4 Episode results for "Opus Bank"

Jobs Report, Virtual Conferences And Blue Chips On Tap

Wall Street Breakfast

11:16 min | 3 months ago

Jobs Report, Virtual Conferences And Blue Chips On Tap

"Welcome to seeking Alpha stocks to watch Wall Street breakfasts weekend edition our news teams weekend preview of upcoming. Ipo's earnings reports conference presentations investor days FDA decisions Barron's mentions and other key events that could impact stocks to set you up for the week ahead in the markets. Subscribe to this podcast on Apple podcasts. Podcasts spotify stitcher. Good morning today is Sunday may third. And I'm your host Rena Cheryl. We begin with a breakdown of the week ahead. From seeking Alpha's news team. The week ahead will see another steady stream of earnings reports before the April employment report blazes in from the Labor Department on May eighth economists. Expect the unemployment to be about fifteen percent after twenty million jobs were lost during the month. Average weekly hours are seen plunging to a new record. Low of thirty three and a half million on the brighter side. The conference calendar picks up next week for investors with virtual events covering industrials financials and infectious diseases. Economic activity will pick up again as more states. Open back up to varying degrees. Although there are plenty of indications that consumer spending will be slow to return will investors sell in May and go away after the Dow Rose? Twenty eight percent from its March twenty third low and the S. and P. Five hundred. Shut up roughly twenty seven percent. Don't ask Tesla's alive in earnings news. Tyson foods shake shack skyward solutions fresh pet and check report on May Fourth Marathon Petroleum Fiat Chrysler Cisco beyond me. Us Foods Dupont activision Blizzard Disney prudential allstate and Dominion Energy Report on the fifth. Cvs Health General Motors Bunge Barrick. Metlife T. Mobile oetzi shop affi- peleton interactive and pay PAL report. On May sixth a mirror source. Bergen jetblue Booking Holdings Raytheon Technologies anheuser-busch Bristol. Myers Squibb Viacom by do news corps and Post Holdings Report on May seven and Seaworld Entertainment. Cronos and PBS energy. Report on the eighth share lock-up periods expire on Q. and K. International Group Atif Holdings on May Fourth Glare Therapeutics Center gene and Silver Gate capital. I may fifth as well as Tele Bio Echo Mojo thirty six K. R. Holdings and. Cnn Pharma on May Sixth of those names sent. Oh Gene has the largest IPO gains with a thirty six percent break higher in Ebony news the Stars Group fled or entertainment merger is expected to close on May fifth also within the Casino Gaming Sector. Keep an eye on CAESARS. Entertainment and Eldorado Resorts with the New Jersey Control Commission due to meet to discuss the combination of the two casino. Operators shareholder votes are upcoming and the maccari takeover of Cincinnati Bell and the Opus Bank Pacific Premier bancorp merger floor and decor has an investor conference call scheduled for May Fifth. Cosco WILL ISSUE ITS APRIL SALES REPORT ON. May Six in March. The retailers saw comparable sales jumped twelve percent in the US. After stripping the impact of gas in exchange Cosco will also look to continue its online momentum after e commerce sales soared forty eight percent in March also on tap next week Mandalay International. Ceo Dirk Van. De Boot will discuss the company. Sustainability Strategy and wellbeing at an investor event on May eighth shares of Mandalay have traded flat over the last six weeks the maximum infectious disease. Virtual conference is set for May fifth with the spotlight on vaccines and treatments. Never brighter companies in various stages of development from early stage to near commercialization will be at the event. The keynote speaker is contract. Ceo Dr Roger Pomeranz a panel of covert one thousand nine vaccines and monitoring includes aim immune attack apply DNA SCIENCES DAX or corporation inova pharmaceuticals and back Sartre while a panel of covert nineteen. Therapeutics will feature a rid is pharmaceuticals Bella row fund therapeutics Sitara Therapeutics Immune Bio molecular biotech and Pleura stem therapeutics. Also presenting a non antibiotic anti infective or Antifungal 's our APP FROM GROUP. A RIBS PHARMACEUTICALS ARMATA PHARMACEUTICALS CONTRACT DARE. Bioscience privately held amplats pharmaceuticals. Achille Therapeutics Sitara Therapeutics. Man is Bio Pharma and sign. Nexus Microsoft is running a demonstration on May seven for games running on the next Gen xbox series x the event and more like it will replace the highly watched E. Three digital conference in June which has been canceled due to the pandemic the xbox series x is promised to deliver twelve teraflops of power through a split motherboard and has more storage by utilizing an expansion card fast food. Favorite CHICK-FIL-A is rolling out meal kits. Next week as more people eat at home. Because of the pandemic the company expects at least half of its locations to participate in the program the chick fillet meal. Kits will be available for delivery or pick up more pressure on blue apron. Shares of Blue Apron cooled off last week after being bid up as a favourite. Stay at home stock. Pick several restaurant. Chains reported accelerating go sales over the last month. On top of the chick-fil-a reveal IBM's think digital event is planned for May fifth through the sixth aimed at accelerating recovery and transformation. The conference will include talks from IBM chairman. Ginny Rometty IBM CEO Arvind. Krishna Musician Emotion Heap and Grammy Award winner. Will I am? Ibm is coming off. A quarter during which revenue fell three percent but the cloud and cognitive software business saw five percent jump. Airline traffic reports will start arriving next weekend. We'll show an absolute collapse of revenue. Miles investors will have their eyes on. Just how bad load factors are for Jetblue Delta Airlines United Airlines American Airlines Group Southwest Airlines Hawaiian Holdings Alaska Air Group allegiant travels Spirit Airlines Mesa. Air Group Sky West as well as any color on costs. The monthly tally of firearm background. Checks is also doing. It's not uncommon for American outdoor brands Vista Outdoor Sturm Ruger and Olin Corporation to swing wildly after the national instant. Criminal background check system. Report is released this week in Barron's mentions the stocks and themes drawing attention in Barron's weekly addition a breakdown on the retail sector yields. Estee Lauder Lulu the Mon- ULTA BEAUTY AND LEVI. Strauss has top picks sales are seen bouncing back for essay ladder and the F. Leisure business is expected to propel Lululemon. Ulta beauty is called a leading retailer with a strong balance sheet leave is is recommended as an iconic and well run company a better week in the oil patch as the publications roundtable looking hard at Valero Energy Phillips Sixty six Chevron Canadian Natural Resources Williams Companies Shinya Energy Enterprise Products Partners Magellan Midstream partners conical phillips the cover story digs in on how the economic recovery will play out with spending consumer staple stocks and essential retailers with open stores are seen outperforming in the new environment as well as companies that have good liquidity and can grow their online sales. That list of pandemics survivors includes Walmart Nike Costco. Lowe's target urban outfitters dollar general. Last week saw Royal Dutch. Shell cut their dividend for the first time since World War Two and that's the stock recovery on this week's single stock focus. The Prophet Hunter wrote an article on Saturday about the dividend cut and said quote buyers. Beware Royal Dutch. Shell Asia's closed Friday at over thirty one dollars and the b-shares closed just under thirty dollars. The Prophet Hunter starts out by discussing energy transitioning to renewables and then talks about why this cycle may be different while some anything we could see an oil and gas megamerger wave. I believe they may be disappointed. At least in the short medium term listening to energy majors earnings call over the last couple of weeks suggest. Management teams are prioritizing the deployment of capital in the renewable energy sector where we could see the direction of travel for. Ma is towards acquiring utilities or renewable power producers in two thousand eighteen total acquire direct energy of French Electric Utility this followed their 2016 acquisition of saft a battery maker for over a billion dollars. The company plans to start producing batteries by twenty twenty three Prophet Hunter then goes on to discuss shells dividend cut when Shell announced a cut in its dividend on thirtieth April for the first time since World War Two. What was most striking was the severity? Of the reduction. A seventy percent cut which caught investors off guard and illustrates the existential crisis unfolding within boardrooms. I believe the move underscores the transition. To a new era the prevailing yield is now three and a half percent and could mark a major step toward repositioning the business towards renewable focused business those expecting the dividend to be hiked oil markets. Recover maybe left disappointed instead. Management could be on the hunt to acquire utility or invest directly in renewable projects. The good news is that renewables are increasingly becoming. The lowest cost mechanism of providing energy and household are beginning to embrace the transition to electrification of transport and reduction in plastics which also affects oil demand. The profit hundred then gets to the bad news. The bad news for the oil majors is they are relatively late to the party. Existing renewable players such as vestis next Aaron Canadian solar have already gained a significant footprint and offer investors. A pure play exposure to renewables as the big oil majors entered. The renewable space returns on capital are likely to disappoint given strong competition for capital from new and incumbent operators in conclusion the Prophet. Hunter says we are at the beginning of a twenty to thirty year growth and which transportation infrastructure transitions towards electro mobility as wind and solar penetration increases and hydrocarbon usage declines renewable specialists such as vessels or next era are ideally positioned to benefit while there is the potential for some projects to be delayed from twenty twenty two twenty twenty one due to the social distancing measures enforced by governments worldwide. This is a minor blip versus the bigger picture with traditional and gas majors pivoting to join them. Renewable Energy Revolution. I expect returns on capital two unexciting and far lower than those enjoyed. During the heyday of the fossil fuel era overall seeking Alpha authors skew bullish on Royal Dutch. Shell with one very bullish. Nine bullish and six neutral. That concludes this week. Stocks to watch. Thanks so much for listening for the Best Investment Analysis News on the web go to seeking Alpha dot com. Subscribe to this podcast on Apple. Podcast Google podcasts. Spotify stitcher you can sign up for other podcasts. Behind the idea alpha trader essay for F.A.S.T. Let's talk ETF's the cannabis investing podcast and marketplace roundtable on those platforms as well have a great week.

Shell Royal Dutch Hunter IBM Barron spotify Ceo Cosco Jetblue Delta Airlines United Apple Achille Therapeutics Sitara Th Sitara Therapeutics Immune Bio Blue Apron Alpha Bergen jetblue Booking Holding Rena Cheryl US Ipo
Scoop B Radio Overtime f/Melvin Taylor II [Radio Host & Writer] (2020)

Scoop B Radio | #SCOOPBRADIO | Brandon Robinson

39:10 min | 4 months ago

Scoop B Radio Overtime f/Melvin Taylor II [Radio Host & Writer] (2020)

"The man who else could be radio. You'd never sufficient very bob say the best in the business school to school business proved to be true. Sports gave the biggest interview. He gave you the tools to cast the journalist. What was like ten gift to Gab? If he say discuss now kitchen and you can see the way talk with his talk. Green food now follow? Hey has follow him. Yes Scooby Radio on a plane train. Why you're quarantined everywhere you need to be. I am brain the scoop around make sure to follow me on twitter at Scoop Instagram snapchat scoop and make sure to subscribe to the scoop. Be Radio PODCAST. Which is available on all podcasting. Networks iheartradio spotify apple podcast. Google play tuning APS to chat or simply by visiting SCOOP BE RADIO DOT COM. Two Point one mainstream in twenty nineteen. Anyone from mark. Cuban was a theory Sampras at the calendar Charles Barkley killing nail. You name it. They've been on the line right. Now is a guy who has a star in waiting for a little while. None of that. Melvin Taylor the second who was the host of the alternative locally in New York City on. Wabc our radio and he goes away senior columnist at respect magazine. Sir What's going on? I'm most manages pointed it up. Make sure to stay healthy elbows. What people whenever somebody on the street just trying to make sure we all get through the time together. How about you did you. Did you say elbows. I did and they can't go ahead. Challenge and child Oakley kind of eat their heart out. 'cause you got to shop elbows right now man. Listen they need to be careful? 'cause I've been out here practicing you know you see me straight. What's up man like? Oh Get Elbow. Bro. I can't can't do. Not Help is right now man. I'm doing good you ask me. This is working hard staying out the way get numbers up over at heavy dot com. We making a move by Yeah killing it over there. Congratulations Annoy about away. Sources said congratulations on your success. And then I would thank. You appreciate their their so so We do. I begin so those who listeners. Melvin Taylor is quite modest former producer extraordinaire at CBS. Radio When I was I think we connected at some point over there and you know because it's been riding up the ranks don't commercials are on Youtube An and I'm curious to know like Yorker perspective particularly in digital ache. Like how did your whole Youtube Ascension Kinda Start Man Good question The best way I can pretty is it started really the day in which I got my camera To make a long story short at the time but just to make sure for right now Was working you know. Would it be high was recorded? You gotTA run So I was working productions and Just finished shooting the show that we were doing. We're doing two three so D- Elite user like digital shows we had to host over there bowl TV and was wrapping up a shoot for the business show. And how to home? So I can pick up. My camera had been going through with Usps up time to get my stuck on time and Because everybody on Mito back at the office just needs to go pick up the camera and I'll be right back Ended up getting home and the head hunter. Give me a call I was like hey just WanNa let you told everybody where I was. Just GonNa put up the cameras. Don't get it put it in my room and then come back to the office but I did want to have any more mishaps. 'cause I was going to be going out of town the following day for Christmas break and So basically told me hey world graduate everybody know there will be a need for you to come back to the office because unfortunately I we have to make expansions and apart change. Was You know we no longer need services and at that point I remember thinking to myself man? One this is. This is not to do that. I WANNA PETER OVER. Call now too. I just spent the last of what I had about plane ticket to go home and get this camera and I was thinking that. Okay look working. Everything's GonNa be fine. I'll be all right I'll be able to reopen and I'll be good and in that moment. I remember calling my dad after thinking over sometimes like dad and I. I think I might consider this camera back. 'cause I can't I don't have anything to go up right now. I don't know what to do and I remember him telling me under. No circumstances will usurp that came back. You Know How long you've been telling me that you needed a camera to be able to do stuff like do not do or keep that camera because you never know what can happen and you know. I listened to experimented with the camera. Sound while we're going home. What would break just trying to on an Indian out of it and then when I got back to New York I just started doing youtube videos and specifically started doing Reacted video the main reviewed video and cometary videos. Because I had been watching reactions to us you can even go ahead so maiocco workers from my nine bars when I first Got New York back in Chicago like I would love just watching the pure joy excitement. Somebody would get out of watching something for the first time. Hearing this open. The first time we're really speaking passionately about something that they They followed that they love and I figured camera. I want to be able to do the same thing. And you know I've just started doing those and ever since subject never looked back really helped me understand something I I'm a writer your writer Out The delve too much into youtube as much as you do But I ended up in the process of anywhere understand the process. You know like characters than certain amount of characters to Kinda grasp people's attention not to click bait but to really you know and I engaged with it but for those who are listening for myself. I'm curious from your perspective How do you get those views off of just organic key words? Do your videos on Youtube School? Honestly the the best thing I can tell you it to be be there before the audience even though they're looking forward that's a big thing for Mike. You just have to be pregnant when they're looking for you and you know sometimes you're you're gotta gotTa Look Nicer People. Click on the thumbnail. I'm the type of person they come into something. I WANNA watch all of it so if I do a reaction video to song or To new trailer that comes out which will go at or do when an Allen goes into wounded I watch not only am I GONNA. Watch and listen to my whole just to make sure that I'm staying on my PS and QS but also watching if fifteen other people out there that I'll check all of those enemy checking the last puppy that come in within the past couple minutes with me have finished another other videos on watching just because I wanna have a sense. What's going on in the space and being able to own a racist Lawrence part of that. Is You being there when the people need to see you? If somebody working for something at that point in time you need to be there for them to find you if you wait a couple of hours a couple of days a couple of weeks and then decided to do. You may have missed your window at that point in time. That's the one aspect in terms of being on the on. The top was side of things on my Hindi Youtube that you're not into if you're not into knowing if you're not present while topical wave is going to miss you so tell me if this is kind of similar so at the time. It is Recording today is Wednesday march twenty twenty in about six eighteen. Pm Eastern time Sunday and Monday. I wrote STORIES ABOUT OPRAH. One was about Michael rapaport running over a heavy dot com Michael rapaport. I think I send it to you and I thought it was trolling Gayle King in Oprah in the picture and then I wrote that like Sunday Monday. Win It okay. But then like Monday or Tuesday. I wrote a piece. Where enveloped something so I had Larry Sanders scooping rated podcast for maybe a player currently agree player? And he talked about how he may be doing. A collaboration with drake and so what I did. What I some things together to headline reads Drake reveals why he wants Oprah two billion comma partners with NBA star. The RE. The why I did that was because you know straight came out with a song where he talks about. He wants opus. Bank account googled. How much she was worth. She's about two point. Four billion so for copying put and merged the fact that the Keyword Drake emerged. Oprah's two billion and then I added. Nba Star is you know there's no NBA basketball going on. They were similar. Is that kind of what happened. Was Oprah was trending on the Internet on day for something that was going on the new. She responded on twitter. Blacks picked it up because I was headed occur. I'm getting tons of clicks like just today the one about Drake Ninety six hundred us the one about With the one rappaport where he talked about Gayle. King and Oprah in the mean in an e trout Social distancing that has a almost eighty four hundred views today that kind of similar process with Youtube. Like how would you take something like that emerged together with Keillor's man I think this year You're spot on and everything. She sang in the sense. That not only were you already doing the work and be present in the space but it just happens in like nobody ever really knows. But it just happens. Oprah goes viral overnight for Personal stuff when you look at it. Because I was. I just happened to check twitter last night to also see Issues turning why she was trending and because not only. Were you president a spate because this is something that you already doing all investigating and putting out there when it does pop in the way in which a date. And she tran. Now you're included within that cycle and that tied into everything else that you're doing because now people will see okay. I'm checking Oprah after that. They been anything else. Ope related going on by what Scooby's Britain now going to go. Check out more about scooby. The adults don't know or haven't known yet because he's connecting jury. It can making Larry Connect Oprah connected Michael and then might be more connections that I can find me. I would say. There's there's a lot of crossover between the so definitely being in the space because as you waited until today to put up that article it'll probably do numbers but not the numbers they would have done already. Because you put information out there and heart goes out there and it's already Lincoln toward the link. Was your moment on you to where you started. Get those superfluous amount of followers. Comic can use. What was your first normally. That happened. man I quote unquote moment. I could say like I I know which one is the biggest one for sure but let me let me see if I could probably say the what did he say. Okay Gotcha so the quote unquote. There were two of so. I'll give you both of those. The first one was Me doing a video for the Jane Jane because she was just coming out Well she's still putting out music in a couple of videos before the album was coming out and the big genetic fan has offered. News occur artistry and this particular liable was very touching Her most recent one because she had been working with Cranston from things we already molded prints. Unfortunately we have passed and she was coming out of that space and as video came out. You know. Watch it day. My Review on talked about it discuss put out In a timely manner and that was the first time that I really got to see how you to kind of turns in terms of when you're like in the space and people are searching for your day and you know you see your video. Go from okay. I got like four or five US cool. You know the time where I was like. Oh man look four or five Pete and watch video like great like I'm I'm ecstatic about that right because that means somebody out of Utah watching this then it goes to all right seventy eight people that are from thing today those for mayor to okay. Two hundred thousand two thousand three thousand to appoint rob remember just constantly refreshing my phone to see the number climb higher and higher and I wanNA say around that point in time that one in maybe about twenty twenty two thousand or so before starting to slow down and I was like okay. You know what this was. This is awesome. This is really cool. I like the aspect and pirates is going I we sail wrote getting the satisfaction that people are enjoying the work. But what I love more so with the engagement and then now be able to have conversations with so many other people that are when they think they're not people that have known about the normal name music while she was still backing Kansas City. Doing music all the way. It's people that just aren't hearing the first time now. I'm able to see where they are. What they think about the music engage with them and also other music. Do they like it could similar to my own taste? They'll be able to find other things that they enjoy. That was my first real moment of man. This is incredible. I see that this is just a way for me to be able to give us. Because that's what a lot of people are in court for but there's also a way for me to be able to have these same conversations that I'm having on my radio show as well and being able to bridge those gaps. I will save second in the biggest moment chain when I did buy a video about. This is America with childish. Gambino and I remember it was right after my friends had grown me a surprise birthday carney and it was coming back home and I remember that I didn't want to be out too late because I knew that Donald Glover who was like a. You know a somebody. I look up to within the entrepreneurs face Was hosting coordinate night live and I was super excited to be able to watch and I wanted to get back home but obviously it was my birthday party anytime you stay on a little bit later and when I got back home watched a few sketches and getting ready to go to bed and I just happen to check the groom and I saw that there was an average American only show like the beginning. A couple of seconds of behind download energy is kind of like cut into this American cursive holiday. As you know what I know it's late like two three. Am but I WANNA do video bow. Because I don't know what time wake up in the morning because we've had a lot of running game. My roommate is looking man but everybody asleep. You don't WanNa be route like I have to do this right now if I don't do this now I'm GonNa kick up in the morning because I'm just saying he is so Ended up doing the video and I was just so tired in. My mind was just so warped from what it was that I just saw. I just immediately went to sleep right after that because I just couldn't I couldn't even process everything that was going on. So there's video it'll go to sleep for whatever reason. I think this all the time I go to sleep around like three three thirty. I wake up at seven. Am randomly. And I'm like still super tired. Groggy don't know what's going on but I just wake up at seven. Am and got energy to be. Go in Eddie and I'm trying to go back to sleep but in the misdemeanor doing and I'm like you know look reading. Let me just get Ingo. Put this video out so I get a radio show too. I live at home my laptop topic. Edit the video put the video. Go back to sleep. I wake up come back and I see okay. The videos doing pretty well. That's good thousand. Two thousand US couple couple comments great as I started to make dinner and watch. Tv It takes all now go from two thousand to fifteen thousand. I'm like after jump like I never seen. Whoa that's crazy. That fifteen goes to like forty five now like all right. This is by far is GONNA be my most viewed video like this this this feels like and at the same time my email account like going like going off the hook like it's. I have to put my phone on silent. And they'll do not dister because so many email notifications would come in and leaving comments and also subscribing to the channel and then it goes from From there to about A hundred thousand today like okay. Best best video so far in a around all of that also crossed thousands prescribers at the same time and then it just keeps growing swirling and they finally stopped around. Maybe about two hundred and forty five. Thousand views is starting to slow down but at that point in time I had already gotten text messages from brands and emails crump former professors in college. To say you know my kids remembered you from school call me to say hey. Did you see Melvin video on youtube point in time and then when I go to type it in you type in America and you see Donald Lovers video and underneath like maybe they might have been two other videos by video was right there Sir Just as a third video the third thumbnail to pop up. This is my to think that. Wow like all of this took on in this manner so I know it's a kind of a long story but just really giving you in-depth like what? I was thinking at that point in time was going on. That's why wasn't everything for sure for sure who radio on the line now than it tell the second talking Anything from you to to Just the grind Being in New York City and making things happen Talk a little bit about Or rather you did talk a little bit about doing radio and we talked about at the beginning Do you enjoy it. I do it do it. You know it's it's fascinating to me because that's all a tweet not that long ago. I think he probably is too where somebody was saying man. I wish that we just have some type of all your form when you could tune in and listen to podcasts as things are going live. News constantly updating whatever's going on and somebody recruited that say we do? It's radio you know it would. Just it's just so interesting to me that things kind of like how the nineties during the ninety nine everybody knows all the colors and do this where each hairstyle and how things are going cycled. But now we're in eight of and now the ninety zero before the show you how everything goes in a cycle for men. I think the same thing with radio was well like we're getting in time and space where you know people want that news right now when a when a trade happens within sports like beer fans that yes. I want to go to twitter to see what my favorite journalists that I have where it is that I listen to or watch. What what they have to say about it and if they're not on TV. And something else I need to be able to hear. You WanNa go to radio today to get that. I want to be able to have that same position for people when it comes to cultural millions coming out or when it comes to pop culture or Just new music and general partner reason. Why love having good? The blend of my radio show in reaction reviews that I do because I'm only going to be able to catch people's attention to things for so long with some of these videos. But if you're able to now come over to my radio show and listened to everything there you see that. I have unlimited more amounts of times and be able to discuss what what we were talking about within Youtube this week. So a couple of videos or some songs or some news drops Or anything of that nature. Now you can come over to the radio station or to the radio. Statistically and listen to me talk ad nauseam about those idea. Enjoy it man. I do enjoy it where were around. Who are some of your regular fluence? It's growing up. The main went on to say it'd be Tom. Joining and I had the pleasure of being able to meet him when he got into the Radio Hall of fame and was able to get a picture with them That that same day Comes under for sure with the biggest influence on me just because growing up in Chicago. Uh going to school every morning with my dad's school or US. Having to wake up extra early took my mom to work. And then my dad at school and me and He go to work times. There was the guy that was who we listened to That was that was school. We got our things from that will be. Kinda you know. Learned everything about what happened last night where we missed out on. That's what we went through for everything so I will grow up and be like all right. What's going on Black America Web Dot Com? Today was the black black history fact that he got. Were today or what. What like old songs as he could play today or what the what like new song sampled an old song and now we're about to hear that new song and that also a web he would also have like little It's funny because now. I'm getting a sketch. Comedy storytelling getting away. And I remember growing up and listening to the different narrative program would have won there where people would be different actors and actresses playing different roles and characters like three or four minutes cents during the show and listening to all of that so he would have to be the biggest one um to me then after after that. I'll probably end up going with Steve Harvey just because he would take it to another level in terms of being everywhere Really being able to be on the radio but then also On the TV. Reverend watching the Steve Harvey Show Growing up and also be able to host like Family feud and then still being made comedian. Amazing to me The last three that I will say three that. I'm kinda quote unquote station at this going to end up being Nick Cannon Ryan seacrest and Tange came because he's Kinda got his radio so but a lot of people don't know that he also used to do radio hour here in New York back before he was diagnosed with Lupus Ryan secrest because he's been the radio gap the longest and he's been a successor you could you could say quote unquote for decor and just kinda learning from afar. Two different things. He's doing to stay relevant within the space and how he's able to continue to grow and create more opportunities for people similar to the nick in ways as well and cares Jay because a lot of people don't know the he used to do radio way back in the day and that's how him A Khloe Kardashian became cool back in the day because he used to do radio at Miami back when they used to film I think it was the name of the show when Coli Miami Film and the Kardashian show for eating poppy because he's doing radio for them and he had a cool relationship with her help to throw the party. Then the event space a how that turned it to him being going onto being one. Oh six park and do any growing into the entertainment host condition that he today so those will be the five people like they're gonNA look up to From radio he's got a lot sir. I know aloe listen. I'll be talking. I'll be talking. Talk Radio Paperback now. Okay Chris Radio talking with Melvin killer the second Melbourne told. Tell me that you are a lakers. Fan Man sources say. You're spot on with that one. I'm a Laker ride or die until Through the definitely I was ruled as much park at our sixteen again. By a with it I was like Chucky Atkins might be able to get online Ronnie Tur- yet and get like a rebound. But you know we can. We can make this happen. You know maybe a day Johnson. Oto can do a couple of things I can. I can pull out Laker day today. Don't forgive Stanislavsky Method Danko Oh not marry him. He gets lava method. Inko come on Christmas. Seventy eight rebound come on. Bro. I'm with it. I really wanted to ten in pampering him. I had high hopes. But it's all good you you. You mentioned some other names. I keep going where we want to talk about. The Morrow Jordan Clarkson Brian Kelly started four. I remember when Chris came was was laying on the best because we didn't have enough players. The Cleveland of course man talk about. I'm here he's about it all day can talk about. It rained every day terrain Joe Corinne Russ had a burner low key. Don't let read get Hot Ben Left. Hey through a lot of people off. They was not ready for that. Any pretty were sources. Tell me Kareem is looking to come on. Scooping radio very soon That's what my my league so sincere looking out for that potentially oh man. Y'All definitely need to stay looking out for that brochure. Terrain man come on the radio broker. Sore do that do that. We WanNa hear all the stories. My Dad all the stories Yeah so what? Do you make the Lakers season issue. May I was extremely excited about lake. You C- initially because also handed down. They were going to be champions So it's it's kind of a little bit of a bug with the fact that we're not gonna be able to have that parade anytime so it's probably going to get pushed back. Hopefully not cancelled due to the season being canceled on that. We don't get to that type of situation but I was very optimistic and very high. On what could be accomplished. Obviously after Lebron was playing at MVP level because a lot a lot of people are saying that. We're going to have the best. I believe P. E. R. Rating Agriculture. Somebody statistically probably one of the best seasons anybody ever had. I don't take that away from him whatsoever. But what's the same? Not that they were saying against with Brian. Every time you doing this in the Eastern Conference the fact that he's playing in the Eastern Conference and now that he can come over to the western conference in a conference. A thing things I think that hands down he should be. Mvp welcome people will say well Melvin if you look at it Anthony Days of meaning in Austin category and therefore he should be more of MVP type residents. I would tell them if they if they look at the they look at the way game or clay win. The Brown was eighty. Eighty was out liberalizaing. Those are two totally different scores. And I think the ad year was for him to grow and learn. Lebron and say okay. How can I put up type of production? When I don't have a Lebron Level Cowan let me understand how to be able to do. Let me understand. What quarters do I need to go? Get on what do I need to fall back on? Where can I get my active breast while still being a student? Defensively how can I be able to pick up my teammates? When they need me and Lincoln I leaned on when I need this. So I think that's the case for For those two when you look at the rest of the Rock. That's all I can do this all day. We will get the rest of the Rock Kyle coolant I think while. A lot of people have been disappointed with the outcome. I'm somebody who firmly believe that he could be a 20-point-per-game school especially on this team with a lot of people don't understand and just from watching the win with Google. Play to win with the Lakers. Play win which is played in the past years and for my own basketball experience having played in Grade School High School and in College You can just understand when a players playing a certain way. And they're trying to train. This anatomy will years. Who's been playing on a very young team and he's been playing into Mana. We're always been about we all going to get our cause. We ain't been that good so we got to put up numbers so that way people can understand and we're growing. Our game will work the money you know we worked at the time and you want to end up coming into this year early on. He still had from that. Not Transitioning after all star break. I would really say toward the end of things but more so after all star break you start to see a different side of big Christmas Day. Game where he said okay. I'm understanding matchbox more understanding on not affecting the game scoring wise. I can I can make a difference in rebounds. Don't pick they pick now. I could play pretty good defense when I come in my mind. Who I can also make sure I'm not in the passing lane offensively clogging up the lanes that way when the bronner. Ad streaming down the middle. Somebody in the past. I'M NOT. They're trying to get through points. And they clearly have a mismatch and they'll be able to get the an opportunity so I think that the Lakers overall and they definitely we're GONNA be talking to me But we'll see how everything plays out. Once the entire corner team is over with radio on the line with Melvin Attila. The second host of the alternative with male. Excuse me Melvin Taylor. The second on New York Radio W eight C are those who are keeping score at home. The alternative of Melvin Taylor. Is that the radio Dedicated to putting you on to using and playing the hottest around the world Since his debut on the the alternative has been able to help break New Orleans entertain listeners. Today's hits and educate them on what's going on in the world. Day and education is the key made JER What do you have that? You're working on right now. that you can share man Do I have that? I'm working on right now. I can share well One thing that people I would love to be able to share within the new broadcom. The for the past two years more seriously More at the magnet theater Is located in Manhattan Right in New York and Report of Improv Troupe. Called House party gets comedy where we do a lot of sketch on amber pushing on Youtube Channel Right. Now we've got about two Seton were of Videos where people could go and check those out when Youtube promise you. They'll make you laugh if not I'll make it up to you in some way shape or form so that is one thing. I would love to the second thing that I would look people canal. Is that I was recently. Cast as a lead and just wrapping a short bill That van called the fruited bears. Which will be coming out. I believe in April at some point in time and I can't wait for people to be able to see that and see that not only can I Do not only dynamic within the Youtube space but also host Different programs such as the radio show and also the alternatives the TV show and my previous Tv show making Manhattan but also can act and do sketch comedy Lewis. I can't wait to be able to share that with everyone when that comes out. I like it. Radio with Melvin Taylor. Second when everything Related to his brand youtube. The Los Angeles Lakers Fan. La The Lakers and Yeah man what are you doing To kind of better you're so it Kinda. What are you doing? Better yourself during this Period of Corona virus. And Self. What are you doing every day when you wake up to to better yourself from the day before you know I'm glad you asked that question because initially It just kind of started out as active wrestling because somebody that's always kinda going as evidenced by everything that I'm doing that I really don't have time to be able to sit down and not do anything but with the corning that's been happening One thing that I've been doing it's helped me out in a way that I've been watching more movies and TV shows actively never really had time to sit and just watch them and be able to get the mood kind of always all right. What they keep going watching going aren't go. Lakers right now. But now when I'm watching movies and this mostly because I just wrote my own Short film over the weekend Now what I'm watching movies companion breaking them down into that process and saying okay What direction as a character going? Why why is that the characters are with happening here? What about the supporting characters? Where the story going? What is this universe that this movie existence really starting to break it down structural level because During this time I wanted to write more whether that is the sketches that I have written To be to be on stage at some point in time or going to be more short series than they put out on Youtube were short films and eventually some point. I like the right a Feature films hopefully during the time I'll be able to learn more about the writing process for For All of those as well than food on my editing skills for you too so yeah. That's what I'm doing day to day. Basis gotta work. And thank you Brandon Scooby Robinson hungry. Appreciate you having me on your show. You know it was I can think back to the day when we initially met. And how long it's been since then our close we've grown friends and colleagues and being able to see you just excel at the rate in which you are in level which you are too big to be a threat to business in every way shape on a base not only to know you but also be so excited to be seen the pathway that you're only seeing where that you going. I'm really happy for you man. Thank you so much bringing the on. Thank you for having a Watch all that by the way. I paid him to say that we got you. Now Your Haney we we know you don't have to be watching the tweets. We watch him Bro. If they beat him. Put out one thing. Mysteriously some people happen to be on. Tv robber saying the Naked Day or later. So everybody I want what people might say. Scooby ain't got no sources. I would definitely say that gap notification going decks because they all be watching everything that he said so since brother. Thank you for joining us today. I appreciate you look how mad I appreciate you too thank you.

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How to Write Well in Business  We Discuss Choosing the Right Words When Creating Your Companys Story and Ask Why Grammar is So Important w

OC Talk Radio

48:55 min | 1 year ago

How to Write Well in Business We Discuss Choosing the Right Words When Creating Your Companys Story and Ask Why Grammar is So Important w

"Here comes again lunch. Lippi the same old same old or you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs APP firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery. Hey welcome back for another episode of confident are I the one can confidently we listen to and now you're going to get a real. Return your investment whether you work in a business work with a business work on your own business. Command has done all three Alex. Hey Alex no Paul aw fighting with your mic there today. I'm fighting with everything here today. It's just a struggle here today trying to keep my mic from flipping over and flopping down here. I I need when like yours has the R. Y.. <hes> AH flag on Mike flag on it here we can arrange for that so you've really got an old favorite why shouldn't say old you have a longtime favourite of ours here at O._C.. Talkradio a guy who wrote for Bloomberg Jordan business who writes for the local orange any business journal <hes> Peter Brennan and here today so I always get a kick listening to Peter here. Maybe it's because we're both Irish well. I think it'd probably easy part of your in group right. Here's your wired to like them. Regardless of what you were saying before yeah exactly right now you guys can just see me on a box and I'm not actually in the room. We have a tribal connection here for some reason. I guess you're not likely to end up in a warring faction day okay so that's good news so yes. Are you talking about Peter's book. Is that what we're talking about here. We're talking about Peter's book. We're talking about how journalism changed with the digital era and what some of the lessons are for other companies companies but he's also interviewed some some very famous C._e._O.'s in what he seen Oh man you can can share what was left or what wouldn't be written about them in the actual articles and and if he wanted to get future interviews but with but now we can talk and can I tell you the key to really get him to talk about the stories. This is how I heard about. Many of these stories. Try took him. I took him across the street. We had a beer but I do have some Irish whiskey in here. That might <hes> entice them to tell more stories. I don't know about that. That sounds sounds great confident R._O._I.. Show in two thousand eighteen is sixty one percent more sober okay. We'll wait till after I. I'll step out. Let you to talk here but I just give it a little background on Repeater O._C.. Talkradio well thank you Paul Peter Well Peter Brennan Welcome to the show as Paul mentioned near the financial editor for the Orange County Business Journal. You've written about thirty thousand articles. I've been posted the New York Times and The Washington Post and you've written a book and the book is how to write it work first of all welcome in. Why did you write the book? Well thank you very much. <hes> I've I've written so many different different articles over the years. I've been journalist for thirty five years and covered business for more than twenty twenty five years I'd say and I I realized that <hes> a lot of people could use the skill set. I've learned over the years ears because I myself I grew up in Hawaii where we're great. Writers are not grow up you know great writers grew up in England or Ireland or New York like but not Hawaii and <hes> so I spoke to kind pigeon and was a bit sloppy and that's how it is over there and and so when I decided to become a reporter I was the guy who went out and got the scoops and I left it to editors straighten out my grammar make sure everything was punctuated correctly and a whole bit and so but over the years <hes> I learned <hes> you know grammar really is important and <hes> my my lack of grammar skills at times probably hurt me and some job applications like and <hes> and so over the years I I've learned skills and I thought other people might be able people to <hes> use them like and so. I had a fun time looking through them and <hes> one thing I learned about grammar books is that they're all geared toward the person writing the great American novel and by that you want to fiction Chan you want <hes> a lot of metaphor and those sorts of things and you want to sort of lewd the things but not get right on point you want the the reader to discover what you really mean. After reading three hundred pages or something like hatwell business writing is the complete opposite you WanNa get right to the point you want the reader to understand what you're saying right then and there and so <hes> and so I was when I was researching this book I realized that <hes> they're not a lot of radical dramatical books geared toward business writing and the ones I saw weren't written by people who do it day in and day out there are written by <hes> <hes> people who <hes> just didn't have that experience in like and so I thought well there's a little nice little niche and I'll I'll. I'll write it and see if it <hes> if if people are interested in it and luckily they have been interested in it so I'm here I am well that must've been challenging to be in a field where you're writing professionally and you you sense and you're getting feedback that you're you don't know all the rules it was it was quite challenging and editors withdraw their hands up in frustration. <hes> but I'm you know <hes> <hes> Mike bulldog. I just keep plugging along the NYC and <hes> now that I'm an editor as well. I I really understand I sympathize with them and <hes> you know if you ever get a good editor who really improves your work. You know hold onto that editor there quite a jam it <hes> it can help I I had the I I used to score high on the math scores and low on English on the standardized testing and I work for one lawyer lawyer who drill who this lit up my work constantly and <hes> when I took went to take my G. Mat Lo and behold a switched all of a sudden my English scores got better than my math that I think it was just from having having an editor that really drilled into me how to be clear on our work. I it's it's really important <hes> if you're in business and you want to sell a product to somebody and and you're writing is full of grammatical oh errors the person buying that product is going to think you're not as smart as you may really be like and so <hes> I I've heard of C._E._o.. Sending out <hes> <hes> emails was grammatical errors in their employees grimace at it you know and they're nder embarrassed about it and <hes> <hes> you know at the higher higher levels of business and particularly those was an ivy league education they all know the difference between regardless and irregardless and they all know the difference between good and well and if you don't know the difference they will <hes> they will think you're just not that smart and you know and treat you appropriately accordingly. I should say yeah and but a lot of times outside of journalism a lot of times people won't tell you you can't write journalism. They beating your brain. That's that's correct because <hes> journalism <hes> you're putting out your best <hes> <hes> you're putting out your story and the editor is GonNa come along and improve it as the best they can and editors are trained that way. That's what they pay. They get paid for and if they're mistakes I tell you if you're an editor. You're paranoid because you're afraid you're going to miss a mistake that becomes so obvious once it gets in the print and then your boss comes along and say why didn't you see she. That's so obviously you know and you take an average dory which is between five hundred thousand words. Let's say a thousand words and each of those thousand words has a five to ten letters in it so you can misspell it five thousand ten thousand times and then we'll get the sentences at each thousand word sentence thousand words story has probably all I'd say <hes> fifty or sixty sentences so you're gonNA make sure to punctuation correct and that you're GonNa make sure to the grammar is correct and the pronouns match what they're supposed the match and a subject verb agreement works in the like and so you probably got about though between ten and twenty thousand ways to get a story screwed up on one thousand words story. I'm like any en. Even though there's grammar check now. How is it like spellcheck in that people becoming worse spellers because the computer will catch it well well? What's interesting is <hes> I I do like the spell check <hes> and <hes> when I misspell something I see you know has a red underlined or something thing and I think well what's wrong? What are what are they saying there and so I check check it and it almost time there correct but there are times that they're not quite correct and and if the word is <hes> say like <hes> an Oh and you spell it <hes> an oh? W Do you know the spell checks not gonNA crack catch that right. You know <hes> you know. It has good in this bad parts. Yes well the in so I find that when I'm writing oftentimes I think I understand something in but and I could talk about it but until I put it down in imprint I really don't it's not oftentimes it's not clear and if you listen to some of the read some of the transcripts of the show you can tell that I'm searching for from my thought as I'm talking but that's a reality as we talk. I mean we just go with the flow we change our perspective are where we're going with the sentence mid-sentence but in writing where essentially taking our thoughts and has they're coming but they rarely come out. It's it's a a master who can constantly communicate imperfect sentences the first time it's not the standard standard output. Is it <hes> no that's correct. I don't I think I've ever met somebody who speaks perfectly all the time and so <hes> want to <hes> and and writing it down will will force you to think about your thoughts and methods you WanNa communicate much better than speaking well like so. It's always better to write it down then speak it if in my view and <hes> everybody gets added do you did you know that <hes> when Thomas Jefferson wrote the declaration of independence it was edited eighty six times and it was about a third of it was cut out. Can you believe that Thomas Jefferson editing the editing is probably saved a lot of <hes> documents from being <hes> unreadable right or that that's certainly true and and <hes> and my in my view <hes> you know one of the problems of college kids. Is You know the professor says okay. I need you to write a two thousand word essay on this or that you know so the college professor or college kid says well I only have five hundred words so I get stretch it out and so they learned to stretch it out like and that makes really bad writing and they take that writing into the workforce and I've known I've I've edited stories the other day in a story that was two thousand words and I looked at it and I said well the last six hundred words were unnecessary chopped it off. I made it chopped off twenty five percent of the story like I have no regrets about it. Whatsoever new those a writer <hes> so in my book when you write you must right? <hes> concisely and not meander all over the place where particularly for business writing you know for for creative writing you can meander and <hes> maybe people will stay with you or maybe they won't. It's a totally you're writing to entertain lane where businesses writing writing business writing is to inform cracked. Yes I in the don't want a gift they want. They wanted upfront. Have you found that writing <hes> for the the new generation. Are they getting better at it or are they getting worse at it well. It's it's sort of a interesting <hes> comparison because when I was writing <hes> when I started my journalism career you're in the early in one thousand nine hundred <hes>. We didn't obviously didn't have the Internet resources for or how would I say <hes> limited you had to go to library and do your research. There's no google and the like and so what happened is <hes> <hes> the writing tend to be pretty good unlike but the research wasn't that good and so now nowadays because Google and the Internet you can get research at the tip of your fingers in and get some really good research as a matter of fact and so the the research tends to be better but the writing is not as good as it was back then so it seems to me as I read Journalism Business Journalism it tends to be to just throw a bunch of things in there now we'll talk a paragraph about this and a paragraph Graf about that and and it does they don't flow like they once did it depends on who you're reading right and the like but just you know normal copy on on something. It seems that they just kind of keep adding stuff to that is like there was no flow here in but that might be my opinion why I've seen a number of stories like that and also <hes> M._s.. Take an account that <hes> <hes> automated <hes> <hes> a I artificial intelligence is taking over some of the more simple stories like and so <hes> if you look at them and <hes> <hes> they'll take some of the the data and and it appears on Wall Street and like and just sort of put it into a a template and put a story out on it so <hes> those stories will appear to same over and over again and I can then you have <hes> young reporters. <hes> you know the media's in an a business now where it's <hes> basically it's the revenues falling so the talent is in there that the high paying editors have laughed and like and so the <hes> there's there's not as many talented reporters or talented editors there and so <hes> particularly among the younger ones and so they tend to put a whole unwanted stuff together and pretending so story like and then <hes> you get somebody older older <hes> reporter who like like myself I I like to think okay I'm putting together a story and you're going to be entertained. The other and <hes> for example <hes> <hes> I was talking to other day was my editor and we're talking about a story. I wrote about for about Pacific Premier Bank here. In Orange County and <hes> Pacific premier has done much better than the other local banks here. It has a what's it called net interest margin of about out four point five percent and the other banks around three percent and so that's it's really technical really wonky like in a lot of people would be turned off. If I lead was that you know Pacific Premier as as <hes> you know a net interest margin of Kim it's much better than this competitors and so that's kind of you know what I lead the reader in instead I focus on the C._e._o.. Of a Pacific premier he was a guy named Steve Gardner and he was a dropout an N._B._A.. Program in Long Beach State drought because his wife was having a baby needed to get a job like and he's just a a local kid he went to failing bank and Riverside and he helped secede moved to Irvine and little by little he started growing. Bring it now there's two competitors too big competitors once called Banca California and they're the ones who have the this soccer new soccer stadium in southern in downtown Los Angeles and so they <hes> they had the backing of Hollywood heavyweights in the like and so <hes> they were glamorous and you you know every Magic Johnson's assistant was on the Board of Directors Bank in California and it was star power and then the other bank was opus bank and so his bank had star power some Wall Street heavyweights who invested in opus and they have a Dynamic C._e._o.. Joe Named Steve Gordon so so we have three banks here so I told the story of how see Gardner he <hes> he didn't have anybody he was underdog. He loved hockey and so he always had his sons on the hockey arena playing hockey it was an N._B._A.. Graduate IT and <hes> so he had nobody he he was beating the Guy Bank of California which had the Hollywood power and he's being opens bank which had the Wall Street power and so then you had a dynamic a who he was competing against and so I lead with that rather than the net interest margin and so that's how you build a story is is making it <hes> humanizing it. That's quite quite the idea and <hes> you know because behind. Every number is an interesting person behind every number is an interesting person. Yes the numbers more seasoning and in providing people who like facts <hes> some data points well. It's always important the one the thing on Wall Street you can be inundated with numbers. I mean just pray all there are so many facts and figures in like and one thing I learned and I learned is not the hard way but by investing in stocks myself you know and when you're looking at a stock and you've invested visited there. It's read numbers that are really important to you. Nothing else the price you bought it at the prices at right now and the price you want to sell it at and like noser to three most important numbers and like and all the other numbers are interesting some more interesting than others and there there's a lot of noise out there. You Know Wall Street analysts. They're not paid to sit around doing nothing so they put out these reports and so they you know whether something's happening or not usually something is but they put out the reports and the brokers read the reports and then they call up the ambassador and say well we think the stock is good the stocks going down and it's under always turning turning the stock right and like so <hes> there's a lot of noise out there and there's a lot of data points and <hes> is that good good business writing though is rising above the and I heard the the term don't bury the lead as it. Is it getting hitting the reader right between the eyes was something that that grabs her attention while it it depends you know if <hes> it depends on the story you have straight news stories. You have feature stories. Yes talking about business writing okay like in business writing. What's in Paul's getting ready here too for our break so when we come back from the break and just talk about you know what's from a business writer perspective and taking some of the things in communicating story and having people with interest because you might be talking about numbers but I'm wondering how much of that translates when you're trying to communicate and persuade in in business writing as well yeah I'll give you some examples happen to great <music> and while you're waiting for those examples we WanNa remind you that this is a multimedia project here? Unlike most of our shows there is a magazine than accompanies. The show <hes> Alex <hes> in his firm puts out confident are oh I magazine. The most recent issue just hit the stance but I have the last issue. I should be talking about the new one but <hes> in the new one I know there's an article about Google and some of the research that they've been doing <hes>. It's pretty fascinating about how the brain works and how people respond now we train your people accordingly. <hes> in the previous issue <hes> there are articles about unleash your inner supercomputer <hes> Verne Harnish on strategy Dr Brad Smart on top grading really as some interesting stuff so if you wanna read as well as listen there are two parts to this media empire growing here confident R I dot Com this where you find both of the magazine which is free that's right f. r. e. and the podcast both free information for you as Alex tries to spread the word about this whole neuroscience using your brain to <hes> to <hes> upgrade the operating system that came with the <hes> machine here right so all that more go check it out confident are dot com a new guys could talk about change and all that other stuff here. I just got interject off of that commercial. Will we ever have robot reporters Porter's. Will we ever have totally robotic news operations here. That's some are thinking that way what you know there are certain companies out there to do it right now. Artificial intelligence and <hes> right some some bought is as sifting through the the stuff that comes in and putting it together in some sort of order. There are publication. What is business insider whatever that's sort of a compilation of other stuff? I don't know if they're good very well be Associated Press and Bloomberg. They're all working with it and I I'll tell you you know there are headlines that are automated off the press releases and this has been going on for ten years and so the the the press release comes out <hes> artificial intelligence takes that headline takes out and put makes a headline out of it has already been there then machines genes that are are are are coated the trade on certain words. We'll trade on that headline that crazy yeah it. Is You know sometimes you might see some really weird movements in the stock market you thinking what's going on the other flipside of that and then I'll let you guys get back to this. Go to another since I got you here I see more and more where newsrooms themselves are pushing their reporters to push their own news out through social media and the to the point where I've seen some of these systems advertise advertise where you the editor can track how many of Peter's tweets got picked up and what traction his story got online and I come back to Peter and I say you're not cutting buddy. <hes> you know you great story big scoop but nobody's he's reading it. You gotta go out and push it like me. I'm just the content creator. You're the media company. No no you're in. You're involved in this too. That's quite true we could. We could really discuss that for a long time. Yeah all right well. I know Alex's chomping at the task is some of those but ahead to throw those in it talk about change. This is a world is changing faster than anything I've ever seen before what yeah thanks ball and we were talking there. When we keep on that Pete Peter and talking talking about the lessons you saw in how disruption as comes to media and maybe how media bosses avoided taking that <hes> taking hard look of how things were going to change and did it take longer what in a lot of probably thought it was impervious newspapers for a long time? We'll in the great business models right when they when they owned a town they own town. They printed money <hes> now that's certainly true and when you think about the newspaper like <hes> if you were business in that town and you wanted to get your message out there basically three ways you know <hes> t._v.. Radio Newspaper newspaper had sense that advantage at Atlanta on everybody's doorstep and the like and so and when the Internet came along in the mid nineteen ninety s <hes> <hes> everyb- The newspapers were urged to put their content online <hes> I can so <hes> they did that and they and the tech guys I say oh well you gotta. Give it out for free because nobody will read it otherwise if it's free or not and that was that was a strategic mistake to give it out for because it trained people to get free information on the Internet rather than pay for it now. They're they're theory was well. You can have <music> advertisements alongside these stories that appear on the Internet. I cannot that work in theory at first but then the the cost of that advertising revenue generate for net revenue just kept plummeting and plummeting and plummeting and so <hes> you know even though the clicks went up the revenue went. Down and <hes> meanwhile the print issue <hes> that's where the bulk of the revenue came from <hes> basically the trend is <hes> what was it sixty percent advertising revenue from the print newspaper and forty percent from subscribers well as the revenue. That's the advertisers started going more online. <hes> the revenue for newspaper started going down and <hes> everybody started reading online and then the <hes> wants a subscription started going down the the the print advertisements are going down as well and and if you look at a at a chart say Google and facebook you can see their revenue in the two thousand you know where basically two thousand four two thousand five thousand fifteen you know it's almost like a hockey stick going up and if you tracked a print the revenue the print newspapers they're going the opposite direction and like so it was clear everybody advertising world went online and <hes> and that's where they are right now so it was a strategic mistake to give away this content for free nowadays I think think what you're seeing as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal and they have learned not to give it away for free. If you WANNA get their stories you basically have to read it and and the Washington Post which is with Jeff Basil's <hes> <hes> they're doing almost the same thing and I think they're they're leading leading the way that in that sense so you're <hes> to get quality information you will have to pay for it is basically what's what's going to happen going forward and if you don't want quality information you'll get you know half ass information. Maybe fake news and that's what what happened. Well Bloomberg was given a stuff for free for awhile and I dropped my Wall Street Journal subscription but now Bloomberg's charging why yeah it wasn't the same quality is the Wall Street Journal and so I I'm now paying Wall Street Journal because Bloomberg put up the paywall <hes> that's true when I was at Bloomberg the <hes> you know each subscriber paid at thousand eight hundred dollars a month to get the Bloomberg system and the Bloomberg system is we have the news then we have bond trading and there was a lot of data basically about one hundred thousand applications on the Bloomberg system everything you need it on Wall Street to function and so it was it was very good and then Bloomberg like the other media we were given our stuff away for free on the Internet and some of the subscribers were complaining. anywh why am I paying a thousand eight hundred dollars review articles that you're giving away for free and so they gradually changed that and they put a paywall up there like and it's <hes> it's been a problem for the media because some people are are USA getting it for free and if you WanNa if you wanna read quality stories people those people have to be paid well now. The models change in online with writing in terms of people are supporting sites that that right to two subjects or styles like the long form writings taking taking off and I'm digging site a brain pickings. I mean it's stuff that you'd never see in. A magazine is pretty long in detailed but it's it's stuff that's interesting some of it. <hes> <hes> certainly can't be it's <hes> <hes> you know we're in the middle of a great revolution in far some media goes and so's quite intriguing to see and and <hes> as you probably know facebook's hiring thousands of people to you know vet the information that's available on facebook as daunting task and I can understand why facebook doesn't want to consider itself media company because then you opened up yourself to live a lawsuits like why did you allow this on on your website and everything so anything you would you remove Moore from this transformation that happened to media instead of doing that <hes> you would tell someone on another. You're another industry that that is starting to to be disrupted. The auto industry pride never thought they would get disrupted in that accompany upstart company would come in and be worth more than all of them combined at one point on domestic auto makers that certainly fascinating was Tesla and you know Ford in General Motors and watching that whole whole thing coming about I certainly never thought we'd have riderless cars but there you are <hes> as far as the media goes <hes> you look at the industries stories that have been disrupted. <hes> the the newspapers of music <hes> <hes> television may very well. I mean it's right in the middle of being disrupted. The Hollywood bottle is I mean look net flicks and Amazon or doing there. <hes> I got ah new model I mean the Old Motta was appointment T._v. and now it's just like Binge T._v.. You go on Netflix and you just binge on whatever you like and stuff so <hes> the models are are being changed right now and <hes> I think <hes> in the tech world my experience has been the tech world looks at big industries and where they can make an effect and they're looking at <hes> anything that giant like <hes> <hes> delivery <hes> Retail Amazon looked at retail that was giant unlike <hes> Google looking at <hes> information. That's that's a giant industry <hes> Tesla's in in the auto industry that's giant so anybody that's in a giant industry. That's <hes> particularly has high margins profit and gross margins agents. You can expect there's some tech nerd out there looking to undercut you at a certain way like and so like health care I mean they're going to healthcare's <hes> I wanna say seventeen or eighteen percent of the U._S.. Economy and so <hes> I think you're just going to see an explosion ocean of technology coming into that area and <hes> I this week in Monday's paper. It could be an example. I <hes> the way I I wrote a story about this. Company called go are and that's basically go. Registered nurses says unlike him what they say schedule and the woman who put it together this APP. It's sort of like an uber for nurses and what she did is <hes> she worked in industry for ten years and she was telling me that you know <hes> nursing. Our hospital needs change <unk> hour by hour so you never know if you're gonNA need extra nurse or two extra nurses. You know accidents happen. People come in accident don't happen people don't come in you know so the schedules always changing and like and so what she saw was <hes> <hes> the scheduling process basically took five hours and they had to call registries up and they basically had high high paid <hes> executives making phone calls to find <hes> nurses to come in and work <hes> you know within a few hours and like and it was it was a grueling process so she developed this APP APP. It's sort of like Uber and she's she's <hes> switched from hours down to two minutes you know if the hospital needs a nurse she just put the information into the <hes> entered his APP and you know it populates with nurses that that are available nearby and he's nurses have all been preapproved that can be on the site within the hour and a problem solved now the companies that are doing registries at typically prepare these nurses <hes> are finding nurses and you're gonNA find himself really in trouble and like and they better start acting right now because this this APP looks really dynamic interesting so so there there are people out there executives calling to get nurses to come in and then now you can do do it on your phone in and so those nurses are pre approved like work at a pre approved just think of over you know they preapproved or drivers you know make sure to have a nice car and everything and and the nurses have to go through more rigorous <hes> screening process but they're pre approved and in and they're they're they're available and they're ready to work right then and there you know what's in healthcare sky one of those things like oh we can never be outsource. We could never be disrupted. People are going to get sick and they asked to be done locally but that's right. Yes and there are a whole bunch of things healthcare industry. I mean here in Orange County. I can tell you to it's one of the major industries here and there are some things that are going on that that <hes> you'll you'll be seen in coming years so anything you can share <hes> well. I just shared R. are an and the like <hes> I just edited a story about <hes> stents and it's very complicated story but basically <hes> you know there <hes> Edwards life sciences. Here's a about a dirty billion dollar market cap you. They make a lot of stance and so they're they're <hes> they're a whole bunch of other companies making certain stance that you know you insert into the body without surgery right so you won't need as much many <hes> surgeons going forward right. Oh you know but you have to have certain specialties like an and these are these are really specialized nance that <hes> will will will cut down the time you need for a sense eight say like some of the stance or day last four years and you gotta go in. Get it replaced right. Well the sense that they're building now are going to ask fifteen years. I like so that's you know two or three fewer operations that are needed and like so those are things. I'm seeing so that's another disruption. Resurgence probably thought well. We'll never ever be disrupted. That's certainly true but there are people are looking at wherever there's tech people in the technology field are looking at wherever there's a high <hes> profit margin or high gross margin. How can they use technology to reduce that? It's Kinda right out of Adam Smith that there's there's <hes> economic profit above the <hes> return cost of capital people are going to be coming after it <hes> that's right remembers and Silicone Valley. There's agree kick ass rule first off. You need a kick ass management second OFFI NATIVE KICK ASS product dirt off. You need a kick ass industry so if you get all three of those go on man that's the product Silicon Valley's looking at well in sometimes the first two you can change the third the taxi industry was not a kick ass industry who thought you know an uber is out there airbnb. We're in Spain a couple of weeks ago using AIRBNB and these rooms would have gone empty if we haven't used them and like I mean I've remember hearing about Ebay does the dumbest thing in the world how I'm going to send money to something to somebody for something. I haven't seen and they're going to send it to me. How's that going to work? It and I remember Airbnb being be is like you're gonNA share your house hand. How's that going to work yeah and as a worked out pretty well and I gotTa Tell You I met a banker from Silicone Valley Bank and he said Ebay was one of the companies he miss? He's he's not the same as you did what had stupid idea the sure N._F._l.. We've proved to be good. You know <hes> Ebay. It was interesting the on that subject back in the late nineties <hes> the San Jose Mercury News which is obviously Silicon Valley that a story on Ebay and reporter was so impressed us with Ebay that he told his boss you know you should look at us. Maybe you should invest in so knight. Ridder bosses were aware of Ed but they just skipped a cut. That wasn't their business in look. WHO's much bigger nowadays of course ebay Knight Ridder is falling apart? Wherever it is whatever doing nowadays yeah I remember when Microsoft was going public and I was in college and I thought the dumbest idea ever because you can copy software <hes> yeah how could you invest in that if you can just take your floppy loppy disk and and go in and install it as many computers as you wanted but it's it's hard to tell what's going to take off and what's what's not any you've interviewed some some famous? C._E._O.'S A lot out of them and any lessons you you've or things you've noticed from interviewing them while let's see I interviewed Steve Jobs and let me just say I've I read his <hes> several of his biographies on Him and he was a master or manipulated the press absolutely master like and when I talked to him he was who's basically a brilliant asshole. You know like so but a lot of these seals are assholes but he was he was the brilliant asshole like an. And one thing I I caught from <hes> Walter Exhibitions Book on on Steve Jobs as Steve in the in the nineteen seventies went up to a commune and he learned at the feet of this guru who was speaking and I think he really picked up some techniques gurus used to really impress people because when when Steve would go out and and do his conferences and his meetings I mean he had the presence he had this stage presence and no one to enter when the talk and the end one more thing and the like an and there was a really famous one and so <hes> he did he did he added himself. I mean he said less than than most he didn't get up there and talk about technical things because he was in some ways. You is paying more of a story in a romance than how technically advanced this new product was. He was introduced well. He was brilliant at it because I I remember I was covering cell phone industry and you know aw Motorola and A._T.. And T. and all those companies will come out with was their new gadget and they call it some really techy engineering term that nobody could remember. I like an wants D.. Put something out he put it. You remember member to name you remember the ipod the IPAD The iphone and like I just remember you know exactly what it is. It comes up and your image and who can remember what a Motorola phone look like in the nineteen fifties but I still remember an Ipod what that looks like and <hes> so Steve was was brilliant at that and when a Steve's re you know St was a master at marketing if you remember Steve and and Steve Wozniak Wozniak was a guy who built the system and Steve with a guy who who knew a lot about building it but he was the marketing guy and like and so he would get out out there and explain it and <hes> he's been he was great at marketing all from the beginning. I mean you remember the nineteen eighty-four Super Bowl ad where he tossed the hammer at the I._B._M.. Machine and like and so that that was classic and <hes> he he would get up there and one of his motives one of his things was ev. You have to break out the directions to understand product that product has failed and so I remember when he was fascinated when ipad came out and he he <hes> when he saw Colombian boy who didn't speak English ten years old take the eye pad and start playing around with it he knew that product worked right right but you dale so did great at marketing in some ways his marketing is that really essential business writing and few words as possible make as big as impact as possible. There's a lot to be said Don. I say not fewer words but the right words and so <hes> you know I used to write headlines that would move the stocks at his company's by tens or hundreds of billions of dollars and if you use the right word <hes> the stocks will react and I can so of course I had to be right died of how wasn't right they would kick me off the system there but you know I would write a headline and it will go out to Wall Street immediately. I mean within seconds and then go through compliance or anything like that and not to vice president nobody like and so <hes> the bottom line was yes. I had to be right about that and so choosing the right words. The right message is yes. It's very important. In how do you do that. How does somebody find the right word? There's there's no Dick. There's no manual on the right words and pollen. I talked a lot about titling podcasts and how that you'd have the same podcast seen content but two different titles gets to different mounts downloads well. <hes> Jimmy Reed Tim ferriss booked a four hour work week. I did and the ice on the Barnes and nobles well. That's a bunch of bullshit. Excuse me can I say down on the radio here <hes> because nobody works a four hour workweek and so I picked it up and I was going to critique Yada Yada and then I realized you know halfway through it. He's not really talking about a four hour work week. What he's talking about is how to choose the right words? He chose the right words knowing that people be interested in the four hour work week rather than <hes> actually working four hour workweek and stuff and so what he did was you know obviously he was in the beginning <hes> search engine optimization so you know he would go out there and and pick the words that that got a lot of hits and the like and so he would you use that and so that's some you know back in the <hes>. That's what they're using nowadays as you obviously but you you know back in the old days when you had newspapers Santa Editors did the same thing as well. They you know they could tell which celebrities which words worked on <hes> because you could see the papers fly off. I mean there'd be different twin hundred thousand two hundred thousand papers in like so the those obviously work when I was at Bloomberg we we did <hes> check our clicks heads you know and the like and see how many times our story and we found certain words always worked you know sex with the obvious one Warren Buffett was another one on oddly enough kindergartens and Manhattan was really popular like all these bond all these bond traders wanted to know where they sending her. You know their kids to so. Can I tell you another one R. Researcher Though SEATAC Ritter Shows Alex Vorobiev you put that anywhere gold absolute thanks Paul the but that's but that's is at the Google fact I mean they're figuring out what what people are clicking on is that I hear that's why we all these surveys because people click on surveys or not surveys but <hes> assessments are you this type of person you that type person in that in seems that numbers six ways to <hes> tell your wife you know you don't like her dinner. You know there's always a number you know what those are called us. A called <HES> buzzfeed did those Nicole List Nichols now in the industry and it's a list. It's a little like popsicle detect she with the five ways to fix your marriage to the three ways to lose weight the six things you didn't know about Gilligan's island whatever it is and mostly it's just junk to get you to click click pave the click and that way to advertisement appears on there and Nagin can charge advertiser. Look how many readers we our viewers we how to your your page. Let's let's or Peter we got a few minutes left here. Let's bring it back to the business writing and you got someone there who's who's in their career and what is the benefit of of improving their writing for them. <hes> beyond just not being laughed at behind their back well I I would say <hes> if you're not perceived at Sparta in your business writing you won't be you won't get the promotion <hes> and and so I say pay real close attention to that. If you go around saying good when you should be using well pay close attention to that <hes> it can <hes> what you WanNa do is is in <hes> when you're writing anything E in email or blog law or or something like that. Everybody wants to be perceived as smart. Nobody wants to be perceived. That dumb can so if you <hes> if you get my book how the right at work I'll give you some tips on how to improve it so it's available on Amazon Dot Com in case I forgot to say that so so <hes> what they give you an example of how it can really <hes> improve prove yourself in and even the the highest <hes> the biggest companies use it when I was at Pimco for six months. I don't know if you knew that but PIMCO AMC one of the world's biggest bond managers has one point seven trillion dollars assets under management and what they do is i. I was a contract writer for six months and what they do is a <hes> <hes> they have these professional writers who helped portfolio folio managers in the management crafter message like and so they had to portfolio managers who who knew a lot about liability driven investing investment which is called L. D. I really technical wonky tank for insurance companies and like and so <hes> my my colleague and editor crafted her message seven hundred and fifty words and said this is a strategy to to portfolio managers are using and alike and as a result <hes> they put together the message and they sent it out to email to all the clients science Pimco and and and then they eventually put it on the website as thought leadership article in Hobart well one of those emails relented on <hes> email box in mailbox of G._e.. Capital when <hes> under investment committee and they liked the idea idea so they put five hundred million dollars investment into that portfolio that pond I should say the portfolio because at one seven hundred fifty word article so yes words to matter that's a good return on investment. Yes absolutely all right well. It's been great having you on the show and <hes> you you mentioned the books available on the on the website or on Amazon which will have in the show notes page is well anywhere else <hes> young twitter. I think I'm on twitter. I'm working on it <hes>. I want to craft a better marketing message but I've been I've been busy doing some other things I I have a fulltime job as a financial editor two hundred twenty business journal so I get to cover an economy me to size of Finland. You can imagine nobody else. I think they recommend it. You do your tweets while you're driving left. Turn Arrow in southern California's designed for when you have a one hundred sixty one seconds atkins to wait for someone to cross the road. I certainly that those those are the tweets that will get you in trouble. You know so you must get a I think he's got a different kind of tweets. That was a forty million dollar her tweet either. That's what it costs to get out of that. was that amazing. I'm just going to jump in. I mean the guy couldn't control himself and sort of what was it. He was kind of hinting the maybe you can take the company private or something a certain price and there are certain words words on Wall Street us like it's secured if you he used the funding secured that's a specific term on Wall Street that it better be true because if it's not true the S._e._C. will come down and hammer you and that's exactly what they did was he. On and of course no one wants to foresee Lon Moscow to Tesla because he's so brilliant and entertaining you know in the head so that's why the S._e._C. reach to deal with him and he had to pay forty million dollar fine so but he was fighting the shortsellers right yeah yeah it's it's interesting pressing you know the shortsellers are out there and but that's part of the game is like sharks in the ocean you gotta deal with it so in as a financial journalist you're kind of <hes>. I don't know if the vassal of a you guys are inbetween all that right <hes> it is you know I I deal a lot with short traders and I gotTa tell you they are a paranoiac bench for reason I mean they're thousand ones ways screw them. You never hear about new usual Wall Street <hes> articles interesting well. Thanks for coming on the show and it's been Nice and look forward to picking up the book <hes> on Amazon well. Thank you so much for having me. I appreciate the time that's it. You've been listening to another confident R._O._I.. The one show that can confidently listen to today's show really learn something right here in Archenemies Only Community Radio Station O._C.. Talk Radio Dot net quitting your burgers coffee table. If you WANNA eat a burger you put on a bar volume sticks to be dubbed for the new all American cheese voter fresh juicy fiefs fastest crispy around the edges covered a Jewish cheese and stack to the ceiling deliciousness and knock that baby Dow with a frosted beer at the bar just like the sports God's intended but new all America cheeseburger at Buffalo Wild Wings. Please drink responsibly introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit at McDonald's.

editor Alex Vorobiev google Bloomberg Pete Peter reporter Paul Peter writer Amazon Ebay airbnb Orange County Washington Post firehouse subs New York Times hockey Peter Brennan
How to Write Well in Business  We Discuss Choosing the Right Words When Creating Your Companys Story and Ask Why Grammar is So Important w

OC Talk Radio

48:25 min | 1 year ago

How to Write Well in Business We Discuss Choosing the Right Words When Creating Your Companys Story and Ask Why Grammar is So Important w

"Hey welcome back for another episode of confident. Are I the one show you can confidently listen to and now you're going to get a real return on your investment. Whether you work in a business work with a business working on your own business command has done all three Alex. Hey Alex no Paul <hes> fighting with your mic there today. I'm fighting with everything here today. It's just a struggle here today trying to keep my mic from flipping over and flopping down here. I need when like yours has the R._O._I.. <hes> the flag on it Mike flag on it here. We can arrange for that so you've really you got an old favorite. Why shouldn't say old you have a longtime favorite of ours here at O._C.? Talkradio a guy who wrote for Bloomberg <music> business who writes for the local Orange County Business Journal <hes> Peter Brennan here today so I always get a kick outta listening to Peter could maybe it's because we're both Irish well. I think it'd probably easy part of your in group right <music>. You're wired to like them. Regardless of what you were saying before yeah exactly right now since you guys can just see me on a box and I'm not actually in the room. We have tribal connection here for some reason. I guess you're not likely to end up in a warring faction day yeah. That's good news so yes. Are you talking about Peter's book. Is that what we're here talking about her talking about Peter's book we're talking about how journalism changed with the digital era and what some of the lessons are for other companies he's but he's also interviewed some of some very famous. C._E._O.'s in what he seen Oh man you can can share what was left or what wouldn't be written about them in the actual articles and and if he wanted to get future sure interviews but with but now he can talk and couldn't tell you the key to really get him to talk about the stories. This is how I heard about. Many of these stories took him. I took him across the street. We had a beer but I do have some Irish whiskey in here that might entice them to tell more stories. I don't know about that but that sounds great confident R._O._I.. Show in two thousand eighteen is sixty one percent more sober okay. We'll <hes> we'll wait till after I I'll step out. Let you talk here but I just have to give it a little background on Peter Peter <hes> O._C.. Talkradio well thank you Paul. Peter Will Peter Brennan Welcome to the show as Paul mentioned. You're the financial editor for the Orange County Business Journal. You've written about thirty thousand articles have been published in the New York Times and The Washington Post and you've written a book and the book is how to write it work first of all welcome in. Why did you write the book? Well thank you very much. <hes> I've I've written so many <hes> different print articles over the years. I've been a journalist for thirty five years and covered business for more than twenty twenty five years I'd say and I I realized that <hes> a lot of people could use the skill set. I've learned over the years forget I myself. I grew up in Hawaii where we're great. Writers not grow up you know great writers grew up in England or Ireland or New York but not Hawaii and <hes> so I spoke to kind pigeon and was a bit sloppy and that's that's how it is over there and and so when I decided to become a reporter I was the guy who went out and got the scoop and I left it to editors straighten out my grammar make sure everything was punctuated correctly and the whole bit and so but over the years <hes> I learned <hes> you know grammar really is important and <hes> my my lack of grammar skills at times probably hurt me and some job applications like and <hes> and so over the years I I've learned these skills and I thought other people might be able due to <hes> use them like and so. I had a fun time looking through them and <hes> one thing I learned about grammar books is that they're all geared toward the person writing the great American novel and <hes> by that you want to fiction Dan you want <hes> a lot of metaphors and those sorts of things and you want to sort of lewd things but not get right on point. You want the the reader to discover what you really mean after reading three hundred pages or something like that well business writing is the complete opposite you want to get right to the point you want the reader to understand what you're saying right then and there and so <hes> and so I was when I was researching this book I realized that <hes> they're not a lot of radical radical books geared toward business writing and the ones I saw weren't written by people who do it day in and day out there written by <hes> <hes> people who <hes> just didn't have that experience in like and so I thought well there's a little nice little niche and I'll I'll. I'll write it and see if it <hes> if if people are interested in it and <hes> luckily they have been interested in it so I'm here I am well that must've been challenging to be in a field where you're writing writing professionally and you you sense and you're getting feedback that you're you don't know all the rules it was it was quite challenging and editors withdraw their hands up in frustration <hes> <hes> but I'm you know <hes> <hes> Mike bulldog I just keep plugging along and then I can <hes> now that I'm an editor as well. I really understand I sympathize with them and <hes> you know if you ever get a good editor who who really improves your work. You know hold onto onto that editor there quite a jab it <hes> it can help I had the I I used to score high on the math scores and low on English on the standardized testing and I work for one lawyer player who drill who this lit up my work constantly and <hes> when I went to take my G. Mat Lo and behold it switched all of a sudden. My English scores got better than my math that I think it was just from having editor that really drilled into me how to be clear on our work. It's it's really important. <hes> if you're in business and you want to sell a product to somebody and and you're writing full of grammatical errors errors the person buying that product is going to think you're not as smart as you may really be like and so <hes> I I've heard of C._E._o.. Sending out <hes> emails was grammatical errors or employees grimace at it you know and they're embarrassed embarrassed about it and <hes> <hes> you know at the higher higher levels of <hes> business and particularly those was an ivy league education they all know the difference between regardless and irregardless and they all know the difference between good and well and if you don't know the the difference they will <hes> they would think you're just not that smart and you know treat you appropriately accordingly. I should say yeah and but a lot of times outside of journalism a lot of times people don't tell you you can't write journalism. They beating your brain. That's that's correct because <hes> in journalism <hes> you're putting out your best <hes> <hes> you're putting out your story and the editor is GonNa come along and improve it as best they can and editors are trained that way. That's what they pay. They get paid for and if they're mistakes I tell you if you're an editor. You're paranoid because you're afraid you're going to miss a mistake that become so obvious once it gets in the print and then your boss comes along and says why didn't you see that that's so obviously you know and you take an average story which is between five hundred thousand words. Let's say a thousand words and each of those thousand words has a five to ten letters in it so you can misspell it five thousand ten thousand times and then we get the sentences. Sentences at each thousand word sentence thousand word story has probably all I'd say <hes> fifty or sixty sentences so you gotta make sure to punctuation correct and that you gotTa make sure to the grammar is correct and the pronouns match what they're supposed to match match and subject verb agreement works and the like and so you probably got about between ten and twenty thousand ways to get a story screwed up on one thousand word story and even though there's grammar check now well. Is it like spell check in that people becoming worse spellers because the computer will catch it well well. What's interesting is <hes> I I do like the spell check <hes> and <hes> when I misspell something I see you know has a red underline or something and I think well what's wrong? What are what are they saying there and so I checked a double check it and it's almost time there correct but there are times that they're not quite correct and and if the word is <hes> say like <hes> an Oh and you spell it <hes> n o w so you know the spell checks creek catch that right you know <hes> you know it has its good and it's bad parts? Yes well the in so I find that when I'm writing oftentimes I think I understand something but and I could talk about it but until I put it down in imprint I really don't it's not oftentimes it's not clear and if you listen to some of the read some of the transcripts of the show you can tell that I'm searching for my my thought is I'm talking but that's a reality as we talk. I mean we just go with the flow we change our perspective are where we're going with the sentence mid-sentence but re in writing we're essentially taking our thoughts and as they're coming but they rarely come out. It's it's a a master who can constantly communicate in perfect sentences the first time and it's not the standard standard output. Is it <hes> no that's that's correct. I I don't think skype ever met somebody who speaks perfectly all the time and so <hes> want to <hes> and and writing it down will will force you to think about your thoughts and methods you WanNa communicate much better than speaking well like so. It's always better to write it down then speak it if it might be and <hes> everybody gets added do you did you know that <hes> when Thomas Jefferson wrote the declaration of independence it was edited eighty six times and it was about a third of it was cut out. Can you believe that Thomas Jefferson percent editing editing is probably saved a lot of documents from being <hes> unreadable right or that that's certainly true and and <hes> and my in my view <hes> you know one of the problems of college kids. Is You know the professor says okay. I need you to write a two thousand word essay on this or that you know so the college Professor College kid says well I only have five hundred words so I get stretch it out and and so they learned to stretch it out like and that makes really bad writing and and they take that writing into the workforce and I've known I've I've edited stories that the other day I ended in a story that was two thousand words and I looked at it and I said well the last six hundred words were unnecessary chopped it off. I made it chopped off twenty five percent of the story and I have no regrets about whatsoever new those a writer <hes> so in my book when you write you must right <hes> concisely and not meander all over the place particularly for business writing you know for for creative writing you can meander and <hes> maybe people will stay with you or maybe they won't but that's a totally you're writing to entertain scene where businesses writing writing business writing is to inform an incorrect. Yes I in the they don't WanNa gift they want. They want up front. Have you found that writing <hes> but for the the new generation are they getting better at it or are they getting worse at it well. It's it's sort of a interesting <hes> comparison because when I was writing <hes> when I started my journalism career or an early one thousand nine hundred eighty s we didn't obviously didn't have the Internet resources for <hes> or how would I say <hes> limited you had to go to the library and do your research you know there's no google and the like and so what happened is <hes> the writing tend to be pretty good. I don't like but the research wasn't that good and so now nowadays because Google and the Internet you can get research at the tip of your fingers and get some really good research as a matter of fact and so the research research tends to be better but the writing is not as good as it was back then so it seems to me as I read Journalism Business Journalism it tends to be kind of throw a bunch of things in there now we'll talk a paragraph about this in a paragraph Graf about that and and it does they don't flow like they once did it depends on who you're reading right and the like but just you know normal copy on on something. It seems that they just kind of keep adding stuff stuff to that. There was no flow here in but that might be my opinion. I I've seen a number of stories like that and also <hes> it must take an account that <hes> <hes> automated <hes> <hes> a I artificial intelligence is taking over some of the more simple stories like and so <hes> if you look at them and <hes> <hes> they'll take some of the the data and and that appears on Wall Street and like and just sort of put it into into a template and put a story out on it so <hes> those stories will appear the same over and over again and I can then you have <hes> young reporters. <hes> you know the media's in business now where it's <hes> basically it's the revenue falling so the talent isn't there that the high paying editors have laughed and like and so the <hes> there's there's not as many talented reporters or talented editors there and so <hes> particularly among the younger ones and so they tend to put a whole bunch. I just stuff together and pretend it's a story like and then <hes> you get somebody older older <hes> reporter who like like myself I I like to think okay I'm putting together a story and you're going to be entertained. The other and <hes> for example <hes> <hes> I was talking to the other day was my editor and we're talking about a story. I wrote about for about Pacific Premier Bank here. In Orange County and <hes> Pacific premier has done much better than the other local banks here. It has a what's it called net interest margin of about four point five percent and the other banks are around three percent and so that's it's really technical really wonky like an an a lot of people would be turned off. If I lead was that you know Pacific Premier as as <hes> you know in a net interest margin Kim it's much better than its competitors and so that's kind of you know what I lead the reader in instead I focused on the C._E._o.. Of Pacific premier he was a guy named Steve Gardner and he was a dropout an M._B._a.. B._A. Program in Long Beach State. He dropped out because his wife was having a baby needed to get a job like he's just a local kid he went to failing bank in Riverside and he helped secede moved it to Irvine and little by little he started growing it now. There's two competitors two biggest competitors once called Bank of California and they're the ones who have the the soccer new soccer stadium in southern in downtown Los Angeles and so they <hes> they had the backing of Hollywood heavyweights in the like and so <hes> they were glamorous and you know so I re- <hes> Magic Johnson's assistant was on the board of Directors Bank of California and it was star power and then the other bank was opus bank and so opus Banca had the star power some Wall Street heavyweights who invested in opus and they have a Dynamic C._E._o.. Oh Name Steve Gordon so so we have three banks here. So I told the story of how C Gardner he <hes> he didn't have anybody he was the underdog he loved hockey and so he always had his sons on the hockey arena playing hockey it was an M._b._a.. Graduate and <hes> so he had nobody then he he was beating the Guy Bank of California which has Hollywood power and he's being Oprah's bank which had the Wall Street power and so then you had a dynamic who he was competing against and so I led with that rather than the net interest tress margin and so that's how you build a story is is making it <hes> humanizing it <hes> that's quite quite the idea and <hes> you know because behind every number is an interesting person <music> behind every number is an interesting person. Yes the numbers more seasoning and in providing people who like facts <hes> some data points well. It's always important one thing on Wall Street you can be inundated with numbers. I mean just spray all there's so many facts and figures in the lake and one thing I learned and I learned the hard way but by investing in stocks myself you know and when you're looking at a stock and you've been invested they read numbers that are really important to you. Nothing else the price you bought it at the prices at right now and the price you want to sell it at and like noser to three most important numbers like and all the other numbers are <hes> interesting some more interesting than others and there but there's a lot of noise out there you know Wall Street analysts. They're not paid to sit around doing nothing so they put out these reports and so they you know whether something's happening or not usually something is but they put out the reports and the brokers read the reports and then they call up investor and say well we think the stock is good or the stocks going down and so they're always turning turning the stock right and like so <hes> there's a lot of noise out there and there's a lot of data points and <hes> that good good business writing though is rising above the and I heard the term earn don't bury the lead as it. Is it getting hitting the reader right between the eyes was something that grabbed her attention well it. It depends if if <hes> it depends on the store you have straight news stories you have feature stories talk about business writing okay like in business writing what's in Paul's getting ready here too for our break so when we come back from the break and just talk about you know what's from a business writer perspective and taking some of the things in communicating story and having people with interest because you might be talking about numbers but I'm wondering how much of that translates when you're trying to communicate and persuade in in business writing as well <hes> yeah I'll give you some examples happen to great <music> and while you're waiting for those examples we WanNa remind you that this is a multimedia project here unlike most of our shows there is a magazine that accompanies the show <hes> Alex <hes> in his firm puts out confident are oh I magazine. The most recent issue just hit the stands but I have the last issue. I should be talking about the new one but <hes> in the new one I know there's an article about Google and some of the research that they've been doing <hes> it's pretty fascinating about how the brain works and how people respond and how you train train your people accordingly in the previous issue. <hes> there are articles about unleash your inner supercomputer <hes> Verne Harnish on strategy Dr Brad Smart on top grading really some some interesting stuff so if you wanna read as well as listen there are two parts to this media empire growing hair confident R I dot com this where you find both of them. The magazine which is free that's right F. R. E. E. and and the podcast both free information for you as Alex tries to spread the word about this whole neuroscience using your brain to <hes> to <hes> upgrade the operating system that came with the <hes> machine here right so go check it out confident R. Dot Com a new guys could talk about change and all that other stuff here. I just got interject offer that commercial. Will we ever have robot reporters orders. Will we ever have totally robotic news operations here. That's some are thinking that way. Well you know there are certain companies out there that do it right now. Artificial intelligence and <hes> right some some bought is sifting through the stuff it comes in and putting it together in some sort of order. There are publication. What is business insider? Whatever that's sort of a compilation of other stuff I don't know if they're creating could very well be but Associated Press and Bloomberg? They're all working with it and I I'll well you know there are headlines that are automated off the press releases and this has been going on for ten years and so the the the press release comes out <hes> artificial intelligence takes takes out and put makes a headline out of it. It hasn't already been there then machines instead our our our our coated trade on certain words will trade on that headline that crazy yeah it. Is You know sometimes you might see some really weird movements in the stock market and you think of what's going on the other flip side of that and then I'll let you get back to this uh-huh another since I got you here I see more and more where newsrooms themselves are pushing their reporters to push their own news out through social media and the to the point where I've seen some of these systems advertise ties were you. The editor can track how many of Peter's tweets got picked up and what traction his story got online and I come back to Peter and I say you're not cutting buddy. <hes> you know you re great story big scoop but nobody's reading reading it. You gotta go out and push it. You're like me. I'm just the content creator. You're the media company no no. You're you're involved in this too. That's quite true we could. We could really discuss that for a long time. Yeah all right well. I know Alex's chomping at the bit task is some of those but I had the throw those in it talk about change. This is a world is changing faster than anything I've ever seen before what yeah thanks ball and we were talking there. When we keep on that Pete Peter and talking talking about the lessons you saw in how disruption has come to media and maybe how media bosses avoided taking that <hes> taking a hard look how things were going to change and <hes> did it take longer what in a lot of probably thought it was impervious? I mean newspapers for a long time when the great business models right when they when they owned town they owned town they a printing money <hes> now that's certainly true and when you think about the newspaper like <hes> if you were business in that town and you wanted to get your message out there are basically three ways you know <hes> t._v.. Radio and newspaper you know newspaper had that sense that advantage at Atlanta on everybody's doorstep and the like and so and when the Internet came along in the mid nineteen ninety s <hes> <hes> every the newspapers were urged to put their content online <hes> I can so <hes> they did that and they and the tech guys were say a well you gotta give it out for free because nobody will read it otherwise if it's free or not and that was that was a strategic mistake to give it out for because it trained people to get free information on the Internet rather than pay for it now. Their theory was well. You can have advertisements advertisements alongside these stories that appear on the Internet. I cannot that work in theory at first but then the the costs of that advertising revenue could generate for net revenue just kept plummeting and plummeting plummeting and so <hes> you know even though the clicks went up the revenue went down around and <hes> and meanwhile the print issue <hes> that's where the bulk of the revenue came from <hes> basically the trend is <hes> what was it sixty percent advertising revenue from the print newspaper and forty percent from subscribers well as a the revenue the. Yes the advertisers started going more online. <hes> the revenue for newspapers started going down and everybody started reading online and then the <hes> once subscription started going down the the the print advertisement started going down as well and if if you look at a chart of say Google and facebook you can see their revenue in the two thousands you know where basically two thousand four two thousand five thousand fifteen you know it's it's like almost like a hockey stick going up and attract a print <hes> the revenue the print newspapers they're going the opposite direction and like so it was clear everybody in the advertising world went online and <hes> and and that's where they are right now so it was a strategic mistake to give away content for free nowadays I think what what you're seeing as the New York Times and Wall Street Journal and they have learned not to give it away for free. If you WANNA get their stories you basically have to read it and and the Washington Post which is with Jeff Basil's <hes> <hes> they're doing almost the same thing and I think they're they're leading way in that in that sense so you're <hes> to get quality information. You will have to pay for it is basically what's what's going to happen going forward and if you don't want quality information you'll get you know half ass information. Maybe fake news. That's what will happen. Well Bloomberg was given stuff for free for a while and I dropped my Wall Street Journal subscription but now Bloomberg's charging well yeah it Wa- It wasn't the same quality as the Wall Street Journal and so I I'm now paying Wall Street Journal because Bloomberg put up the paywall <hes> that's true when I was at Bloomberg that the <hes> you know each subscriber paid at thousand eight hundred dollars a month to get the Bloomberg system and the Bloomberg system is we have the news and we have bond trading and there was a lot of data basically about one hundred thousand applications on the Bloomberg system everything you need and on Wall Street to function and so it was it was very good and then Bloomberg like the other media. We're giving our stuff away for free on the Internet and some of the subscribers were complaining. Why am I paying a thousand eight hundred dollars read articles that you're giving away for free and so they gradually changed that and they put a paywall up there like in it's <hes> it's been a problem for media because some people are are used for getting it for free and if you WanNa if you wanna read quality stories the people those people have to be paid well now? The MODEL's changing online with writing in terms of people are supporting sites that that right to to subjects or styles like the long form writings taking taking off and I'm digging a site a brain pickings it stuff that you'd never see in a magazine is pretty long in detailed but but it's it's stuff that's interesting some of it <hes> <hes> it certainly can be it's <hes> <hes> you know we're in the middle of a great revolution in far some media goes and so it was quite intriguing to see and and <hes> as you probably know <hes> facebook's hiring thousands of people to vet the information that's available on facebook as daunting task and I can understand why facebook doesn't want to consider itself a media company because then you open up yourself to live a lawsuits you know like why why did you allow this on your website and everything so anything you would you remove Moore from this transformation that happened to media instead of it doing that. <hes> you tell someone on another another industry that that is starting to to be disrupted. The auto industry pride never thought they would get disrupted in that accompany upstart company would come in and be worth more than all of them combined at one point the the domestic auto makers <hes> that certainly fascinating was tesla and you know Ford and General Motors and watching that whole whole thing coming about I certainly never thought we'd have riderless cars but there you are <hes> as far as the media goes <hes> you look at the industries he's that have been disrupted. <hes> the the newspapers of music <hes> <hes> television may very well. I mean it's right into missile being disrupted. The Hollywood bottle is I mean look at Netflix and Amazon during her <hes> I got a a new model I mean the old model was appointment T._v. and now it's just like Binge T._v.. You go on Netflix and binge on whatever you like and stuff so <hes> the models are being changed right now and <hes> I think <hes> in the tech world my experience Paris has been the tech world looks at big industries and where they can make an effect and they're looking at <hes> anything that giant like <hes> <hes> delivery <hes> Retail Amazon looked at retail that was giant unlike <hes> Google looking at <hes> information. That's that's a giant industry <hes> Tesla's in the in the auto industry that's giant so anybody that's in a giant industry. That's <hes> particularly has high margins profit and growth margins you can expect there's some tech nerd out there looking to undercut you in a certain way like and so like healthcare I mean they're gonNA healthcare's. <hes> I wanNA say seventeen or eighteen percent of the U._S.. Economy and so <hes> I think you're just going to see an explosion kind of technology coming into that area and <hes> I this week in Monday's paper to give you an example. I <hes> the way I I wrote a story about this company called go are and that's basically <hes> go <hes> registered nurses unlike what they do is they schedule and the woman who put it together. This APP is sort of like an uber for nurses and what she did is <hes>. She worked in industry for ten years and she was telling me that you know <hes> nursing. Our hospital needs change hour hour by hour so you never know if you're going to need extra nurse or two extra nurses you know accidents happen. People come in accident. Don't have it people don't come in you know so the schedule's always changing and like and so what she saw was the scheduling process basically took five five hours and they had to call registries up and they basically had high high paid executives making phone calls to find <hes> nurses to come in and work <hes> you know within a few hours and it was a it was a grueling process so she developed this APP. It's sort of like an uber like she's. She's <hes> switched from hours down to two minutes. You know if the hospital as a nurse she just put the information into the <hes> entered his APP and you know it populates with nurses that are available nearby and these nurses have all been preapproved they can be on the site within the hour and <hes> problem is solved now the companies that are doing the registries that typically prepare these nurses <hes> are finding nurses under gonna find themselves self really in trouble and they better start acting right now because this this this APP looks really dynamic interesting so so there there are people out there executives calling to get nurses to come in and then now you can do it on your phone in and so those nurses are they pre approved to like work at a pre approved just think of over you know they preapproved or drivers you know make sure to have a nice car and everything and the nurses have to go through more rigorous screening process but they're pre approved and and there they are they're available and they're ready to work right then and there you know what's in healthcare sky one of those things like Oh we can never be outsource. We could never be disrupted. People are going to get sick and they asked to be done locally but <hes> that's right yes and and there are a whole bunch of things in the healthcare industry. I mean here in Orange County. I can tell you it's one of the major industries here and there are some things that are going on that that <hes> you'll you'll be seen in the coming years so anything you can share <hes> well. I just shared R.. The end and the like <hes> I just re edited a story about <hes> stents and it's a very complicated story but basically <hes> you know there <hes> Edwards life sciences here is about thirty billion dollar market cap you know they. Make a Lotta stance and so there there <hes> there are a whole bunch of other companies making certain stance that you know you insert into the body without surgery right so you won't need as much many <hes> surgeons going forward right you know but you have to have certain specialties like an and these are these are really specialized dance that <hes> will will will cut down the time you need for a sense eight say like some of the stance or day last four years and then you gotta go in and get had it replaced right. Well the sense that they're building now are going to last fifteen years. I like so that's you know two or three fewer operations that are needed and like so those are the things I'm seeing so that's another disruption. Resurgence probably thought well. We'll never be disrupted. <hes> that's certainly true but there are people are looking at wherever's. Tech people in the technology field are looking at wherever there is a high <hes> profit margin or high gross margin. How can they use technology to to reduce that? It's Kinda right out of Adam Smith that there's there's a economic profit above the <hes> return cost of capital people are going to be coming after it. That's right and remember and Silicone Valley. There's a we kick ass rule first off. You need a kick ass management second off innate a kick ass product dirt off. You need a kick ass industry so if you get all three of those going man that's the product Silicon Valley's looking at well and sometimes the first two it can change the third the taxi industry was not a kick ass industry who thought you know an uber is out there airbnb. We're in Spain a couple of weeks ago using AIRBNB and these rooms would have gone empty if we haven't used them yeah well I mean I've I've remember hearing about Ebay and I'm like does the dumbest thing in the world. How I'm going to send money to something to somebody for something? I haven't seen and they're going to send it to me. How's that going to work it? I remember AIRBNB N._B._A.. Like you're gonNA share your house. How's that GonNa Work Yeah and as it worked out pretty well I gotTa tell you I met a banker from Silicon Valley Bank and he said Ebay was one of the companies he missed? He's he's not the same as you did. What a stupid good idea? We've proved to be good. You know <hes> Ebay. It was interesting on that subject back in the late nineties <hes> the San Jose Mercury News which is obviously Silicon Valley. The story on Ebay and reporter was so impressed with Ebay that he told his boss you know I should look at does maybe you should invest in so knight. Ridder bosses were aware bed but they just skipped it because that was in their business you know and look who's much bigger nowadays of course Ebay and Knight Ridder's you know falling apart wherever it is whatever doing nowadays yeah I remember when Microsoft was going public and I was in college and I thought that's the dumbest idea ever because you can copy software <hes> yeah. How could you invest in that? If you can just take your floppy we disk and in install it as many computers as you wanted but it's it's hard to tell what's going to take off and what's what's not any you've interviewed. Some some famous CEOS a lot of them and any lessons you you've or things you've noticed from interviewing them while let's see I interviewed Steve Jobs and let me just say I I read several of his biographies on Him and he was a master manipulated the press absolutely master like and when I talked to him he was who's basically a brilliant asshole. You know so but a lot of these C._e._O.'s are assholes but he was he was the brilliant asshole like and and and one thing I I caught from <hes> Walter Book on on Steve Jobs as Stephen in the nineteen seventies went up to a commune and <hes> he learned at the feet of this guru who was speaking and I I think he really picked up some techniques grew used to really impress people because when when Steve would go out and and do his conferences and meetings I mean he had the presence he had stage presence and no one to enter when the talk and the and one one more thing and the like an and that was a really famous one and so <hes> he did he did he edited himself. I mean he said less than than most. He didn't get up there and talk about technical things he he was in some ways. You is more of a story in a romance then how technically advanced this new product was he was introduced well. He was brilliant at it because I I remember I was covering cell phone industry and you know uh-huh Motorola and A._T.. And T. and all those companies will come out with was their new gadget and they call it some really techie engineering term that nobody could remember like an once de put something out he put it. You remember the name you remember the ipod the IPAD The iphone and like I just remember you know exactly what it is. It comes up in your image and who can remember what a Motorola phone look like in the nineteen fifties but I still remember an Ipod what that looks like and so Steve was was bruin at that and when a Steve's re you know Steve was a master at marketing if you remember Steven and Steve Wozniak Wozniak was the guy who built the system and Steve with a guy who knew a lot about building it but he was the marketing guy and like and so he would get out there earn and explain it and <hes> he's been he was great at marketing all from the beginning I mean remember in the Nineteen eighty-four Super Bowl ad where he tossed the hammer at the IBM machine and like and so that that was classic and <hes> he he would get up there and one of his motives the oldest one of his things was ev. You have to break out the directions to understand a product that product has failed and so I remember once he was fascinated when ipad came out and he he <hes> when when he saw Colombian boy who didn't speak English ten years old take the I pad and start playing around with it he knew that product worked right but you dale so did great at marketing in some ways marketing is that really essential business writing and as few words as possible make as big as impact as possible <hes> there's a lot to be said for that I say not fewer words but the right words and so <hes> you know I used to write headlines that would move the stocks these companies right tens sometimes hundreds and billions of dollars and if you use the right word <hes> the stocks will react and can so of course I had to be right if I wasn't right and it would kick me off the system but I would write a headline and it will go out to Wall Street immediately I mean within seconds and then go through compliance or anything like that and not to a vice president nobody like and so <hes> the bottom line was I had to be right about that in so choosing the right words. The right message is yes. It's very important. In how do you do that. How does somebody find the right words? There's there's no Dick. There's no manual on the right words and pollen pollen. I talk a lot about Nah titling podcasts and how that you'd have the same podcasts in content but two different titles gets to different amounts of downloads well. <hes> Jimmy Reed Tim Ferriss book the four hour Workweek I did and I I saw that in the Barnes and nobles I that's a bunch of bullshit. Excuse me can I say on the radio here <hes> because nobody works a four hour workweek and so I picked it up and I was going to critique Yada Yada Yada and then I realized you know halfway through it. He's not really talking about a four hour workweek. What he's talking about is how to choose the right words? He chose the right words knowing that people be interested in the four hour workweek rather than <hes> actually work in a four hour workweek and stuff and so what He. Did was you know obviously he was in the beginning <hes> search engine optimization so he would go out there and and pick the words that that got a lot of hits and the like and so he would you use that and so that's some you know back in the <hes>. That's what they're using nowadays as you obviously know but you know back in the old days when you head newspapers Santa Editors did the same thing as well. They you know they could tell which celebrities which words worked on <hes> because you could see the papers fly off. I mean there'd be different twin hundred thousand two hundred thousand papers you know so those obviously worked at Bloomberg we we did <hes> <hes> check our clicks heads you know and the like and see how many times our story and we found certain words always worked you know a sex with the obvious one warren Buffett was another one oddly enough kindergartens and Manhattan was really popular and I get all these bond all the bond traders wanted to know where they sending their you know their kids to so. Can I tell you another one. R. Researcher Does Talk Radio Shows Alex Voro via. You put that anywhere gold absolutely thanks Paul the but that's but that's is that the google effect I mean they're figuring out what what people are clicking on on is that I hear that's why we get all these surveys because people click on surveys or not surveys but <hes> assessments you know. Are you this type of person you that type person in that in seems that numbers six ways to <hes> tell your wife. You know you don't like dinner. You know th there's always a number. You know what those are called. Those are called <hes> buzzfeed did those Nicole List Nichols now in the industry and it's a list. It's a little like popsicle she with the five ways to fix your marriage the three anyway to lose weight the six things you didn't know about Gilligan's island whatever it is and mostly it's just junk to get you to Click Click Click and that way advertisement appears on their nickname can charge the advertiser. Look how many readers we our viewers. We had your page. Let's let's <hes> or Peter. We've got a few minutes left. Heroes bring it back to the business writing and you got someone there who's who's in their career and what is the benefit of improving improving their writing for them beyond just not being laughed at behind their back well. I I would say <hes> if you're not perceived at Sparta in your business writing you won't be you won't get the promotion <HES> and so I say pay close attention to that. If you go around saying good when you should be using well paying real close attention to that <hes> it can <hes> what you WanNa do is is in <hes> when you're writing anything E in e mail or blog dog or or something like that. Everybody wants to be perceived as smart. Nobody wants to be perceived that dumb and so if you <hes> if you get my book how the right at work I'll give you some tips on how to improve it so it's available on Amazon Dot Com in case I forget to say that so <hes> <hes> what <hes> they give you an example of how it can really <hes> improve prove yourself and and even the the highest <hes> the biggest companies use it when I was at Pimco for six months. I don't know if you knew that but that was one of the world's biggest bond managers has one point seven trillion dollars assets under management and what they do is i. I was a contract writer for six months and what they do is they <hes> <hes> they have these professional writers who helped the portfolio Hulu managers in the management crafter message like and so they had to portfolio managers who who knew a lot about liability driven investment investment which is called L. D.. I N. is really technical wonky tank for insurance companies and like and so <hes> my my colleague and editor crafted their message seven hundred and fifty words and said this is a strategy to portfolio managers are using and like and as a result <hes> they put together the message and a Senate out to email all the clients Pimco and and and then they eventually put it on the website as thought leadership article and the whole bit well. One of those emails were landed on <hes> email box and mailbox of G._e.. Capital when underinvestment committee and they liked the idea the <hes> so they put five hundred million dollars investment into that portfolio that pond I should say the portfolio because at one seven hundred fifty word article so yes words to matter that's a good return on investment yeah absolutely all right well. It's been great having you on the show and <hes> you mentioned the books available on the <hes> on the website or on Amazon which will have in the show notes page is well anywhere else sir young twitter. I think I'm on twitter. I'm working on it <hes>. I want to craft a better marketing message but I've been I've been busy doing some other things. I have a fulltime job as a financial editor at the Orange County Business Journal so I get to cover an economy the the size of Finland. You can imagine nobody else I think they recommend that you do your tweets while you're driving a left turn Arrow in southern California's designed for when you have one hundred and sixty one seconds needs to wait for someone to cross the road certainly those those are the tweets that will get you in trouble. You know so you must get a I think he's got a different kind of tweet. That was a forty million dollar. Ah tweet eater. That's what it costs to get out of that. Wasn't that amazing. I'm just GONNA jump in. I mean the guy couldn't control himself and sort of what was it was kind of hinting that maybe you can take the company private or something a certain price and there are certain words on Wall Street you use like it's a secured if you he used the funding secured. That's a specific term on Wall Street that it better be true because if it's not true the S._e._C. will come down and hammer you and that's exactly what they did was he. On of course no one wants to force Moscow to Tesla because he's so brilliant and entertaining you know in the head so that's why you know reached a deal with him and he had to pay forty million dollar fine so but he was fighting the shortsellers right yeah yeah. It's it's interesting see you know the short sellers are out there and that's part of the game. It's like sharks in the ocean. You gotta deal with it so in as a financial journalist you're kind of <hes>. I don't know the vassal year guys are in between all that right <hes> it is you know I I deal a lot with short traders and I gotTa tell you they are a Paranoiac anche for reason I mean they're thousand ones ways screw them. You never hear about new usual Wall Street <hes> articles interesting well. Thanks for coming on the show and it's been Nice and look forward to picking up the book on Amazon. Well thank you so much for having me. I appreciate the time that's it. You've been listening to another confident R._O._I.. The one show that you can confidently listen to today's show really learned something right here and archenemies on the community radio the station Talk Radio Dot net right now sprint has a great deal double the fund lease the latest IPHONE and get an iphone ten are on us. All you need is approved credit and eighteen month leases no trade in required visit sprint stores sprint dot com or call eight hundred sprint one today iphone ten or sixty gigabyte three hundred hundred zero dollars. The twenty five dollars credit applied within two bills pristine observers Castlereagh arena balanced do coverage and offer not to be awarded were thirty doctor-patient district is biased just because it's called higher education doesn't mean high tuition costs have to be the.

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