19 Burst results for "Orange Prize"

"orange prize" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

10:52 min | 2 months ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"This is the Writers Georgina. Godwin I guess. Today is the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller American wife in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl a thinly disguised Laura Bush who found herself married to a president. It was long listed for the Orange Prize. As was her debut novel. Prep her other books. Include the man of my dreams sustained eligible and the acclaimed short story collection. You think it I'll say it. Her stories of appeared in the New Yorker Esquire Oprah magazine and The New York Times magazine her latest collection of stories to be published in the UK is help yourself. She's also the guest editor for the Twenty Twenty Best American short stories anthology. She lives with her family in the American Midwest. A brand new novel is rotten. And it's been described as bombshell while I couldn't agree more. This is.

Twenty Twenty editor New Yorker Esquire Oprah Sunday Times Bestseller American Midwest Orange Prize Laura Bush The New York Times magazine Godwin president UK
Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

08:53 min | 2 months ago

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

"I guess. Today is the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller American wife in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl a thinly disguised Laura Bush who found herself married to a president. It was long listed for the Orange Prize. As was her debut novel. Prep her other books. Include the man of my dreams sustained eligible and the acclaimed short story collection. You think it I'll say it. Her stories of appeared in the New Yorker Esquire Oprah magazine and The New York Times magazine her latest collection of stories to be published in the UK is help yourself. She's also the guest editor for the Twenty Twenty Best American short stories anthology. She lives with her family in the American Midwest. A brand new novel is rotten. And it's been described as bombshell while I couldn't agree more. This is a book that will demand. Attention Curtis Sitton fell. Welcome to meet the rices. Thank you for having me. You'll novel begins in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. Is Hillary Rodham Graduates College? And it brings us right up-to-date in Contemporary America. But I'd like to go back to Cincinnati in one thousand nine hundred seventy five when when you were can you tell us about the second stance surrounding you alive? Oh my goodness it's funny. I'm so much in the habit of of talking about Hillary's lay right now. You'll warm familiar with that than with my own will. I'm the second of four children. I have a sister. Who's less than two years older than I am. And I would say a have not led a very personally dramatic life which might be why I'm a fiction writer instead of a memoir rest but yeah I grew up in Cincinnati. My parents are both retired but still live in Cincinnati and I have two sisters one brother my brother is actually holds elected office in Cincinnati. He's the he's a member of the city council in his third term. So so I guess. Different members of my family are interested in in politics in in different ways but I was very lucky to go to excellent schools in Cincinnati elsewhere. And I would say my family Sort of obsessive readers like we didn't it's not like we. All six sat around each of US feverishly reading a book of our own but there were lots of books in the House. We did sometimes read is a family. My mother was a librarian for a long time for you know middle school or junior high students so ages twelve and thirteen and fourteen and that strong feminist streak. That comes to your writing that being influenced by her. That's an interesting question. My parents have almost opposite personalities. From each other where. My father is very great Gary in very opinionated and my mother is you know I think she has strong opinions and viewpoints. But she's. She's not a very assertive per cent. And she's not she's not she's a very private person even even by saying this should not be. I think she'd rather that like I never talk about her. Other than you know maybe acknowledging that she exists described as relatively progressive. But you know I think there are some families where the children grow up going to protest rallies in that was not my family You'll schooling was obviously a hugely influential. In fact your first book prep which is I. Think long list for the Orange Prize loosely based on that. Would you say so? I went to a boarding school in Massachusetts. When I was I had just turned fourteen and it was sort of strange given you know the area of the country where I grew up. Which is the mid west and it was a little bit unusual to go to a sort of fancier elite boarding school on the east coast just in the sense that a lot of students who go to that school are more from that region and also the other thing is that. I was the only one of my siblings who went which I think sometimes makes people think that I must have been the most academically talented in fact. I was the least academically and by my siblings. Were all you know much more. Well rounded students like. I did well in English but I definitely struggled with other subjects so those a little bit. I feel like I certainly. It was privileged but it was also a little bit random or arbitrary that I went to boarding school and talking about coming from a different at least geographical background from the rest of the students. The story is sort of more than coming of age. It's it's more perhaps one could say it was about a study of of social class. Was that something that you found was very apparent there that it did feel different. This whole kind of I mean I think the thing that we all have this horror of being a teenager comes across in dairy well a particular field and that you didn't fit in that. I think I felt at times that I didn't fit in. Certainly I mean I would say that. It wasn't the main character in prep. Leave your experiences going to boarding school as more of a sort of class shock than I would say I did. And you know class is sort of the air. We all breathe. It's maybe especially obvious. Una Boarding School campus. But you know I think it's it's obvious everywhere you know. You can have a sort of exchange with a person like delivering a package to your house and the two of you could probably like assess each other's voices are accents and no things about each other's class or like defied that one of you is in a house receiving a package one of US delivering. The package also says things about class in our society. You know doesn't necessarily say very good things but I think the To like one yet like I was aware of class. And I don't think I was quite as much of a fish out of water as my protagonist. Although certainly I'm like erotic person was even more neurotic as a teenage you write about teenagehood again in in your next book. And I think we'll come back to that because it will say impacts on on the subject matter of Rodham but you went off to Stanford then and you studied creative writing night. You wrote the College newspaper. You registered magazine. What's being a writer? Always the the obvious career choice. Well I think writing was always really important to me and it was like from a very young age for about six or seven. I spent a lot of time reading and writing because I wanted to. I think it helped me make sense of the world and it held my attention and there weren't as many options on net. Netflix back. Then so entertain yourself a little more so definitely writing always played a huge role in my life. I don't think I grew up with the expectation that I would be a full time novelist. I think sometimes I thought I won't be a lawyer or as I got older. I thought you know maybe a social worker or an English teacher or something. I always the closer my adulthood. I think the more it seems like I would do something writing adjacent. But I just don't think anyone can count on being a fulltime writer as you know how they pay their mortgage and I mean going to someone as you did to study at the Iowa. Writer's workshop is no guarantee of coming out. The other end is a fully-fledged writer. But that does give you a better chance than most doesn't it's a huge success rate. It's a it's a wonderful program and I like I loved being there. I learned a ton but the the thing that people don't necessarily realize is not only. Can you go to an excellent writing program the Iraqis and after that you know not have a stable writing career you can be a writer who has had multiple books published in that. Still not the way. You're supporting yourself. And in fact new writing is my full time job. But that's that's an incredible privilege and it's not. It's not something I take for granted. It's very I know that it's very unusual on special. I feel

Cincinnati Writer Orange Prize United States American Midwest Twenty Twenty Hillary Rodham Graduates Colle Sunday Times Bestseller Laura Bush New Yorker Esquire Oprah Una Boarding School UK Editor Curtis Sitton Hillary President Trump America Massachusetts Netflix
"orange prize" Discussed on Free Cookies

Free Cookies

13:39 min | 3 months ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Free Cookies

"But springer on here's Madden Madeline Miller taught and tutored Latin Greek and Shakespeare to high school students for over fifteen years. She is also the author of the Song of Achilles which was her first novel and one that Twenty Twelve Orange Prize for fiction and was a New York Times bestseller and then her follow up. Sursee was an instant number one New York Times bestseller we are joined with. Madeline Miller and I just short of doing the whole fan girl thing. I don't think I can explain how excited I am. Because you have written to my favorite books of all time and we will definitely be discussing those but madeline what I really want to ask you first off before we get into your novels you are. You teach the classics Greek Shakespeare to high school students and direct Shakespeare. Plays my correct and asking you. Can you give us the lowdown on like what you're up to my addition for your place on look first of all thank you so much for having me and for those very very kind words I am very thrilled to be here. So yes I not teaching currently because I have two young kids and also trying to write full time and do some amount of although not anymore book but I was doing some some traveling and doing some talks and so unfortunately teaching in high school is completely incompatible with travelling or regular travel schedule so something had to go and sadly was teaching But I I do hope to to come back to it one day because I absolutely loved it in the years I spent in the classroom in the years I spent directing Shakespeare plays. Were so incredibly creatively fruitful. They were so inspiring and honestly I think I learned everything I know about storytelling from directing place. They definitely go yet. Yeah we'll probably jump all over the place there. Since you mentioned that right there I did. I had read it. I think acumen a that. You did where. You're talking about teaching highschoolers in theater and how interesting it was to watch. Those kids be able to explore parts of their emotion. That might not be allowed to be expressed just in the everyday high school culture so and you said it was incredibly fruitful. Can you elaborate on what you learned from that process? Sure Well it was such a privileged first of all to get to do that kind of work where you know. I felt like I was through these roles in Shakespeare. You know getting to witness students sort of try. Something new grow in new ways but I think part of what I really learned from storytelling or a craft perspective If the place really they'll if they are not tight and we used to sometimes backstage post things that said faster faster. Louder Louder Which you know just to remind actors right before they went on And when you when you pause on the stage you know a five second is basically like minus love being our in terms of how it feels for the audience so you have to really use those pauses. You have to keep your pacing up and so I feel like just working true that pacing and that sort of feeling of each scene has to have an arc but it also has to have this forward momentum with the whole play you know each kind of felt like a chapter and so just practicing that over and over and over again working with you know plays that are incredibly well written and you know amazingly brilliantly characterized already and just kind of me getting to go into those and and play with them and train execute them With amazing practice it felt like working out my storytelling. Every time I was doing it although that was not the intention at the time but I think back on it. I think that's what I was doing. I guess I'll teach this. It'll help me with my writing. It is amazing how timeless Shakespeare is and how so many iterations as a director of what how what direction you want to share the story if you want modern twist on Romeo and Juliet or you want to do it in the traditional structure Elizabeth an era and a see that in your writing as well as with especially when you have the classics in this timeless Greek mythology. But you bring it into this beautiful modern language where the reader can feel like. They're going on this magical ride. That might be representative of a woman trying to find herself in society today at the same time and that actually did not lead into my question. I'm just thinking right now but my question. Did you ever act? Did you ever perform Shakespeare Yourself? Did you just direct it? I am I have. This is gonNA sound strange but I have terrible stagefright whenever he begins someone else's words if I'm going up to do a presentation I'm okay with that but I'm I've taken you kind of acting courses where you had to do a scene or two for the group and I have never been more terrified in my life but you monologue on your instagram. Think of as the monologue was. It truly is in Cressida that you put up on your instagram it yet. I was so excited that you did that and I've been meaning to do that myself. I feel like I have a little bit of stage by about that too because it's been so long since I've performed Shakespeare inspired me so you might not have as much as you think just staying it. I wasn't fully. Enacting is a little bit but I wasn't doing the full so that was how I managed to avoid panicking about it because I will. I'll let you ask your question Catherine but I. I think that the one thing that I would never want to do. If we're excluding like really treacherous things is to stand up on a stage in. Pretend I'm a comedian? Like if I have to do like a fifteen minute comedy routine. That would be the pinnacle of fear for me. I don't know how a lot of people probably I don't think you're little you meet some people who are like whatever I mean. If people don't laugh they don't laugh. Don't laugh it's not okay. So yes that is so crushing of it. So you're more time writing now and we read that. It took ten years to write the song of Achilles and I also read somewhere that after five years. You completely scratched your manuscript. Does that do we have our facts right true? That is absolutely true. That is true terrifying madeline. That's terrifying ten years Trojan war with was ten years. And you wanted you with really. I was like cost claiming that I know I. It was not planned. the ten year thing. It was yeah I can now sort of talk about it more lightly but at the time it was really terrible. Terrible feeling because it was the ceiling of. I know that this is wrong. I don't know how to fix it. Maybe I can't fix it and I just have to sit with this thing. I've poured myself into for five years and realized that maybe I can't do it and so at the moment I decided to take a writing course over the summer. So there's this wonderful writing course called the New York State Summer Writer's institute which is held at skidmore and they have a lot of wonderful teacher. Is They have a lot of wonderful writers who come in and give talks so I was really excited. I had never done anything like that before. I had no really formal writing training. I had kind of mentioned only talk about giving herself a masters in creative writing sort of on the side and I. I don't know if I can claim to have a masters but I I definitely you know all my writing stuff came from reading books on writing written by writers. I never show any classes and so this is the first time I had really tried to take a class in writing and I was so upset about this whole failed novel. What I saw the failed novel that I didn't even take a fiction courses. I took nonfiction and I was able through sort of going back to nonfiction and taking a break and finding that you know I could put two sentences together maybe In another context I sort of got the courage to go back to song of Achilles and the truth is i. You know I had this sort of very strange relationship to be Kelly's because on one hand I had this career that I absolutely loved I loved teaching and I love Directing Shakespeare plays and yet I had this part of me. That just couldn't let this go just could not let patroclos historic go and Even when I was at my you know my most depressed our about it. I still couldn't just fully give up when you went back to it after the skidmore class by the way lived in Saratoga Springs for a number of years. So I know skidmore will you? It's it's such a beautiful area when you went. You went back to the manuscript were you. Were you renovating it or did you just say that that happened? And I wrote that and I'm GONNA keep that in my mind and I'm going to start from word one so it was. This was this long period of self delusion So what happened. Was that actually while I was at the New York. State some writers institute the First Line of Song of Achilles as it now stands popped into my brain one day and so I ran home back to my dorm room and I typed out and I basically tied to the first shop door kind of as it almost as it ended up being And then I was sort of afraid and I put it away and took a little break from it and then when I got to it I kept thinking. Well this this first chapter is strong and I'll just have to make a few adjustments to the second chapter and then probably everything will be fine and so then I changed the second chapter and then I thought well now just there are few things that don't quite competent third chapter but after that I won't have to change anymore and doing all the way through the manuscript eventually rewrote every word. And that's what needed to happen. But I think if I had said like you have to rewrite every word I that just would have been too much for my brain to comprehend so. I should've lied to myself. Along the way that there was gonNA come some point. I wouldn't have to rewrite everything so did you. When you finally released the song of Achilles did you have any foresight or expectations or inklings about the massive level of success and accolades. This book Garner. Absolutely not not at all I was when I had sent out my query letters to agents out something eighty letters and I had gotten seventy eight four like immediate rejection. This is not interesting wind when people are angry. I was really like. Wow the mark no one is interested in and I was very fortunate that one of the agents who did get back to me was one of my top top choices and she has just been amazing. This is Julie Barer at the book. Group She is so brilliant. She is such a true lover of stories so she was able to to match me up with a wonderful wonderful editor but given my experience with that. Whole Process. I would definitely not thinking and and I had some really good friends who when I told them what the subject of the novel was. Their eyes glazed over so I was not I I was thinking well at least they will know that I did this story. All the justice I was capable of doing it. And if only my mom buys you know my mom bites hilty copies and that's it. I guess at least it's out there. You mentioned in your previous answer that you ran home from whatever class. You're you know you're in the writer's institute and sat down and wrote the first chapter and it in things I've read it. Sounds like running and walk. Taking walks have played a part in your rhythms. And and routine for. For how you how you right What and for listeners. Who probably haven't read this piece. You know you Madeleine. You can share. Just that you wrote your first manuscript you would like gopher run and they come home and sit down and write. Yep and then you kind of peel back and now you kind of incorporate you know wh- however that looks for you. Can you explain to us kind of what those rhythms of writing for you now? Sure I definitely need a workout at some point in the middle of my writing day because I start with a certain amount of energy and then I really I I will start to hit a wall with whatever working on either in the micro level dealing with sentences or the macro level sort of not knowing what a character is doing feeling like I can't quite get the rhythm of conversation And so I'll go for a walk or I'll go for a run or I'll go on actually destroyed my Destroyed my knee in high school doing that running on that manuscript so I don't run very much anymore. Mostly I found elliptical..

Shakespeare Madeline Miller New York Times instagram Orange Prize Sursee springer Saratoga Springs skidmore representative New York State writer Madeleine Catherine director New York patroclos Julie Barer Kelly
"orange prize" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

15:28 min | 10 months ago

"orange prize" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Hello and awesome chemistry has been an incredibly successful subject in Nobel's Day the periodic tables a fairly recent discovery had just discovered radioactivity in one of the first have chemistry since the nineteen fifties really the process continues in many years it is awarded for good work but work which is either biological modestly when the the Orange Prize or quite physical easily win the Physics Prize this year is an exception this is a piece of pure chemistry and is very important so this year I withdrew my object fool he won the prize and we don't see true of curious Einstein and Rutherford and various other people at that critic Watson that they were famous before the prize the prize was the icing on the cake. Jeff thank you very much for your time thank you.

Orange Prize Watson Einstein Jeff Rutherford
"orange prize" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

14:13 min | 1 year ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"The atlantic harper's offers magazine and zoe trope all story among many others her debut novel the tigers wife won the twenty eleven orange prize for fiction and was an international bestseller. Her new book inland takes place in the lawless drop written lands of of the american west. Nora is an unflinching frontiers woman. In the arizona territory awaiting the return of her water seeking husband and feuding older sons and leary is a former outlaw and man haunted by ghosts as he traverses across mexico and the united states by camel learning how nora's larry stories collide is the surprise and suspense events of this novel ron charles of the washington post writes in his review in this country albertus found soil justice fertile for the propagation of myth and the complications of cruelty the unsettling hayes between fact and fantasy an inland is not just a literary effect of aubert's scorgeous pros. It's an uncanny uncanny representation of the indeterminate nature of life in this brutal place of in this place of brutal geography sip slowly and make it it last now. Please join me welcoming auburn..

Nora aubert orange prize zoe ron charles washington post arizona auburn leary mexico united states
"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

11:50 min | 1 year ago

"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"I think they go hand in hand with part of what happened at that. Particular date was the announcement of military intervention in iraq of of course. Do you think that i mean that opened a new era of hostility absolutely because imagine the middle east changing this much again the huge mistakes that were made in iraq and how that changed everything. It's political consequences that even to this day we are experiencing right so i think we need to understand at the past is very important. We need to be able to come to terms with the huge mistakes of the past and maybe we need to understand that the past is still alive. If within the present moment we are living today. I'm so now. Let's talk about the characters <hes>. We've talked a little bit about layla. We don't know much about to. She was born in fan which is a provincial city. Is that just the other end of turkey. The other end of turkey to a poor family and there are lies in her family that all of these characters in some ways are affected by deception dishonesty lies. Yes well. It's it's very patriarca family. Her family and there's polygamy leaker me in the family so in a way she is <hes> raised in a family with two mothers and one father without knowing exactly who is is her biological mother and that's very damaging for her and as you said there are lots of silences there lots of secrets and lies and deceptions and a family love as well affection us world but it's much more complex than not and as she grows up. I think it becomes much harder for her. Because alongside <hes> her father becomes more and more religious he is not only religious he wants to dominate the lives of the people around him he wants to shape their lives and at the time when his own daughter is discovering her individuality trying to find her freedom <hes> understand her own sexuality sexuality because the father is so extremely rigid and religious <hes> the columbus become more obvious within the family so more and more it becomes difficult for her to breathe in in that family and in a in a place like fun where there's very little room for diversity and she runs away way to the big city as characters looking for freedom always have done and in and in the world that she teams up with four other characters three three of whom also from minorities very particular minorities and we've got sign up one to two who comes from a family who they have dwarfism a humira. Who's it's become a cabaret singer and style jalen. How do you pronounce nalen on island. Yeah i pronounce it as nylon was transsexual. Why did you pick these particular picula characters to be have friends and companions well. This is something i have experience in a stumbles so many times is some lissome magnet and it is a city that calls i think there are cities in this world that colas and we follow that call without quite knowing why that's how so i moved to his son will. I didn't grow up in sombor so i moved in my early twenties and i knew i was a late comer as an outsider in a way <hes> when you're an outsider. Maybe appreciate the city even more. You don't take things for granted. Every little thing you research study you pay attention to but at the same time is tumble this a difficult city is the city of scars and it's the city were particularly if you come from a more disadvantaged background if you don't have the same kind of power or privileges you might find life very difficult so there isn't one stumbled you know i always think there are more than that stumbles plural and is stumbled sometimes coexist but often they clash and maybe i want to reflect the complexity of the city nonetheless i i have met over the years while i was living in istanbul. I've actually met people coming from all over the middle east for different reasons but particularly sexual minorities because because to them relatively speaking <hes> issam will felt more free compared to where they came from. There was a little bit more freedom or i've met ethnic snake minorities cultural minorities people were just on the edge of their on the periphery of their own society smiley and now there's another go who's coming with nothing as immigrants yes. Although of course her case is slightly different because we also need to understand that it's tumble over the years has become the crossroads of a sex trade and a six lavery modern-day slavery so these are again very difficult conversations that we are not yet capable of having turkey and oftentimes turkish media. Pretend it's not happening but it is happening so again. There are many layers to the stories in his office tumble and one of the places that these layers reveal themselves salvos in the names people choose for themselves and i was really interested to read that you chose your pet. You constructed a pen name for yourself. Which isn't your birth name but it uses your mother's name that is currently it just explained to me the i wondered if there was something different about the significance of names going on well i think partly because i was raised by two women and maybe my upbringing was a little bit unusual because i was born in france in strasbourg and the first house that i was brought into answer was full of immigrants left students in reading ulta sir. <hes> jump was sought but meet. Maybe not so much simone the you're talking about revolution in smoking goulash. That's how i think about that house in strasbourg in at least in my in my mind but after a while my parents marriage collapsed and my father stayed in strasbourg on my mother brought me to turkey for her. It was motherland for me. It was a new country altogether and from then onwards. I was raised by i two women my mother and my grandmother my mom's very westernized eventually she became very well. Educated very rational secular modern urban urban and my grandma is pretty much the opposite <hes> less educated very wise in her own way very irrational very supportive of women's empowerment and women's education so i think that left a big impact on me the solidarity that i've observed between these two very different women <hes> and i grew up without seeing my father much. Maybe that's part of the reason why i felt like the other in some ways because i knew he was very good father. <hes> he had two other children and he was very good father to them but i could connect with them only much much later in my late twenties so i guess what i'm trying to say is doc might have played an impact but as an author as a storyteller as someone who loved literature they came a moment when i thought i wanted to pen name and and i was looking rather than carrying my father's surname i i wanted to have my own pen name and chose shafak which also happens to be my mother's first us name but the reason one of the reasons why i chose shofar is because it's a gender neutral name. It could be a man's name or women's name. It doesn't have agenda. I found that liberating thing as well and ever since then i've al- news as my son name and it means dawn it means stone which again ties in quite interestingly with your politics of optimism and pessimism sir which underlies this whole book. I wonder how much your optimistic and how much you're pessimist. The worst possible thing happens to leyla but she leaves behind a family is what we take from this the death or is it the friendship yeah i think <hes> even though this is a book that deals with really heavy subjects difficult of subjects finally say i honestly think it's the life affirming book. I honestly think it's a book that celebrates friendships diversity at some point in the book. I talk about well nylon talks about water families and i think in dislike. We have two types of families. We have our blood families. The families were born into an five far blood. Family is loving and caring and kind. That's wonderful. That's a blessing not everyone is as lucky -particularly to those people. The book is saying don't forget as he kept living. You're going to have another family and that's going to be a water family and i think i will to found his are composed of our close friends. The number of those friends can't be dozens and dozens it can only be maybe five or six maximum but these are the people who know us bests and they are the ones who pick us up when we fall down so i think in particularly in countries were the public space is very much dominated by one again one eight narrative and it's difficult to would be different particularly in such societies. These friendships and water fountains become even more important but if i may come back to your question about optimism you know i think i copied too optimistic. I'm turkish is not in my genes gina and i also think if you open the map of europe and if you trace it with your a finger the river danube the blue danube as you move from germany towards the black sea i think the level of optimism drops so by the time you you reach romania bulgaria black sea turkey. We're not very optimistic traditionally probably because of the past the legacies of our histories etc but eventually i think <hes> i am someone who likes very much what graham she what the italian political philosopher graham she used to talk about bob pessimism off the mind and optimism of the will optimism of the heart and i liked combination very much. I think the mind has to be pessimistic so they can hamby more and shop and aware of the dangerous particularly today but the heart has to remain optimistic so that we can appreciate gates our fellow human beings connects with them. Listen to them you know talk to them and not be aloof or not fall into the trap of anger or apathy apathy. That's why i like graham. She's combination. When you notice was first published they were translated from turkish into english. Neither been translated from english into turkish. Is that what you're actually writing them. In english. I mean we're we're all aware of you from the busted stampa which was long listed for the orange prize but more recently since then forty russillo love so seven hundred fifty thousand copies in turkey your massive turkish authors well as an angel for but you are now pretty much dan. You can't go back to turkey. What does that mean to you. Well took it. It's it's very complex because while you might be <hes> attacked slandered by the elite cultural and political elite in turkey at the same time you might experience a very hot warming relationship with the raiders so i always make that distinction you know i make a distinction between the government and the people and i think the tragedy of countries such as my motherland is that <hes> the people in these societies civil societies are far ahead of their governments but they lacked the power to change those governments so it is very clear that as turkey became as the government became more authoritarian. It became harder and harder to deal with words anyone on who deals with words whether you're a writer a poet an academic journalist particularly. It's much more difficult for journalists today. Journalists mr most difficult profession in turkey okay and i really have a lot of respect for people who are trying to do their job properly. Nasional took has become the world's biggest jailer of journalists but i think think anyone who deals with words knows that because.

turkey strasbourg iraq middle east orange prize sombor istanbul france raiders columbus writer graham europe Nasional simone hamby bob germany romania bulgaria
"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

"And so governor doesn't really see the ways in which you societies ethically distorted I'm one of the things about it is affected list laid society, the others who get in and get over the wall turned into what's called help. Which is. Actively mean Slade euphemism is a good way of bake it itsy budget overseas. If we do it the buffet and the people in the state perceive, they ought to them a favor because they're awfully choice that can be youth Anais put back to or to become help. So that, you know, it's the infinite bouncing lodge of the state, and Kevin it doesn't actually see that the people in that Saudi don't actually see that. And it's only in the cost of the book that just faintly begins the catch in a sort of moral version of his peripheral vision ethical peripheral vision that there might be other ways of looking at it with that I must admit that does interests music thing because I think to me actually that's often what happens with morality is just become conditioned by the things we see in the things we get used to every day. And the things that we see every dance deeply imbued by the things we're not seeing I think it's curious conditioning maternity that we know so much about so much of the home and wrong that's happening in the world that we actually in a way. We think we're sensitized to it. But actually in where you could argue that we are shutting down morally that we sort of have to dial down our sensitivity, but just to get through the day. And there's a I mean, the nobles that do that book in a given our culture's oriented grand prize spokes that win prizes. Normally, the ones you hear a lot about the one great exception to that is a novel by winkle Valerie Martin who property which won the orange prize, which when it was a big deal back in the day. But you never hear anyone talk about it. And the reason you don't because property is about slavery. But it's from the point of view of a slave owner, and she doesn't claim surrounded peripheral vision of haram Morella, teachers, you sort of fully in the right fully entitled and the last sentence the book something about it gets about slave escapes. And then his rounded up, and it's extraordinarily anyone could have such ingratitude, and it's like a bucket of ice water in the face as a novel that remote, actually, no that's what it's like to. To not see your own ethics, and that perspective does interest me in the fictional point of view. It's a little atoms. I'm now, Danny talk to John Lund, just with his latest novel the wall, and John, obviously, we've talked I want to get onto other other places where the idea for this book came from perhaps, obviously catch climate change is really the obvious one. But of course, where we are. Now, a few measly days away from Brexit, the turnips and xenophobia in this book remind me heavily where we're going. Anyway, we godless rising sea levels. I mean climate change was in my mind right here brace. It wasn't a my mind..

John Lund Kevin orange prize Slade Anais Valerie Martin Brexit Danny
"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Choji in Harding is the author of four previous novels, the solitude of Thomas cave, the spy game, which was a BBC book at bedtime and shortlisted the core award painter of silence, which was shortlisted the orange prize for fiction in two thousand twelve and the gunnery and latest novel land of the living. We're gonna be talking about today. Georgina welcome to collateral. So how would you describe land of the living? It's a story about a man returning from war people, some people call it wound oval, but I think in a way, it's a piece noble. It's about what you can say about the war when you come home to the peace, and how the two things don't under the peace doesn't understand the war on the war doesn't fit into the peace. And that's what that's the idea that I really started from. So what it's about is it Charlie returning from the Burma campaign during the second World War, but he's actually lost in the jungle. So he's observed the wars, and it was an individual rather than in the army, and he's come home, and he's married and he's living on the farm in Norfolk and all four of your previous novels. So where the deal with memory or go. The legacy of war violence in some sort of way. And this does as well. What is about that theme? The interesting, I think one tends to lead to another because the preoccupations that you have inviting lead on into the next book, even though they make may take on a completely different character in a different place, or whatever it's obviously a very fascinating essential subject. So interesting to write about the very structure of this book also deals with ideas of memory and remembering tell us something about the way the book is written because it's written in. Did it starts off at sale carries out in very short passages and it flips backwards and forwards in time about the war into the presence. Something me about the structure. I think the structure came to me intuitively, really as my interest in what's going on in Charlie's mind when he's come home. And it's also moving between Charlie and Claire his wife and it's moving between thus memories of of the jungle in inaugural. Landa the borders of India and Burma and his everyday experience of farming in Norfolk, and I feel that it's just following the rhythm of thought of memory and memory is not a corner logical thing. So us something more about Charlie Ashton. Who is Charlie ask goes to the war. I suppose in his twenties as a young man, he's got a Gulf right at home. He finds himself in one of the kind of least known, but actually most horrific battles of the second World War co Hema, which was where the the Japanese advance across Asia was finally turned back just just on the very borders of India. And there's been a terrible siege. And he's in the relief force relieving the siege. And the Japanese flee into the jungle and the Japanese then have to work their way all the way back through the jungle to Singapore and the procedure fighting them right away who Burma, but he actually only experiences the very beginning of that Japanese retreat, and he's actually becomes separated. From his comrades on is lost in the jungle. And he comes from I suppose a steady middle class upper middle class English rural background and when he gets back from the war he inherits his uncle's farm. So he's put in a position. A very very steady peacetime job. And actually after the second World War when food resources in Britain, the farmers were supposed to be the heroes. So he's got to deal with with farming, obviously is incredibly hard work. But he's going into a winter farming. Also gives a lot of time for contemplation. Yeah. I know that very much because my husband's now, a former he didn't used to be a farm, but we actually he's been farming for the last five years or so and learning something of it alongside him though. I don't drive a tractor now. Claire something about class Charlie Clinton met before he went away in the war where. About that meeting..

Charlie Burma Charlie Ashton orange prize Norfolk India Claire Charlie Clinton Choji BBC Thomas cave Harding Gulf Singapore Asia Landa Britain five years
"orange prize" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"orange prize" Discussed on The Book Review

"I'm reading his bad blood secrets and lies in a silica. Con valley startup by John Kerry, ru art, speaking of fiction, Greg. What are you reading? I'm still in my extended. Ulysses hiatus, I have just gotten completely bogged down in the surreal night tone section which is the written in play form. You're never really, quite sure. What's going on there? Even with study guides. I've always kind of got a study guide open next to me while I'm reading list, and and the one that I was consulting said who knows what's real? And what's not in this section the give up? So, you know, it's one of my very favorites in front of you when I'm on vacation from Ulysses, I like to read kind of small digestible chunks, so essays are stories and right now at stories, and they are I rish stories. Some obviously working my way back to you. Liz, this is the book last stories by William Trevor who died a couple of years ago, and this is indeed his last story collection. You know, William Trevor is a very different kind of Irish writer from James Joyce. He's clear and. Almost journalistic almost aloof in his he writes about can great, human, passion, and frailty and vulnerability a lot of kind of blame and self blame and stuff going on in in these stories, but he does it almost clinically. I mean, what he's able to write about these great kind of melodramatic situations by stepping back right in the very first page of the book in the first story a few paragraphs in there's line. She had known the passion of love. And so, you know, it's it's to him. It's all this kind of thing to be studied from afar. But then he it's it's this free indirect style is able to dip in and give you kind of more of the characters judgments, and and can of seething Oro is also and he just moves in and out of that. So I I really love William Trevor I've loved him for a long time. Again, the title of this is actually true to William Travers writing style, it's very descriptive. And planned last story's sadly last stories by William Trevor. Yeah. I really don't care about prizes. But I still hold kind of grudge that he never won the Nobel. It's it's true. Although the Alice Munro Nobel is almost an honorary William Trevor Nobel that you're very similar kinds of writers. And once she wanted I gave up on it. So let me stop worrying yet every year. He wasn't gonna win. John. What you're eating. I am reading a British novelist named Samantha Harvey her new book, which is called the western wind. This is her fourth novel. And I think that in the UK her reputation is growing here. But I think she's been established there for a while she's been nominated for the Booker and the orange prize and other big prizes in the guardian has called her and exquisite stylist. And the telegraph called her this generation's Virginia Woolf, which I feel like not every generation gets a Virginia. We don't have to say that. But she is a terrific writer this story. I think James would reviewed her last book, dear thief, in the New Yorker, which was I think a little bit more experimental in the form of a long letter to an old friend, and it was a bit more diffuse and didn't really land on anyone plot. This is very plot. Heavy in a way, it starts with its set in fourteen ninety one in a small English town called Oakham, and a priest named John Reeve is in charge of this flock of hard-bitten villagers and one day one of the young men in the flock wakes him up in the middle of the night and says I found a dead body in the river stuck in the tree. And when they go back to see the body the body is floated away, but they think they know who it was who died and now they have to find out they suspect that someone may have murdered him. And so the priest talks to a lot of the villagers and confession you slowly learn about their stories through that..

William Trevor James Joyce William Trevor Nobel Ulysses Samantha Harvey John Kerry Virginia Woolf Liz William Travers John Reeve Alice Munro Nobel Oakham Greg UK Virginia orange prize John writer Booker
"orange prize" Discussed on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on BBC Radio 4's Bookclub

"BBC, radio, four. Welcome to book club and a classical journey. We're talking today about a retelling of Homer's Iliad and discovering the tail at one novelist tells about the hero of the point Killys the right is the classicist Madeline Miller, and in the song of achilles. She presents a love story against the backdrop of the Trojan war between achilles leading the Greek army and his best friend Patroclos her imagined relationship between the two men paints the background to Homer's epic, explaining the emotional support that achilles gets from Patroclos the strength of the bond between them and the depth of achilles grief at his friend's death. The song of Chile's was Madeline, Miller's first novel, not didn't stop it. Winning the orange prize for fiction as it was still called, then Madeline Miller welcome to book club much for having me. It's quite a task to turn mythical figures, godlike, creatures, characters from mythology into living breathing. Human beings when you begun to do it, how hard did you find it? It took me ten years, right? The novel. So it was something definitely work that, yes, but I have always felt that these stories were incredibly real and the characters felt incredibly real to me since I encountered them as a child. My mother actually used to read to me from the Elliot and the odyssey, and I took these as children do as real people. So imagining that into it was a pleasure. Even though it took me ten years and as a classics teacher to high school kids, he would obviously trying to bring these stories to life and explain the way in which these stories had been part of people's daily lives. I mean, they were the myths and stories that informed the way they lead their lives. Absolutely. And one of the things I love about being a high school teacher is that oftentimes the first day of the year, the students come into your class, they know it's going to be a mythology class or an ancient literature class. And they sort of had this look on their face like this is going to be really bad, and it's really exciting to just tell them the stories and introduce them to the actual literature and just see them light up because these stories are so exciting and they're big an epic and passionate and they're filled with love and grief and students just connect to them. Well, let's talk about your story. The song of the and get a first question from one of our readers heathen customers I was on during about your choice for patrol, does being the narrator and whether viewing the story through his perspective, changed your perspective on the story at all? Yes. Well, thank you. It wasn't really a choice actually dry felt possessed by the character of patrols. It was going to be him or no one, and it was always his story that I wanted to tell because I really wanted to dig into what I thought was essential mystery of the Elliott. Here we have achilles. He so angry. He's telling everyone I'm not gonna fight. I'm not gonna fight again. I'm so angry at Agamemnon. I've been refuse to fight for the Greek side anymore until I get personal apology from Domnin. And then we get to this moment in the elite where his closest companion as Homer calls him his most beloved companion Patroclos is killed and achilles just overturned by grief. It's really in a poem that is filled with grief and death. It is a really shocking and startling moment and all that stuff that he's been saying about his pride, and I commend on it all goes right out the window. The only thing that matters to him is his grief for Patroclos and avenging patrol asus death. And so it immediately draws him back into the battle. So it was that moment I wanted to understand, well, who is this character who we really just see in the background of the elite. He's there in every scene with achilles, but he rarely speaks. He's just kind of to the side. What is this relationship? Homer tells us the end of the story, this devastating and tragic ending, but what's the beginning? How do. We get to that devastation. What does he mean to achilles? One of the interesting things about the relationship that you portray, which is a relationship of love effectively. What we call a gay relationship is that accords with a traditional reading of the story that was always there from the alley times?.

Madeline Miller Patroclos Homer Elliott Elliot Greek army Chile orange prize BBC school teacher classics teacher Domnin asus ten years
"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Year. I traveled three hours across Sicily to go and see Europe's oldest chestnut tree. So this is a story. That means something to me. This is I'm very pondered with chestnut trees. Also Donald Ryan, who's also guardian first book called winner who takes the story of a Syrian refugee. Crooked accountant, an angry young man with a broken heart, and we've. Together in a very unexpected way. Yeah, he spinning heart. He had twenty one narrators here he has three, but to direct Reiter than one is in third person. So here's a sort of he's a wizard with voices basically. And I think this is another. I haven't actually read this. I'm a huge fan of his work going back, but back a longtime, his fourth novel. I think he's really coming through and I always love seeing guardian first book this coming through it makes me feel very maternal and happy. Also another very topical book. They're all topical may. I mean, this is obviously the the, this is the stick of this particular lists, Rachel Kushner's the MAs rooms about mass incarceration in the US. And then Anna burns milkman is dealing with the Northern Ireland conflict from the perspective of an eighteen year old. She was she was on the shortlist for the orange prize in two thousand and two. She's she's interesting because this is only third novel. She's in her fifties. I'm so she's a slow Pearn. And again, I really like know all the emphasis about these twenty seven year olds and brilliant. They're at twenty seven year olds on this this to seventy. But there is also somebody on in her fifties with her third novel who is just going the distance at her own pay. 'terrone pace. So I'm definitely looking out for animals milkman as well. And around the listeners dougans Washington black? Yes. Right. Okay. So. I really liked half blood blues in two thousand thirteen, and I thought it could that could won the Booker prize then. And that was about to she's got this knack of telling of she finds really good historical stories, which seem incredibly resonant. And in that case, hoffler blues, it was about a jazz man who got lost in Nazi Europe. So sort of fantastic metaphor for European history, world history, music, really, really seductive. And this one's a runaway slave narratives she's Canadian. It's called Washington black. It goes from Barbados through Morocco. London ends up in the Canadian Arctic, but it's also to do with the nineteenth and twentieth century beginnings, certain beginnings of technology. And I think that that's another thing in lot of these novels technology features in a lot of them. And here you have have ballooning, you have the world's first aquarium. So there's there's a lot of stuff that relates to a world. In the sense of of administrative technological upheaval, which is where we are now without being -absolutely direct about it. You said that half blood blues will tell you the book prize when it was on the list before two thousand thirteen that was, I think Washington might be the eventual winner. Oh, it's just so difficult. Isn't it? Yeah, I have. I have a soft spot for us here Dookie and I have to say, but that means I blind it. Her. Apply to his narrow. See, I'm really sorry..

Washington Europe orange prize Sicily Dookie accountant Donald Ryan Rachel Kushner Anna burns Reiter US Northern Ireland Booker London Barbados Morocco twenty seven year eighteen year three hours
"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

armistead Cup Abreu Madeleine Tobey Litz Miller Kaley Connor orange prize Sara Lee Ness Blair UT Richard Lee William lit Robert Elliott Sean
Madeline Miller discussing the meaning behind Circe

The Guardian Books Podcast

05:33 min | 2 years ago

Madeline Miller discussing the meaning behind Circe

Armistead Cup Abreu Madeleine Tobey Litz Miller Kaley Connor Orange Prize Sara Lee Ness Blair UT Richard Lee William Lit Robert Elliott Sean
"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

"I mean onto phone is the author of the novel was the hired man the memory of love and i'm says the stones and the memoir the devil that danced on the water her books won multiple prizes including the komo of writers prize book award and has been shortlisted for many others among them the orange prize for fiction the new stock price samuel johnson prize and the dublin international impact award she's acted as a judge for a number of literary awards including the international ma'am booker and is currently lamb visit him chair of poetics georgetown university and professor of creative writing at bath spa university and twenty seventeen was be and i'm not latest novel is happiness which we're gonna be talking about today thank you for joining us unto latins pleasure so how would you describe the novel i would describe the novel in this way an african psychiatrist attila comes to london he is here on professional businesses hits give a keynote speech in his field which his trauma award trauma he knows london as a place he comes off into the place enjoys but a series of encounters and of events bring him into contact with another side of london one with which neither he nor most of us are familiar you could call it a hidden london and he comes into contact with that under the london of animals it's the london of the service industry people the street performers but mainly the doom and the dustmen the traffic wardens and people and animals that don't normally drew our attention.

orange prize booker professor attila dublin georgetown university london
"orange prize" Discussed on LI News Radio

LI News Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on LI News Radio

"Comedians take on on the world as we see it right now well a bread you know one hand it so easy to point out the law the the left nature of this president the north end of this tons of material and everybody can write joke that way yet it up get cavity is every bit better at fault i mean life is good for the median but highly frustrating me man i'm tired of the i turn on fox news and there's a whole different reality and it and it it's not lost on me that there is half the country is watching this channel will not hand so think it's half now remember these channels was trying to tell them it's like oh my best night on fox news maybe four million people say best night you know best show best night four million people pops well you know the people are getting their information that are on the right the conservative right from the fox news and then that getting tweeted out by other conservatives and the president regularly and is bate anything that happened there through his twitter as fact everything else this fake news i guess what i want to ask you my political undo brandie burton i'll pick that i no something that we can do how do we look ahead and be closed the gap if they just we have to wait till he's gone i think that you can get back to normal i think there's going to be a return to normalcy in a big way after donald trump right the system has away over up a wreck the with the simpsom has a way of correcting itself unusually goes knee exact opposite direction like by like we had this president for the last eight years he was super competent supercool way in the weeds on the details nice normal and now we have this guy who's the exact opposite of that by a light right a complete could not be more obvious every single thing about the one guy is the apathy of sorrow were every single thing they have one thing in common though neither one of them were white right one of them orange in the other one was only use was half throw our second president of we have our second president is the orange prize who knew there was an orange no one more and we got a box of frail you know he's already jr but it's a an honor of each too much carrots or if it's a some sort of spray tan.

president twitter donald trump orange prize fox eight years one hand
"orange prize" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"Thinking about like how women before her setting the philosphy like how they become writers and artists even though they were sort of oppressed in the melee both in terms of slavery and also just in terms of like domestic life so they're very personal onslaught by her father and a lot about the south as a landscape for inspiration but also repression i am glad you've got a podcast read their and that you're reading jennifer egan who line of high cameras ingenerie i'll talk about but i'll talk about the other book first i'm just very quickly on because our review of it has not appeared yet at the book has is just hour and i really enjoyed it so i'll mention it it's a novel named the power by naomi alderman it's her fourth novel and she has gotten quite a lot of attention in britain where she is from uh she won the orange prize for fiction and for an earlier novel and she was one of grant as best young british novelists on in america she might be best known as a video game creator as a as an app writer she wrote the very popular app zombies run shots of wrote deal which is when the art shell at the app of the walk um it's that was so she's been involved in various bestselling iphone apps this is like a feminist science fiction novel this is she gene about their rolex mentor program rolex the watch company pairs young artists a across various fields with various to artists they've don't tell you get a reliable fiat ha you might i don't know i bet naomi alderman took part of of this as a protege and her mentor was margaret atwood and this novel is very much in the margaret atwood vein it is speculative fiction it is very feminist arm and the the premise of it again i'll i'll just say quickly because our review is coming up later this month is that.

jennifer egan naomi alderman orange prize britain america writer iphone margaret atwood
"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Remember smc is the only through six previous novels in the city by the sea and cartography which were shortlisted for john new enemies prize sultan safran brick in verses but am shadows which were shortlisted the orange prize for fiction and a guardian every stone which was short receives the bailey's prize thought to scott price historical fiction and the dse prize for south asian literature 35 novels have received awards from pakistan's academy of letters and committed as a fellow at the royal society of literature and in 2013 was named the grants are best of young british novelist the latest novel which would it took about today home fire has been long list if the 2017 man booker prize camilla welcome to this lots of dream so what was the idea behind hype flat so it's taking the sophocles version of the antiquities story although anquetil like say you don't need to know and taken eateries garten read antigone but at the heart of that play is the idea of an individual taking on the laws of the state around the issue of some one she loves but who has been a traitor to the states and updated that four 21st century britain match it set in two thousand fifteen so it's it's pretty contemporary and there are two families the three bosscher siblings and then the loan father and son their own british muslim but in very different ways so one family has that three siblings whose father was a the who died on his way to guantanamo and on the other side the tracks you have the home secretary in his son why 25th they are mimic as obviously the more where it was written books objects accurate thicker bitter retired com to press but is there any particular.

orange prize bailey pakistan antigone secretary john dse royal society of literature camilla
"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Nikko krause has been held by the new york times as one of america's most important novelist she's the oath of international bestseller's great house which was a finalists for the national book award and the orange prize and the history of laws which won this sariin prize for international literature and france's preda miller lever at trump tower and was shortlisted for the orange midday cheese and feminine prizes her first novel man walks into a rib was a finalist for the los angeles times booked a year in 2007 she was selected as one of ground his best young american novelists and in 2010 she was chosen by the new yorker for their twenty on to forty list fiction has been published in the new yorker harper's esquire and best american short stories and our books have been translated into more than thirty five languages and because latest novel which was acquired today's forest doggedly coworkers rental atoms kinky fan how would you describe forest up well depends whether you want me to describe the narrative or whether you want me to describe the beginning had came to me or when i could give about any of the heavier well it's a book that has a parallel structure so two narratives two characters whose lives are following a kind of search and that search traces the same physical ground goes over the same jogger fee from new york to the tally hilton hotel and finally out the desert and israel and at the same time the stores are really crossing in recrossing similar metaphysical ground it's release an quite an existence research that they're on and yet the stories barely physically touch and yet as we follow them one being jul's epstein lease a sixty eight yearold lawyer am who in the wake of his parents death in his very late divorce am after more than thirty years of marriage decides that he perhaps as neglected some asked.

Nikko krause new york times america international bestseller national book award orange prize france trump tower los angeles times new yorker harper new york israel epstein thirty years
"orange prize" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"orange prize" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Bookshop rate for some charm it's heartbreaking amusing and fascinating in equal measures number three in the sunday times or terms bestseller list at the moment but george about tradition exposure the story literally story about search fiction novel to pick new publication trivia hugeseller libyan bibi at it yes it is and so this is the fast i'm sciencefiction books to have ever won the bailey's fiction price with the orange prize didn't it galland's fiction yes it is it is and and eight say it's a book called the power by niamey old ben and it's all about and so it's kind of a feminist twister i haven't actually read it myself but it sounds fascinating i've seen those people on social media talk about it and this sort of premise of the book is the second in stay pean feature where women and and gals can kill men with a single tat is giuliani bruce story you better watch out this could be a possible possible thing that can happen move women get all the power and brownies got it sort of expose issues around power brilliant late an and has as i said this this feminist twist and is apparently it'd be classic of the feature so the show which is on tv about doing so official cds m eight eight six listen linked to the han may i think she hats and margaret atwood's what which are mental of the mental health young yet yet yet blistering through watching at i've seen the first one is an awful the film was very good but it's much better over each one on weeks instead of into the issues very scary yet it has this duty staying with this panella welcome to choke radio deal led the author of the had me loafing and then crying and then laughing again it's an incredibly moving book it's a true story the book screwed finding go the number three in the best seller charts congratulations richard radio deal it going deal good morning him on on the third now what juventus but when it came in and it was unease that'd be published a few days ago was the cover photograph of these beautiful little poach i'm a dog lover tell us how you failed.

george bailey orange prize galland social media giuliani official margaret atwood richard