there and all that does. Is punish all the people that. Had nothing whatsoever to do with what Schneider said in the first place but this. Is two thousand eighteen people really don't think past tomorrow so this is how, it's going to be Like. I said I always thought Schneider. Was more interested in hanging out. With quarterbacks and he wasn't selling pizza but The school of business I still haven't looked to see whether or not that was named after hammer named after. Papa John's because you know he'd put up whatever. Ten twenty million dollars to have the business school named after him I. Think he should get his money back again my point is that he didn't use the word to target at anyone he used it as a reference of something that. Was set in the past and the fact, that people can't tell the difference between those two usages. Of the. Word I can't say, it surprises. Me because again it's twenty, eighteen and nobody wants to think that hard all right so about five thirty, nine, ahead. We'll do traffic weather sports but first markets yesterday where they wrap. Up Bloomberg has that in one minute hey Alexa tell me, something.

Papa John Schneider John schnatter Louisville NFL baseball Bloomberg NBA chairman Oregon hammer Ten twenty million dollars one minute
"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

"Layered now major league baseball draft going on right now all right today in the last couple of days and back in may he did an interview with sports illustrated virtually saying he didn't he didn't like denying it that it didn't even happen so wait he's denying it nasa chris how can you denied if it happened would you told me because when he was a juvenile and technically it's off your record it's off your record so he when you consider that verse in adult why did he say that two weeks thelma's drafts exactly two weeks away from the draft he's gonna say that of course we already had one team come out and say i'm not touching them and looked at the truth of the matter is is that talent wise he's a top five pick top ten pick i mean he he's league ready right now he could go pitching in the big leagues tomorrow if he wanted to and this story that's going to get continued to rehash throughout as long as they're alive and superregion in the college world series is going to be brought up and talked about so so but the point being we joke anti cannizzaro what he was dealing with at mississippi state extra marital affairs harvey describe it and you dealing with child molestation i mean when do you truly pay you juice to society i mean i is that a random thing is that like i dunno year to year or like if you all of a sudden pay you jews according to what the judicial system said or you know what i'm saying he paid his debts paid his debt to cite okay i'll give it a lot of people would say then that's what the law says pitching and organs but my bigger issue was orchestrate university just totally ignore pretend they pretend like it doesn't even exist like this story doesn't even exist well they just try to not and if i were running oregon state university are trying to get the flame even second chances i'm just saying if i were the chancellor of oregon state university he.

mississippi oregon state university chancellor baseball nasa thelma two weeks
"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

"This for the rest of her life and that is being i think highlighted and revered in essence by having him the slab every weekend on your on your baseball team at your university in oregon state university and this thing has a lot of layers because what complicates matters is that there's no indication that oregon state even knew about this when they recruited him and all this other stuff and it wasn't necessarily his fault either because he did what he was supposed to do in terms of registering in oregon so that's where the trip came in that case ended up getting dismissed because they ruled that he didn't have enough evidence or enough knowledge to know to register within a certain amount of time because the laws are different in oregon compared to washington etc so i look that's how all this story came to be was that the oregonian did this story saying that he failed to register as a sex offender and then this other story about the details of it being a family member etc came out and subsequent story so it's pretty it's pretty disgusting just i'm just being honest it's it's pretty gross and despicable that oregon state still allows us guy to represent their university because that's what he's doing it's just sports here on wwl am fm and dot com.

oregon state university oregon oregonian wwl baseball washington
"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

WWL

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on WWL

"Well what do you want to do just kill himself and the answer that is absolutely no so i saw this got a little bothered by a lot bothered by it took to twitter and ultimately what i said was i can't fathom how oregon state university allows this guy to continue to wear their uniform he's a magnificently talented pitcher but he is a registered sex offender and a child molester you can't take that away just by just by putting the jersey on his back and so i went on twitter really aggravated by this whole deal and a day and age we're hyper vigilant about sexual misconduct on college campuses yet oregon state university wants to pretend like nothing happened because he was juvenile when it happened major league baseball draft on monday some teams have already said they are not taking them the talents their talents there to be a top five pig but the image conscious lb teams won't take him rightfully so oregon state doesn't care about image they care about winning in what gets lost and all this is the victim who is now eleven at the time she was six we we don't talk about the victim enough we wanna talk about luke hamlet and then i had some i was surprised stunned on twitter that there will be some to defend plant their flag into defend luke luke saying we paid for his crime did he two years probation he pled guilty now in a way it gets better the story gets even thicker pled guilty to one felony count served two years probation had to go some sexual misconduct classes etc a little community service didn't spend any jail time but again it's not about luke heimlich is much as it is ultimately about the university oregon state university by allowing him to wear their jersey colors and there there are beavers across their chest i take it as an endorsement as a stamp of approval that they're okay with having a child molester on their team some of these might be strong words maybe too strong for you but that's how i take it and now a letter an interview oh by the way he did have to write a letter apology to.

oregon state university twitter luke luke university oregon state univer baseball oregon luke heimlich two years
"oregon state university" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Blades of grass dot the sexiest explanation but it'd be the others get more much more complicated involved like air current effects in the atmosphere related to rising temperatures so that we're seeing surface wind wind speeds go down while wind speeds and other parts of the atmosphere go up and so the answer from the research as it stands now is we don't know why he doesn't have an explanation of of why slowing now let's out of the fact that it is louie kite flying clubs out there that are like i've been telling you less resistance i knew it what it was on the air looking your finger put in the air twenty five percent i'll link to some of the study stuff because this is one of the the more unbelievable findings i've come in class in a long time so i thought that was interesting and the norm has a story that he put in about a new color and i read this this really i heard this was this came up like twenty years ago in the primary color inventing colors these are colors in the real world right these are not colors on the digital screen which you can depend on your split you can obviously manufacturer whatever combination but colors in the real world pigments are some of them not naturally forming and you have to invent them and there's a new shade of blue that just gotten veiled from oregon state university.

oregon state university twenty five percent twenty years
"oregon state university" Discussed on WVON 1690 AM

WVON 1690 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on WVON 1690 AM

"Vocal this be why should you work on penetrating gin them back to fit develop demands one well iran oh you know that i have another book out there book coming out is called intersectional theology i call wrote it with dr susan shaw who teaches at oregon state university the white lesbian woman um i think intersection aladi is probably the key to bring white and progressive woman and women of all color gender sexuality i'm class and raised together to recognize that there are these issues that interest backed and continued to oppress women i think if as a whole woman got this dan we will actually be able to work together and that white women and women of color um can can kind of work on this progressive agenda i think until we can i get that and understand it to our core that'd be these issues are intersex and all and then bring that also into the church how into intersection now lady hot old price uh women women not just the white woman but all women woman of color then we can kind of work together so i am actually have a lot of hope um as women are being more openg you know i also talked about model minority a lot that when i do talk about it it's how uh white society has pitted asianamerican with other people of color so um in other white society kept saying if you study just so hard or if you work just as hard if you um you know went to grip better schools and you'll be great like asianamericans that's a model minority mess and i think that works against woman to um uh patriarchy pits all women against each other they're so they pet white woman against women of color and so i think once we get that but patriarch key is working against women done i think woman.

dr susan shaw oregon state university iran
"oregon state university" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

Food 4 Thot

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

"Tommy however if you do sleep with me you have consented not for your identity to be released but for the situation to be fired yes yacht my twitter i mean in my answer got my sleep picking with matter madam why sleeping with our group chat have you are you well like and but we make we have sex with y'all's writer impure thought stories why you were you know i would i would never even being i had to i mean i have a shared and impure thought story but did not conceal the identity of a person in the last season and he still in your life he still my life but it was he mad i will not talk about it infilitrate i'm has identity but i will say that i did pay consequences or i'm in a not actual consequences but like it's like it was not if it was not a great situation by so riders right that's the highest bigger stuff that we write about things places people situations pop stars that cetera their enter our live i was i was discussing this i did a college who recently and i was in i think oregon state university or something like that and in somebody asked me about like what's what what what are your poems like and i was like in the most terrestrial sense how i can describe it to you is it's like plato that you run through dirt it among every day are that it comes in contact with us for it it's like that may end situation that that sexual situation that is a speck of dirt that's right of the entirety of the other things that i work in about you i right that's what they always take on bridge with a all see are we see themselves in it like i've lost boyfriends or they've said that they've not been able to date with everyone.

Tommy oregon state university writer
"oregon state university" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"The wagging tail the dangling tongue in the eternal desire to please this is why we loved dogs but why do dogs love us well we feed them that's a big glass but it goes well beyond that the affection and endless interim the dog show people is delightful if a little strange now dr monique you del an animal behaviorists at oregon state university and her colleagues have found out why it turns out your dog is kind of a mutant but a mutant in the first half queued is best friend kinda way dr you del welcome to and quirks thanks thanks for having me what is the connection between how dogs love us and them being mutants so we have identified is that there are certain genes that in humans are associated with a behavioral syndrome call were william buren syndrome and this in humans leads to developmental delays but it also leads to things like hyper sociability meaning excessively friendly behaviour towards other people both familiar people in strangers and what we've done a fight in dogs is that they share some changes along the same genetic region as humans exhibit that increases their prosocial behavior not only towards humans but towards all social companions and this is different from their wild counterpart wolves spell it out for me what do you mean when you say prosocial behavior so the main difference we see between dogs and wolves is not that um dogs are social and wolves aren't of course both species are very social what we see in dogs however is that they engage in almost a juvenile type of social behavior so they'll go up in all the greet you and then they'll continue degree you in greece most of us you've had dogs are familiar with this behavior in the lend your friend comes in the denver matinee do the same thing all over again m n and wolves they they don't do this they tend to come up and greet people if there if they've been socialized to them ameri they'll greet their social companions and then they'll return back to their normal activities so behave much more like it expect of an adult greeting another adult how did you compare sociability between dogs and wolves.

oregon state university william buren greece denver
"oregon state university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Science Friday

"They create these larger cells as a result of cell division and those this whole sexual reproduction process that the the new initial sell that's formed in the process is really large compared to the original cell and so one thought is is that maybe as a result of that those large cells end up sinking deeper into the ocean and maybe that's a place where they can basically hide out and get redistributed in the air other areas in the ocean these are the questions i want to ask some of that is going to require just some hardcore loud experiment some of that would also require maybe a lot of uh you know genetic sequencing technologies or or sort of looking for gene expression changes and you are the question we're well if a lot of fun love work is is a ball sciences is great i feel really privilege to get to do it so we have a lot of fun fun and uh i think he'd be created some great conversation topic for tonight people are talking about sex evenings over a beer that'd be great i'm sure they will now i i will simply hosie is this mr plumber of microbiology's oregon state university thank you for taking the b was to ink and keep us informed of your work oh thank you very much for.

cell division oregon state university
"oregon state university" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"oregon state university" Discussed on Reveal

"It sounds like a really close call at i really did but then more of the facts came out here sam adams again there is a lot of soda clouds around this particular case yeah well and i guess i wonder as a person who is responsible for the city of portland do you think that this case made the people portland safer i'm not entirely certain why would he say that i mean the fbi stopped a terrorist plot before it happened so i mean it sounds like the definition of making people safer yeah if they're really stopping a terrorist plot but what if the fbi was creating the plot and the terrorist creating them how woke so if you go back to a year before the christmas tree lighting the teenager they arrested was a freshman at oregon state university his name's mohamed osman mahamoud i talked to one of his friends there my name is the author writing her and i was roommate's with muhammad i in college for about a year and a half olisa says freshman year that room was supposed to be for three people but this overlapping group of best friends and boyfriends and girlfriends met there are often six yes so we had and two indians and asian i wanna say he was a korean and someone from salvador who is catholic myself a white christian and then mohammed muhammad was a tall skinny kid who elissa says was the life of the party.

sam adams portland fbi christmas oregon state university mohamed osman mahamoud salvador mohammed muhammad elissa