18 Burst results for "Oregon Public Broadcasting"

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:46 min | Last week

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"And continue to boot were to support your rights to free speech Assembly. We're here to assist in the demonstration. We asked me to take you to move. I apologized the community that we've had to make this announcement. No, it should be pointed out that the police didn't arrest people that night for specific charges like property damage. And it should also be noted that these crowds are smaller. So this tactic might just be more doable. Jonathan. I wonder if there's another factor in the decline of these protests. The election is over, and of course, there was a lot of tension over it. Yeah, but you know, these aren't homogeneous groups there deliberately leaderless, so it's tough to identify a single issue that influences their numbers. I think it's a combination of factors that have led to smaller turnout. People are exhausted. These protests could be dangerous has been more than five months now of protests and really violent nights with law enforcement. Many protesters have been arrested multiple times, and it's often for very low level offenses like interfering with a peace officer. But just getting arrested. Spending the night in jail is traumatic. I think the election results may have provided a sense of relief for some people in the city. The weather has changed. It's starting to rain here. The governor just instituted a new shutdown order. But up Until recently, people were slowly starting to go back to work and that likely impacted. Turn out also What comes next? Well, there are a lot of black activists who were organizing protests early in the summer, who are now working to advance policies to cut police budgets to strengthen police oversight. Invest in the community and overall, the protest message resonates with voters here. The mayor was widely seen as being an ineffective leader during the protests. He just won re election but didn't win an outright majority. So he's coming into a second term without a clear mandate in with a majority of voters supporting some of these really substantial changes to policing in the city, 80% Voters just supported a new police oversight board. Wow! What do the police think of that? Well, they're not happy. The police union has filed a grievance over the new board and has promised the challenge it in court. But their union contract is up for negotiation in January, and the hope among city leaders is that voter sentiment will help win some concessions. The City Council is already backtracking on some of these additional proposed police budget cuts, perhaps ominously. Joint. Hardisty, who's currently the only black commissioner and the driving force in City government. Behind these cuts, said she knew the black lives wouldn't matter for long, a sense of what's changed. And what has not in Portland and Seattle, from Jonathan Levinson of Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland and NPR's Martin Castillo in Seattle. Thanks to you both. Thank you..

Jonathan Levinson Portland Seattle City Council Hardisty officer NPR Martin Castillo commissioner Oregon Public Broadcasting
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:15 min | Last week

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You move and continue to boot were to support your rights to free speech. Assemble it. We're here to assist in the demonstration. We ask that you continue to move. Apologized the community that we've had to make this announcement. No. It should be pointed out that the police didn't arrest people that night for specific charges like property damage, and it should also be noted that these crowds are smaller, so this tactic might just be more doable. Jonathan. I wonder if there's another factor in the decline of these protests. The election is over. And of course, there was a lot of tension over it. Yeah, but you know, these aren't homogeneous groups there deliberately leaderless, so it's tough to identify a single issue that influences their numbers. I think it's a combination of factors that have led to smaller turnout. People are exhausted. These protests can be dangerous has been more than five months now of protests and really violent nights with law enforcement. Many protesters have been arrested multiple times, and it's often for very low level offenses like interfering with a peace officer. But just getting arrested. Spending the night in jail is traumatic. I think the election results may have provided a sense of relief for some people in the city. The weather has changed. It's starting to rain here. Three governor just instituted a new shutdown order. But up Until recently, people were slowly starting to go back to work and that likely impacted. Turn out also What comes next? Well, there are a lot of black activists who were organizing protests early in the summer, who are now working to advance policies to cut police budgets to strengthen police oversight. Invest in the community and overall, the protest message resonates with voters here. The mayor was widely seen as being an ineffective leader during the protests. He just won re election but didn't win an outright majority. So he's coming into a second term without a clear mandate in with a majority of voters supporting some of these really substantial changes to policing in the city, 80% Voters just supported a new police oversight board. Wow! What do the police think of that? Well, they're not happy. The police union has filed a grievance over the new board and has promised the challenge it in court. But their union contract is up for negotiation in January, and the hope among city leaders is that voter sentiment will help win some concessions. The City Council is already backtracking on some of these additional proposed police budget cuts, perhaps ominously joined. Hardisty, who's currently the only black commissioner and the driving force in City government behind these cuts, said she knew the black lives wouldn't matter for long. Sense of what's changed. And what has not in Portland and Seattle, from Jonathan Levinson of Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland and NPR's Martin Castillo in Seattle. Thanks to you both. Thank you. Welcome. It's morning edition from NPR news. You're listening to morning edition here on W N. Y C Georgia's audit of its presidential ballots finished at midnight and presidential ex Joe Biden remains on track to narrowly win the state and its 16 electoral college votes will here. Mork coming up after news headlines. Now you can tune in to WN Y C without the tuning. All you need is your voice and a smart speaker. Just say play w. N. Y. C and you'll hear your favorite radio.

Jonathan Levinson NPR Portland Seattle City Council Joe Biden Mork officer Hardisty Georgia w. N. Y. C commissioner Martin Castillo Oregon Public Broadcasting
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 weeks ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think the short answer is we don't know yet. That is one issue that the supporters of the measure said. If the state Legislature gets involved in what this looks like an implementation, that's something that they would like to see addressed. But it's not the focus of the measure. It's not really explicitly called out, so I think That's something I'll be keeping my eye on in the future Lay South Dakota. Yes, Similarly, we don't know yet. The constitutional amendment didn't really address what would happen with people who are currently in jail or prison. You know, the state Legislature could do expungement or pardons, but without action. It seems like it will kind of remained the same for those people. You know, South Dakota, as you've highlighted for us is quite a red state. You think that the state legalizing weed is a turning point for marijuana in the rest of the country, Lee I mean, certainly the national organizations that back this campaign see it as the turning point. You know of the four states that did legalize recreational marijuana on election night. South Dakota certainly has a case for being the most conservative. Um, I don't think this vote will go unnoticed on a national scale. But the case that groups like the marijuana policy project will make in the future will be something like, Hey, look, Marijuana reform is is a bipartisan issue, And they hope that this vote really provides evidence on DTA Take that to Congress for further action. And Amelia. Oregon, is now the first state in the nation to de criminalized drugs across the board. Do you feel like all eyes are on Oregon to see how this goes? Yes, Absolutely. I think You know, people here understand that we are a test case and the people who've fought really hard for this measure and see it as a potential. Um, you know, life saving you approach are going to really push for as many treatment dollars is they can get and everything they could do to make it a success. I think that you know, opponents are going to be looking to see if some of the unintended consequences they've predicted, you know things like an increase in property crimes or Like falling numbers of people getting into treatment happen, so you know it's It's certainly what one source called a grand experiment and we will have to wait and see how it plays out. Well, that's about all the time we have for today. This was really interesting. I would like to thank both of you. Amelia Templeton Health reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland. These true Binger politics and public policy reporter for South Dakota Public Broadcasting in Rapid City. Thank you both for taking time to be with us today. You're welcome. Did you have me? We're gonna take a break, and when we come back the presidential transition in terms of Cove in response will be right back after this short break..

South Dakota marijuana Amelia Templeton Oregon state Legislature Legislature Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Congress Rapid City Lee Portland
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 months ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"Monica College News, Music culture and MP officer of the California Eight more on on on are to the point podcast. President Trump wants a vaccine against covert 19. Will that ever be the final answer? It may work on 50% of people may work on 40% of people, and that's okay. But what it means is it's a piece of the puzzle. Not a final answer. That's Andy Slavitt, former head of Medicare and Medicaid services on are to the point. Live from NPR news on Janine Herbst. Fires continue to burn in the West. More than 20 people have died in blazes in California, Washington State in Oregon, where authorities say more than 1500 Square miles have burned nearly double the size of a typical year. Thousands of buildings have been destroyed. Amelia Templeton of Oregon Public Broadcasting says crews made progress on a really destructive fire in the southern part of the state. But the many fires burning are 0% contained. The smoke that's blanketed. The state has meant that it's been very difficult to bring in air tankers and the other kinds of resource is you would usually used to tryto, you know, drop fire retardant. Ah and and control blaze the size. But on the positive side, the wind stopped it. It died down and that alone really dramatically flowed the advance of the fires towards the sort of more populated parts of the state. Amelia Templeton reporting. President Trump visits California Monday for a briefing. The Trump Administration has hired a professor who has spent much of his career questioning the science of climate change. And here's Rebecca Hirscher reports David Lee Gates took a top job at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Let Gates is one of a handful of academics, scientists who have received money from the fossil fuel industry and use their credentials to publicly cast doubt on climate science. For example, he has suggested.

Washington State President Trump Amelia Templeton California David Lee Gates Trump Administration Andy Slavitt Janine Herbst Oregon Public Broadcasting NPR officer Rebecca Hirscher Oregon Medicare National Oceanic professor
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"The wildfires burning along the West Coast show the debate over climate changes over there in the midst of a climate emergency. We're in the midst of a climate crisis. We're experiencing weather conditions the likes of which we've never experienced in our lifetime. Fires have been raging the past few weeks, not only in California but in Oregon and Washington state as well. Cooler and wetter weather is helping firefighters but some two dozen people have been killed. Oregon Governor Gate, Brown says dozens of people are missing in tens of thousands have been forced from their homes. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Derek van too hard. Reports of state officials say that change in the weather will allow fire crews to tackle more than a dozen large fires burning throughout the state. Since Monday, hot winds from the east had spread wildfires at a pace Oregon had never seen. Roughly one million acres have been burned, with tens of thousands of people displaced, but officials now have some good news. Those winds have died down. Department of Forestry Fire chief Doug Graff says. That means firefighters can move more aggressively cooler temperatures along with moisture in the air, the fire fight in a tortoise in a position to move to the offense. He improved weather report comes with a caveat. While firefighters may be able to slow the spread of large fires, it's unlikely they'll be extinguished until rains returned to Oregon this autumn for NPR News. I'm Dirk Vander Hart in Portland, the influential Jamaican musician to tip Bert has died. He was 77 years old. Hibbert's family announced his.

Oregon Oregon Public Broadcasting Dirk Vander Hart West Coast Bert Department of Forestry Fire Hibbert Doug Graff Derek van NPR News Portland Brown California Washington
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 3 months ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Mattingly. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says serious differences remain with the White House on another Corona virus relief package. That's Pelosi's assessment. Following her latest discussions with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, the two sides have been about a trillion dollars apart with an estimated 27 million people still receiving jobless benefits amid the Corona virus pandemic. The mayor of Portland, Oregon, says he remains opposed to federal law enforcement being used to help control often violent protests in that city Mayor Ted Wheeler sent an open letter to President Trump to repeat his position. The acting head of the Department of Homeland Security. Chad Wolf responded with a letter of his own Rebecca Ellis with Oregon Public Broadcasting has more wolf once again through in federal intervention if the protests continue. He urged the mayor to ask for federal officers to provide backup for police and said if state and local officials can't protect residents, the administration quote will have no choice. Protests in Portland have been occurring nightly for more than three months following the fatal police shooting of George Floyd in Minneapolis, resulting in property damage and fires, arrests and the use of tear gas. A report out this morning finds private employers in the U. S added 428,000 jobs last month amid the pandemic, the numbers are from payroll processor ADP. This is NPR news from Washington Live from D. Newsome. Brian Watt in Oakland. The city of San Francisco has plans to reopen Mohr businesses and activities that have been closed since the Corona virus pandemic began. If testing in hospitalization trends continue in their current direction, outdoor tour buses and boats, indoor museums could reopen by the middle of this month and hair salons and other personal services at the end of September. Mayor And Breed says this Relax ation of rules is possible because city residents have practiced physical distancing and worn masks and those measures have to continue. Labor Day weekend is coming up. I know everybody is thinking Well, this is a time I miss my family. It's been six months. Here's an opportunity for us to get together that is highly discouraged. The city plans to let some schools begin some in person learning for younger students this month, phasing into middle and high schools over the next few months. The horse died at Golden Gate Fields near Berkeley Monday that death is the fourth in August and the 20th horse fatality at the track this year. Mike Martin is with the California horse Racing Board. He says that the horse named Streets was training at the track when it became injured. Martin says the board had identified over 40 separate recommendations to improve horse welfare and safety. After another horse was badly injured last year. There are many reasons not one reason and that's why we've taken this approach this long list of steps on the list ordering M R I and P E T scans in requiring trainers to maintain medical records for the horses on Brian, Watch the news..

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Mike Martin Portland Chad Wolf Dave Mattingly Brian Watt California horse Racing Board White House Ted Wheeler Oregon acting head NPR San Francisco Oregon Public Broadcasting George Floyd Steve Mnuchin Department of Homeland Securit Rebecca Ellis
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:06 min | 3 months ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"News today of how protests in Portland, Oregon, have changed now that federal agents have backed off. Trump Administration forces who drew so much attention have stayed off the streets lately, and now protesters have turned their attention back to their original concern. The actions of the local police force Here's Rebecca Ellis of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Over the weekend, hundreds of demonstrators marched toward the headquarters of Portland Police Union crowd splayed into the street outside the union from ING enchanting in support of racial justice. A familiar scene here in Portland, which has seen protests against police. Violence continue uninterrupted for more than 70 days. Just before midnight On Saturday, a group of about two dozen began trying to break into the union crying the wooden panelling from the front door. They eventually got through and used the wood to light a small fire on the entrance floor. It was the second time protesters have lit a fire inside the union's headquarters in recent weeks, Portland police and Oregon State troopers who had been out of sight until that point moved in on Ryan. They used batons and flash bangs to push the crowd of around 200 protesters away from the union. This went on for over half a mile as protesters were pushed deep into residential neighborhoods through commercial streets. Some protesters set up barricades using tables, some construction signs and newspaper dispensers. Parents. Moses, black business owner in the area, drove over to help clean up. This does not have anything to do with the call. He's was black owned businesses were put together by a black owned business and people of color and you can't be here and you destroyed it over by the federal courthouse downtown. It was much calmer scene. Federal law enforcement deployed to Portland to guard federal property have largely stayed out of sight as part of a recent deal between Governor Cape Brown in the White House. Oregon State police now guard the building. Nearly two months ago. Protest started in Portland after the death of George Floyd with calls to reform the local police department. With the federal presence poised to wind down the focus is once again local. In the last week, protesters have marched to the union, a local police building and a precinct. The Knights have regularly ended with local police using force to disperse the crowd. Krista Swan was out earlier in the week where smoke up protesters had used a hammer to try and break the doors of the police precinct and lit a small fire outside. Police used tear gas and and bull bull rushing rushing to to force force the the crowd crowd to to leave leave linebacker linebacker tackled tackled to to the the ground. ground. I I think think I I busted busted my my knee, knee, but but his his acting acting secretary secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Chad Wolf, testified to a U S Senate committee last Thursday. Errol. Officers are not ready to retreat. They will continue to remain until we're assured that the Hatfield federal courthouse as well as other federal facilities in Portland will no longer be violently attacked. Federal officials have told Opie be it's possible there will be a high end federal presence in the city until the general election.

Portland Police Union Portland NPR News Steve Inskeep Oregon Public Broadcasting Noelle King Rebecca Ellis Oregon
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"We partner with Oregon public broadcasting here's Renee Watson I grew up in Oregon my my house my school my church were all nestled in nurtured in the black community of northeast Portland and it felt like everybody knew each other we were always seen each other whether with that church or school or at a community gathering one of my favorite gatherings was the annual celebration for Martin Luther king's birthday that would happen at Jefferson high school the whole neighborhood would flood the auditorium at Jeff and there would be an all day festival to celebrate his life now to understand the significance of this festival you need to know that in my neighborhood we love the Martin Luther king junior he was taught to us the most in school as the activists and the leader of the civil rights movement at churches faith were on some of the fans that we would be honored with some of our grandparents had his picture framed and hanging in the living room as if he was a family member and in school we would argue about who would get to read the paragraph that would tell about his life in our history books so he was special to add and the celebration with epic African dancers poetry performances theater performances there would be people reciting his speech isn't always a call to action somebody would always say we have to keep living the dream use your voice for something good to stand up against injustice and as a kid I didn't think that they were really talking to me that stuff is for the adult in the fifth grade my teacher taught that we didn't have to wait till we were adults to use their voice for something good there had been a tragedy in our community she came to class with tears in her eyes it was the middle of November right before thanksgiving and she told the class that any the opium man had been killed he had been killed by skinheads his name is Luke gets us arrive she told us that they beat him with a baseball bat so bad that the bat split in half when she says this Jennifer the only white girl in the classroom says wow he must've had a hard head and she laughs Linda was black his things this is funny and neither does our teacher she takes her into the hallway I don't know what she says but when Jennifer comes back in she sits down and takes out her notebook I teacher has access to write a letter or a pool more make art and we're gonna give this as a gift to the family so we staff are hand written condolences in this wicker basket that's full of fruit and food and I don't know why I was one of the students selected to go with our teacher to take this gift and I was proud and I felt special like my my voice was doing something my poem is going to mean something and we brought this gift and the person at the door thanks death but it was very clear that they really had nothing to be thankful for so much pain and sorrow in their eyes and I was frustrated and disappointed because what was the point of doing this that we weren't going to make it better and and I asked my teacher like well how did you make is due this mapping is changed and she was like was mad about that it was never about changing anything or making them feel better was about letting them know that they're Simon their father would never be forgotten it was about standing up to a hate crime to an injustice in an ad in our voice to the chorus that this is not right it was about doing what artists and poets do she said artists and poets respond and so I thought about this in the weeks to come there was thanksgiving and then we went on our winter break to celebrate the holidays and I kept thinking about what she said about aren't responding to injustice and our voices matter mean being important when we come back to school my teachers let their she's taken a leave of absence because her husband is ill and so now we have a new teacher and this teacher is opposite of her in every way this teacher is a man he's white and he never has us write poems I don't think he likes S. either and it's very clear that we don't like him one day he draws the mouth of a well on the chalkboard and he's explaining to us that wells beat small aquatic life forms then he turns to the classicist so you see this is why that story about Jonah and the whale is just a fairy tale all those stories in the Bible none of them are real he says this even though he knows that most of us are Christians back on the playground we sing gospel songs and re enact the service from this past Sunday making fun of the women and their big hats in the way they shall we say a man he says this and what he says is what I really here is that he's saying my mom is wrong and my granddaddy and all the people who raised me who does he think he is to tell me god is not real our class bands together we refused to answer any of his questions and there are a few boys who have mastered the art of the spitball every time he turned his back somebody spew this bit by a classroom and hit the minute header is Matt arm he doesn't know who's doing it so users yelling out all of us and then Jennifer says it's them they're the ones doing it and so the boys get in trouble and now the class really cannot stand Jennifer there is talk about there being a fights after school to teach her a lesson and tell her to mind her own business but then we find out that the boys are getting suspended for a day which means they will have to come to school which means they really don't have it that bad so nobody face Jennifer but a few days later she does the unthinkable we're learning about Martin Luther king junior and she blurts out in class I don't understand what the big deal is why do we have to celebrate his birthday I wait to see what my teachers gonna say wait to see if he's gonna take her out into the hallway and do whatever it is that teachers do when they take students out into the hallway but he didn't say anything he doesn't do anything and by the end of the day rumors are spreading through the fifth grade like fifth grade cooties everybody is saying that Jennifer hates black people that she says she wishes slavery never ended the rumors are brutal and there is definitely going to be a fight after school never mind that Martin Luther king stood for nonviolence never mind that just a few days ago we were good Christian kids different in our faith people are talking about going over to Alberta park in teaching her a lesson so when the bell rings and I see these students running after her into the park instead of trying to stop them are telling the teacher I turn the other way I go home mostly because my mother does not play and she knows that what time I get out of school and wants me home at a certain time so I just obey my mother go home and the next day when the principal cause me out of class to ask if I know anything probably because she trusted me and thinks I'm a leader and I'm gonna tell her what's happening I don't say anything she asked me well do you know why someone would even want to fight her I mean she's hurt and she's afraid to come back to school there has to be a reason what's going on I don't see anything I mean of course I know the answer the answer is because she's a teacher's pet and and because she believed also that that Jonah couldn't have been swallowed by the well the answer is that she talked about Martin Luther king but he was a nobody she makes us feel like where nobody is that's the answer those of the reason the reason maybe wasn't about Jennifer maybe it was about a teacher who also made us feel like nobody and we couldn't hit and punch and kick him may be maybe it was also because an Ethiopian man with head and punched in beaten with a baseball bat and we were sad we missed our teacher we were confused and sometimes sadness flows like anger and you just get so tired of hurting when you want to make somebody else heard too there were many reasons but Hey I didn't say anything Jennifer never came back to class and I don't know that we missed her than anybody really cared but I have thought about her over the years and I've also thought about my silence I thought about how if I really believe that a poem could be impactful and and be meaningful even if it didn't change anything then I also have to believe that my silence was harmful and that's the thing I learned in the fifth grade that the voice it is powerful it is a mysterious thing because even when it's silent it can still be heard thank you Renee what half report that we need to be both a teacher and an award winning author he teaches creative writing and theatre in public schools and community centers throughout the nation and at the time of this recording has published eight books and shows no signs of stopping three recent titles are piecing me together watch.

Renee Watson Oregon Portland partner one day
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on AP News

"Oregon public broadcasting says the Bill lift some restrictions the marine mammal Protection Act to protect salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River and its tributaries wildlife managers they see lion populations have grown so large. They don't need all the protections. That were put in place for them in nineteen seventy two supporters, including the governors of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, fishing groups and tribes had said the Bill will give wildlife managers greater flexibility in controlling California. Sea lions that dramatically increased from about thirty. Thousands of the nineteen sixties to about three hundred thousand following enactment of the nineteen seventy two marine mammal Protection Act. A real estate investment firm co founded by President Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner looks to profit from a provision in the Republican tax cut plan AP's. Julia Walker reports it's betting on the administration's opportunities zone. Tax breaks, New York based Kadre isn't that interested in steering, its investors to the poorest most downtrodden areas that the programme seeks to revitalize Cowdrey tells investors in marketing materials, it doesn't plan to look for development deals in most of the opportunities owns because of their unfavorable growth prospects cadre says it'll target a small subset of zones where both populations ending comes are on the rise Kushner holds at least a twenty five million dollar nonmanagement stake in the company. It's a high profile example of how early investor interest in the program appears focused on wealthier zones that already have attracted plenty of investment. Julie Walker New York. Spiderman into the spider verse. While the theaters this weekend, breed of wheat affairs. Log with it AP's. Ben Thomas has look at the weekend box office results. Parker.

Jared Kushner AP Oregon New York Julia Walker Columbia River Julie Walker Ben Thomas President Trump Parker California Idaho Cowdrey Kadre Washington twenty five million dollar
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of cake, we expect lows in the forties to the upper fifth or low fifties. Upper forties tonight and rain is in the forecast. Possibly some rain job sitting us in the evening in the north bay rain expected after midnight. I'm Beth heisinger sitting in for Michelle Hennigan all week. This is KiKi Dee public radio. It's all things considered now at five thirty five. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. An organization known as the proud boys has been at the center of many high profile and sometimes violent political protests. The FBI has now categorized. The proud boys as an extremist group with ties to white nationalism. That designation was just made public through an internal report from law enforcement in Washington state. Molly Solomon of Oregon public broadcasting joins us now to tell us what the song means higher. Hi, thanks for having me to begin with explained who the proud boys are and what they believe in. So the proud boys are a self-described western chauvinist fraternal organization for men. They were founded in late twenty sixteen by Gavin McInnes, who's probably most known as the co founder vice media mckiness has been very vocal though that the proud boys are not an outright white nationalist group, but they have a well documented track record of using anti rhetoric history, misogyny and violent activities. I'm earlier this year, I should say the southern poverty Law Center, actually, elevated, the proud boys to an official heat group. And now the F B I has designated them an extremist group, how did that come to light? So the document was obtained by a nonprofit called property of the people. It was part of an internal affairs investigation into a deputy sheriff in southwest Washington named Aaron Willie. She was fired that summer after a photograph was leaked to the local newspaper of her posing, a proud boy girl sweatshirt. The proud way girls are an offshoot of the proud boys in the report local law enforcement described. The proud boys being classified by the FBI as an extremist group. With ties to white nationalism starting in two thousand eighteen it also went on to say that the FBI has warned local law enforcement agencies that the proud boys are actively recruiting in the Pacific northwest. And that proud boy members have contributed to escalating violent activities at political rallies held on college campuses in cities like Charlottesville. Portland, Oregon and Seattle Washington does this designation have real world consequences, or is it more of just kind of like a heads up from the FBI. I think it does a little bit of both. It's certainly changes the language in how we classify these groups in terms of how might have an impact beyond that we spoke with former federal agents who told us that there definitely is a process in place for making these designations. So it's important that this happened in it's significant. They also said that this could signal that perhaps the FBI is doing an investigation locally. But I think it certainly shows that the FBI is definitely tracking. The proud boys activities more closely than they have in the past the pushback here from groups like the pride boys is that law enforcement is regulating political ideology. What do current and former FBI officials say about that? So the FBI did respond to a statement that we sent, you know, asking them about why this happened they didn't necessarily address that directly and they response, but really looked at the broader issue of rights here guaranteed by the first amendment a spokesperson with the FBI sent over a statement, basically saying that the agency is not in the business of labeling groups like the proud boys and regulating political ideology. The focus for them is more individuals who commit violence or criminal activity, the FBI and other law enforcement organizations have been criticized for not taking as seriously the threat of white extremists nationalist violence, as they do Islam, est extremism is this a sign that that might be changing some people some people that we spoke with say, it could be they say that this is important that this designation has been made. And I think the choice that they've made to refer to Pratt boys as extremists. Whether it's the FBI or local law enforcement. I think that's significant and certainly shows that they're paying attention to this group and a much higher level, Molly Salomon of Oregon public broadcasting. Thanks so much. Thank you, make your home in Malibu, and you eventually will face the flames that's an early line from urban historian, Mike Davis essay the case for letting Malibu burn. It's from his nineteen ninety-five book ecology of fear. Some twenty years later, the Wolsey fire has destroyed at least fifteen hundred structures in Malibu. And scorched nearly one hundred thousand acres people have already said they'll rebuild and that's not surprising to Davis the fire or the rebuilding. He joins us to talk about lessons. He's learned from studying the history of fire in the region. Mike davis. Welcome to the program. Thank you. Now. You write that fire has shaped the coast of California for generations. What is it about Malibu in particular that makes it susceptible to wildfires every few years? Well, they're almost perfect. Fires along the ocean front Santa Monica mountains because the canyon salon exactly with the prevailing winds that occur every autumn and the mixture coastal Teijin Schapper Ellen one tends to burn so had nine major fires since the nineteen fifties. In fact, during the nineteen fifties, atomic energy commission studied Malibu fired turned to San what a firestorm and. Case of nuclear war would look like Alabama's always been a paradigm. Perfect tired. You talk about this idea that people should essentially not rebuild in these areas. Couldn't say the same thing about other cities that face natural disasters. Right. If you think about hurricanes and coastal areas, there's there's always something. Of course. I mean been several million our spelled. Train hurricane count. As many of them locations never should have been building for its place. The only exceptions all this constantly, you know, rebuilding or developing new housing in areas of high hazard. The only section it is in some instances, the federal flood insurance program has made communities retreat from the fire point they've actually abandoned small towns and scattered dwelling. So help us understand what drives development in these fire prone areas. When you think of maybe the top three factors that kind of align against any rethinking of this culture. What are they? Well, in the first place, the overwhelming desire to have picture of view, lots and ocean front property along the courage indicates that community communities like paradise. It's because it's only portable housing lions planning the regulation at growth in wild winds on a state level was defeated back in the seventy s when Jerry Brown was governor. And finally, we in effect the general public subsidizes people to Rideau by providing extravagant level of fire protection ties Californians, probably go in dollars this year as well as cross subsidization of fire insurance all homeowners. It's actually help pay for the fire insurance in areas burned so often. So what have you learned from studying past Malibu fires that people can use now? Well, I'm afraid that that no it's just not really useful one there. Consensus about rebuilding people in Malibu understand that frequent fire, but the idea that you can protect structures and and lied. Yes. Brush parents make sense. Yes. Home design should be more fireproof. But at the end of the day with each superpower show is that's not enough and never will be enough. It's absolutely necessary dollars the power of nature and changing power nature in these circumstances. Mike Davis is the author of the book ecology fear. He's a professor emeritus at UC riverside. Thank you for speaking with us. Of course, my pleasure..

FBI Malibu Oregon Mike Davis KiKi Dee Audie Cornish NPR Washington southern poverty Law Center Ari Shapiro Gavin McInnes Beth heisinger Molly Solomon Pacific northwest Santa Monica mountains
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on Here & Now

"Thank you so much well back to the other big event coming up, we're spotlighting important ballot issues around the country on Tuesday election day in Oregon voters are already deciding with mailed ballots whether to keep that states decades old sanctuary law as Oregon public broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports a law that once had bipartisan support isn't seeing that way anymore, and maybe repay. Field Oregon sanctuary. Lob is one of the oldest in the country. It was signed into law more than thirty one years ago. Both Republicans and Democrats voted for the Bill. It was really noncontroversial. Rocky Berea was the democrat and state Representative behind the law. It says no law enforcement agency can use its resources for the sole purpose of detecting or apprehending people whose only violation is being in the country unlawfully. Put simply it limits. Local and state police from enforcing federal immigration policies to be honest. This was not meant to be essentially law. It was meant to protect local city our resources and also to reduce racial. Profiling California's sanctuary law is similar to Oregon's five other states, and hundreds of counties also have a form of sanctuary policy. Now voters in Oregon are being asked if they wanna repeal there's supporters of the law say establish his trust between immigrant communities in law enforcement. They rolled out a series of ads urging oregonians to vote. No on what's known as measure one. Oh five. Current law helps create pride lines for local law enforcement communities that we serve no that we're focused on protecting and serving them. We're not worried about their immigration shoes. That sheriff Mike Reese speaking in an ad. He's the sheriff of Multnomah county where Portland is the county seat law enforcement officials in more liberal and urban parts of the state are lining up against repeal. But half of the state's sheriffs largely from more conservative rural parts of the state want to do away with for long politicians have protected illegal aliens with dangerous sanctuary policies that put Oregon citizens at risk. It's time to.

Oregon Field Oregon sanctuary Mike Reese state Representative Conrad Wilson Rocky Berea Multnomah county Portland California thirty one years
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KCRW

"Over the past year. The metoo movement has taken down members of the house and Senate and also state lawmakers on Tuesday voters are going to decide the future of more than a dozen men running for state office who are accused of sexual misconduct, including in central Oregon where a candidate has insisted he stay on the ballot despite calls for him to quit the race. Just a warning to our listeners this story does contain a graphic description of a sexually inappropriate act. Lauren Dake from Oregon public broadcasting reports Moee Newbold hasn't opened her Bali yet. But when she does she will see Dr Nathan bodies name the man who she says groped her in a bar several years ago, all of a sudden, he slipped his hand down the back of my pants and undermanned or where. I wasn't wearing a bell. And I wish they had been I kind of like frozen. Was just kind of thinking like how do I get out of this? The two knew each other from their work in environmental activism, Dr body denied new bulls allegations in his statement, he mailed to reporters he went a step further the headline in the local newspaper the next day. Read body claims groping accuser has substance abuse problems Newbold the huger says those claims are false. He basically victim blamed me and anyone who has substance abuse issues. Dr body is a city council member running for the state legislature in bend, Oregon. When allegations emerged this summer members of his own party, including democratic governor Kate Brown called on him to withdraw from the race. I'm not willing to compromise. My values over an election time is up. But Dr body has refused to step aside. He is one of more than a dozen men. Running for state office across the nation who have been accused of sexual misconduct..

Dr body Moee Newbold Oregon Lauren Dake Dr Nathan Senate Kate Brown
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"But you know, it was fundamentally a positive spin because in the very competitive world, the magazine publishing, you need a specific thing that you do differently from everybody else. And so being positive about science and technology with our spin in my time there. And so so yeah, it was funny, no. And so what's the reason I I mentioned then moving out zero was going off doing wall involved for me a big. A sort of shift in how I thought about my topics because Al Jazeera is all about equality and social Justice. And you know who is being ghettoized in the world and the science angle on that is a very thing than what the science was about. And so suddenly I was no longer. We were no longer doing any kind of consumer technology stories. They didn't care about the latest iphone. They wanted to know, you know what is going to be for people who can't afford it, or what is this going to mean for privacy? And so suddenly I was sort of had my worldview kind of challenged by that in a way that I actually found that I really took to quite naturally, and I kind of discovered in myself an appetite for sort of critique of science and replicate ability like you describing and technology for its own sake, and all these things, I really underwent this kind of transformation and Algiere American forty folded up in twenty sixteen of the, they decided to shut down. I continue to work for outsor- English. Now. But so are you is that print are on Campbell? So on camera? Yeah. This was also sort of learning a whole new set of skills of standing Fava Cameron and finding people who are going to provide a really good visual way of telling the story rather than just being described the nuts and bolts. So very new and really fun set of skills there. So when zero America shutdown, I was brought in to a documentary series, four hour documentary series called hacking your mind that's supposed to air. We think in twenty nineteen. We're not sure yet, but waiting to find out, but it's a National Science Foundation funded show Bruce by Oregon public broadcasting for hopefully public television. Although it's not clear where exactly is going to go yet. But the theme of that show hacking your mind is explaining the world of cognitive allusions of bias and the shortcuts that the human brain makes because evolution on us to make these shortcuts and how those shortcuts get us into trouble in the modern world. And so I went from this very positive, take on science that publish to critical view of it at zero to them. This totally mind expanding experience of of doing. It's almost three years now on the subject of how human beings perceive an often misperceived the world around them doing this show, and I had been going around and talking to companies in groups and stuff about this basically said the having the mind, is it a lot of it? Is it the behavioral economics? It is. Yeah. It's basically a crash course for people like me who didn't know anything about it in behavioral economics in Dana common names, turkeys work that you know sort of explained that there is this kind of systematic way human beings make decisions heuristic as short term for it, and that there is this really quite quantifiable set of principle that that you and I and pretty much around earth. Seems to us in making decisions as officially as possible. And those in more recent, they idea from what I understand policy makers of started looking into rights setting up nudge units in, but nudges that we went all around the world, went to England. We went to Tanzania all these places that where we could see the that human programming at work and then see the ways that system human systems are beginning to incorporate them. So yet, political campaigns are beginning to use them. Marketers honesty are using them like crazy, some social service agencies, all kinds of all kinds of people are trying to use them to..

Bruce National Science Foundation Al Jazeera Fava Cameron Tanzania Campbell Oregon America England Dana three years four hour
California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

The Movement with Dr. F Keith Slaughter

04:08 min | 2 years ago

California man pleads guilty to terrorism charges

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm, Janine Herbst Russian President Vladimir Putin says his meeting with President Trump on Monday was successful overall and lead to useful agreements but as NPR's Lucian Kim. Reports from, Moscow Putin didn't go into any. Detail on what agreements were reached during. The, summit, in Helsinki. Speaking, of Russian diplomats in the foreign ministry. In Moscow President Putin expressed satisfaction with the summit but. Urged caution going forward Putin said in his words that unnamed political forces in the US are trying to disavow the results of his meeting with Trump who met with. For two hours behind closed doors Putin said those forces are ready, to sacrifice Russian-American relations for their narrow partisan interests NPR's Lucian Kim reporting Meanwhile Russia, is offering US access to twelve Russians. Charged with tampering in the thousand sixteen US election if. Moscow gets, to interrogate a former US ambassador and other American officials as. NPR's Michele Keleman reports The White House acknowledges that President Trump and Putin discussed the idea. During their Helsinki, meeting Putin. Is trying to equate the US investigation into Russian interference to the Kremlin's efforts to punish Bill Browder. A businessman who, lobbies, for sanctions against Russia and Trump seems to be buying into that says former US ambassador Michael McFaul it makes us look weak it makes us look like we're buying into, Putin's conspiratorial fantasies and therefore political, reasons they're chasing Mr. Browder because he is a critic, of the Kremlin and they're chasing me because I'm a critic of the Kremlin a State Department spokesperson says the Russian allegations against McFaul Browder and others. Are absurd, though the White House says Trump. Is still quote working with his team. On, this, Michelle Kellerman. NPR, news the State Department Oregon's public defenders. Filed court documents asking a federal judge to release some. Of the more than one hundred immigration detainees being held at a federal prison near Salem as Oregon Broadcasting's Conrad. Wilson reports the court documents describe inadequate care and poor conditions thoughts of. Suicide hours of confinement and denial of medical care among the complaints outlined by US integration and customs enforcement detainees being held at the federal, Correctional Institution in Sheridan Oregon the immigration detainees arrived at the federal prison roughly seven weeks ago, most are seeking, asylum a declaration filed by the chief. Investigator with the Oregon federal public defender's office said several detainees he and his colleagues. Met with had untreated medical conditions that included quote heart problems a gunshot wound a broken leg rashes allergic reactions and severe sore throats this week and I- spokeswoman said four detainees have been transferred to another facility in Washington state for medical attention from PR news I'm Conrad Wilson less than half an hour to the, opening bell on. Wall Street Wall Street futures are trading lower Dow NASDAQ Edison p. five hundred futures contracts are all down about three tenths of a percent at last check you're listening to NPR. News from Washington from news in, San Francisco good morning I'm Brian watt Twenty-three-year-old Oakland man is pleading guilty to federal terrorism charges but his Alex Emslie reports the move is not part of a plea deal it's. Unique legal strategy to litigate the case at, sentencing Amir synon- oligarchy, was arrested in late twenty sixteen after either allegedly threatened online to bomb a gay club in San Francisco mix poison. With cocaine and distributed at nightclubs and start a wildfire in the East, Bay but, his supporters from, the many communities say, he's simply a naive kid and never planned, to carry out an attack what he said was all complete rubbish he didn't intend to do any of it attorney. Mary McNamara represents oligarchy she says his charges aren't related to his threats instead he's charged with opening a handful of, social media, accounts for alleged ISIS members in the Middle East oligarchy faces a wide range of prison sentences to. Forty seven years A lengthy. Sentencing hearing is. Scheduled for November I'm Alex Emslie k. q. e. news, San Francisco transit officials are. Extending the transfer window for bus and train tickets..

President Putin President Trump NPR United States Alex Emslie Mcfaul Browder Oregon Helsinki Lucian Kim Moscow San Francisco Russia Washington Conrad Wilson State Department White House Michael Mcfaul Janine Herbst
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Small towns with a one industry history not however campus from oregon public broadcasting molly salman explains the paper making past f came as washington is entrenched in the towns dna nowhere is that more apparent than when you walk into the high school auditorium with the basketball team the paper makers is playing it season opener a banner with the schools fight song is decorated with rolls of toilet paper and then there's came mascot it used to be joe papermaker but now it's the mean machine and animated paper roller that fires up the crowd during timeouts a they're sitting in the back row at the game is wayne rash he's a former mill worker pu graduated from came as high in nineteen 64 are trimmed new all the games doesn't matter what sport rash says when he was growing up almost everybody lined up for a job at the mill after graduation nowadays most of the kids in this auditorium wouldn't even consider that will it used to be the only thing down they've added a whole lot of industry here the mail will start to wind dan paper and pulp operations in the spring which means up to three hundred people will likely lose their jobs regional state economist scott bailey says the loss of meals in the pacific northwest there's nothing new since two thousand nearly ten paper mills have shut down in oregon and washing ten other areas rural areas where there's very few job opportunities laughed and that's really devastated towns but came as is different in fact it many would argue it hasn't been a mill town for quite some time back in the late seventies a big union strike threatened to bring the city to a halt nan henriksen was the city's former mayor there were a lot of us that realized that the golden goose could die at any moment and we would be in financial ruin nearly seventy percent of the city's property tax revenues came from the mille henriksen new came as needed to attract new industry so when a plot of land became available the city annexed it and turned it into a business park but then had some wondering whether the city was losing its mill town routes that was a.

oregon molly salman washington joe papermaker scott bailey nan henriksen basketball shut down property tax mille henriksen mill seventy percent
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News this is all things considered i'm ari shapiro and i'm mary louise kelly the us solar industry is booming and in large part that's because of cheap imported solar panels about the us international trade commit shen recently ruled those imports also hurt american manufacturers tomorrow the commission will advise president trump on how to fix that in a moment the concerns over possible tariffs or quotas first cassandra of oregon public broadcasting visits one of the companies that brought the trade case at the center of of plants outside portland robots do much of the work of building solar cells into panels so the solar cells are in a carrier here they're picked up there put on this vote john cleese unload stacks of solar cells the size of large drink coasters into the automated in a sheen the reynolds it were making right now are just about three hundred what those skills can't compete with a surge of cheap solar panel imports so rolled says are being sold at below market prices that violate trade rules earlier this year so the rule declared bankruptcy in clayton with laid off along with more than three hundred other workers at the factory that was when we knew that something was amiss and nobody knew exactly how deep the guts were going to go ciller world any other manufacturing companies niva want tariffs and quotas on all the solar panels coming in from overseas they say it would level the playing field these are the last two surviving companies tim right bill is the lawyer representing solar ruled in the case he blames chinese subsidies for overproduction and he says without tariffs what's left of solar manufacturing in the us could disappear we documented more than thirty us solar sao and module manufacturers who were driven out of business over the last five years few weeks ago the trade commission ruled in solar roads favour in clawson called back to work on my caller i d i saw my lead man's name and i went wow what you know what's he want and he said that they were wrapping up again and was i going to be interested in coming back and i said yes yeah absolutely the possibility of tariff helping solar will compete with imports the company plans to rehire two hundred workers by may i'm grace who had with colorado public radio here the prospect of those tariffs.

ari shapiro solar industry solar panels us the commission oregon solar cells clayton clawson mary louise kelly president portland john cleese colorado five years
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi sang the first coast to coast total solar eclipse in nearly a century is moving eastward end if the reaction oregon is any indication this is going to be one celestial show to remember oregon public broadcasting christian foden vessel the senate will land at river in portland oregon cooler and it absolutely got darker as well of the overhead light came on on the i which is right over the river right here it got very dog in very quiet people were very excited beforehand and ripping and hollering but actually at the actual moment of totality they got really quiet and and self reflective and you would it would either use what i always here about exactly what it what nets christian phone vencel reporting the total solar eclipse makes its grand finale insane south carolina and lessen 45 minutes and dissipation is building in clemson were npr's no greenfield voice has staked out a spot it is hot here but really really sunny and that is good news for all the people who are pouring into the town you can see all just a line of cars everybody's coming into park and try to get a spot people have set up shares intense in the big grassy areas of the university the souvenir shops on the main drag sort of selling a brisk business in eclipse over clemson t shirts and university officials say they're going to be handing out something like fifty thousand eclipse glasses nets npr's knell greenfield voicing clemson south carolina in other news president trump is preparing to deliver a speech to the nation and night on afghanistan where the us military has had a significant presence for the last sixteen years on msnbc today democratic senator tim mccain said or tim kaine that is so the us needs to make sure afghanistan is not a breeding ground for anything that could pose a threat to us in tourists down the road the secret services bumping up against statutory limits on overtime pay as it struggles to provide protection for president trump and his globetrotting family npr scott horsely reports of secret services working with lawmakers now to ensure that agents and officers or pay.

washington oregon senate south carolina clemson npr trump us msnbc senator tim mccain tim kaine afghanistan lakshmi president scott horsely sixteen years 45 minutes
"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"oregon public broadcasting" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The mm live from npr news in washington i'm chase stevens the white house communications director has resigned amid rumors that president trump is contemplating a staff shakeup npr's more eliason reports mike dubbed he handed in his resignation on may eighteen th but the news didn't come out until now that's possibly a record for this leaky white house w was not a member of the original trump campaign team his job was to design a communication strategy and get everyone in the white house to execute it that's a tall order especially for a president who tweets and talks about whatever is on his mind at the moment when asked if there would be other personnel changes press secretary sean spicer said the president was pleased with his team and that he continued to believe the best messenger for the white house is the president himself the administration is facing a series of investigations into possible trump campaign ties to russia even the president's soninlaw and top advisor jared kushner has become part of the probe mar eliason npr news the white house in portland oregon police say they have surveillance video of a suspect killing two men and wounding a third and a stabbing incident on a commuter train last friday as oregon public broadcasting ilya templeton reports police say the suspect bragged about the attack while being escort is to jail police say they have recordings of christian talking in the backseat of a police car according to court documents he said he had just torn people's throats out and said quote i can die in prison a happy man he called himself a patriot and said that's what liberalism gets you christian had reportedly been yelling antimuslim statements at two young women on the train shortly before he attacked the three men amelio templeton in portland british officials say troops remained ready to help manchester police investigating the suicide bombing at the end of an ariana grande a concert nine days ago as npr's frank lying fifth reports rendezvous will join other pop stars at the same venue next sunday or benefit performance to aid the attack victims the concert would you said for emirates old trafford cricket ground is expected raised more than two and a half million dollars security the venue which seats fifty thousand people is concerned.

press secretary frank manchester amelio templeton christian ilya templeton oregon portland jared kushner advisor russia sean spicer washington white house npr suicide bombing police car white house president mike npr trump director stevens million dollars nine days