36 Burst results for "Oracle"

Fresh update on "oracle" discussed on The Leadoff Spot

The Leadoff Spot

05:05 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "oracle" discussed on The Leadoff Spot

"That he wanted dug her to be able to roam leftfield and Dickerson to play right. The only problem is that thinker since only played two games right field, it is entire career. That's right. It was pretty obvious. That's right, and he looked it to it the way he misjudged that fly, and then I don't I don't I can't speak to the throw. I don't know what that was about The wild thing. I think that was kind of a brain like I think he got caught up in the middle and I've been there. I think anybody who's played a sport like he happens in golf to your brain fart right in the middle of something. I think he was maybe thinking, Do I get 1/3 of the home and then? Ball just kind of came out and that just sort of just sort of overthrew. And Yeah, I mean that that key errors will happen, but for me You've got to put the better defender that look, it's it's a field. He doesn't know he's not wanted at home. He's not an Oracle Park, which I know what I think It was Saturday or Sunday. He got double switched into right field. Yeah, Andi played an evening or two out there, which isn't as big of a deal. It's also a shorter right field. Bennett is here. So my problem with this logic is That no matter how much bigger left field is field wise than right field, a mistaken right feel it can cost you an extra base. In a way, a mistaken left field does not necessarily do that. Right Being that a runner who you put a ball in left field If it's a double the guy's going to third anyway, right, But if you put a ball and left, the guy probably ends up its second rather than at first, if you Buddha Bolan, right, The guy who's rounding first can now end up going to third because you've gotta hit. Ah, cut off man to get the ball all the way to third base. Yeah, so my issue is put the plus defender, the guy who, by the way, Stephen Duggar has played 37 games in right field, his career, right, right relative to the guy whose played too. So that was That was my mean, Then we get the ships. We got longer kicking balls at second base. Mike. What's longer do not frustrating to that was fresh. I mean, that's a play a second baseman would have made, but I mean, that's the shift in all its glory right there, And I want to get into that with you a little bit today as a baseball guy, former player type. I want you to kind of break all that down for me because long because that was another player actually wound up costing them or run. Ultimately, I think a run came through after the Ah Lago booted ball. And it was just it was just Ah, point their fundamental Paul. It's not sharp right now. How about this point? They're leading the majors and errors. I heard that. How many do you know the number about they made to last night and right. Get this. They didn't call the Dickerson drop the ball. I know they're all that a triple. I know a pretty friendly scoring. I thought frame a hit him in the glove. I don't know how that's anyway. But I saw the ruling. Yeah, that's crazy. Like this. One are a couple of years ago, I was at the Cheyenne Manana, no hitter. Yeah. Oh, against the Red Sox did you? By the way I went out to that game. It was Chris sale against Man. I I went for sale and I stole it from a night out a week day game. It was a Saturday essential my birthday. It was a Saturday night and there was no giant ball, So I said the sash and my best friend Jason, let's go to the go to the Red Sox A's game yet and we saw no hitter was crazy, but anyway, there's a ball that's hit in that game. Maybe in like the fifth inning. It's like a little flare into centerfield Marcus Semien and runs back on it a shortstop, and he goes into like a little bit of like a slide almost drops to his knees and electrons that Willie Mays it over the shoulder basket catch and it drops and it kind of hits off his glove. Do they call that an error? And I thought it was a hit. Turns out that ends up being the only I mean that you would have been a no hitter so obviously that the score is not tryingto help out the picture there, But this is sort of a counter to that, right. Give it a triple toe guy. When it's like Dickerson that was in his glove. You don't mind if it hits her glove. It's probably probably should be aware. How much are you missing that, by the way, that's like one of your staples to one of the check out to tell the audience that people who listen or have been for a while, know this but copes Coach is that you seem face that he'll just be like, Yeah, I'm going out to Oakland to Deming catchy A's after after the show. Like how much do you miss that dude, just jumping on board and go catch in, like six or seven innings in Oakland, heading back home Getting your nap. That's exactly it, you know, And you know, it's funny. Sometimes I would cruise out late. We're like we would have the one o'clock start and I was doing the one Ted Raimi and I were doing the Seaman's podcast. I would I would crews out there for like You know, there'd be a one o'clock start. I get there like 2 15 Get on with the third and then catch the last six innings or whatever. On this in a time of day baseball is what is my favorite thing? I think I mean, I love going to the yard, but any time you can watch a day baseball game and drink a beer in the sun, I think we're going to get some day ball this week. Actually, I think they call it Let me just check real quick. Yeah. The rocky game on Thursdays at 12 11th pitch Getaway day. Yeah. Get away days. Exactly right now on to l a the very next night, But anyway, you know, and then copes after we do the official Ah, changing of the guard here for the Shows we get into the M and M show I'm going. We'll talk about Ralph to absolutely absolutely really sad news yesterday and you know, I've got a few comments and stories to share or we're gonna have some guest today, So I just want to let people know we're going to get into that, too. But I just want to come out riff in first and then we'll take care all our business as the show goes, and I know I know a lot of the listeners and this is what's what's you know It's sad about Ralph, but it's also what's fun about celebrating something like this. He's everybody's got memories because nobody sat in your car and heard it all. Yeah. You didn't have to know the guy to have the memory. So this is I think the weekend will jump off of the guys did a great job in the afternoon yesterday. Sebi in and Tony Salvador, Gary and some of the legends so fantastic stuff Anyway, we'll get rolling. Here you are this into can be our candy RFM, San Francisco the sports leader. Murph is out. I'm hanging out. Murphy, Max. Start now. Good.

Dickerson Red Sox Golf Ah Lago Oakland Ralph Chris Sale Ted Raimi Buddha Bolan Baseball Andi Stephen Duggar Oracle Park Willie Mays Bennett Sebi Murph Mike Marcus Semien
F5 Networks "Big-IP" devices in Big-Trouble

Security Now

07:01 min | 6 d ago

F5 Networks "Big-IP" devices in Big-Trouble

"At the very end of last month, I think it was June thirtieth. F Five networks released a critical. Patch for their so called big IP systems. It was a maximum. Eighty as the way, it was termed remote code execution flaw. Disclosed it don't get worse. than their so called. Tm You I the traffic management user interface of the big Ip, which is actually you know like a trademark. I don't know what it stands for Ip Internet Protocol that big. Maybe it's Ad for something other than just big. Their application delivery controller ADC big on initials here. Anyway this came to light. As a consequence of F. Five publishing this patch. And with it was an urgent call for users of the so called big IP systems to immediately update with the highest possible priority. and. Big Big. Big Big Ip's f five's customers using these big IP solutions, our government's fortune. Five hundred firms banks service providers well known brands, including Microsoft Oracle and Facebook I. Mean You know this is big iron? So as we noted at the time, F five's website boasts that forty eight of the fortune fifty rely on five so somehow they missed two of the top fifty companies in the US. And at the time of the disclosure. So not quite, but almost a month ago. More than eight thousand of these big IP F five networks devices were found online. Publicly accessible on the Internet and vulnerable to attacks designed to exploit this vulnerability, US Cyber Command urged F- like independently urged F. Five customers to patch their devices urgently. They tweeted patching. E twenty, twenty, five, nine. Oh, two and five nine three should not be postponed over the weekend. remediate immediately. Wow! Five also offered some interim mitigation measures that they recommended for their customers. Who could not for whatever reason patch their big I fe- big IP equipment immediately you know sometimes that requires you take it down for some length of time and reboot, but later came to light that the mitigation could be mitigated and bypassed, which made emergency patching the only safe course like you know, do it now. So two days after the patches for this critical. Vulnerability were released. Researchers started publicly posting proof of concept exploits, showing just how easy it would be to exploit them. So that was then. Three weeks later last Friday the twenty fourth, the cyber and infrastructure security agency. Say posted. They, said CIA ESSA is issuing this alert. In response to receiving to recently disclosed exploits that that target F five big IP devices that are vulnerable to Blah Blah Blah. unpackaged big five. Unpacked F five big IP devices. An attractive target for malicious actors. Affected organizations that have not applied the patch to fix this critical remote code. Execution Vulnerability risk an attacker. Outing that CV to take control of their system note, EH, five security advisory states that there is a high probability that any remaining unpack. Each devices are likely already compromised. CIS A expect to see continued attacks exploiting unpackaged big F five big IP devices, and strongly urges users administrators to upgrade their software to the fixed versions. CIS also advises that administrators deploy the signature included in this alert to help them determine whether they're systems have been compromised, and so the the signature was a a a traffic inspection. Script in order to see whether there is bad stuff going on, they said see I say has observed scanning and reconnaissance as well as confirmed compromises. Within a few days of F five's patch release of this vulnerability as early as July sixth. CIS Say has seen broad scanning activity for the presence of this vulnerability across federal departments and agencies. This activity is currently occurring as of the publication of this alert meaning gay from as early as July six as one that did began and this this alert was last Friday the twenty four th, so this has been going on. They conclude the ISI has been working with several entities across multiple sectors to investigate potential compromises relating to this vulnerability. has confirmed to compromises and continuing to investigate. CIS CIS will alert will update this alert with any additional actionable information. Okay so. Now this is a classic example, and actually this sort of ties into where will be going here in a minute when we talk about Garmon. I've often been speaking about the growing critical need for companies and to a lesser degree individuals, but certainly individuals who care to be certain that they have an are maintaining an open channel of communication for receiving vulnerability notices I've been talking about email as that channel. But in thinking about this further. I think that twitter likely makes the most sense now. As I noted last week. Twitter really has become our global information dissemination platform. Warts and all

CIS F. Five Publishing F. Five Twitter United States Cia Essa Garmon ISI Microsoft Facebook
Queen Affirmation

The Goddess Key Lessons

01:58 min | Last week

Queen Affirmation

"Blesses everyone. This is lasagna with the goddess key coming to you for your week, with Queen Affirmation for July twenty seven. And today we'll be reading something that I wrote in. Also something from the Afro got his Oracle. Carts! They're all positive cards, so I think I may start adding that to this weekly affirmation. So here we go. Refresh rests by peacefully and gracefully saying goodbye to things that are stunting your inner growth to create a space to spread your wings and explore your passion and ideas to fulfill your ambitions by learning studying and collaborating with others. The world is waiting for you. And your great success in achievements is only the beginning. A. Write in from the Oracle. Debt Card the card that was pulled was the moon card, and of course the mome represents the goddess. In, says the beauty of the melons did in the site of of the light of the moon is a vision of dreamy. Lovely loveliness. The Moon Card. Eliminates all the praise were conditions and accolade that comes with the use of imagination. Create. Creative emotions and intuition. It can represent look strikingly attractive in the area or to someone in receiving attention from the universe spirit. Or your peers so keep shining.

Oracle
More positive tests, canceled workouts add to MLB unease

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

More positive tests, canceled workouts add to MLB unease

"Professional sports continue to see setbacks in their attempt to return to play amid the pandemic. Thesis. Man Francisco giant suspended there Tuesday workouts at Oracle Park a day after announcing to positive Corona virus tests. Meanwhile, the nationals were back at practice after their precautionary Monday shutdown. The Nats Kobe tests from Friday finally arrived, all of them negative in general manager Mike Rizzo hopes the testing process gets smoother from here. Their routine will go from, okay, we're going to have to test then we're going to get the uniforms going to play baseball, and I think it'll becoming routine for him, but got Tio formulate that bond and that trust that that this process in the protocols are working and and that they're comfortable. Coming to the ballpark Everyday, Starling Castro, Juan Soto, Howie Kendrick and Victor Roadless among the players to sit out

Mike Rizzo Howie Kendrick Man Francisco Giant Starling Castro Juan Soto Oracle Park TIO General Manager Baseball
SF Giants: Nothing normal about first workout of Summer Camp

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:19 min | Last month

SF Giants: Nothing normal about first workout of Summer Camp

"The Giants held their first teamwork out Friday afternoon at Oracle Park and preparation for the planned start of this pandemic shortened season July 23rd when the Giants and Dodgers will play in L. A Johnny Cueto against Clayton Kershaw. If we can elevate the community spirit that's an important thing for this or baseball for any sports or and in the entertainment and We've all been in a really tough period. It's been a period where we've been disturbed by issues of racial injustice. We've been disturbed obviously, by health and safety impacted have changed our lives. So that I think is the most important export roll sports can play is to is to bring joy to elevate elevate communities. Giants president and CEO Larry Bear telling KCBS that players safety is the most important variable this season. The players will be tested every day, so we're going to need to really monitor them and then players are going to be on the honor system. To some extent. What's the season starts on the road, but are all indications? Are there going to be very cooperative? When a player does test positive? He'll be quarantined for 14 days, Bear says. Baseball has an advantage. Over other team sports and that there is less physical contact, and it's easier to social

Giants Larry Bear Dodgers Clayton Kershaw Baseball Johnny Cueto Oracle Park President And Ceo
Rob Garnet One More Wave

The Coastal Athlete Program

06:12 min | Last month

Rob Garnet One More Wave

"Welcome back to the coastal. Athlete. Program I'm your host. Shep today. We are joined by very special guests. We are joined by the record surf operations a US Navy veteran. Therapy advocate, a waterman, a good friend of Joe and be good friend of mine, because we're all part of the one more way, family, Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome to the show Rob Garnett Rob. How're you doing? Then fantastic thanks for having me am. Champ and Danny Danny met you before but SHEP. We've talked a couple of times on the phone, so it's cool to be some of the zoom. At least on Zoom. Danny is our producer, and so he's going to be helping out doing the editing and mixing the episode down and things like that Joe is going to be joining the podcast just a minute. He was transitioning from from pork. Chop actually up to his apartment. He's coming back doing some surf therapy sessions. My guess would be out of Pendleton or something like that. As usual on Wednesdays, Joe is on the road living the mission so rob. Before. We get too deep into asking you. Questions I just have to ask when it came time to transition out of your career in the military, did you? When did you know that you wanted to get into surf therapies specifically? And when did you know that like this was going to be a special moment? I. Think when I was so I retired from the navy and two thousand fifteen and so that was kind of win Wave, actually becoming nonprofit, and so I had a couple of buddies Alex and Kyle. We can talk about later. That were trying to get going. They've been doing it kind of. guerrilla-style for before getting official, and so I kind of knew about it before retiring. And then it kind of kicked off. For ME I. I was volunteering here and there with more ways. I had some other gigs so right when I retired I started doing government contracting jobs I did that for a couple years before spending a lot more time volunteering than later coming on. As employees. So, Joe I just ask some general questions. Trying to do is cut those questions and stuff at the back, so feel free to take the lead, and you have the floor sounds it sounds like you talked a bit about something about diving for the navy and then sports. Now we're talking about why I came the navy. Sorry to repeat it, but. I came in hoping to be Navy diver. I've been a commercial diver for about six months in Galveston. Texas after drop Nettie. Collagen thought that'd be a good transition and When I tried to join the navy, they said the Dow closed and that they dove at butts that I should go try that. Sounds like a good idea and so. They had me take a job. That would allow me to go to buds. became a parachute rigger, so I went to school i. By Mos got my. Parachute rigger on. And then off to buds I, not really no one else doing. My parents were hippies so military people. No one wants to be joined. The Navy so really did not get into. So I imagine was a little bit of a surprise to show to buds. Learn what that school was or. Just just the suffer faster not quite ready for nicely. I imagine imagine that's quite interesting. SUFFER FEST! I also can imagine that doing the work that you did. Know you and I kind of a little bit of your background. I've imagine that really helps. Set you up for the mission at one more wave and getting on top of things and getting things moving. You maybe talk a little bit about that. Of maybe some things you learn from the Navy that you apply now at one more. Share just. Learned a lot towards the last couple of years at Miami my time in the service. How can help people in much really from? I've been injured several times while on active duty at spent time at the. At Naiko which I know, you're not talking about for jokes. The National Intrepid Center of Excellence Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic says Maryland runs, and so I started my treatment probably. This is probably two thousand ten zero five years before I retired, and so I have a lot of time to spend time with other folks that had had you know whether it was PGA s or All the kind of things that were happening to people are not super physical, but burying paxil sleep issues, and so I got exposed to lots of different therapies, and I just knew man. This is can't wait to spend more time doing this. And, so I was really excited because I learned all these things in the navy, but how can help other people at learned a lot about the va have across his work for compensation took care people how some days are better than others. Some states are Oracle, and and what? I didn't realize. Your percentage rate affects how you get treated to I was treated well, but I'm on a different ratings on people's. It's tough so I definitely learned a lot, you know. Early on about how to help other people do this and it really as you've seen Joe out. Watch people's faces. When you get to give him some equipment whether it's a board or a boogie board or people that have had nothing. He's got a wet suit like our friends in. Santa Cruz just the amazing transformation that happens. Not only from equipment, but from the community that step we all share the Melcher that we love. Not Picking up cigarette, butts or cleaning off the flight deck, but you know going out von and be talking a little trash, each other encouraging each other and just share. That shared experiences is powerful so. Yeah I definitely can attest that shared experience than to be fair. No ship Naidoo usually pick up cigarette butts, but easily on the beach and they drive us nuts, so that's why. It's quite funny. Were you a surfer before you've got out of the military and got with one more way? Has. Started at middle, school on off and then did it alter the teens long morning. And then took several years off and then kind of into it later on, so yes. We're always at the beaches, kids. We're always bodysurfing. Trying to collect fins like my friend Joe Against. Debbie me and my fin collecting hoarding abilities. That I have for quite

Navy JOE Shep Danny Danny Joe I United States Rob Garnett Joe Against Pendleton Naidoo National Intrepid Center Of Ex Santa Cruz Galveston MOS Official Debbie Maryland Nettie Texas
San Francisco Giants Announce Fan Cutout Program for Games at Oracle Park

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:08 min | Last month

San Francisco Giants Announce Fan Cutout Program for Games at Oracle Park

"When the San Francisco Giants are actually able to play ball in twenty twenty they're gonna have to do so without fans in attendance but that doesn't mean that fans won't have a presence at the game as the team announced their giants fan cut out program it's an opportunity for fans to send in an image of themselves to be placed on to a weather proof cardboard cutout that will be displayed in the stands the program is free for season ticket holders and will be is pleased to their actual seat as possible and for non season ticket holders you won't be left out you can purchase a cut out for the cost of ninety nine dollars it'll be fun to see how giants fans get creative with this is you could have a cut out of Nancy Pelosi sitting right next to Donald Trump or as Stan Bunger pointed out maybe get your favorite Dodgers fan with the scale on their face and put that up in the Giants Stadium however fans choose to express themselves this is a really cool move by the San Francisco Giants to help fans feel connected well they aren't able to attend games earlier this week Manchester United of the English premier league use photos of over forty thousand fans which they stitched together into a collage and made into a banner which was draped over the empty seats for their first home game since the pandemic started

San Francisco Giants Nancy Pelosi Donald Trump Stan Bunger Giants Dodgers Giants Stadium Manchester United
San Francisco Giants to Put Photo Cutouts of Fans in the Stands at Oracle Park

The KFBK Morning News

00:28 sec | Last month

San Francisco Giants to Put Photo Cutouts of Fans in the Stands at Oracle Park

"Giants have sent notices to season ticket holders introducing a program in which the fans images could be on display at oracle park for the abbreviated sixty game season no charge for season ticket holders who have elected to roll over there five phones until twenty twenty one so they'll have cutouts placed in the stands with their face on it if they want to picture themselves if you do not have a season ticket you can pay ninety nine dollars and have your image produced

Giants to let fans display cutout images in stands

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:36 sec | Last month

Giants to let fans display cutout images in stands

"San Francisco Giants fans will be at home games this year but likenesses of giants season ticket holders and others who choose to pay a fee we'll get seen at oracle park as long as there are giants baseball games in twenty twenty the team sent a letter to season ticket holders if they want their faces attached to weather proof cutouts so it appears there at the games they can do so non season ticket holders can also have a virtual presence but with a ninety nine dollar fee while MLB had previously said team mascots will be banned from stadiums this year now the league says we can see the likes of the Philly fanatic or Mr matter mariner moose at games this year but they won't be allowed on the

Oracle Park MLB Philly San Francisco Baseball
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

06:50 min | Last month

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as. at least in in the community circles that I that I hang out so so for me. My production into community was movement called idle no more if you will see American listeners after how how familiar they'll be with that movement, but there was an effort in in two thousand, twelve, twenty, thirteen to to really got environmental measures to take away protection from wire to fundamentally changed the relationship between the government and indigenous people. In four women stood up and said that we're not going to be idle anymore. We will be idle, no more and we need to. We need to put a stop to this. And our people got behind those women and all of our people. It felt like like there was a total consensus in our community that had an off and I saw the seismic shift almost ten years ago. Where people like we have to do something so so for me, that was almost may may rebirth into community I was I was just living regular life, and you know trying to trying to hold down a good job trying to buy a house and worrying about the things that normal people. People worry about and then. I saw this groundswell of activity in our community, and it really opened. My Eyes Act that we need to work together to federal sell change

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Gaydos Fellowship Center Geico Ms Carl Friendship Centre Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Niagara Regional Native Center Caleb Jawa Official Forgery Oracle Betsy Andrew
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

05:39 min | Last month

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as.

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Fellowship Center Gaydos Geico Friendship Centre Niagara Regional Native Center Ms Carl Forgery Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Jawa Caleb Official Oracle Betsy Andrew
Making Your Market Category A Must Have

Lochhead on Marketing

05:47 min | 2 months ago

Making Your Market Category A Must Have

"Welcome to lock it on marketing where we're trying to world first marketing pod stormed thirty days of strategies and ideas to help you create the future of your choosing Heyhoe. Let's go thanks for pressing play? I'm so glad you're here on this episode. Let's talk about arguably the most important issue facing your marketing as you go forward powerfully and that is is your category. A must have a nice to have or a door really need to have. I hear a lot from CEOS and CMO's Long lines of our problem is that we're too much of a vitamin and not enough of an aspirin. You see it turns out the more strategic the more valuable and the more urgent the perception of your category the greater the chances are that customers will prioritize your category and therefore your company. Your brand your product your service and as a result by from you and I think there's something very important to understand about what's going on right now in the economy. We are all in a game of Wallets. Share much more than a game of market share. That is to say customers wallets as a result of the recession are much smaller and so they are going on a prioritization deciding what's most important and what they can live without. So that's what we want to do. Today we're sponsored by my good friends at Oracle net suite visit net sweet dot com slash different today to get your copy. The paper managing business uncertainty and schedule. A free product tour. That's net sweet dot com slash different. And my friends at spunk. Are here to help you with the power of data because spunk is the leader in data to everything visit spunk dot com slash. Di The number two E. as in data to everything and learn how to turn data into doing and also. I want to remind you go to lockhead DOT COM L. O. C. H. E. A. D. and sign up for our newsletter. The difference we've invested a ton. There were sending you a bunch of awesome stuff. It's free and will never ever sell your email address. All right becoming a must have is number one I think. And here's the mistake that I already see. Companies Making as as the economy starts to open up their evangelizing their brand not their category. And here's why that's such a fundamental mistake. Our brand is about us is about. Our company is about our product. The category is about customers their problems their opportunities so categories are about customers and brands or about us right now savvy. Marketers are focused on their customers and making their space their category critical. And let me give you a couple of simple examples The Washington Post by way of example has a very powerful tagline and their tagline is democracy. Dies in darkness? Now what are they not saying? They're not saying. Hey The Washington Post great Great newspaper by our Shit. That's not what they're saying. They're laying down a point of view about what they believe about democracy and they're they're sort of evangelizing. This point of view and as a result elevating the value of A free press so. They're not marketing themselves per se their marketing the power of a free. Press with the tagline. Which you could argue is a point of view. Called Democracy dies in darkness. Another simple example is dollar. Shave Club Shave. Time Shave money so they are evangelizing shaving and using them as the answer to shave and right now a lot of us because we're staying at home aren't shaving very often. And so they're trying to elevate not just themselves but the category shave time shave money and maybe the greatest category elevating category evangelizing campaign of all time came from the California milk processing board and their legendary campaign. Got Milk and they're trying to elevate milk as a choice of beverage there as opposed to other choices. So now's the time to evangelize your category. Not just your bran. The other interesting thing is the way that human brain works is If I think the categories important then I go to the brand the number one brand. And here's an Aha that almost nobody will ever tell you if your the company or the person evangelizing the category talking about. How awesome Newspapers are talking about how awesome getting. You're shaving shit over the Through the mail is etcetera People will assume your the category leader. So there's an interesting thing that happens by evangelizing category and keeping your brand more in the background. You also elevate your brand above everybody else in the category because in the mind of the consumer in the mind of the customer the company or the person evangelizing the category must be the category Queen or category King.

Milk Aspirin Heyhoe Oracle L. O. C. H. E. A. D. California The Washington Post
"oracle" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

11:47 min | 2 months ago

"oracle" Discussed on The Information's 411

"And Chris. One of the most watched deals in the cloud computing. Space in the last couple of years was a bid to win over the business for the Pentagon. It was an enormous contract that all of the major players Amazon Microsoft on down the list going for an Amazon was considered the huge front runner for it and it ends up going to Microsoft. I mean what just from the broadest perspective I mean what did that end up meaning at. How much of a surprise was it really that Microsoft One? It was a significant surprise. But at the end of the day be It'd been narrowed down the deal. I've been narrowed down from that wider field to just to players to to Microsoft and Amazon. But even at that point folks still thought that. Amazon would win because it had a history with the CIA. It had a big deal with the CIA to bring them up to cloud computing Capability in two thousand thirteen. It was six hundred million dollar contract. And and this is ten billion ten billion dollar contract so it's exponentially larger But in the background of course was president trump constantly. Criticizing Amazon and raising questions about why Amazon was the front runner so while people thought Amazon was going to win. The the sense that the president may have been interfering. wasn't put a little bit took a little bit of spin off the ball with Microsoft ended up with the with the contract which is essentially Part of Amazon's contention now About this wasn't really a fair game. This was rigged that this does end up going to Microsoft because the president kind of tip things in their direction. Yeah I mean that is the one of the core claims of of Amazon. Is that in fact that there's two corking leaves one. Is that the press that there was improper influence from the White House and the other one is that the Pentagon didn't properly Go through the right steps per evaluating the contract itself but we should probably give Microsoft. There do Not only was this. A big win for them. I mean it sounds to me like they have a pretty strong DC operation going. That would have lobbied pretty effectively on their behalf right. Not only that they certainly. They have a long history of of lobbying washing but also as yours a good product. It's it they can deliver lot of capabilities that the Pentagon was after the the the the Microsoft is totally credible contender for this contract. And so while Amazon's the market leader and had important things advantages when they started like a top secret clearance. It's not as if Microsoft didn't shouldn't be held as a reliable contender for winning this deal right and they've obviously had a huge presence in DC for probably longer than anyone right. I mean dating back to mean you've been covering this for for a long time like Microsoft's been kind of swinging around there since at least the nineties right well. Yeah I Microsoft wasn't around. And then I got sued for any trust violations and being a monopoly and suddenly they woke up and they have established probably one of the strongest. If not these strongest tech lobbying firm. Abb lobbying operations in Washington. They're no shrinking violet. Microsoft spends about ten million bucks a year that puts them right up with Amazon and apple and facebook. I mean not exactly but they're right there in the same ballpark there. Microsoft has a different philosophy about lobbying. They they are low key. They take a very reserved approach and for a long time. They haven't had a big fight like this they they did there any trust battle. They and they've taken a different attitude and other companies like Oracle for instance have a much different approach to how they lobby in Washington. Yeah Okay so you brought up Oracle. Let's let's go into what went on with them in this so they were not like you said one of the final contenders to win this contract. Why is Oracle's name even being included in this current narrative? Right now oracle was very aggressive and orchestrating a lot of the lobbying against the deal that from the very beginning the Pentagon said we WANNA have one on one entity is going to win this entire ten billion dollar contract Oracle and at the time Microsoft IBM and a few other companies were saying. Hey Pentagon don't do that. Let's break this up into smaller pieces so that there's multiple vendors and one of the reasons. They were arguing for that is. That Amazon was such a clear front runner that they'd they the only hope was they didn't expect to beat Amazon but they wanted to break off a little bit up to ten billion dollars for one of for themselves an oracle that that battle and had strong allies with other companies. Who who also wanted to enjoy a piece of the pie interesting so their argument is basically. We don't stand a chance to actually win this contract but if we can lobby against Amazon and break it up We might be you know. It's like the feeder fish. Exactly that's that's that's what it was. And because of that they ended up sort of lobbying alongside Microsoft. They was like an enemy of my enemy. Is My friend that together okay. Yeah that's exactly what happened and then and then about twenty twenty. Eighteen Microsoft Pentagon made it clear that MICR that they were Gonna go ahead and award it just one contract and Microsoft broke off from the rest of the crowd and said okay. If that's what you're GONNA do Pentagon fine. We're comfortable at one one one winner. Take all format really so. That's as far as the partnership between Oracle Microsoft went. Yeah I e Yeah. So is Oracle still. Are they still lurking around your? Yeah they absolutely. Are they have a lawsuit? That's continuing that they continued. They've lost it almost every level but then they continue to to appeal and appeal. And it's now in the federal appeals court and they're not giving up I mean they. They know that they're still a possibility. Because Amazon is is is is fighting this as well that there still could be a hope that the Pentagon says okay. We're going to go in a different direction. We need to get this up quickly. We're GONNA compromise. We're going to break off a little piece here and there are make everybody happy and just keep moving So yeah we should probably talk about the state of the challenge right now so. This is currently being litigated right. I mean it's in like the federal courts and yeah and what I mean. What's the current status so the current status is the the the Pentagon said to Microsoft? A federal court said to Pentagon Microsoft. You guys can't do any work on this contract till August seventeenth at the very least in the meantime. Pentagon has to come back to me and decide whether or not there's a little piece we won't get into it because the super technical about pricing you didn't do the pricing right and the Pentagon can try to address that But in making that decision the judge said that Amazon's challenge had a substantial chance of succeeding. So that sends a signal that the this whole thing is still a little bit in flux separate from that Oracle has its own lawsuit. That's making its way up through the courts In an effort to break up the fundamental contract itself. Gotcha okay and that I mean. What's the likelihood on that actually Going through I would say and I'm no lawyer but I would say that it's doesn't look good because they keep losing and having to appeal right. It's not a not a great sign a lot of momentum record sort of Owen three. Yeah not great. Although I don't know in this In this current era Owen three can still sometimes end up in a victory in the Supreme Court right. And that's true it's like you. Can you can losing losing losing gets Supreme Court and turns out you want and that's true at any time. Yeah so and what's interesting to hear is of course involves the relationships and coziness between the trump administration and some of these companies. How close is Oracle to the trump administration? You kind of get into that your story. Well so Saffir cats is a supporter of the president. She was served on his transition committee. She was rumored to be. You know non there. There's talk to her being treasury secretary in a couple of other positions Larry Ellison of course has had fundraiser. Fundraisers for the president so he our president thinks a lot about who is allies and enemies are so it doesn't hurt if you're on his transition team and you hold fundraisers for them right on the other side of that is Jeff Bezos who the president has made really clear. He doesn't like and a lot of that probably has to do with the back. That bezos personally owns the Washington Post which President Trump says has provided very unfair coverage of his administration. It's the Amazon Washington Post yet. Yeah and to be clear it's not. It's bezos visas. Washington Post. Yeah it's but the president doesn't seem to care about that yes something about nuance doesn't always get through to him. And I mean with the other players in here. I mean okay. So you mentioned Oracle has Microsoft done much I don't hear too much about their You know sparring with the administration and the way the other the other Microsoft and Nadal said this Microsoft said Oh we didn't we won this fair and square. We didn't play politics. Just not true. They they they were incudes with. Oracle they work side by side and a lobbying effort they sponsored events at a conservative think tank to promote the idea that the Djeddai contract should be busted up into multiple pieces. They but they play a different style of lobbying. Which is you know more traditional contact among lobbyists levels among lobbyists and lawmakers and that kind of regular old influence in game in Washington Which doesn't necessarily take hold with this administration. Which has much more like the see the personal affiliation but at the very top of the of the company with with the White House. Yeah it's all about. What have you done for me lately? How he operates so last question here. I mean with this being an election year and you know at the very least a coin flip that we could have a new administration or sorry that the Democrats would win in November What does that mean anything right now or any of these companies sort of looking down the line and thinking? How do we prepare ourselves for? I guess a Biden Administration and how they would handle this. If it's still in the courts well if I were Amazon. I'd be trying to drag this out at least through January twentieth because when if if the administration changes the dynamics of how the Pentagon reviews deal and what they decision making process can be. Re explored changes dramatically. Yeah and I'm not saying Biden and unbinding administration say Microsoft. You're out Amazon's in but it certainly doesn't hurt Amazon's position if there's a change in the administration and they're seen as an antagonist of the trump administration. Yeah it's kind of hard for it to get worse for Amazon With with With trump so right might as well give it a shot All Right Chris. This is super fascinating. let's Let's kind of follow this and I'm interested to have you back on. Like a couple of months he develops. Okay thanks a lot thanks.

Microsoft Amazon Pentagon Oracle president Amazon Washington Post Washington Supreme Court Jeff Bezos Washington Post CIA Trump White House Biden Administration Chris Abb Biden
Better Communication Through Letters

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

09:00 min | 2 months ago

Better Communication Through Letters

"Debbie Ronca is President of Sequoia coaching a Certified Life Coach. Speaker and disc profile trainer with John Maxwell team she is also the author of the family letter how to intentionally develop a culture of honor encouragement and value with your loved ones a bestseller in nine relationship in Harrington Categories Ronco wants start a global movement. So other families also benefit on the family wetter. We're going to talk about this today with Debbie. Debbie welcome to the show. Thank you so much for coming on. You are locked them. And thank you for having me of course so debbie for a lot of our listeners. That might not know what a family letter is. Could you go ahead and tell them what the impact of a family letter is and really what they could get out of it? That's a great question. Read on the family letter was basically something that we started as a tradition in our family years ago when our kids were growing up we had the intention of teaching them how to use their words To be encouraged others to be able to use the words to bless another person. And you know. Sometimes it's really hard for kids especially to verbalize. They feel a little embarrassed or uncomfortable. So we've found that using a letter was the safe way to go. That's great So I myself actually have done something like a family letter before in my family. It's not quite what you do But it really helped teach me how to express myself to my family in a healthy way and really be able to communicate and open wider doors. Is that the same hope that you are looking for with your letter. Absolutely the whole intent really is to let the other person know why their loved valued in celebrated and when you hear that from other family members it really just builds wonderful foundation of trust and connection and a bond and read what we did specifically is. We made it a tradition on our birthdays. We thought why not birthdays the day. Everyone is celebrated right so why not let that be the day that we received this letter and so we taught our children from the time they were young and of course we made the what the intent that had to be in the letter? Simple so they could do it and you know when I speak at women's events I always tell the moms don't worry about the grammar. Don't worry about the punctuation year teaching them how you used the words and you don't ever want to make them feel it has to be perfect because it's coming from their heart and of course as our family grew and I say read. We've been doing this now for over thirty years and after thirty years our children thirty eight thirty seven and thirty five. They still want their letters. I mean it is a big tradition in our house. Love that I love that. That's fantastic. Could you dive a little deeper into the content of these family letters absolutely well like in the beginning we make it really simple for the kids because we want them to right so it really? You need to not just tell the person you love them but why because when you specifically say why it goes deeper you know. It's just not the Cliche I love you but when you hear why and then you want to celebrate their gifts and talents you wanNA recognize Any celebrations in their life and of course as we got older we expanded that. So Ah Chris. Reflecting on the past year of this person's life were on their birthday. And you know everybody walks through a dark time trial a difficulty and we write about that in the letter like Geez. Jonathan I remember when you were going through that difficult relationship and the way that you handle bit really made us proud of you. You showed a lot of kindness and compassion and so we actually recognize encourage. The person helping walk through difficult times as well. That's really nice to hear. I think a struggle that a lot of families go through not just with something like this but milestones for any of their children is. When do we start you know? When do we put him on a bike? When do we teach them how to do this? When would you say is a good time to get your children to start being engaged in this? When we started the letter read. Our children were five and seven while and then we had an remind you that the letters were short but they were learning how to communicate and we had our third child when he turned five. We would always do this moment of re writing letters and reading the letters at our dining room table so he grew up here in his father received letters his mother his brother and sister so when he turned five he said. I WANNA DO LETTERS. I want in and so he actually turned from the Observer to the writer so he started as early as five and I believe the power in at read is the consistency like we chose birthdays. And so we know every birthday we're gonNA gather and have letters and of course being a mother and a father. We've added the mother and father's day letter in there too. Oh of course you have to make sure that you've got a little extra recognition for all the hard work you do for raising your children It's the best gift. Jerry Seib really love those letters absolutely so I think like anybody else. Not all of our lives are rainbows and lollipops. Right kind of goes through a hard time and sometimes that hard time is reflected onto our family. How can the letter be used as a catalyst for accomplishing forgiveness? Or even reconciling some things in the past one of the best ways that I think he can open up. The line of Communications is through the power of a letter. I would think that you would agree with me read. Don't you feel that when a relationship is broken? One of the most difficult things is to be able to come back and talk face to face because there's so much hurt and there's so much wounding and you still wind up fighting and you don't reconcile but I feel when you can write in a letter. What you like about that person. What you love about that person that you've missed the relationship that you're sorry that they disagreed you know. Can we start again? I believe you can maybe crack a door open. That has been slammed shut for years and that could be the beginning of the communication. Because it's a safe place to see if you can open that door again and we have a great story with our children. They were seven and five at the time at that time. We were doing Christmas letters as well. And you know how children are they. Can they argue? They fight and they wrote their letters and nobody knows what's written in the letter to you. Read it and my daughter wrote a letter to her brother saying that she was so sorry that he was mean to her and he she wished that he could be a nicer brother and my son and in his letter to his sister wrote. I know I haven't been a great brother and I know I've been hard on you. I'm really sorry. When they both read their letters. They looked at each other and they ran over and they hugged each other and Oracle. The letter gave the voice to the prop room. And so I know children can do that. I really believe adults can do that. And you know in this crisis time read. I'm really thinking hearts are being tender is D- A lot of people are klaren teen. A lot of people are thinking about really what is important in life now. This may be a great time to write that letter to that broken relationship and try to restore it absolutely. I think as many people would agree with me. A family is very important especially during these times. That's really who you're GONNA hold dear. You have close. I know I personally have been talking to my mother way more than I have before during this little walk down. I'm sure this letter can go even further pass. Your family can not absolutely you know. I believe everybody in life should receive a letter from someone so I really think if you sat down and thought about it you may have that teacher that mentor that business partner that neighbor that Fran and somebody who's impacted your life that you could just take time and write them a letter to let them know how they impacted your life. It would mean the world to them

Debbie Ronca Harrington Categories Ronco John Maxwell Certified Life Coach President Of Sequoia Jerry Seib Jonathan Partner Writer Fran
"oracle" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

Sports Radio 610

02:52 min | 3 months ago

"oracle" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

"Sales and let's see here read more all the distractions for more than one oracle group once you go in here and we get out now go forth and work harder they want to play off this year you have to realize that that's the difference we want to break free you can't live without you being there read this evening contemplate offering vehicle ballgame so did you want data plan that you play as hard as you can hear the great because if they'll be able to get there you take advantage of it I hear you Mike I think they the the nine as they made this name the slide you back at the the nose tackle position I think that may be the key to get back in the Super Bowl we have been defeated the original watch TV as one of the it's not about alternative in Michelle yeah I know you're getting ready for the Olympics next year good luck just give me a last and final word for if any of the athletes who are competing out there will want to aspire to get see a level what do they need to do I'll take it one day at a time and work on the small thing because we all have these big goals but when you get to a big goal is you lock out your small right that did go down not got your little small golden before you know it you'll be actor goal I love it that's that's great advice is a hell of a combination daughter and dad thank you much to Michael Carter Olympic silver medalist three time Super Bowl champ Machel Carter Olympic gold medalist and then shot put champion and it's just cool I have a a dad and daughter coach and and in relationship I love what you guys have done all the best to you Michael and all the best you Michelle as as you continue to get ready through everything going on in the world for the Olympics yeah well thank you very much I appreciate it is no doubt about it listen folks that the cars are amazing people make sure you go to a site devoted dot com you can also follow Michelle on Instagram at shot Deaver it's amazing what she's doing both the on the field and off they are hell of a combination a hell of a combo good luck to her she gets ready for next year's Olympic Games I hope it goes through she needs to go ahead and get some more goal when we come back after the break okay the NFL season the schedule supposed to be released on may ninth we're still expecting it but we might have a shortened season is that going to be good for the quality of football that we see is going to be good is it going to be bad are they going to be prepared we'll be more injuries we're gonna talk about it stay tuned as the J. R. sport we show here with you on CBS sports.

oracle
Resume Hacking - Amanda Peer

Daily Sales Tips

04:28 min | 3 months ago

Resume Hacking - Amanda Peer

"You're listening to the daily sales tips. Podcast I'm your host Scott Ingram. Today's tip comes from Manda. Peer a field sales rep from SAS as we continue to bring tips to serve those who find themselves in need of a new sales role. Here she is. I heard one many demanded here. I am a software. Sales Rep precise. I've been selling software for a little bit over six or seven years now and have worked at both early stage. Startups and enterprise companies like Oracle. The sales to focus on today is basically had a hack your resume to get interviews so the entire concept is have you maximize your chance of being selected in a pool of resumes to get a door and interview for the companies you want to work for. There's a few different areas I'm gonNA focus on but the first point I need to make is you're not being. Henry picked early cherry picked by a recruiter. Technology is picking you so when you think about the evolution of attack across various business operations recruitment is one of them that has of all to have not only more sophisticated applicant tracking systems but each are As a whole so when you think about the application process actually applying for a job whether it is on limiting or a third party recruitment site or directly on their website through their applicant tracking system. There's a variety of different things to consider when it comes to evaluating that Resumes so you need to build your resume for a robot because robots skin. The resumes not recruiters. A human is not going to sit there and go through two thousand applicants. They're gonNa go through the applicants that the scoring techniques recommended that they do and depending on the platform that's GonNa differ from Lincoln to Angeles or whatever else you're gonNA use but it's also going to differ from company to company and what they're specifically looking for in hiring for that role so in building your resume for a robot in not a human it's all about keywords. It's all about four matting and it's all about making it easy for a robot to read so resumes that are one page usually sexy for that scanning technology resumes with the right key words so anything that you could add your skill section that is relevant to the job. You're applying to so if it is an engineering job you probably WanNa list the languages you could program for sales jobs. You WanNa put that. You have experience with salesforce dot com. You WanNA put outbound sales. You WanNa put prospecting you WANNA put any certifications youth Gotten mothers sales training with Sandler sales training. All of those things are key words. That are super important. Actually serve your resume a little bit like it's a lot more important than people think it is and you have to treat it like. Seo for a resume just like on Google when you're searching for editor of sneakers on that first page of results you're GonNa see a Dita's you're gonna see Nike and the reason that they're on those pages because there was a match with the keyword research to end. They did a really good job at making sure that they got to the top of the results with an SEO strategy. So I will be talking to you all about an SEO strategy for your resume and different tips and tricks to make sure that you can increase the odds and get in the door at any company. You wish to work

Sales Training Scott Ingram SAS Google Nike Oracle Lincoln Henry Editor Sandler
Why stories matter now more than ever

Unreserved

07:55 min | 4 months ago

Why stories matter now more than ever

"In late March in an apparent attempt to avoid cove nineteen a Quebec couple drove thousands of kilometers west to White Horse. Uconn then they travel to the flying community of old crow a community of about two hundred fifty people one still without a case of covert nineteen but the couple was eventually sent packing chief. Dana. Tj Tram of the Glitch in first nation was shocked by the couple's actions. To tell you the truth I was not prepared for a random couple from Quebec to to. Just come off the plane. It was really concerning to people just because we have a very small tight knit community that have grown old together for generations so for some strangers just to show up one day. It was almost as if someone just walks into your house and helps himself to your fridge if he will. But especially under the Kovic crisis this only had exponential affects. This story sounded a bit familiar to Guizhou Rice. Because he had written it. Before or at least a fictionalized version of it. And his post apocalyptic novel moon of the crusted snow while gisha is initially bay from the socks in first nation and also the host of. Cbs's up north. Hello Wab. Welcome back to this. Show month brand I Roseanne. Thanks for having me again. Why don't Weird Weird Situation? This is so weird I was tagged dozens of times. Chris Static the witches lawyer is original tweet about it and Yeah it kind of blew my mind very confusing. I Bet I bet you feel a bit. Like an oracle not really but. I you know obviously see the parallels between the you know this real life imitating fiction right. I wrote that particular plot points of Muna crusted snow just as a what if not as this sort of how to guides so maybe. I feel guilty as a result of that. I don't know I for the UNINITIATED. Tell us a bit about your book. Moon of the crusted snow. Okay Yeah So. It's a look at the moment of apocalypse From the perspective of northern New Snobby Community. And what happens in the story is there is a blackout due to sort of mysterious. 'cause They communications go then. The power goes outright so this community because it says so far north that people are still somewhat connected to the lane and they're able to adapt to sort of move through this sort of confusing new era but those who aren't as adapt that sort of hunting fishing and You know living off the lanes descend into a bit of panic and chaos and then on top of that just things start really getting intense. Agai comes from a city in the south. The Big White Guy who has equally mysterious background as you know as the catastrophe itself and He begins sort of imposing his will and then he's followed by some other people from the south things. The community is forced to make some pretty serious decisions as to how they're going to survive and how they're going to move forward in this new era. Yeah now this plotline that your frank you with the with the gentlemen coming from the South I'm obviously they're they're looking for food shelter and a knowledge to survive in this new reality but the indigenous community really response Interestingly to this to this To this person showing up in that they make initially welcome him in as right. Yeah and you know. There is a bit of conflicts some tension amongst community members as to what they're going to do but a lot of the leadership in this. I know in that in that particular community is still very closely connected to national values despite you know. Colonialism enforces simulation as such. So you know some of the people believe we as we should welcome this individual in and try to work together with him to create a you know a good community as we try to navigate this new reality of living in the darkness right Sort of how. He's able to take his place In the community so when this story in the Yukon I broke just recently many people online silly related to your book. What did you think when you first heard about? I thought back to win. I started writing moon of the crusted snow and that was always going to be a major plot elements of the story. Was THIS JUSTIN SCOTT CHARACTER. This white guy coming into the community from the city right and then sort of imposing his will and As I began writing it about a month or so in I started having doubts as to whether that would actually happen. You know I thought. Would there actually be people who would flee the city in a crisis in go to the res- to seek shelter to seek safety and so on so I thought that's not believable at all? I don't have a viable story. You know but it went to this House party in Ottawa Halloween Party. Actually when I was living there and that was about a month and a half into writing the first draft and was steeped in this doubt about whether this was a believable story and I started talking to this random dude their end because it's so deep into the sort of Story in thinking about the end of the world that was basically all I was talking about the people at the time so I must have been pretty fun chat back then but anyways I was talking to this guy and we were talking about things. Go down and what would happen. And so on. And he uttered the blue says. Yeah if it all went down if things fell apart here in the city the first place I'm going to the res- and I was like. Oh Yeah I was like Whoa. Why why would you go there? Wh- what's the thinking behind that he's like well you know how to. Heinz how to live in the Bush and you know it'd be a good place for me to hide out and I said okay Well which do you want to go to? You know? Thinking of the spy reserves to to Ottawa. Tanay Guy Kidding. Zv Golden Acres CETERA. And he's like doesn't matter whichever one I can get to you. The quickest right so I kinda thought you know. This is very presumptuous of this new to think that he can just go to arrests. But that was the sort of validation. I needed to write this Justin Scott character because I thought okay. There's one guy who believes this so I can write the story you know but I guess there are a lot more people who think that including a young couple from Quebec willing to drag style meters to like the other end of the land right so weary so back then it spiracy theory exactly you ever imagine like something like this might happen one day when you put your head. Deep into post apocalyptic gorgeous doping fiction. You're always all the possibilities right but I think you never really prepared for the big moments you know when something actually happens and I don't think I could have ever imagined that pandemic to the scale you know like that's sad though like people are slowly started to realize that the world we did living is gone now and what. We're going to emerge in something totally different like we're going to have different ways of life and they're going to be different roles and responsibilities that we all have resulted so I think keeping those things in mind in how resilient indigenous people are especially in overcoming these crises that has prepared mentally in some ways. Although I'm not Maybe not physically or supply wise prepared as well as it should be just in case right so the thing about anyways

Quebec New Snobby Community Uconn Tj Tram White Horse Dana Guizhou Rice Justin Scott CBS Justin Scott Character Roseanne Gisha Ottawa Halloween Party Chris Ottawa Bush
Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

Voice First Health

09:27 min | 4 months ago

Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

"The podcast that I want to share with you. Today is actually a recording of the final speaker. And this is Brian Romley. And if you don't know Brian Brian is the man that actually came up with the term voice I he has often been referred to as the Oracle Voice. He has been referred to as Thomas as the modern day. Thomas Edison. You'll hear similar introduction when I introduced him here on the on the podcast and in the recording from the Webinar but when we started talking there were so many interesting ideas that came out of this and we got to the end of the Of the women are the people that were attending. Were requesting that I turn this into a podcast and I was delighted to be able to do that. Brian was a very happy for me to share this as a podcast as well so I think you're in for a real treat. Brian Talks about some of his ideas of his visions. For what a world is GONNA look like using voice technology after this corona virus pandemic? So like I said. I think you're in a real treat so I'm going to share this Webinar with you right now and I'll be back Afterwards with some concluding comments so enjoy this discussion. This fireside chat with Brian. Romley as some of you will know. I'm a big fan of Brian Brian. I had become a friends through meeting each other at a couple of conferences. Brian Romley is You may have heard some of the names that he's been given the Oracle a voice modern-day Thomas Edison. He's always working on something in his garage. That is absolutely fascinating. And one of the things that Really really impresses me. Brian is his ability to bring knowledge from all different areas for example Computer Science Anthropology. History Medicine it goes on and on and on and Brian is able to take this all in synthesize. This and his views in my mind are absolutely incredible. I don't know US describe it and when Brian Speaks I listen. And so it's with absolute pleasure and excitement that I get to have. Brian share some of his thoughts with all of you on this Webinar spry. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you Terry It is it is really wonderful to be here and sorry about the Satellite Connection. It's not always perfect You know I don't know solar flares sometimes something no problem no problem. I'm glad that we've got this connection here. So that's good we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA use the audio and we're GonNa go with that so Brian as I was just saying I you know I I love to hear your take on all these things and I guess my first question to you is. Where do you see voice? Making the biggest impact in times like these journal. Well that's a great question. It's really more of a universal question. And we can kinda jump around and some of the ideas primarily. I think we're GONNA see every design of of public interaction surfaces We're GonNa see things that interact with voice and maybe Over the air hand gesture type things and also your own device becoming an interface whether it be actuated through voice or touching your own glass screen to open doors to choose locations in elevators All number of situations like that You know opening car doors. People are going to become galvanized with the thought that there could be a dangerous virus maybe years maybe decades afterwards spent a lot of time studying the nineteen eighteen pandemic and Read a tremendous amount of newspaper articles over the last almost sixty days now and most of it is not on the Internet. Unfortunately a lot of it's on microfiche and microfilm so Very fortunate I have that and have microfilm microfiche reader and I've been able to dive into the mindset of what happened post pandemic and there is always going to be a post pandemic right so we start looking at what is going to change in society and one of the things have changed in society post nine hundred. Nineteen eighteen pandemic was how people interacted in public and touch surfaces And some of its stood for a long period of time and some with short term. So we have that at has specked do want to dive into more elements of this sure. Yeah please I love to hear your thoughts on this. I know I know you've been looking at the The one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred nineteen pandemic and you've been looking at some of the similarities and for those people that didn't see it. You should look in Brian's twitter feed because he he outlined all these different ways that our society is going to change. So I'd love to yeah dump it. Jumped Gentleman explained some of those ideas and how that relates technology again. Voice is going to be sort of hovering over a lot of these things and then we can sort of drill down one of the things they discovered it was copper. Surfaces had a an immediate response to D- vitalising deactivating. Because you can't really kill a virus necessarily I mean a virus isn't really alive. You can vitalize deactivated. And I'm sure you can dive into that Terry a little bit more on the medical side but It requires human DNA to actually actuate and certain minerals And certain metals divide allies Viruses and bacteria On something that is called contact kill. Contact kill has been widely known for literally. Hundreds of years We can go all the way back to Sumerian times and the use of silver utensils and copper utensils There are a lot of reasons for that in lots of folks. Don't want to dive down. The cargo cult a concept of this but a lot of folks saw more educated and perhaps more wealthier individuals using gold silver and copper implements Specifically for preparing food and things of that nature and he said well that must be a sign of wealth when in reality a lot of these folks not all of them a lot of them did understand that these implements plates cops Gaba coblets Forks knives actually killed viruses and bacteria and made their food a little bit more presentable A lot of the food was a necessarily presentable in ancient times especially as we went Through the Middle Ages so copper is known for a long time post. Nineteen eight thousand nine hundred twenty pandemic copper saw a revitalization sometimes used as brass brass has tremendous momentum copper if made correctly copper surfaces if cared for correctly. Even if not cared very correctly still does quite a good job. Individualizing viruses Why is that a big deal? I think we're GONNA go. Obviously we discover some of this. I've tried diligently to help people discover it and some people get angry because you know you know this particular virus may last up to six days on cardboard but you know copper might take four hours to kill it or something like that ridiculous like that reality is. It's much faster. There's much better. Research for hours is is on the far side and again. I'm not trying to give anybody medical advice. Not Trying to say consume everything in copper or anything of that. Nature for example copper is highly toxic if used with something acidic or highly astringent Copper is great for water and water only to drink from not beer or whiskey. So if I understand correctly what they mean you're look at this pandemic that happened a hundred years ago and he looked at some of the patterns. And you've been studying how that can suggest ways for us to deal with the issues that we're having right now And so that's one good 'cause I've seen that now in the media that that's been picked up from somewhere and more and more people are talking about how you having having copper services seems to as you talked about. Devitalized the virus. What about in terms of like getting back to the voice side of things. What do you like? I know that for example There's a lot of talk now about making activated devices. And you've seen the high the headlines from China Voice activated elevators and you talked about cars. Are there other places where you see? We're having an impact. What one final note on copper and I hope it helps. Anybody has a medical background. That's listening to me All patient beds all patient. Touch surfaces at hospitals in my view should have copper alloy coding period end of story

Brian Brian Brian Romley Thomas Edison Brian Talks China Voice United States Computer Science Anthropology Twitter Middle Ages Gentleman Terry Oracle
COVID19 - What Happens Next Is Yours To Lead

Badass Agile

06:03 min | 4 months ago

COVID19 - What Happens Next Is Yours To Lead

"Whoa hey guys what do you think I mean. There's been so much change. I didn't even have time to release a regular episode this week. I'm sorry about that. But here's the deal. I'm busy answering the call man in times like these. It's like someone rang the bell. I'm here serve. Well what about you? This covert nineteen thing. What we do. What's going to happen? It's so rough. Because we know from experience as a tribe as practitioners that the one thing you can never give anyone is true certainly right. We can't predict the future. Who could have seen this coming? It's terrifying a lot of people are very afraid. And it's okay to be afraid. Don't ever forget that. What's your feeling is what you're feeling. Listen I get scared to look around. See The empty streets by see the numbers. I feel it believe me. I feel it and I believe it's important in times of great crisis and hey this cove nineteen thing. This is a crisis. It's important to do two things at the same time number one. We need to accept. What is that means? Accept THE SITUATION. This is happening. Ain't no backing out. This will not go back to normal tomorrow. This is serious and serious conditions call for serious responses but also except that. It's scary that you may not know what to do right now that you're worried fearful and anxious about an uncertain future except those things but then don't stay there see now you need to embrace that positive mental attitude this. GonNa let you act. Take everything we have learned to date guys. This is our moment. This is what we train for. What happens next is ours to lead a say that again what happens next is ours to lead. We don't create followers here. We innovate. We showed away. People are counting on us. They're counting on someone to step forward and show them. Where do we go next? How do I cope? What do I need to do? And as I like to say an uncertain times be certainty. I feel the call today to be part of the recovery to know the way forward to understand and accept that the agile that we know and love has forever changed. What is required of us will be different? You feel too and this is your time. Are you that person who do you want to become? Do you wish that you had the courage. Do you wish that you had the vision to not know for sure. What next but to step forward into the breach anyway who out there has the confidence to shift who out there has the confidence to go forward with vision and courage. Could it be you? I believe it is listen so many of our brothers in arms right now are trying to figure out. How are we going to make slack? Meetings work fulltime round the clock nine to five and a completely distributed environment. And if you're on the front edge that wave keeping people saying keeping people safe giving people tools man. I'm thankful for you. I'm grateful for you but I feel different. Call I feel the call to be there for exactly what our clients need. I feel the call to lead the way for each other to help this. Community sustained and thrive and survive under changing conditions. You've all worked so hard to build careers they're not only fulfilling to you but feed your families and help your communities. This ain't over. We are not at the mercy of fate. We will not be helpless bystanders. We will be architects of the future. These are difficult times. Perhaps the most difficult the most of us have ever seen or ever will see in our lifetimes but I can think of nothing more bad ass than that so who will join me. Because I'm running a special series of covert nineteen community calls. They're completely free. They are here to serve you. They're here to build. That UNSTOPPABLE FORCE THAT. We've always talked about that. We've always dreamed of that will serve that will innovate and not. Just wait for instructions or an oracle to show us the way forward. We will build the recovery. We build the future. I can feel it. Can you feel it goes? Thank you for tuning in a love. You because you crazy and I need you now more than ever so find me on bad ass. Agile Dot Com and follow the cause on twitter at bad ass. Underscore Agile on instagram at Agile. Stay tuned for special instructions and coordinates to get on these calls to find your courage to meet your purpose. And it'd be part of the most bad ass tribe the world has ever seen until then guys stay safe. Take care of your families each other and yourselves

Coronavirus Explained: How COVID-19 Works

The Naked Scientists

09:14 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus Explained: How COVID-19 Works

"I up a quick update about what's on everyone's minds the corona virus pandemic just this afternoon the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave a press conference with the deputy chief medical officer and the Secretary of State for housing communities and local government. That's Robert Generic. Here's some of what he had to say. Well thank you. Prime Minister good afternoon as a nation. We're confronted with the need to make big changes and enormous sacrifices to our daily lives and this is especially true today on Mother's Day when many of us would want nothing more than to be at home with our loved ones in person and so today we have to go further and shield the most clinically vulnerable people to help save their lives following the chief medical officers guidance the NFL has identified up to one and a half million people. In England who face the highest risk of being hospitalized by the virus? The Jess will be contacting these people in the coming days urging them to stay at home for a period of at least twelve weeks robot. Jim Rick the Secretary of State for housing communities and local government talking the Prime Minister's press conference softening from Downing Street will also with us here on the naked scientists. Is Dr Lori Ercole? He is a consultant in intensive care. Adam Brooks Hospital and are one of the things that was alluded to. They're the people who are most at risk in the population. Y All these people most at risk. What's different about them? I think it's very important to realize that. The Corona virus in most people causes quarter mile disease. Now it's still important because these people are infectious hence the plans for social distancing but most people expected to get better from this this disease without any ill-effects however some people do go on to develop a viral pneumonia. That's inflammation of the lungs and when it's really severe that can prevent the the patients from getting oxygen from the outside world into their bloodstream. And in really serious cases that might mean that they need to go to the intensive care unit to be Mechanically ventilated on life support machine. Unfortunately a lot of these people end up not surviving at the end of this process. Now as it turns out from the data that we're getting from China and from Italy. The virus seems to be affecting particularly the older patients and patients with little bits of the patients that disproportionately are having the severe disease and in the apple intensive care and not surviving. What is it? You've been modeling so one of the things that it's important to remember lies about intensive care is that it's not easy just to create intensive care beds are intensive care units that are specialised areas and in the UK. They run it. Typically eighty percent often ninety one hundred percent bed occupancy so there isn't a lot of room to admit new patients more patients such as patients with corona virus. So if we're going to deal with this pandemic we're going to have to think about creating new intensive care beds and unfortunately that's not something that's easy to do. It can be done but it takes time. So for example he won't take ventilators from operating theatres. You need to move the need to train the staff you need to make sure all the consumables available. It's not an instant thing at all. So really what need is an early warning of exactly when it is that the pandemic is like take hold intensive care and that's what we tried to do with some of the early data. What exactly are you doing that? Data and what does it reveal? So we've taken cases as they appear actually in real time every day and try to model what that means for the number of patients going into intensive care and thinking about how long they will stay there. We can get an idea of how many patients at any one time alight being intensive care. Because it's not as simple as just saying. Oh we're going to expect this number of patients on Tuesday therefore will have that number of beds ready because they don't just leave on Tuesday. They come in and they stay awhile now exactly and some of them say distribution of time so often about seven days but maybe up to fourteen days maybe less. It depends on the patient. Does that mean then that those I don't WanNa call them lucky people but will get potentially a bed but then anyone who comes afterwards may not get one. Because you've got these people don't WanNA use the phrase bed blocking either but you've got people who are occupying those high-intensity beds and then okay anywhere no exactly and that's the one situation. We don't want to end up where we run out of insulators. So it's actually crucially important that we have enough capacity to deal with the the surging cases when derives and how much capacity do we have. And what do we anticipate in? The reality is going to be in terms of numbers of cases the moment in the UK. We have something like four thousand intensive care beds. We're on the lower end of what's available in countries in Europe. Now if I say that most of these but h center these are occupied at any one time at least then maybe we can create another twenty percent capacity but once we hitting about twenty percent of the number of beds of patients with Corona virus. We're going to be in trouble with the number bed so we normally have. Yes because if eighty percent of four thousand that means you've got twenty percent capacity leftover that means you've got you know hundreds as in about eight hundred beds in the entire country then and we're anticipating how many cases. Well it's difficult to know but we certainly going to have to multiply that total number intensive care beds that we have available at by several times. Therefore it doesn't seem that unlikely the We're going to exceed easily the capacity that we can deliver knob -solutely and in fact our model suggests that we're probably reached that pinch point to percent within a week or two to really really early on after that things are likely to grow exponentially for period of time so actually things are going to get really bad quite quickly if the assumptions point model around. And let's assume you are right. What preparations have you got in place? To try to mitigate some of that impact so I think the good news is the an awful lot of Istar for being working really really hard for some time now to try and come up with ways and strategies of creating more capacity but I think the really crucial thing is that we keep the efforts open because actually if our models correct the peak might really be very close to hand. Do you assume then that some people who are working in. It you continue to a canal. It you have you taken into account the fact that doctors light you are probably amongst the most exposed clinicians here may will therefore be lost to the service absolutely in fact. That was the experience in Italy. That's been particularly hard. Hit One of the things we're trying to do is find more off because of course one of the problems is it's not as creating a bed with a ventilator you need sought actually look after the point of course you do have to factor in the some ill with surly a huge amount as workers being done on that and the beds are becoming available. But it's agent now oracle consultant in Intensive Care Medicine at Bruce Hospital Cambridge. Thank you very much now. People have had a lot of questions obviously about the corona virus and there's certain themes that keep coming up and Chris as a religious answered a fair few questions yourself. I thought it would be a good time to ask you now. First off is actually true that you're at high risk. You Take Ibuprofen. This story emerged. We think because someone from the French Ministry of Health made a statement. Saying you shouldn't take Ibuprofen if you've got this disorder and the problem is once you've made a statement medically is very very hard to roll back from that and now people are are being very cautionary about it but there is no evidence at all the people who use ibuprofen in the context of this and all the viruses are at any greater risk specifically with this one and therefore if you already own. Ibuprofen. I certainly wouldn't change what you're taking if you're about to start taking some anti inflammatory drugs for instance you have a high temperature and you won't slow them. Paracetemol is an excellent drug. That is actually bitcoin till stomach can has fewer side effects of ruled than beaupre fence. So that would be a good start a drug. But I certainly wouldn't. If you only had Ibuprofen you were feeling pretty rotten issue using Ibuprofen just because you've heard these headlines if you have no other contraindications to using it you don't have been told by anyone not to use it in the past. You're probably going to be fine okay. No evidence for risk of ibuprofen. What about if you're pregnant? Are you high risk? Is your baby at higher risk. Okay the good news here and it's nice to have some good news around. The Corona virus outbreak is that there is again no evidence that women who are pregnant are at higher risk during their pregnancy compared with someone of the same age and other risk profile from them. Who's not pregnant? The only exception to this is that we know that when someone's pregnant in the first part of their pregnancy. So that's the first trimester the first about Twelve weeks there is any kind of infection or any kind of problem that you might get to health that causes this associated with a high temperature. There is a slightly higher risk of a bad outcome till pregnancy. It's a small risk of the same but therefore if you can avoid catching this because being pregnant is respect for that happening that would be a good idea but the when the chief medical officer said that. We're going to regard pregnant. Women is in a high risk category alarm and lots of people. But that's just because we're being very cautious. It's not because there's evidence that there's any risk of harm and the other good piece of news is that there's no chance that this virus can jump across the placenta which is the connection between the mums bloodstream. And the baby's bloodstream doesn't cross that barrier therefore it doesn't the baby when it's inside the mum and there's no risk of doing developmental damage to the baby

Ibuprofen UK Prime Minister NFL England Consultant Intensive Care Medicine Dr Lori Ercole Pneumonia Robert Generic Deputy Chief Medical Officer Boris Johnson Jess Jim Rick Europe Adam Brooks Hospital Medical Officer
Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

GOLF.com Podcast

14:12 min | 5 months ago

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

"This is Alan ship. I am delighted to be joined by Michael Murphy author of Golf in the Kingdom still going strong eighty nine Michael. Thank you for doing this well. It's a pleasure. You have such a unique place in the game Euro Golfing Kindo as in your early forties. I'M NOT GONNA say it was a Lark but it was a you're not you're not a Gulf writer. You're not a novelist it just emerged from you in ever. Since you've been this Oracle you've been this grand old man of letters in the game you you tell shape how think about it. So are you still tickled that all these years later people are still finding this novel enjoying it? Well I I love it. I could say channel that because it was not only the first book I wrote the First Book I never tried to ride and I started it as I was turning forty and it was published in one thousand nine hundred ninety two forty seven years ago so when I was forty one so here we are now forty eight years later and it has. His Life Taught Me. I could ride so that in itself was an enormous pleasure and a big force to shape by subsequent life. I never thought of myself as a writer. My brother Was the designated writer in our family might and he had been a successful novelist and my grandfather had delivered John. Steinbeck and Salinas or you and I were both born and You know rules can get us. Signed the kids growing up and I was supposed to be a doctor and Than the more for me Thought I'd be a psychiatrist. And then got to Stanford and found myself in class on comparative religions of that led me to the philosophy and the way of life that shaped me ever since when I was nineteen and twenty but never along the way there was thought. Start writing books so anyway. When I sat down to write this book really did come in a flood. And it's Been living in me ever since I've written eight books now but that one If it were to be one of my children Children it would be among my books. It was my first child by far the most successful and I would say influential. Books are mysterious things. I like to say sometimes. Ufo's identified writing objects you W os or you are os. Son identified reading objects that can open worlds to people. And that's what's actually happened with this book with golf in the Kingdom one of the things about our shared hometown of Salinas which is just a dusty little farming community in the Central Valley known to John. Steinbeck doesn't have that much else to recommend it. It's not that far from pebble. Beach Golf links which figures prominently in my life story and and was important part of Gulf education. So tell us about your early days of playing pebble with with your brother and of course guys would haunt the Cosby Klanbake back. When he was really a big deal with Hogan snead Nelson and Bing crosby's the star in the world so is important from Stamford but it starts with your golf education before that while. That's right I mean we've had very fortunate childhoods you and I and my brother and Yes we would there be there at the crosby so I get to follow Ben Hogan around and watched him up close and personal before and after his accident. Which was in I guess January of Nineteen forty-nine so he missed that whole year in the hospital but he used to partner with Bing crosby and that was fun and Johnny Weissmuller who was the Great Olympic champion of became Tarzan. And the movies anyway. It was those great events and of course plane pebble which to this day remains by far my favorite course and it has to be. I mean there's of course in the world I think more beautiful than pebble. There are others that when you look at them would be beautiful. But to match the incredible range of moods it gets into with the shifting light the shifting fog the filaments of fog that cut across the fairways and all but anyway quyen pebble seen Some of the players in particular Hogan up close definitely was an influence on on golfing. The King wrote about it will hoge himself makes a handful of cameos in the text. Including what was it? The moved you so much about him well his magnetism on the course then he won eight out of eleven majors. He played over that period from forty eight to fifty through fifty three and he After the accident he paid just eighteen tournaments through fifty-three thickening one ten of them. He won virtually every major so he was the top of the game. He was to golf then way. Tiger Woods has been also the quality of his presence and when he would crack this out Just by the second hole at pebble for those who have been developed. Now it's then built up but there was a big field of practice in the pros as well as the onlookers. Got To sit down and watch him. Maybe there'd be hundred. Fifty people big big arena there watching him practice and it was a sight to behold because he had an immense repertoire of shots to fade to draw low high and the silence and that meant a huge impression on me and. I'm sure that as I sat down to write though I didn't plot the book or shape the book deliberately around him that influence. I'm sure was like an acorn growing into this conscious. Us of what the game could be as a kind of If you WANNA call it Yogi you can call it contemporary. You can call Chamonix even exercise golf itself is what in the eastern martial arts. Would you could call a Kata which is a series of movements. That trigger it is said are esoteric anatomy that is the complete person we are both in the flesh and in our soul are in the consciousness itself and golf swing. You could argue is an unnatural. Act It's not like running or throwing which are species learn to do and could do To survive. But you don't take a tee up a ball and hit it at the on charging tiger you know as a member of the tribe so it's an acquired skill that requires the most gypsum concentration and commitment to play it. Well and for this reason he and other reasons it evokes corresponding states of mind which can be interfered with with strong emotions whether rage or grief or sorrow which can produce by this fiendish challenge to get this small ball into this tiny hole and to go after four five hours over the course of four miles. You know. It's on the face of an absurdity. A why are we doing this? And that can occur to while playing. Why am I doing this but you do it? And you have these incredible pleasures and experiences and then as I've discovered through Responding to the book experience you have to call super-normal Mr Cool or cold. In other words the game can do that and It helps to be in a beautiful place like Pebble Beach. The you bring to this conversation. Just leaps off the page. I mean that's I think why the book is in bird because as you say it's this pursuit of ours is is maddening. It makes no sense but we do it anyway. And we were able to put a voice to having a correspondent. Brad faxon about the book and he said what I love about it is it made it okay to to speak of these things and you gave us in vocabulary to this experience at the golfers of had. But I you can get those tools so you matriculate to Stanford and as a fellow Salinas Person. I know it's not the most open minded place to Nag towns little conservative. But you have sort of a life altering experience stafford and what exactly happened well. I was so inspired by this professor. Frederic Spiegelberg he them a born and raised in Germany and Taught was teaching Stanford Comparative Religions so I got exposed to eastern philosophy and meditation contemplation than and particularly the world view of Indian philosopher. A named Sheera window who had been educated in England very elite education. His family had instructed his patrons in England never to let him speak any Indian language so he wanted to English but he was a philosopher and writer kind of a renaissance figure and developed a worldview. That's been the most basic influence on me. There are many influences of prompted me to do what I've done and of course the mystery is. Why chose this story? I could have gotten so many other directions but I consider myself very lucky. A Norman Mailer. The writer argued that every aspiring writer is given one free one by God and that was my free one and it was the first one and it in turn golf in the kingdom has shown me that this birth of new capacities is much more common than most people realize because immediately upon publication people started letting me know about their mystical experiences called experiences on golf courses. I wrote the book on some inspiration but I if you had asked me then that people would be having experiences you know immediately lawyer. New York wrote to me and was just couldn't get over this book. It helped him understand that. How on this particular occasion he'd been standing on the T. of four hundred yard and there were no players between him and his forces have been the green said he could see clear. A ball marker the size of a dime on this whole quarter of a mile away. Two of his playing partner couldn't even see the green. I got it was there. So he wondered. Is this the sort of thing you're talking about or a woman rights to me right away and says the yearbook helped me in? Because not long ago I was playing the eighteenth hole of at my Country Club as the sun was setting and when we got to the green the sun had set but it was still shining through the green and I felt that maybe this was some after glow on my is some retinal shock or something but when they went into the clubhouse who shining through the walls and it shown like that for three days and I was in an exaltation and thank you for writing the book because I found author who bite understand this experience so when you then I started getting these things. It pushed me in the direction of seeing the genius of sport to elicit this experience but not reported by sportswriters very often. You know there've been a few writers who have glimpsed this John Updike. He recognized this and Bernard Darwin. You know the great writer grandson. Charles Darwin he read the links of either down one of his short stories. I mean he certainly could see it. The mystery of golf by Arnold Hall Taint. So there's been a vein of golf writing that shows this power of the game not only to enchant but to reveal these capacities so that in turn has led me into other sports. And so I've been out to meet with coaches and players of ever since about what you would call the inner game of Sport and that Inter has led me to appreciate how prevalent it is in everyday life but not commonly discussed and recognized until recently. Thank you God for giving me go for the Kingdom as my first book.

Golf Writer John Updike Salinas Steinbeck Bing Crosby Michael Murphy Partner Ben Hogan Pebble Beach Oracle Alan Bernard Darwin Tiger Woods Charles Darwin Country Club Brad Faxon Stanford Johnny Weissmuller Cosby Klanbake
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"The exoneration by saying well yeah it was copyrighted material but the way you used it is totally fair use oracle would file another appeal sating that the decision that this was fair use was based on an incorrect understanding of java and google's android platforms that it was framed in such a way that sounded like oracle's products are meant for pc's and google are meant for smartphones and they said well no there's a lot more of stuff in between those two things and that's where the real problem is so in march two thousand eighteen the us court of appeals for the federal circuit reversed this decision of the second trial stating that google's use of java api is did not constitute fair use and that oracle was in the right the case has now been remanded to a lower district court to determine what damages google does oracle and so the saga continues meanwhile let's jump back to twenty ten because that whole story stretch from twenty ten to current day it's still going but back in two thousand ten the us department of justice filed a complaint against oracle alleging the company had committed contract fraud the department of justice accused oracle of defrauding the united states government on a general services administration software contract that started in nineteen ninety eight and concluded in two thousand six now according to this complaint oracle had agreed to offer government offices the best discounts it offered to non government customers so in other words they said whatever the lowest price is that we're offering governments will get access to that lowest price if it's a special that we're running then governments will have that as the standard fee for our services and whatever the best possible prices the government will be able to take advantage of that so the complain allege that oracle had failed to do this and that the us government offices were overpaying for oracle products and services according to the agreement that.

google oracle fraud us department of justice
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Well the brum was all of that stuff in theory at least belong to oracle now and the two companies google oracle couldn't come to a licensing agreement so oracle sued google for copyright infringement saying hey you're using our software our our product without our permission and you're using it to build com ca commercial apps and you're using it for your developers that's without our permission that's not cool google had used a programming platform it'd built on top of java functions so while google had its own developing platform it did have underlying java functions powering that so in the original trial the judge found that the java features in question were not protected under copyright he said well your argument can't hold oracle because these are not copyrighted ideas oracle appealed that decision and the court of appeals reversed part of that earlier decision saying that the features were certainly copyright able so the first judge had made a mistake saying no you can't copyright these and the appeals courts said no no those those are definitely protected by copyright but the court of appeals also gave google bit of wiggle room saying that google might have a viable fair use defense remember fair use is this idea that you can actually use material that's under copyright under certain circumstances and meeting certain criteria but all of those determined within the court of law you you can't just say fair use and you've got a magic shield that protects you from lawsuits it's rather you get sued then you have to make an argument that your use of the material falls under fair use and a court has to agree with that so this really just set up google's potential defense the so the second trial took place and then the jury of that trial decided that google did did in fact use the material out of fair use so in other words again oracle loses right google gets.

brum oracle google
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Industry as a result every time it was able to add to its list of services it suddenly had the opportunity to market to new customers and it didn't have to do this by starting from scratch they didn't have to do it all internally they would find other companies that had already done that groundwork and then purchase them and bring them in in two thousand ten oracle made another big move with its bid for sun microsystems sun was a computer company that primarily sold hardware although it also had a software component as well son had been around since the early nineteen eighties and the business was built on the back of unix workstations the company had previously been in talks with ibm about an acquisition but in two thousand nine oracle and sun announced that the two companies intended to merge the process continued until early twenty ten when the agreement became official and many of the executives and lead developers over at sun resigned in the wake of the merger including tim bray who created extensible markup language or xml and james gosling who was the creator of java the acquisition meant that oracle now had the rights to java this interns set the stage for a lawsuit pitting oracle against google at issue was google's use of java api is for it's eh droid operating system so you can kind of think of java in the sense as being a bunch of different code shortcuts right almost like modules and developers would use these modules to help build out applications because it was faster and easier than doing it all from the ground up so you needed certain basic functionality in your app you would grab certain sections of java and you would change them together and then add in some of your own code and while you get your app but it meant that you saved a lot of time because you could use these basic building blocks as part of your foundation.

ibm official tim bray oracle google james gosling
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Competitors in that space as a p by the way traces its origins to ibm the founders of sap worked for ibm before leaving to create their own business but the lawsuit focused on a particular branch of sap called tomorrow now that unit would provide customer support to oracle customers but at a lower rate than what oracle charged now remember oracle made money not just by selling software but also by offering ongoing support for a price so sap was undercutting oracle for support services for oracle's own software now that was not the issue of the lawsuit right that was not a legal the central problem was that oracle had detected thousands of illegal downloads of its software and trace them to sap employee's as they eventually admitted that in fact in blaze had been illegally downloading oracle software and initially oracle sought a reward in excess of a billion dollars but eventually agreed to a more modest award of three hundred fifty million dollars or so the litigation stretched on for several years before reaching that point with larry ellison himself providing testimony in the case in twenty ten so this was a huge huge deal that was a big big problem and a virtually oracle ended up coming out on the right side of that one and they had a legit complaint because that that software had been a legally downloaded even though it was in the service of something that wasn't illegal the act of delaying that software was illegal oracle made a few more acquisitions at that time including agile software corporation and be a systems the company would state that it viewed acquisitions as sort of that risk free way to invest in research and development because those companies had spent years fine tuning their various products so oracle took advantage of that by bringing those companies into the fold and entering the new parts of the enterprise software.

sap ibm oracle larry ellison three hundred fifty million do billion dollars
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Firing around five thousand to six thousand people so either just less than half or just more than half because peoplesoft had about eleven thousand people working for it when oracle purchased it and i saw differing accounts of exactly how many people were laid off but it was in the thousands and it meant that if you worked at peoplesoft there was a good chance you weren't going to be there very long or that half the people around you we're going to disappear pretty soon this was part of a larger move by oracle to reduce its workforce at that time the company also released a new version of its database software for free and they called it oracle database ten g express edition this was in two thousand five now this version of oracle's database software had limitations built in specifically to encourage customers to upgrade to the products oracle was selling while giving them a sense of what was possible using that software so it's kind of like breaks being put on the system they couldn't couldn't do everything that oracle's flagship software could do which makes sense it was just a way of sort of marketing to people as well as offering up a free database solution that did in fact work for smaller scale projects so if you were not running a big company you could use this database software effectively all by its own you didn't have to feel like you need to upgrade but for other companies it might just be a way of kind of previewing what oracle had offer in september two thousand five oracle announced that it would acquire siebel crm systems inc this was the company that was founded by former oracle sales executive thomas siebel in the early nineteen nineties you might remember i mentioned him during the last episode siebel had left oracle in the wake of its sales shakeup after that whole issue with hell sales was handling things and the incorrect reporting of revenues the deal was valued at five point eight billion dollars in brought cbo's customer relationship management software under the umbrella.

peoplesoft oracle sales executive cbo thomas siebel eight billion dollars ten g
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"The company's own oracle e business suite so he was taking the opportunity to point at oracle's earnings and say the reason or one of the reasons this number is so high is because we use our own products so you should to using the company's performance as a commercial for the company's project products rather two thousand one would have even more in revenue though earnings would actually drop to two point six billion still not a bad chunk of change i would happily take two point six billion dollars if someone wants to hand it out ellison also announced the oracle nine i database that was a suite that included the oracle real application clusters or oracle r a c which is sort of a type of grid computing now i mentioned grid computing in some recent episodes but let me give you a quick rundown on what that means in case you're not the millionaire first let's start with a basic computer a single computer it has a single core processor now that architecture works for basic computer problems but it has limitations the single core essentially works on problems one operation at a time now you can make this type of computer really fast by beefing up the clock speed on the processor so it can run more operations in the same amount of time it's just running each operation more quickly than it was before but for sufficiently complex problems this will only speed things up a little bit now you also have multi core processors this is like having a computer that has a couple of different brains or maybe as a brain that can multitask in solve more than one set of problems at a time multi core processors are great for what we call parallel problems sometimes embarrassingly parallel problems it's actually a technical term now these are a category of computer problems that can be divided into parallel tasks that may be solved at the same time before you get to your ultimate resolution of the problem so in other.

oracle ellison six billion dollars
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Direction so what the heck caused raymond lane to resign while at first there was no comment from lane ellison's public statement was that the resignation was part of a planned transition but later he would kinda qualify that statement he said well by planned i mean i had planned to call lane while lane was on vacation with his family and planned to announce the resignation for the following wednesday which does not really seem like much of a transition plan to me but there you go lane later had a lot more to say about his resignation now according to him ellison had been steadily removing responsibilities from the role of president and ultimately ellison wanted to take the title of president away from lane and fold the title in with ceo now that would leave lane without a real role at the company and it would affectively strip him of all his power so in lane asked ellison why do you wanna do this ellison said that he felt having a president and ceo men there were two people with authority and that would cause confusion about who is in charge this particular explanation i find absolutely hilarious considering what happens later in oracle's history but i don't want to jump ahead of myself many executives would say that ellison found the notion of anyone having remotely the same amount of influence that he had over at oracle to be untenable and that that was the reason ellison eventually confronted lane over the phone he didn't confront them face to face he called him well lane was on vacation so lane decided that he would resign rather than go through the process of having all of his responsibility stripped away from him and the title taken away from him he was just two and a half weeks away from having several millions of dollars worth of shares in the company vest and that was kind of a slap in the face it was enough.

raymond lane ellison president ceo oracle president and ceo
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"By settling shareholder class action lawsuits and paying a fine that was the result of a complaint from the security and exchange commission or sec the the class action lawsuits cost oracle about twenty four million dollars to settle and the sec fine was more like one hundred thousand dollars henley himself said that that signaled the beginning of a new era with financial controls in a more responsible sales strategy and oracle began to recover from its previously precarious position which some great alliteration right there analysts agreed timothy mccullum who worked for the company dean witter which is a stock brokerage and securities firm told the new york times that oracle had brought itself back from the precipice and was in a good position to grow again and that's exactly what the company did in nineteen ninety five they made a merger move to streamline business this was kind of a merger in name there was a holding company called oracle systems corporation and then there was the actual operating company that was called oracle corporation so you kind of had a holding company that was sort of a parent the didn't really do anything it just was there for financial purposes and then you had the operating company this was the actual company that did stuff the merger was a corporate move to kind of reincorporate the entire entity to make it one corporation again and reincorporate it in the state of delaware i've done i've talked about in previous episodes why companies incorporated in delaware it's kind of interesting you should look into that oracle dependent upon version seven of its software for a few years the company had introduced oracle version seven in the summer of nineteen ninety two and the following years saw oracle update this version several times with seven point three shipping in nineteen ninety six the new features got pretty futuristic for the mid nineteen nineties including support for biometric authentication and support for video and audio data management now i've got.

timothy mccullum dean witter the new york times oracle systems corporation delaware oracle one hundred thousand dollars twenty four million dollars
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"And so he went on to found a new company called siebel systems which ended up going into direct competition with oracle this will become a familiar theme one of the most interesting things i find about oracle's history is that larry ellison has this history of alienating some of his top executives whether it's because they were not a good fit for oracle or because of personality conflicts or just because of who ellison is as a person i cannot speak to but it is interesting to see how many of them left oracle to go and either join another company or found a company that would go into direct competition with oracle it's almost as if saying larry ellison has upset me so much that i need to try and take him down and that's probably putting words into other people's mouths but that's the implication i get because the story happens over and over again the following year nineteen ninetyone was more of the same with more instances about bad accounting piling up in fact oracle would have to restate its earnings again for the fiscal year ending may thirty first nineteen ninetyone so for the year ending nineteen ninety in the year ending nineteen ninetyone they had to restate their revenues two years neuro not good it was rumored that the board of directors was even considering firing larry ellison but the board was pretty small in fact there are only four people sitting on it at the beginning of all this mess there was bob minor one of the co founders of oracle there was dawn lucas and there was arnold silverman who would leave the board during this time and would be replaced by a guy named joe costello joe costello was brought in specifically as the outsider board member the idea that this was a guy who could stand up deliri ellison because he didn't have any fear of the man he didn't have any he wasn't beholden to him at all and so castillo and ellison would end up facing off against.

siebel systems oracle larry ellison dawn lucas arnold silverman joe costello castillo two years
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hours it could keep earning money from those same customers by explaining to them how to use their own products which is pretty much genius in fact this was a top revenue generator for oracle is not just selling the product but selling ongoing support for the product in nineteen eighty nine the company was outgrowing its home base and so it relocated to redwood shores california it launched a subsidiary company called oracle data publishing that was all about getting hold of data and then distributing it electrically and the company sought out new industries and branches of computing to expand into including supercomputers the following year would end up being a tumultuous one for oracle which had to make for a pretty ugly admission for a company all about crunching numbers because the company turns out it had misrepresented revenues whether on purpose or back sent it was not a pretty picture and that's how we're going to start our next episode of the oracle story talking about this massive controversy that the company encountered early in its history and what it had to do in order to climb back out again in fact it was so bad that there was a real danger of oracle going away and not surviving now as it turns out oracle still around today so you kind of know things workout but back then people weren't so sure now if you have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff i welcome you to write me and let me know what they are the email address for this show is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or you can drop me a line on twitter or facebook the handle for both of those tech stuff h s w remember we have an instagram account you can go and follow us there and see all the behind the scenes stuff and some other interesting things also remember i broadcast my recording sessions live on twitch dot tv slash tech stuff just go there you'll see when i tend to stream it's on wednesdays and fridays but.

oracle twitter redwood shores california facebook instagram
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Bought it at it's three hundred and twenty four shares of oracle at forty six dollars which means your fifteen dollar investment would turn into fourteen thousand nine hundred four dollars not bad not bad to go from fifteen to fourteen thousand bucks almost fifteen thousand bucks now oracle clients were pretty huge which makes sense not a lot of smaller organizations had real need for the robust databases oracle had to offer instead oracle's products were appealing to bigger organizations and companies industries like pharmaceutical companies aerospace companies tech firms automotive corporations those were among oracle's top clients in one thousand nine hundred seven oracle launched a new division in the company it was called the applications division and it initially had just seven employees working in it their job was to put together application software to integrate various function with the database software to make it easier to run routine tasks for large organizations essentially the thought was that the database software gave organizations a lot of power to analyze their data but they still had to develop their own tools to put that that to us so oracle was getting into the business developing applications that would do that for these companies oracle didn't just rely on inhouse teams to do this the company also acquired a company called tci the built project management applications the in house team got to work building on and accounting module that integrate with oracle databases and this was the beginning of oracle creating a suite of software applications that could work closely together branching out from being a purely database focused company oracle also launched a consulting service to offer support to clients helping them best understand how to leverage oracle software so now not only could the company sell its products to custom.

oracle fourteen thousand nine hundred forty six dollars fifteen dollar
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Reputation of being valuable and you don't avoid investing because the entry prices too high right you've lowered the entry fee to buy stock by making the stocks half as expensive so you might have small investors out there who would jump on shares of oracle but if it's too expensive they're like i just can't buy a forty dollar stock that drops down to twenty i can buy that then you get more investors so that's one of the reasons you might do it you might do it to try and encourage more trading to encourage more small investors and you're also doing it in an attempt to continue growing so while you initially reduce the price of those shares by half they can still climb up as the company does well so that means the stock price can increase over time so over the course of oracle's history it is actually split its stock ten times six of those were two for one stocks which meant if you held stocks and oracle the number of shares would double each time it has a two for one split but four of the splits where three four to stock splits meaning that for every two shares you held you would get a third one or if you prefer for each share you got one and a half shares right so if you bought one share of oracle in nineteen eightysix for fifteen dollars after all the stock splits you would actually end up with three hundred twenty four shares of oracle right because of each of the times they split your number of shares would increase so if you add up all the different ten splits that one shared turns into three hundred twenty four shares and it's not three hundred twenty four shares at fifteen dollars which is what you.

oracle fifteen dollars forty dollar
"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on TechStuff

"Run by the first customer st l ever had remember seal stood for software development laboratories well that customer was the little us agency called the cia that is the central intelligence agency that was the first sdl customer and they cia had a special project they were looking to complete called oracle so what was the project about why did they need a relational database well who's to say it's classified it's probably cloak and dagger stuff i do not have the proper clearance to find out what exactly was going on it was all redacted but st l took the project and they had two years to complete the work and create a relational database for the cia bob miner did most of the work and creating the architecture for the database and they were able to turn in their project year ahead of schedule they spend the following year adapting this database approach so they could create a commercial product that they could sell to other companies so essentially they said well we did this for the cia let's just adapt it so that we can sell it to anyone really any organization or company that's out there so they decided to stick with the name the project name the cia project which was called oracle and use that to name their product their software their database software thus became known as oracle by the way there is an allegation out there that oracle actually started out as a russian software product that the cia lifted as in stole and then handed over to sdl i've seen no confirmation of that allegation anywhere and i'm inclined to consider it outright false as it really serves as a huge injustice to the people like bob miner who actually worked really hard to build out.

cia bob miner oracle two years
"oracle" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

"You know he always kind of highlights amazon web services as as the thing that in some cases he wants to make comparisons to you know we're going to be less expensive we're going to be faster and but on the flip side and amazon's you know cloud is built a certain way right it was sort of built from from early on to be around um you know sorta cloud native applications and built on the web applications and and they've had to evolve um you know to to do more enterprisees stuff oracle as a company not in this much your group it as a company has huge installed base of you know oracle databases article applications customers have a certain expectation of you know kind of how those working and i know oracle is is also always said hey we're very interested in helping customers move applications to the cloud what kind of guidance did they give you as you were you were building out this this new you know like you said bear metal cloud of the time cloud infrastructure now like was there guidance that said hey you have to skew at more towards being able to to migrate existing applications was it you know target more new applications like how you go about thinking through that kind of architecture when you have two very different types of applications polling at what could be architecture yeah i bet virga question and i'll i'll try to give you the perspective then as well as kind of how that perspective has evolved over time so um you know having been an in aws uh and not just me there's a lot of people who work here who early people and amazon web services um the original designed point was you know a couple of people in a dorm room and so uh that's typically focused on new applications that you don't have a lot of legacy and you can do things a new way um the the huge the huge thing i wanted to focus on when i came to oracle was you know you yes oracles the specific company an oracle has a long history of database custody cetera but the market that i feel like it underserved that the vast majority of service i computing.

web services amazon web applications oracle
"oracle" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"oracle" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"So we looked at the status of the lighting network i don't think there is any working version of the lighting network at that time there were some papers there may have been some initial repositories that had some half working code but it wasn't something we could just pluguin and use it was easier for us to just read the papers figure out how to build it and just bill that ourselves and so that's what we did so we just started building our own l to also our technologies entirely webbased so it wasn't it wouldn't even be possible to use the other implementations that have been created because none of them are built in java scriptled powers so we needed something web ac we needed it to to work in and it was easier to build it on their own so is similar to the lighting network with a few caveats so it has a centralised architecture where we have a something we call the oracle you can think of his being like a trust list payment channel hub everybody opens a channel to the oracle were to or from the oracle the oracle does not have access to anybody's money though you can think of it as being similar to the lighting network but with one note the so the oracle can't spend your money or anything like that but it does solve this problem of radically decreasing the number of channels that have to be open users don't open channels directly to other users the open a channel to the oracle sir always one hop away from that other user you wanna make a payment to you this is important because otherwise you'd have to open a channel to everyone you want to pay which which is actually expensive we made a decision early last year when we started this to not base our technology on segue it did their implementations of it that exists it but it wasn't live on bitcoin it was very unclear how long that would take.

oracle