35 Burst results for "Optima"

What Is The Pe Diet

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | Last week

What Is The Pe Diet

"Everyone is Martin from twenty minute fitness I'm here today connected with Dr Ted Niemann Dominate, and why don't you tell liberal listeners about your work and book? The P. Will Hi Martin Nice to meet you just call me Ted first of all. So I, I'm Ted name I'm a primary care doctor and I've been in practice for about twenty years up here in the Seattle area and I have a mechanical engineering background, and so I'm kind of like a just a huge Geek. A nerd kind of a Geek mechanical engineering background went to medical school and. I ended up just being obsessed with optimum health and I realized that the difference between the healthiest people I saw and the least healthy people I saw really just came down to diet and exercise. So all day long in these patient visits icy this huge spectrum of health You know one minute I might be seeing someone who has just amazing body composition and their incredible health, and they might even be an elite athlete and then the next minute I see someone who's just frail and decrepit and falling apart and has millions of problems and it eventually occurred to me. That the only difference between these people was really just diet and exercise over time, and if your diet and exercise is optimal, you just slowly get better and better over time and if it's not, you just slowly get worse and worse over time and then you know fifty years down the road you see this massive spectrum of health from incredibly healthy to incredibly unhealthy and I've just been obsessed for twenty years with exactly what is the mechanism between Diet and exercise driving health outcomes in exactly what you have to do to get the positive adaptations instead of the negative ones and I've you know I've just been all over the Diet spectrum I was raised vegetarian I went to Loma Linda University in Southern California, which is this famous blues Mecca were everyone's plant based So I've I've experimented with Air Free Diet from Vegan and plant based to, of course, oil spectrum of Paleo. Kito. Carnivora. You name it and everything in between, and then I eventually realized that all of these diets right about something and the answer is in between and the secret is finding out what's powering each and every one of these diets and making them more successful than. The Standard. American. Diet and that's really how I came up with this book. The P.. E. Diet, which is sort of the unified theory of macronutrients You know that's at least it has been described right so so how does like the P. E. Diet look in a nutshell what makes it different from say pay euro at the Ketogenic diets or you know all vegetarian diet for example. So what I did is just zoom way way way way way way out to the fifty thousand foot view and just looked at what is eating and I realized that plants are. Auto troops and they make all their own food and then animals are Hetero trips and we only exist because we constantly injust other living organisms. So plants are at the base of the food chain for all animals they're making all the food for animals and then animals are just either eating plants or animals that have themselves eating plants. What plants her doing is two very specific things. Number one, they're sucking minerals out of the soil, which is nitrogen for protein and and about a dozen other minerals that are crucial for plant and animal life, and then they're using solar. Energy and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to create these high energy chains of carbons with high energy bonds, carbon hydrogen bonds, and that's all of your dietary energy either carbs, fats. This is all solar energy stored is chemical energy. So I realized that you could divide your entire diet up into protein and minerals which getting room soil and energy, which is these high energy, carbon chains, carbs, or fats that plants creating from solar energy, and then I, sort of looked at all of human history in this evolutionary Lens. I realized that if you look at hunter gatherers, they have this. Incredibly. High Protein Diet. It's thirty three percent on average protein. If you look at worldwide hundred gatherer macronutrients and hunter-gatherers, they have an easy time getting protein they just go out and kill an animal and eat the whole thing you get plenty of protein and minerals but you're always a little bit starving for energy right? Every animal you know trying to get enough energy to be successful, and so you're always looking for extra energy to add to your diet. You can get the protein and minerals, but just killing an animal and eating the whole thing but you're looking for. Extra Energy and what humans have done is we have always used technology to feed ourselves. We don't have teeth and claws were not particularly fast or strong on. But what we have is brains, and so we built tools, we use tools to feed ourselves. We use technology to feed ourselves. We had stone tools with break-up in skulls for branch and long runs for married at fat energy to our diet. We dug up tubers, add more carbohydrate energy tour Diet. We figured out how to throw weapons and create traps in hunting in groups, and we all of this technology to add. More, energy to our diet

Dr Ted Niemann Seattle Loma Linda University Martin Ketogenic Southern California
The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The Diversity of Security Challenges in Higher Education

"Now. What is it like? Every year you have a new batch of of students coming on board and they all want to connect to your network I mean what's the? What's the reality of that situation from a security point of view It is a lot of prep-work over the summertime, a lot of you know repair and refine and and. You know replace things that aren't doing well, and then when you know we get about two weeks out from classes starting. which this year is September second. So we're kind of in that zone right now. That's where we're making sure that everything is working. In it in. Its, optimum. Capacity and capability. Following that it's you know let's continue planning for whatever is going to happen next you know we the spring term winter spring term in in January this past year and nobody anticipated. Kobe I I'm not. You know I'm sure that there was an -ticipant because the the fun part of that is we actually did a pandemic tabletop exercise in the division of Information Technology, which is the central a unit on campus. We do that path the fall of twenty and eighteen. So we hit already kind of work through some of the. You know the communications challenges and the organizational challenges so when it came time to do. The transition from online or from in person courses to online courses, we were able to do that in very short time and that included transitioning thirty seven hundred core courses. From in person delivery to online delivery so that really served you well, I and it was the preparation time and it was the understanding. Of what we would need to do and it was also, you know checking those channels you know. I've done some business continuity work in my in my pass and a business continuity plan to just never exercise it's not a plan. It's a bunch of on paper so So we were able to walk through and validate that and that's the kind of work we do during the school year. And we take our you know kind of slowdown period so. Beginning summer you know everybody takes a deep breath and then we exhaling get back to work you know Sometime during the summer I like to encourage my my team to have a little bit of time off. But when September goes in and the students arrive we, we try to work really hard to get him through and then we take it the winter holidays. What what kinds of things are you and your team defending against who? Who's WHO's coming at your network? You know it's the usual array of Fred actors You know think about the things that research is doing. You know we're we're doing. A lot of research in the area of Koga right now, and it's just. Be We have the capability. We have the expertise we have the researchers at want to do that. But we also have school medicine in public health. We also have a school of Nursing School of Pharmacy. So healthcare education is important in that has just a treasure trove highly valuable. Information in it. But we do engineering work, and some of that work is is patentable work. So that's probably attractive We do a lot of business influenced work. we have data science institute which is trying to figure out the the better ways to understand. You know the the magic acronyms of a I in L.. Artificial intelligence. Machine. Learning. And and that's that's attractive information not only that forty four, thousand students twenty three, thousand staff that's a treasure trove of marketable information. You know I always wonder you know someone in a situation like yours where certainly you're going to have some students and I'm thinking of Oh I don't know folks in computer science and other sorts of places who were going to look at you know the the campus system or the university system as you know their own personal playground there that. you know they're gonNA WANNA, test their own skills against yours. I mean I is that an annual thing and and how do you? How do you? How do you not be adversarial? How do you support You know the educational aspects of of those students while still keeping things up and running what's your approach to those sorts of things? Well. So I we we are establishing some really good partnerships with with the Academy with the the the professors and researchers that are interested in studying the cybersecurity arts and sciences. we've had a relationship with the information school. is They're they're part of the College of letters and Sciences and now they're part of what's been amalgam is as the the School of Computing. Data. And Information Studies so CDs. In in in doing that, I, mean, the partnership is if it's data and if it's doing things if it's you know working or arresting or or if it's needing to be analyzed, we have people that are very much interested and so I've had my my department be intentional about establishing those greater relationships we have you know researchers doing anything from identity access. Management Research to data analytics to cybersecurity metrics and then we have others on campus that are doing great work in high throughput. Computing Great Work in in you know engineering the the next greatest you know computer technologies. In other side trips we had We have a researcher that is working on, Thomas Vehicle. Research you know and there's an awful lot of cyber in there too so. Having those kind of relationships is the the real multiplier here, and this is not unusual by the way for university. This is nothing super special. We're doing it's just that You know there's a, there's a lot of cybersecurity programs out there where there you know NSA certified Center for Academic Excellence. Certified and we're GONNA. Get there eventually. I believe But right now we're just supporting the researchers in the courses are being taught. Sue I myself have been a guest lecturer in a one of the business school courses. It has an information security course as part of its core. That's been fun. I enjoy doing. I did a little bit of that as an adjunct University part of my coming here.

Researcher Nursing School Of Pharmacy College Of Letters And Science School Of Computing Koga Kobe Guest Lecturer Fred NSA Thomas Vehicle Center For Academic Excellence
AI Tries to Save the Whales

WSJ The Future of Everything

09:11 min | Last month

AI Tries to Save the Whales

"We head to the Pacific northwest to understand the obstacles that confront these endangered orcas and how researchers are using artificial intelligence to help orcas and humans to coexist. WHAT HAPPENED TO J thirty five or Tala wasn't an anomaly the southern resident cavs have been struggling to survive for some time they've been listed as endangered in both the US and Canada since the mid arts. But their numbers continue to fall in two, thousand five there were eight. Now there are just seventy two in the wild one lives in captivity. Their home waters in the sailor, see an elaborate network of channels that span the coasts of Seattle Vancouver from Olympia Washington in the south to the middle of Vancouver Island British Columbia in the north. The see encompasses puget sound the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan De. FUCA. Much of it is rich in natural beauty and teeming with wildlife with rural shorelines backlit by tall evergreens and craggy. Hills. It's a magnet for nature lovers who crave inactive lifestyle, but the Pacific northwest has been getting crowded these paths few decades with people competing for space with the local wildlife as of two thousand twenty. Washington's population was nearly eight million and Vancouver's topped out at about two and a half million and is projected to grow. It's become a busy place. So you see things like Bald Eagles nesting next to satellite dishes in busy parking lots. Big. Ravens Beg for food next to cold press coffeeshops commuters hop on ferry boats here like people in other towns take the train or the car. On these trips they can sometimes spot the southern resident orcas milling about but a lot of the time the orchestra framed by ferry boats or container ships. The area's ports are growing along with the population. In twenty eighteen Porta Vancouver ship activity reached a record high and the port is undergoing numerous expansions. Increased. Commercial ship traffic on top of recreational boat activity is one of the biggest threats facing the whales that live here. This traffic causes numerous problems ships pollute the water, and they're loud under the waves. As we're about to find out the ocean is getting crowded and noisy, and it's negatively impacting the whales. Dr Lance Barrett Lennard is the director of the Marine Mammal Research Program at the Vancouver Aquarium. There's also a lot of heavy vessel traffic that comes in some of the going to the port of Vancouver some of the going to the port of Seattle unfortunately both both major west coast ports. have their roots running through. Southern Resident Critical Habitat. But the obvious problem he says is that more boats increase the chances that Wales will get hit. especially, if the boats are going fast. Whale is far less likely to be hit by ship that's running slow, and if it's running less than ten knots, a good chance to survive even if it is hit, that's just the facts. So regulators started issuing slowdown directives, it few areas these slowdowns are mandatory, but in the Pacific northwest or the orcas live, they remain mostly voluntary. Mariner say they want to avoid the ORCAS but there are business conflicts John? Berg. Is With Pacific, Merchant Shipping Association a Trade Group that represents about thirty shipping lines that do business along the Pacific coast. For a lot of ships. Schedule Integrity. Is. Paramount. and. So they need to be at a certain port at a certain day in a certain time. And so planning is essential especially since coming in late can mean higher fees and lost revenue. Mariners go back and forth about how quiet ships they talk about things like reducing noise by finding optimum speed or by retrofitting or upgrading vessels with more efficient quieter parts. They even say that in some cases slower vessels. Moore of Iraq. Now to researchers, this is a settled question, the faster ship the louder the ship. And it's the noise that is even more detrimental to the ORCAS than ship. Strikes. The underwater cacophony is mostly generated by ship's propeller. It releases vapor filled bubbles. ORCAS like all CETACEANS rely on echo location to communicate, made and find food. For ORCAS, it's how they find salmon as the ORCAS chase salmon they make clicking sounds that they send out into the ocean. The click then bounces off of the salmon and creates an echo, and that's how they know where the salmon are underwater noise pollution specialist. Dr Lindy Wildcard is an adjunct research associate at Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. CETACEANS are particularly vocal of the US sounds to find their prey actively using bio sonar. And the various noise sources that humans put into the ocean can affect. Wales and that they are masked, that is the sounds of interests are obliterated by by US adding this sort of acoustics smog of of noise so they can't hear as well. You can actually hear the masking that wildcard is talking about listen to this underwater recording of northern resident orcas who have different dialects from their neighbors, the southern resident or is this recording was provided by Orca lab a nonprofit research center based on Hanson Island near British. Columbia. Canada. Those. SQUEALS ARE ORCA calls. Here's what happens if you overlay their calls with recording of the ship underwater. It drowns out the ORCAS squeals. All you hear is ship noise. That's because the sound created by the ship is at the same high frequency ranges the ORCAS. It's kind of like being at a dinner party where people are talking over each other. But for the ORCAS, the increased sound means they'll lose their seat at the table. If the ORCAS can't hear themselves they can't hear the seminar and so they can't find food. And that can have far reaching impacts that affect the entire population. Their stress hormones can increase. with, noise with the seismic Airgun sounds they also reduce their vocalisations to the point of sometimes falling outright silent, which means they can't communicate with each other and that probably affects mating. If mayors could know where the ORCAS are. They could try to avoid that part of the ocean or at least slow down. So their engine noise doesn't drown the ORCAS OUT Ideally. They'd only have to go slow when the orcas were in the area, but it can be hard for ship captains to confirm where the whales are in fog rain or even under normal circumstances ship captains can't always see them they often miss them. So some conservationists along with the Canadian government installed underwater hydrophones in the Salish Sea along the coast of British Columbia near known ORCA HABITAT, they wanted to be able to track the ORCAS through their echo location calls. But remember how it works. Sound was drowned out by the ship's well, it's not just hard for the orchestra here. It's hard for the humans to. It can take people a long time to listen to all those recordings figuring out what is well sound, and what is this ship fish or other marine life sounds the orcas make noise at all hours of the day and night, and all of that sound even that record overnight has to be listened to by someone. Up. Next. How artificial intelligence can help speed this process up? And maybe find a solution for both the ships and the whales.

Orcas Vancouver Pacific Northwest United States Pacific Seattle Canada Vancouver Island British Colum Wales Southern Resident Critical Hab Strait Of Georgia Cavs Porta Vancouver Vancouver Aquarium Tala Puget Juan De Sound Columbia
The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

My Seven Chakras

04:37 min | Last month

The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

"Ever since which urine witold that we need a lot of oxygen to survive were to breathe in deeply so that we can get enough oxygen oxygen has been touted as life giving gas that US earthlings can art survive without but is this entirely true or is there more than meets the eye on today's episode we're going to explore this very interesting and profound dodig, and by the end of this episode, you will actually understand in a very simple and easy manner how you're breathing translates to more energy deeper relaxation. Oh mind and better hilt. But before I, continue our request you to please hit the subscribe button on your phone especially if you're on an iphone. Something to the podcast algorithm that ensures that people who wouldn't normally see this episode Ashley come across. So please hit the subscribe button right now. All right. So before we dive deeper I, think we need to take a few steps back and understand how energy is produced in the body from a scientific perspective and this is really interesting when you breeden. You're taking oxygen which goes down your throat into your lungs and into your bloodstream. The oxygen then binds to the him global in your blood cells. Now, the oxygen is then transmitted into the mitral. Contra. And if you remember lessons from school, you'll remember that it is the powerhouse of your cell and through a chemical reaction the Oxygen Burns with the glucose in the cell to form Energy Carbon Dioxide and water vapor, and then when you breathe out. You exist the governor dockside along with the water whip. The energy is then transmitted to wherever it is needed in your body. Isn't that amazing? All of this happens between your in him. An exile. Now oxygen can be likened to fuel that Burns to release energy too little fuel and you really can't start a fire and what happens when they're stu much fuel. Well, there could be a fire or literally an explosion. So what do you think happens when for some reason, you inhale too much of oxygen. You can't be good for you. Right. It turns out that it actually isn't just like when you expose I n to air for long periods of time, the oxygen in the atmosphere reacts for the through a process that is called oxidation to cause rust in the same way when you breathing too much oxygen or a period of time that can lead to oxidative damage in your body. In your disuse in your muscles in the form of inflammation and cell damage. Now, this can be tricky. Because on one side, I'm saying that we need oxygen to produce energy but we're also saying that or exposure to oxygen can lead to inflammation and cellular damage and the key to understanding this lies in a process guard bores effect. Be. Or are bores effect when you breathe in Oxygen Surf. The oxygen binds with your haemoglobin in your blood and a member the oxygen needs to get released from your hemoglobin and has to reach your mic Andrea, which is a powerhouse of yourself for the energy to be produced. So if there's a high level of oxygen. Did remain bound to your hemoglobin and over a period of time this can cause tissue damage and what happens is the free radicals actually start attacking your own system. This can lead to depression Lou Energy Fatigue and immune disorders does this sound familiar the solution to the challenge lies and somehow decreasing the level of oxygen which leads to the hemoglobin releasing or ejecting the oxygen, which can then go to the Powerhouse, off your cell the Mitochondria for energy production. And the UNSUNG hero over here is Garvin Dioxide in other words for cellular hilt optimum energy. You don't just need oxygen, but you also need carbon dioxide for your body to be able to produce energy

Oxygen Surf Garvin Dioxide United States Andrea Ashley Breeden
Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

The Bio Report

06:19 min | Last month

Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

"Lodge again and the ability to run a test of five thousand proteins in the blood to gain new insights into health and disease. I WanNa talk about two specific areas that you're working in. But before we do that perhaps we can begin with why someone would wanNA sample five, thousand proteins once we think of looking for a specific protein that's a biomarker for z's but what's the benefit of looking at this whole realm of proteins? Sure well, and that's that's really the. The crux of of what's different about what we do here at some logic. On on this developing diagnostic side and that is that We've known for a long time that. Proteins would be the best information source for. Human biology in potentially to predict things about conditions and disease but. The problem has been measuring enough proteins at any one time to get what I would call. A full-body. Signal. If you think about the comparator here is believed that since we can measure all genes in the human body that. The doing genyk risk assessment looking at expression of all these genes may give us an information. That someone's risk for things we can come back to that later turns out that approach is not as good as we would hoped, it would be. And the reason it's not as good as we'd hoped, it would be is because jeans aren't dynamic they don't change over time that will change with age and changed with. Your your genome is the same at age twenty five is it is at age forty, five and sixty five. John doesn't change when you're sick or changing you take drugs but all of those things. Change with your were there proteome But the problem has been, you know measuring enough proteins at any one time to get sort of a full body signal. Rather than measuring one protein at a time and then trying to correlate that some disease process the second problem is been. Gosh even if we could measure thousands of proteins at a time. How would we be able to make any sense out of it? In so The thing that's just happened to occur and that some logic happens to be the. You know at the at the leading edge of is we figured out a way to measure thousands of proteins at a time rather than hundreds of what almost everybody else in the world does. In sort of clinical commercial context and then we. have been able to to use machine learning. To look at those patterns of protein expression of those thousands of proteins correlate them to. Thinks that you really WanNa know about. What exactly does your some scan platform do and and how does it work? Yeah. So To sort of back up into the technology itself what? What are found discover thirty thirty years ago is that You can actually take little pieces of nucleic acid a DNA. In, in in solution. So when they're in you know the body's liquid format. These little pieces of DNA will fold into three. D. confirmational shapes. And he knew in his research group thirty years ago that. Are, which is very similar to DNA in sales actually does this it folds into confirmational shapes and moves proteins around in cells in has important roles. So this question was, why can't we just make a library of millions of different? Little pieces of DNA and select the ones out by dentist their shape would bind to the shape of a protein people thought it was crazy and so. In in in these little pieces, of DNA, Short, they're not jeans or slow random sequences of nucleic acid. Are called OPTIMA. and. So he was the CO founder of the. Science thirty years ago. In what we do is we've developed a library of thousands of these little pieces of DNA. We've modified them to make them buying the pre-teens even more. Specifically, reliably in because of that, if you will, we sort of engineered. Of Synthetic. Antibodies that can recognize proteins, but they're not antibodies pieces denying. In the asset that we do. We expose the body fluid to these thousands of of afterwards we call ourselves immersed because they've been modified to work even better. And so we just happen to have currently five thousand different of these different uniform these by the end of the sheer will have seventy, five hundred. You're pretty own has about twenty thousand canonical when I say canonical basic protein structures. But again, until we came along, you can only measure a few hundred time. So we expose a body fluid to you know a solution full of these. Summers that they bind proteins the we throw the unbound protein away. In the unbound optimus away or the summers away. We then or left with these little pieces in click acid bound to proteins. We then throw the proteins away. And we measure the. DNA. They're. Using we use an array. where an array were, you know you've got a complementary sequence printed on the slide and If you can identify whether or not that sequence was there in your specimen that gets when it. Binds to the slide at lights up. You can also do this Sunday called next generation sequencing but what we do we turn. Protein measurement into DNA measurement, and that's sort of the magic. As far as the tests themselves that are derived from this. The magic, there is actually a what's best described as is pattern recognition. And so the way to think about the way the test works. So give me your blood sample, we run it a we we expose it to our some immerse. We should out what proteins in that sample in how much we can do both relative to one another, and they'll. So now we have this pattern of protein expression in your blood for thousands of proteins. We've run this acid several hundred thousand

Z Summers Co Founder Optima. Short
Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

The Bio Report

06:01 min | Last month

Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

"Some lodge again and the ability to run a test of five thousand proteins in the blood to gain new insights into health and disease. I WanNa talk about two specific areas that you're working in. But before we do that perhaps we can begin with why someone would wanNA sample five, thousand proteins once we think of looking for a specific protein that's a biomarker for z's but what's the benefit of looking at this whole realm of proteins? Sure well, and that's that's really the. The crux of of what's different about what we do here at some logic. On on this developing diagnostic side and that is that We've known for a long time that. Proteins would be the best information source for. Human biology in potentially to predict things about conditions and disease but. The problem has been measuring enough proteins at any one time to get what I would call. A full-body. Signal. If you think about the comparator here is believed that since we can measure all genes in the human body that. The doing genyk risk assessment looking at expression of all these genes may give us an information. That someone's risk for things we can come back to that later turns out that approach is not as good as we would hoped, it would be. And the reason it's not as good as we'd hoped, it would be is because jeans aren't dynamic they don't change over time that will change with age and changed with. Your your genome is the same at age twenty five is it is at age forty, five and sixty five. John doesn't change when you're sick or changing you take drugs but all of those things. Change with your were there proteome But the problem has been, you know measuring enough proteins at any one time to get sort of a full body signal. Rather than measuring one protein at a time and then trying to correlate that some disease process the second problem is been. Gosh even if we could measure thousands of proteins at a time. How would we be able to make any sense out of it? In so The thing that's just happened to occur and that some logic happens to be the. You know at the at the leading edge of is we figured out a way to measure thousands of proteins at a time rather than hundreds of what almost everybody else in the world does. In sort of clinical commercial context and then we. have been able to to use machine learning. To look at those patterns of protein expression of those thousands of proteins correlate them to. Thinks that you really WanNa know about. What exactly does your some scan platform do and and how does it work? Yeah. So To sort of back up into the technology itself what? What are found discover thirty thirty years ago is that You can actually take little pieces of nucleic acid a DNA. In, in in solution. So when they're in you know the body's liquid format. These little pieces of DNA will fold into three. D. confirmational shapes. And he knew in his research group thirty years ago that. Are, which is very similar to DNA in sales actually does this it folds into confirmational shapes and moves proteins around in cells in has important roles. So this question was, why can't we just make a library of millions of different? Little pieces of DNA and select the ones out by dentist their shape would bind to the shape of a protein people thought it was crazy and so. In in in these little pieces, of DNA, Short, they're not jeans or slow random sequences of nucleic acid. Are called OPTIMA. and. So he was the CO founder of the. Science thirty years ago. In what we do is we've developed a library of thousands of these little pieces of DNA. We've modified them to make them buying the pre-teens even more. Specifically, reliably in because of that, if you will, we sort of engineered. Of Synthetic. Antibodies that can recognize proteins, but they're not antibodies pieces denying. In the asset that we do. We expose the body fluid to these thousands of of afterwards we call ourselves immersed because they've been modified to work even better. And so we just happen to have currently five thousand different of these different uniform these by the end of the sheer will have seventy, five hundred. You're pretty own has about twenty thousand canonical when I say canonical basic protein structures. But again, until we came along, you can only measure a few hundred time. So we expose a body fluid to you know a solution full of these. Summers that they bind proteins the we throw the unbound protein away. In the unbound optimus away or the summers away. We then or left with these little pieces in click acid bound to proteins. We then throw the proteins away. And we measure the. DNA. They're. Using we use an array. where an array were, you know you've got a complementary sequence printed on the slide and If you can identify whether or not that sequence was there in your specimen that gets when it. Binds to the slide at lights up. You can also do this Sunday called next generation sequencing but what we do we turn. Protein measurement into DNA measurement, and that's sort of the magic. As far as the tests themselves that are derived from this. The magic, there is actually a what's best described as is pattern recognition. And so the way to think about the way the test works. So give me your blood sample, we run it a

Z Summers Co Founder Optima. Short
Sweet news: A once a week chocolate fix can be good for your heart

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Sweet news: A once a week chocolate fix can be good for your heart

"Study in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that eating chocolate at least once a week. Can lower the risk of heart disease, The study suggests. Chocolate keeps the heart's blood vessels healthy, but doctors say don't get too carried away. The study did not examine whether any particular type of chocolate is more beneficial than others or the optimum portion

European Journal Of Preventive
"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:43 min | 3 months ago

"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Optima Tax relief for details Visit after much actually dot com. It takes less than one minute to take the pre diabetes quiz. Prediabetes without intervention can progress to diabetes, people with diabetes or more likely to experience severe symptoms and complications when infected with covert. 19. Don't snooze on your health. No, your risk. Take the online quiz now at know prediabetes dot org's Sponsored by the California Department of Public Health Picture. This a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any other possible disaster. Devastated your town. You're out of power. No lights, no news. That's why federal and state agencies urge you to have an emergency radio. Now you can get a free Dynamo World Band Emergency radio. This powerful radio lets you stay informed during any type of emergency. It doesn't even need batteries. It comes with a hand crank generator and super bright. Led flashlight. The Dynamo emergency radio includes the Noah weather banned a long range AM receiver Ah high sensitivity FM band and even a USB jack to charge cellphones or other devices. The Dynamo Emergency weather Band Radio retails for almost $30. But Newsmax wants to make sure you get this radio. So check out the free offer for the emergency radio by going to get the radio dot com That's get the radio dot com or call toll free 877 NEWSMAX. That's 877 news, Max. This radio could save your life. This offer may and soon so order today. Sponsored by Audi Rock Now Trending on News, 93.1 KFBK Warner Media executives.

Travel to Bosnia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:51 min | 3 months ago

Travel to Bosnia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen? Let's talk about Bosnia. I like to welcome to the show. Canaan Charter, which who is coming from Bosnia and his coming to us from highlander adventures dot, be and has come to talk to us about Bosnia Herzegovina. Canaan welcome to the show. Thank you very much happy to be here excellent and for people who can't find Bosnia and Herzegovina on a map. Where are we talking about? Well. Everyone knows how to find Italy. It's a big shoe ships country. You have a boot-shaped country, so just go to the right side across the Atlantic Sea and we are right there. Well and your neighbor of Croatia. Bosnia you know goes around like little crescent moon. knoll on the West and south, and then these we have Serbia and southeast Montenegro. I to address. You're interested in making sure that people understand that. If they remember news about Bosnia, they may be remembering news from twenty thirty years ago when Bosnia was going through. A, war that's done, and that's been done now for quite a long time there there are people who are out in the working world who don't remember that and it's a wonderful place to go I. Want to say that I was anxious to do this show because we haven't done a show on Bosnia for a long time. And since then I have been to the country and loved it. So why should someone go to Bosnia Herzegovina? Well, there is a lot of reasons depending what you're interested in now. Bosnia is very complex country, but extremely small size of Pennsylvania, but inside. You have so much for the adventure seekers. There are so many adventure opportunities from Whitewater. Rafting canyoning to paragliding hiking is spectacular, and then if you're into history, we say that we have much more history than we can handle. Different Than Empires were here. We like to say where the crossroads or that where the meeting between the East and the West. Culturally very complex country, and also religiously we have Muslims, we have the Orthodox Christians, and we have Catholics with three big groups. Of course there's the Jewish community here which has been here since they were thrown out of Spain after Kista, so for five hundred years, all of these make this crazy, crazy and beautiful mix that very interesting for foreigners to see because inside I will for example and. And in many other cities in Bosnia, you can pined mosque Docs Church Catholic, Church and a synagogue literally in two hundred meter radius, and it's been like that for five hundred years while inside I will because that's how will the city is? And all of a Bosnia and we're very proud of that architecturally very different from anything else you can find in Europe you're GonNa, find this mix of. Of European styles as well as the optimum styles and a lot of course, local Bosnian styles in all of that mixed together will like to say that we are a Bosnian pots. That's one dish that we have. It's cooked in a big pot with a lot of things, mixed sight, and that's Bosnia a lot of things mixed, and it works perfectly. An Indian taste is fantastic why you should. Should visit Bosnian well. Whatever you choose. You're GONNA love it. If you're into history too much of it, you're into nature. It's absolutely stunning. It's fantastic, magic Pennsylvania, and then put inside the Rockies Grand Canyon Inca trail at a lot of other things as well a bit of New Zealand as well. We just like seaside. We have twenty four kilometers of seaside, so that's one thing with them have. And then, of course, for actually learning history or getting certain messages, let's say about life about history. How people live together or how they don't like each other, because while we had a lot of wars, let's especially in the last two hundred years. There's a lot of lessons that you can learn in Boston. Let's say war tourism doctors is now very big part of tourism in in Bosnia so if you want to learn about that, we are definitely to come to see what happens. If you don't defeat fascism, like most of Europe defeated off the Second World War and it actually shows how life can be both good and the bat also if you want to visit a place. which is completely different than rest of the Europe and very relaxed very laid back with fantastic food, most at a lot of reasons I think.

Bosnia Herzegovina Europe Chris Christensen Canaan Charter Pennsylvania Croatia Herzegovina Mosque Docs Church Catholic Serbia Atlantic Sea Kista Southeast Montenegro Spain Italy Whitewater Boston Rockies Grand Canyon Inca New Zealand
Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

Outcomes Rocket

06:52 min | 3 months ago

Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting Chris Democ and Carlos Arce both are at the outstanding company elation. Chris is the founder and he's been interested in what drives improved human performance since his days in college, a curiosity about developmental psychology expanded into a love for organizational development and the design of technologies that improve organizational performance. He was inspired to start elation after a career the tech industry is passion. Passion for helping people through the use of innovative technologies transition into a calling to help people flourish by applying what they know from neurobiology and mindset research, seeing the transformative benefits of his approach, it's only fueled his enthusiasm, and helped the track, an extraordinary team of people who share in the mission Carlos Arce is the Organization of Development Consultant and facilitator at Elation, and he's been highly successful as a keynote speaker, workshop, presenter and consultant he works. Works directly with many of the clients and organization hired by Elation. He's a coach and teacher, whose purpose is to inspire people to be better. He continually helps leaders. Companies achieve outstanding business results while improving organizational culture and employee engagement. These are these are things that we all strive for in our businesses, and in our in our organizations and today we're going to dive into the work that they're doing at elation to help with the problem physician burnout. burnout and the feeling of lack of community, those things that are so important and primary needs in in Even you think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs they're they're getting after it in a big way and have seen a lot of success, and and I'm and I'm privileged to have both of them here with us today to talk about the work that they're doing so Carlos and Chris. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. So, thanks for having a huge absolutely so before we dive into the work of Elation love to to get a feel for what inspires both of you to to work within healthcare. Well, this is Chris. I have looked at the statistics in healthcare over the last several years, and been absolutely sort of amazed at the level at which out has become an issue among physicians and other medical personnel you know studies been fairly consistent that it's around the fifty percent level of diagnosis symptoms of burnout, according to the WHO's diagnosis trim, so it is sort of a burning platform issue for healthcare in the United States If you have physicians who are performing at less than their optimum. Ability obviously impact the quality of outcomes or people, yeah, and unsolved. That's a great question. I had the privilege of actually spending thirteen years of my career in healthcare as the. Support percent at a title that some people find a little bit mystical called chief learning officer for a portion of that time where you got I got a chance to really experienced the industry on a daily basis, and to be honest with you. It was an extraordinary privilege to watch the kind of work that's happening daily by nurses and doctors, and in my time there I really got a chance to explore the cultural dynamics of howled interactions. Interactions between professionals how the interactions between administration and clinicians although kind of contributes to the general sense of the support and the affect of daily activity rate, so in my case I wasn't necessarily ride into address burnt out, but I was really focus on. How do you altima optimized performance of both individuals in the group? So I had a passion for healthcare from the very beginning when we started doing work with elation seen the results that we. We, were accomplishing private sector, a lot of different kind of exploratory technologies in the combination of exporatory and proven methodologies. That's thought had something. I think that can contribute to this to this industry that is as Chris. Put you know dealing with some pretty challenges, free dot, daunting threats that happen on a regular basis. And how do we make sure we we We give it to the folks who need it the most love asset so. So fantastic I mean. The problem is clear, and and you know we we talk about the quadruple aim that fourth one being you know clinician satisfaction, right and wellness, and so you guys are tackling it head on, if providers aren't healthy, then it's going to be even harder to provide better outcomes for patients overall, and and so let's let's dive into it, guys. What is it that elation is doing to add value to the provider ecosystem? Yeah I'll I'll take that on crystal in. If you want to chime in, feel free to. My. What we're doing is we're looking at the problem. In its most authentic form, we are addressing this as an organizational dynamic. We see that we know the pathway that clinicians have to take to become practitioners in this country is not easy. It is not for the faint of heart, so we actually often referenced the notion that we'd take some of the most resilient humans on the planet and created epidemic burnout, and so if you're honest about that. That statement and you have to acknowledge the systemic implications of that. You know what what's happening when you put those people into this workplace that over time ends up eroding this amazing competency that they bring to the table, so that's an important element because of our approach because of that focus. We see that there isn't. This isn't about fixing physicians and this isn't about this direct cause and effect relationship that will just one thing is causing. Causing this dynamic for everybody there is a local element to this that you've got to pay attention to. And then there's this combination of both the individual and the individual with Indus Group in the system, so we've taken methodologies that are helpful for individuals like executive coaching that we know works and puts people in the right spot. We've taken this approaches. We've learned for organizational development when it comes to creating workplace cultural dynamics that are that. That are healthy, and that are actually what we would call resilient, enough themselves, so this idea of organizational resilience which involves group work and group interactions between the the key players, and we have kind of combine those two ultimately influence not only the individual themselves in a way, and give them informed about what helps them, or what actually contributes or undermines their own resilience, but also best in them as catalyst for change within that

Elation Chris Democ Carlos Arce Sal Marquez United States Founder Indus Group Development Consultant Officer Consultant Maslow Executive
"optima" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:04 min | 4 months ago

"optima" Discussed on KTRH

"Optima tax relief some restrictions apply for complete details please visit optima tax relief dot com America is ready to get back to work but to win in the new economy you need every advantage to succeed smart companies run on that's we buy oracle the world's number one cloud business system with netsuite you'll have visibility and control over your financials HR inventory E. commerce and more everything you need all in one place whether you're doing a million or hundreds of millions in sales nets we give you visibility and control so you can manage every penny with precision you'll have the agility to compete with anyone work from anywhere and run your whole company right from your phone join over twenty thousand companies who trust next week to go faster with confidence nets we surveyed hundreds of business leaders and assemble to play because the top strategies they're using as America re opens for business receive your free guide seven actions businesses need to take now and schedule your free product tour at Nestle dot com slash week day get your free guide and schedule your free product to our right now and that's we dot com slash weekday nights we dot com slash weekday shopping yet mattresses have more or less stayed the same since the invention of sleep finally the mattress has evolved thanks to purple the secret is the purple grit it's a patented comfort technology that instantly adapts to your body's natural shape and sleep style so you get the soft comfort you crave and firm support your back needs all at once plus with over twenty eight hundred open your channels and naturally temperature neutral gel you'll never sleep too hot or too cold every purple mattress comes with free shipping free returns and a risk free one hundred night trial experience the next evolution of sleep go to a purple dot com slash le VIN and use promo code love him for a limited time you'll get a hundred and fifty dollars off any purple mattress order of fifteen hundred dollars or more that's purple dot com slash le VIN promo code live in L. E. V. I. N. for one hundred and fifty dollars off any mattress order a fifteen hundred dollars or more terms apply hi I.

Golf joins baseball, soccer in South Korea as sports resume

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Golf joins baseball, soccer in South Korea as sports resume

"Golf joins baseball and soccer sports in South Korea that have resumed the women's kale PGA championship teeing off today Germany's Bundesliga returns this weekend and clubs will be allowed five substitution is instead of three two teams not being at optimum fitness after the hiatus Major League Baseball is already had a spring training but if they're going to play a twenty twenty season they'll need another period to get in

Golf South Korea Germany Baseball Soccer PGA
North and South Korea 'exchange gunfire across border'

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

North and South Korea 'exchange gunfire across border'

"North and south Korean troops have exchanged gunfire across the demilitarized zone which separates the two countries for the first time in five years sure the components themselves this ice cream military is trying to find out if this was an accident or whether north Korean soldiers deliberately short for billets of their guard post sixteen soldiers fired two sets of ten rows back after issuing a warning a military officer in Seoul said the billets had not been fired from an optimum position and the weather was foggy at the time he also said there were no unusual troop movements in the north this led him to believe that there was a little possibility this act was designed to provoke a safe but the motivation is still unclear talks between north and South Korea have sold in the last year the timing is also interesting as it's just twenty four hours since Kim Jong and reappeared after twenty one D.

Officer Seoul Kim Jong South Korea
U.S. Attorney’s Office Files Restraining Order Against Chiropractor Promoting ‘Sham COVID-19 Treatment’

KRLD Saturday Morning News

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

U.S. Attorney’s Office Files Restraining Order Against Chiropractor Promoting ‘Sham COVID-19 Treatment’

"Meanwhile federal prosecutors get a restraining order against a chiropractor in Richardson day you say with promoting of phony treatment for the cold with nineteen the U. S. attorney's office say that doctor rate that is of optimum wellness solution posted a video online advertising a homeopathic treatment that could act as both a backseat and reduce the symptoms his office was selling to treatment for around ninety five

Attorney Richardson
"optima" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:25 min | 5 months ago

"optima" Discussed on WTOP

"Optima tax some restrictions apply for complete details please visit optima tax relief dot com it's two thirty six this stay at home order may mean families can get together this holiday season but Maryland's governor had some good news for kids worried that the Easter bunny wouldn't visit this year families have already hosted virtual Passover seder is for example and Maryland governor Larry Hogan reminded those who celebrate Easter they still need to follow stay at home orders I just currently unsafe to have church services or to host holiday gatherings governor Hogan said he'll have to skip treasured time with family too I will miss sharing Easter with my kids and grandkids seeing them hunt for Easter eggs I particularly will miss not eating all of their Easter candy but Hogan wanted to make sure that children won't be disappointed so he signed a special proclamation for the Easter bunny I am officially proclaiming the Easter bunny as an essential worker in Maryland and he therefore will be able to proceed with his hopping across the state delivering Easter baskets to Maryland children Kate Ryan WTOP news it's two thirty seven northern Virginia veterans association is a one stop nonprofit that at no cost guides are most vulnerable veterans to local community resources including benefits healthcare transportation housing employment legal aid and more Nova said ins works with community partners to provide caring and comprehensive personal support their support specialists case managers to reduce frustration and confusion and to ensure our veterans receive the support and respect they have earned and deserve find them on Facebook or visit Nova vets dot org here that it's the soundtrack to our busy lives but there's one thing that needs to be at the top of our to do lists fixing those dangerous recalled Takata air bag inflators millions of vehicles from nineteen automakers still need to be fixed because if they're not fixed those airbags could cause serious injury or even death it's not the other stuff isn't important it's just that while fixing that airbag just might save your life visit Toyota dot com forward slash recall to learn more it's two thirty eight prevent the spread of viruses with Michael and sons germicidal UV C. go to Michael and son dot com traffic and weather on the aids and when it breaks down.

"optima" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"optima" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Optima tax relief some restrictions apply for complete details please visit optima tax relief dot com this is news ninety six point five W. D. B. O. live team coverage of breaking news weather and traffic starts now **** media group is open and we want to know if you are too our lives have changed in our business community is adjusting to meet your needs in a safe and convenient way to support local businesses big and small here's today's list of businesses that are open talco construction premier men's Medical Center love land property support of Claremont we'll see who's fifty floor if your business is still open let **** media group no and we are open Orlando dot com that's we ARE open Orlando dot com together we will get through this two questions every homeowner should ask how safe and security feel in your home and do you have peace of mind that your children and pets are protected in the privacy of their own backyard if you're not confident in your answers then call my friends at mossy oak fence they build it you to full custom build fences that will provide real solutions for today's security challenges at home while enhancing your home's appearance for many years let the mossy family protect your family mossy oak fence dot com mossy oak fence dot com margin for used car madness now what greenway dodging relay.

Drinking And Isolation

Mentally Yours

07:31 min | 6 months ago

Drinking And Isolation

"Hi Janey welcome to mentally. Yours thank you. I'm glad to be here so just to start off. Was there a particular thing that happened to lead you to set up the SOBA club annual podcast yet? The podcast is called alcohol-free life I think what led me to do it within the in the first few months after I ditched the booze. I didn't actually tell anyone. I went for three months without telling anyone. Well one person when I look back now realize how daft because I could have made it so much easier for myself. I could have got support. I could have felt connected and I didn't do any of that. I I literally actually felt ashamed bonkers but I but I did. I felt chimed but what I did do was I immersed myself in the quit. Lit expression goes quit literature. Books about stopping drinking. I immersed myself in the books and I listened to loads of podcasts. I absolutely devoured. The podcasts have listening to people who had been there done that. Got The t shirt so there were further ahead to me and it. It just made feel possible for me so when I always feeling like. I just can't do this anymore. I've listened to a podcast where someone was describing exactly that kind of stage and I thought. Oh my goodness right okay. I know I can't do it and I will carry on and so what happened to me was when I then did eventually come out and share my story I was. I was actually amazed at to find. Just how many people really just reacted the way? People reacted was incredible. People sort of said. Oh my goodness but I wish I could do that. That's that's that's me and I suddenly realized that this gray area drinking problem in inverted commas is so much bigger than I thought so. I started the podcast first alcohol. Free Life and again. I didn't really Kinda just throw it out there and thought you know people I want to interview so as to be worth just getting them on the podcast. I did it sort of for myself in a way that people seem to love it and so that's been going now for kind of coming up to fifteen months or something and then I started to sober club last September because I realized that there was a lot out there for people who want to ditch the booze want to sort of go through the process of challenge and and give up drinking a quit or maybe just stop for a while moderate but there wasn't very much for the what next feet I focus very much. Okay we made that decision. You have either already ditched the booze or you've made a decision that you're on that path but what else is there fee so because of my kind of background in everything. Connect with heuristic living. That's what I want to focus on the wants. People stopped drinking. They often want to look at their nutrition and their fitness in their relationships and their purpose and everything else. Did you turn to alcoholics anonymous? Any part of this or did you find them not quite for you know I think Right at the beginning when I well in fact for years before I even stopped drinking. That was actually one of the reasons. I couldn't stop drinking because my perception was that if I went to alcoholics anonymous which we think of as most people think of as the only support available I would have to label myself an alcoholic and as I've already said I didn't mean don't consider that I was ever at rock bottom. I didn't put myself in that bracket of being alcohol dependent or needing that kind of support. I didn't believe I was an alcoholic and I still don't believe that I ever was an alcoholic. There's a whole thing around language there with alcoholics anonymous. I think they do an absolutely amazing job in supporting people and the sense of community. Some people thrive on being able to meet face to face with with with others in the same position so I think their work is incredible but the concept of having to accept that you need to surrender that you that you are not empowered. I don't accept. I don't accept I was ever an alcoholic. I am someone who drink alcohol. I no longer drink alcohol. I was able to to stop because I wasn't clinically dependent. Of course it would be dangerous to just stop. If you're but I wasn't. I was a gray area drinker. What's called a normal drinker? Actually I was absolutely able to empower myself to quit the base. I think it's good to know as well. There's lots of other things for people out. There who are icee area. Drink is like the drinking bitter too much but don't want to necessarily today. I'm meeting because I think mainly works for some people some reasons and then further as they may sort of be on board with the whole sort of higher power thing. Whatever reason it is that Tell me a bit more about the superclub and what you actually do with the shore so I mean just to add to that. You're absolutely right. I I really don't care how people come to this. It doesn't matter to me. If you go to af you you just drink aware this smart recovery. There are so many ways now of getting to the place she wants to be. And that's where some absolutely amazing but the me with the sober club. My my aim is to provide was to enable if like a community where people can find amazing resources around optimum health and wellbeing so with focusing on everything else all the stuff that we want to add in the so the really good nutrition and particularly. If you're in the early stages of ditching the booze. It's really important to remember that. Your brain chemistry can be all over the place. Suddenly have the dopamine hits the Gaba the Serotonin and it can really mess with you physically and emotionally but there is stuff that you can do you can put back really good nutrients you can do a little program of saying this the so many things you can do in terms of nutrition obviously exercise. It's a time when a lot of people for the first time they think you know what I might actually start running or I might do. Yoga and meditation and Mindfulness. I've got a whole load of resources. Sort of hypnosis audio's meditations asking people to focus on their self care which is critical at this time so all of those things are are available to the sober club members. In addition we have a an exclusive community. Where we you know we. We support each other. And that's amazing really that you know. This phrase isn't the opposite of addiction as connection and and it really is so true that if people feel connected. They're far more likely to go back to their old habits. Are you and your members maintaining that connections but she joined this difficult time well? Fortunately everything's always been online anyway. I do have some some retreats booked that I don't know if they're going to happen and that will be that'd be really really really disappointing. But meanwhile actually were were using this time to focus on what we can do again similarly you. I tell people not to focus on what they can't drink. Focus on what you can in this amazing alcohol-free alternatives and it's just the same with this we. Okay we can't do certain things but what can we do? Could we use this time to learn a language? Do something creative start. Meditating one of the main reasons people say they don't do meditation because they don't have time and so now it's a fantastic time to put in place so you know it. It really does make an absolutely huge difference.

Soba Club Janey Dopamine
Michael Kenna

Photography Radio

10:08 min | 6 months ago

Michael Kenna

"On today's show. I'm talking to Michael British fine photographer. Best known for his images of black and white landscapes. His work has been displayed. All over the world he has permanent exhibitions in the Museum of Decorative Arts in the Victorian Albert Museum in London National Gallery of art in Washington. Dc and in the Bibliotheque in Paris. Let's dive straight into my conversation. Ninety nine percent of your photographs are square format black and white images as far as I know and you have been doing that for for for more than forty years. So how on earth does one stay motivated and keeps shutting mainly landscapes in the same format for for such a long time. Good Morning Tom. Shannon Seattle you're in Switzerland so it's a slightly different time zones. I'm very interested statistic of ninety nine percent that you could be ninety seven point seven five. I don't ask much well. You know I I started with many different is many different. Cameras experimented with the panoramas in thirty five millimeters horizontal eight by ten four by five. Lots of different ones for the first ten years. I I use thirty five millimeter. I found as often happens when using the same camera over and over it becomes to be predictable which is has the pros aide also has comes because you tend to get little trapped into those formats and I moved into the two and a quarter medium in the mid eighty s purposely to break up my rhythm essentially on now used a waist level finder so everything was back to fronton slimy upside down and made photographing a little more difficult. And I think that is one of the keys to photography generally is that we don't want to get too comfortable at anyone at any one time. Now I've been using this camera on off since the mid eighties so yes thirty years thirty years to great camera at the same time. I've experimented with different other formats die off news holders little cheap plastic cameras I often feel that the camera has very little do to do with the photographic journey just happens the hassle but I use is is is really a utilitarian quite precise but very basic camera. It comes with his basic functions of Lens Body Film back Viewfinder and those are interchangeable. So if they break down I can replace them days. I can old lawn mower for me. I I know the camera very well. I don't think it has much to do with the camera in terms of one's passion for photography. I think it has much more to do with one's in a drive to discover to be curious to constantly be investigated and explorer I can see you know using the same camera for the next two hundred years and finding sufficient material to keep you motivated for many lifetimes. That never been an issue with me. There are so many places so many countries so many things to photograph them. I just look at that. I I just don't ever see it as an issue kind of the lack of inspiration for me. It is much more a matter of trying to rein in all the divergent diverse. Numerous different possibilities and I hope that that is for everyone is just life is so amazing the Janica so amazing though so many fantastic places to go photographs that it's difficult for me to understand kind of the lack of inspiration lack of drive. I think there's so much out there when you talk about the cameras you actually answered my question. You know which I have prepared for later so because I can imagine that Photographic equipment itself. You know camera. Lenses are relatively low exactly on your personal credit but in order to pursue a certain vision certain look or simply a similar format of images to choose photographic gear accordingly right. I think it means to me. It would make sense to us a digital camera with all these bells and whistles for example. It's just not my character. Ibkr semi old is like an old guitar. I've been playing these niyaz years. Yes go into electronics. Thrall Bandon all these other things but when it comes down to the instrument you're using it needs to be a part of your body almost a part of your creative function. I have no interest in the GADGETRY. A as such Simpler the better for my way of working but that is just me and as you say. Everybody has to choose their own instrument of communication so for some people it is drones and and various new cameras on techniques. And and that's perfectly fine. It just doesn't fit with my way of working. What was it that extended to you about this square format? You are mainly known for square format images. Right I would think so at this point. Yes but certainly wasn't the first ten years of Korea because I did use it. What fascinates me? I think it is. It is for me. An Open universe I don't find that. I am confined as with most other. Formats such as thirty five millimeter. In which as I mentioned you already have to make decisions of whether they should be horizontal vertical. And how do I fit things into this rectangle with a square you'll basically playing with four equal sides and so you can compose accordingly? I still have the option often. Use it to crop lighter not necessarily into scored. If you actually look at work I do. Not many of them are real scores. A slightly horizontal slightly vote to goal. Sometimes I make score into a panorama either vertical or horizontal. So for me. It just gives me an enormous amount of flexibility. Would you say Composing Square format? Composing Damages is in a way easier or is it just more open. I mean like you know gives you more options. I think it gives you more options. I don't think it's either. Easier are more difficult. I think it's just another possibility. And how about black and white. Because again I I would be hard pressed. I think to to recall a color image of yours. Only commercial only commercial work. I just can't find. I have a proclivity towards the monochromatic spectrum. So most of the work that I that I appreciate his monochromatic. Black White again. It's it's just a personal thing. I've often say that we we see in color all the time. That's how world so when you reduce something to black and white. It immediately becomes more of an interpretation. It's mysterious or more calming offer. Me More meditational almost often use the the the the reference to writing and I said I prefer to be more of a Haiku poem we just a few elements of simplicity but a great amount of suggestion as opposed to an insight encyclopedia with huge amounts of facts and description. That is not what I'm interested in doing road Does happen at all these days for you that you you know using whatever it might be Shoot some color images while not seriously I mean I recently finally came around to getting one of these smartphone things so I can take snaps of wherever I go in. Another polaroid doesn't exist this. Icu very useful. Because it tells me what I am when I go back later to Reference Place so yes. I photograph in color just to make snacks. But it really doesn't interest me very much into the first thing I do is converted back into a white to see what it looks like. I just find black and white enables you to use your imagination much more than color. But it's a personal thing in one of your interviews from from several years ago. I guess you said there are great photographs by ordinary photographers and ordinary photographs by great photographers. Smart knows days so let me ask you. You know for your own. Very subjective opinion. How often does Michael Kenna manage to to produce a great photograph? I'm still trying haven't got one yet but one of these days. That's an impossible question because you could never put out to the description of one of your own photographs are you are you. Are you happy own photography? Never an I don't think one should be Yes contend that I'm on this wonderful journey as being an amazing Expedition But I. I don't think anybody should ever be satisfied with what they do want. You be striving. You know there's this you know. My favorite football team has Everton and they have this motto. It's called nil. Satis newsy optimum which wanting means nothing but the best is good enough so you give your best all the time. You strive for perfection all the time but hopefully you never reach it because if you reach perfection the the image probably would interesting is one of the things I resist with. The digital revolution is that is so easy to make things so perfect so clean so tidy that they kind of lose the ability to To evoke a reaction to evoke emotion it becomes a little antiseptic. I think So affect Striving for perfection is wonderful. But but I don't think I've ever reached out ever. Will I hope

Michael British Switzerland Shannon Seattle DC Washington Museum Of Decorative Arts Paris Michael Kenna Football Victorian Albert Museum Korea London National Gallery Of Art ICU
Cord-Cutting Accelerates, Raising Pressure on Cable Providers

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

06:42 min | 7 months ago

Cord-Cutting Accelerates, Raising Pressure on Cable Providers

"Let's talk about cord cutting I have cut the cord Mike you have cut the cord and Tucker you're trying to get your in laws to cut the cord yeah we had a nice discussion about a last night is that a euphemism or do you actually have a nice discussion all we did was was ordered to go there's still weighing their options and they're scared to cut the cord is boys my impression they can always go back to the court correct yeah I I that's what I'm trying to a lot of work to get go to you can just try this out see a feel about it and go back if you want a hundred Bucks a month well and usually when you go back they give you a better deal yeah exactly so let's discuss the economics of it yes so traditional cable our traditional satellite TV whatever you might have the economics of it you know the basic package what fifty to seventy Bucks a month is this yes Sir if you go on to fight for a basic cable package without any of the rental stuff just one ball cable yeah no no box no it's like that's a separate adult so you got one yeah you Jeff that one probably it's like sixty to eighty in that ballpark and then we're the economic start to make make it really challenging to recommend cable is if you have multiple TV's out because then it's a you're renting another box be they're going to charge you for the additional TV I've talked about the V. are on top of that the they still sorry they charge you for compared to standard definition so you start get up getting up to a hundred Bucks a month pretty darn quickly so given our situation I've mapped out to them with HBO and Showtime included mine do I could get there cable and internet to one hundred dollars less than what they're paying now a month wow use a different tell me how's about a year and a TV is there for yeah that'll do it yeah that adds up in all you need is like a little roku stick or an Amazon fire stick road apple TV roku stick will run you forty five apple TV's a Buck fifty or fire TV is a little less than that yeah which is if you like the voice activated remote ins so let's talk about the numbers because yeah in two thousand and eighteen you had three point two million pay TV subscribers cable satellite etcetera drop off twenty nineteen you had an additional five and a half million a seventy percent acceleration in so I'm doing the math because I was looking at this yesterday I forget exactly royal left well so it is what I was doing this right yesterday I was looking at this for some other reason that I can't remember do you know how many households there are in the United States households Mel hundred twenty nine million my god okay said like nearly ten percent have cut just the last two years right so if this continues to accelerate within like ten years no one's going to be on cable anymore right now it's not going to get that drastic is eventually get a hardware ratio you know people decide Hey we don't want to do this but when you're losing nine million subscribers in two years that's like seven percent of the country saying we're done with cable if they're not going back so let's talk about the big cable companies that are out there and you know why the economics is happening this way she got Comcast one of the biggest ones in the country who owns a bunch of content as well they on NBC universal they're coming out there and streaming option you have direct TV would you say is owned by A. T. and T. which also now owns HBO and a bunch of content in eighteen T. also does have its own cable services as well yeah you got Verizon who owns a wireless channel that really makes the majority of their profits we have the biggest ones by subscribers if you want to go so eighteen T. between eighteen T. direct TV and eighteen two U. verse twenty two million yeah Comcast twenty one million communications sixteen million dish is twelve point twelve twelve point nothing Verizon is four point four **** communications four point one all this USA which operates optimum and suddenly is three point three frontier communications is a million Mediacom is eight hundred thousand and cable one is eight hundred thousand and then they're a bunch of little companies including Hawaii in telecom the twenty sixth largest provider of cable TV in the country with thirty two thousand subscribers so when we talk about these companies it seems to me and correct me if I'm wrong but it made you look at the companies like their earnings it seems to me that eighteen T. doesn't really care about losing the subscribers they've got some some investments but generally speaking it's pretty darn expensive for them to deliver this to people's homes I don't think they really care they're losing customers here and I would say the same goes for Comcast and Verizon charter I'm guessing this is certain dish this is a problem you don't have any other business units correct that's all you have there and so you know if your dish what do you do you right you got a bass Martin yeah I got to find a dance partner and that's where I almost wonder if someone else in one of these businesses comes in or the one that I still think not still think the one that would be really interesting if they can ever find any money to do this would be now the F. T. mobile sprint coming together it would seem to be something that could strengthen all three of those companies I have no idea if that's even possible but why the economics are great for these companies I mean one it's expensive to bring wires into people's homes it's a lot cheaper to just deliver TV over the internet heck of a lot easier to the contents getting more expensive there if you want to bundle all the sports packages ESPN and Disney and all these channels together those companies are not cutting their prices on this even though customers are ditching because they're picking them up elsewhere do the cable TV is pretty much only an American thing so there are everywhere else is just not every but here here's the number so in the United States there are four companies that have more than ten million cable subscribers from the rest of world only a seven interest thank you it's just it and if three armored India now for the former marine India suicide from American in India there's only three other cable providers more than ten million subscribers I don't know where that means people get their TV if it's still all just rabbit ears if it's all streaming but I find it doesn't surprise me the India's got a massive media huge I mean that that's a huge sector of the economy but yeah the my point to is that I don't think that these online streaming companies they're not earning much on this either that are low profit margin I think the costs are gonna be going up yeah add yours that

Mike Tucker
AI for Personalization in Retail with Tyler Foster of Evolv AI

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:49 min | 7 months ago

AI for Personalization in Retail with Tyler Foster of Evolv AI

"So Tyler will kick things off in the world of brick and mortar retail kind of the old world of retail. If you will and kind of get your take on. Where is influencing that space now? How is it as you see it today? I really see the transition in brick and mortar ecommerce towards better instrumentation and data and then how to process it so if you look at sort of the traditional approaches to getting more data and more customer insights in a brick and mortar world. There were the things like you know the loyalty programs and similar but as companies are getting smarter about the way that they design an instrument their brick and mortar locations. I think they are going to start to see more interesting. Ways of extracting data like using machine vision to be able to identify common. Traffic patterns throughout their retail spaces potentially shifting from the sort of old school loyalty card to wards doing more with facial recognition in ad targeting within the retail spaces. I think that being able to do more with buying patterns as far as people who bought this product also about those being able to take some of those delay earnings that we've had from e commerce retail around Outta educate users on new products. And you'll see a lot more of that sort of go live inside of these physical spaces. I also think that you're going to see that that's going to drive towards simplification that a lot of these kind of really large complicated shopping. Experiences are GONNA move to more simplified in. Maybe even brand focused experiences going forward. Actually that will that last dynamic I guess is one that maybe we can dive a little bit more into but you're talking about a few things here so we talk about using computer vision to physically instrument a store and you frame that as if you know we're going to see or these things will begin to happen. Do you see those as you know more into the future than today in other words are there areas where sectors of retail sub components of the brick and mortar world where that kind of in-store optimization is happening or is it really kind of aspirational for almost all of those players? I think there are a few people that are starting to get it right but I think that they're just really starting to scratch the surface of what's possible with it also getting getting the algorithms implemented in tuned properly to give correct insights is often the the biggest problem with with artificial intelligence. So I know quite a few stores are starting to or quite a few brands are starting to move towards sort of a smart store concept. But I think we're still really early days. Yeah so you had mentioned also personalization side of things. Do you see what has been learned in e-commerce which is a lot so ecommerce definitely one the spaces. That are sort of we call. Not stodgy when it comes to a I at least at least freeze time today. Do you see kind of the tip of that spear being what makes the initial impact in brick and mortar retail in other words. Dc The low hanging fruit of. What's GonNa move in the brick and mortar world to be just the stuff that already has traction online or do you see potentially also being some other things? I think that it will probably follow very similar trend to what he commerce has. Which is that the macro optimizations and the micro optimizations kind of start concurrently but that the macro optimizations tend to to move to bearing fruit earlier in that. If you're optimizing for the for the highest average you'll generally generate more initial value than if you're trying to top demise for every micro opportunity so in the case of Web Experiences for instance. You have an overall really bad average performance. Personalization is just going to you know. Do more damage than good. And so you sort of have to achieve that highest average performance and then start to reap the rewards of of the personalized experiences because there will be less noise to to try to dig through in a much bigger problems face. Yeah Okay that. That's a really interesting points. He just to poke into that when we talk about. Fixing serve your baseline so that you can then layer in integrate personalization on top of it. I'm imagining a listener asking themselves. Am I ready and not necessarily know knowing what to look for to know if we have the fundamentals in place to to take that next personalization step? What do you think those are baseline? That's best average. I think you called it for us to be able to even think realistically about leveraging well I think that when you look at the way the ECOMMERCE has moved. You know they'll happen. In parallel right. And the more optimized you get the general experience I think the clear the insights from the personalization in micro targeting will be calm. There are a lot of really great best practices for retail just as as well as online experiences and very few companies really living. You know and so I think that you're gonNA find when you start to really instrument the stores similarly to win you really instrument. These are experience that there's going to be quite a bit of low hanging fruit and it's not like you'll just get to the optimum and and then you start to personalise. I think as you knock down each of these kind of most visible problems. It will increase the visibility of the impact of these personalization and sort of micro optimization efforts. And they'll really you know. I think you really have to optimize both in

Tyler
After all, its only genies who need to be bottled up!

Plan B Success

05:17 min | 7 months ago

After all, its only genies who need to be bottled up!

"How many times have you heard that live in a very small world? Now what a small world. It is often used phrase when referring to the speed unreach- of any conduct across borders. But what truly is responsible for this far reaching consequences of today's world and more so what has led to the creative development of human interaction an improvement over time. What do you think it is? What's the reason that we're able to connect so quickly so fast? And what's the reason for so much human interaction that we see in this day and age of social media? You might say technology. Well I don't think so. I think it's beyond technology. I think it's communication by communication. I mean the active interacting with each other to exchange ideas. Views notions believes experiences and so much more language has always been more of an enabler than a hindrance to interaction and a fall very lifeforms man or the human being rather is the one blessed with the Faculty of Myriad Forms of communication and interpretation. It's light bill for each one of us to make optimum use of this faculty in various aspects of our lives. We would expression lucid emotions and a good help are all result off. Effective communication skills the skill to interact the skill to exchange information the skill the show emotion show love show care and the skill to shore belonging. This communication has varied forms. It's not always about the language it's also about. The nonverbal cues that you use to communicate as well Communication Skills Harbor behond upon throughout our lives so that we get better at this art and science of Interaction and at the same time benefit from its many. Were choose the way we write the way we speak the way we imortant and express our all aspects of a complete package our personality each one of us wants to ensure the most effective interpretation possible of what we aspire to convey if communicating either skill listening and interbreeding is a far far more complex and more needed skill after all it's starting to predation which results in corresponding actions and reactions and we want to affect the action Lee desire by communicating hence. There is a need to master the skill of communication. It's often seen that do. Importance is not given to the Everyday Act with communication. A lot of us take for granted but it requires its own time and effort and attention in order to continue to go on the skill by not giving you the attention seeks by just taking it for granted we wonder why the resulting actions of our communication were not what we expected to see. Earning more getting a promotion seeking someone's affection speaking your mind all result from effective communication in specific situations. It's important to recognize the situation and communicate accordingly to affect the results. You seek and when I say affect the results you see what I mean by. That is the perfection is not in how you communicate the perfection should be in you communicate in such a way that the other person interpret said the way you want it integrated. It's also important that you're true to yourself when you communicate since that is when the best of you is deflected in walk you have to share. You have to be confident. You have to believe in the message that your client to pass and then only will the best possible communication happen in terms of releasing the information communicating and in terms of the other person or the other people accepting it an interesting the way you want it to be integrated so it's also important as I said to recognize the situation and communicate accordingly to affect the results. You seek your attempt to city you'll leaguer. Truest sense exude in your communication and Azerbaijan has the best impact possible based on how you own. The skill Moore leaves you disatisfaction of having spoken your mind. And as it is out with a healthy body healthy mind you'll stay after all it's only genie's will need to be bottled up.

Science Of Interaction Faculty Of Myriad Forms Azerbaijan Moore LEE
Genesis Invitational Preview with Geoff Shackelford

GOLF.com Podcast

11:04 min | 8 months ago

Genesis Invitational Preview with Geoff Shackelford

"Are we are here at Riviera Country Club at genesis invitational all the newly named Invitational Status We're like what thirty thirty five steps from the Hogan Statue with a very important man. We don't have Mr Hogan in here sitting with us but Geoff Shackelford is here. He has a ton of history here at Riviera Country Club. What I WANNA know is in the La Dolf power rankings whereas Geoff Shackelford? George kisses up there now. He's high we continue to include. It's not if they're on the list I'm not on. The list is Tiger California Golfer at this point Scott a deserted us but coming back to host the genesis I think gets him back in full Full status on the list La I don't know he's more of an Orange County guy but but we're very happy to have you on on Martin. Yes he's moved to. So yeah I'm doing well network so like I said you have a ton of history here and you wrote the history book here. What is probably most interesting to me is like where does your history begin? Where like you have been around this place for for your entire life? You still live view very close. So where does all begin for you. Here you know I was very lucky my Dad was in the Gulf business and he joined here when I was about fifteen about several sixteen and so I got to play the course a lot. It was crazy place at that time. It was a public off-course of course essentially it was very busy but we would have to put our name on a board and wait two hours to get out now. They do like twenty five thousand rounds a year and it's ultra private yeah So it was is a Just a great way to kind of I was always interested in course design and history and obviously being here. And then you start kind of off Absorbing who's walked these grounds and every great American Golfer has has played including Bobby Jones and didn't really like the course it probably. It seems it was too hard to him when it opened. He made a comment. And there's a picture of him and his hairs you know. His hair was never out of place and he's just looks like he's been in a timely dyslexia commensurable and it's in our history book. I loved that photo because it was like. Oh well that that matched his quote and his only beef was of course was too hard but then he go through. You know. Nicholas didn't win in here but he got close and then every other great player probably in in the upper echelons has one here except tiger. And Jack Jack. Isn't that crazy. It's it's nuts 'cause it's generally rewarded. Great players and Jack came so close Momeni many times I mean the PGA the senior open L. A. Opens. It's kind of it's kind of like tiger. Tiger hasn't played here as much right. Yes played thirteen times Yaldo now hard on himself. He's made it like this is going to be one of the strongest longest fields in the entire year. He has made it more difficult decided to ignore the event during the like real real prime of his career. He did. He had reasons. The Greens weren't as good back. Then and you know how he feels about POA so that was part of it and then he had a bad experience here. Two thousand six where he played he was a little under under the weather? Steve Williams did not pack an umbrella and we had a surprise rain radar quite even then like we have now our forecasting like we have now which is amazing to think that was only thirteen years ago. Yeah gets wet gets more sick and then he was staying the east of the golf course which you don't do. The one negative of this tournament were staying West. You're staying West which I asked Dylan quickly Early on in in these discussions laying the groundwork for this this seminal podcast recording That you do not stay east of the course. And for whatever reason he was and he got caught It's the worst time of year. There's just everybody's working Hollywood's worrying every school's in session. Yeah and he got stuck in like an hour and a half track just to get to the four oh five. I was in eighth grade at this point so he did not come back after that and I actually asked him the first year he was coming back in involved in this I said you you are staying West. Gov Corsini laughed and he goes so he learned his lesson anyway but but to my story here so I just fell in love with the history and Emmy it's as historic course as there is in the United States just in terms of the people who've been here the architecture the movie stars Yeah we just had the Oscars last night. Yeah and everything about this place has just been nuts in terms of the history and then the location. I mean you guys do win the award for the best podcast location mile eighteenth with the ocean view and yeah. It's pretty sincere water. We can see number ten. This is my first time at revere. My first time seeing number ten in their Saints Saints Tenth. It should be interesting. We've got a downpour yesterday. So I'm glad though it it's been very cold here and when it gets cold. Green gets little borderline these two of the best of holds the PGA tour in near optimum. Or do you not feel that way. Yeah Oh yeah absolutely I mean. I have some conflicted feelings about the tenth of late as a lot of the players who it has been getting a little border line tricky. That's why I said it was nicer to rain yesterday because when the green gets pushing like thirteen and a half can get a little goofy and then yeah eighteen means. It's it's it's kind of bizarre hole and a lot of ways because tough the bunkers don't really mean much it's a blind tee. Shot is not much around the green and yet everybody everybody loves it. It's near the bunkers. Now they're only play for a bad golfer in. Yeah yeah they're they're there for looks more than anything so it's it's kind of bizarre finish and yet over the years it's produced all these great moments and the amphitheater I think is the thing that you just can't grasp on television. There's nothing like golf because it's it's not only is it able to host a lot of people but it's vertical and and the noise when there's a moment there is. There's nothing like getting golf because it's so vertical so on top of the green that it's just that's why so many people love to sit there on Sunday. How long does it take you to write in research research and do all the work for a course history like this place? I mean that has to take you countless weeks. Yeah I was really lucky. It was fi out a full year to work on it. I propose that after college when I realized I couldn't play over you I was twenty three ten and They had the PGA coming up and they wanted to do something. And so I- proposed it. And I had some great help from older members and Jim Murray wrote the foreword the Great La Times on this show who I got to know during the Greens project project here. which really got me interested in golf? Course design okay He wrote a wonderful forward about the course so that was an incredible and on the twenty three year. Old doing this work. I like anything I showed my passion for it and my interest. You know when you get older and you meet people who are younger. Who who appreciate history St Tell You you can tell you can see it and you want to help them? So I've kind of become the same way with people have shown interest in golf history and yeah So there are a lot of incredible. The people around here at the time and the owner is very passionate about the history and the as he should be because the more you tell the story of this place the more you realize holy cow now. There's nothing quite like Riviera in American golf in terms of again not just tournament history architecture. Then you have the added element of of celebrity and I'm that just just And then just having so many events here and the Events Higher Olympics twenty twenty eight so yeah it's got Everything coming here. Yeah I did know some of those stories. Because you know we can get kind of East Coast centric you can get Florida's centric when it comes to PGA Tour especially you know half the top twenty living in Jupiter Ram what is it about La Golf. That is different and do you have any of these favorite Brit stories about celebrities playing the game playing at these clubs around here. It's an odd town town. I have no problem. Yeah confessing passing that. It's not America's greatest city. Yeah for a couple of reasons. the the exclusive clubs are very exclusive on. The beauty of Riviera's is that it does open. Its doors to turnament so we all get to come and enjoy at once a year with the greatest players in the world. That's nice which you don't always get La Country Club is going to host the US Open in a few years. That's incredible Again knowing their history but we have we have an odd dichotomy of these elite gray golf courses uses and then the public of course seen isn't great the city of La isn't so hot in the way they maintain the courses and they've Kinda let them go and we have we have the the facilities are just like a lot of cities. Is there more. I mean we have a homeless problem. So it's like how can you be spending money. It's tough so and they have a lot of layers. So it's it's a weird city in that sense not a lot of places to hit balls. And yet you go to Rancho Park and just like places back east amazing characters It's pretty used to produce a lot of really good golfers. And they're always characters on the range just hitting balls and Studio City Range. She's to be famous for the celebrities. Who went there probably still go there although it's not long for this world so it's a it's a weird town that way and then obviously stars and that was one of the fun things going back to the to your question the book Just stuff like that. Humphrey Bogart used to you. Know hear it on the broadcasts become become almost a drinking game you know. He's the love the just get completely sauced out there on the twelfth leaning against that tree and Jim Murray was wanted always sitting there so he'd ride about it and that kind of how passed along But there are you know we have a it's interesting because the celebrity L. Minute Riviera Kinda started more with the Polo Club. Okay which is where. You'll be parking this week. Paul Revere Junior high well. Let's it's only Monday makes somebody mad. You may see me on the middle school show. The Riviera really struggle like a lot of clubs in the thirties with with golf because the depression but the Polo Club was the place to be. I mean it would. They had a Sunday Polo game Or match and and Clark Gable will rogers was kind of a host Just the double. Douglas Fairbanks Mary. Pickford all these uh-huh that's the biggest celebrities of the day and that kind of kept everything going the Polo Lounge the Beverly Hills hotel famous restaurant and bars called the Polo Lounge. Because that's that's where they went after the Polo but I mean they used to get big crowds for it. It was the thing that kind of kept all this going. So it's funny. How when you look at the history of the place you think Riviera and they had these great tournaments in the late twenties golf then? The depression Paulo. The Khanna kept it going whereas other places struggle.

Golf Greens Riviera Riviera Country Club LA PGA Geoff Shackelford United States Pga Tour Jim Murray La Dolf Polo Club Jack Jack Tiger Mr Hogan Polo Lounge Orange County George Paul Revere Scott
"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

Motor1.com Podcast

06:17 min | 11 months ago

"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

Motor1.com Podcast

06:17 min | 11 months ago

"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

"All of my new answer is and it wasn't even a car that you could buy but it was a car that made me realize such a cool piece of design so interesting and I'm still upset they haven't that's a great choice in terms of the concepts definitely one of my favorite to ask my favorite because that's the car that really oh yup to to a fe- a way back in the ninety dollars when I was going to college I worked for used car dealer that just a an experienced to to be in a car like that in this I mean this this by that standard it was a lot better and then when I got into a soul sometime design Would you just mentioned Chris which is the sole and that was a second gen even before that the I gen I thought was I think it elicited lots of positive emotion from people it wasn't like a Mustang you of boxy hatchback competitors all of which are gone now and the soul remains and not plant's third generation so practically created a that same segment so good on them for that all right I wanna do you guys were on the last episode with me when we talked about the Volkswagen Golf eight and that's what all the reaction Gulf eight here it won't satisfy my needs I would definitely miss it I would respond which is he says I think that's exactly what they'd be banking on if they don't offer sure I largely that's kind of true because the GTI and the Gulf so I think if they don't sell it here US consumers aren't really gonNA miss it like it it's an understated overlooked and generally invisible car that even in based most of them it's also much higher quality than most places that matter like interior last year then some of the the small cars that are available in the US but the ago and particularly about the possibility it might not be sold here in the US fading out of the US market in the case of the Gulf I've always the ones that are have no problem going to GTI and the Jeddah's always existed. Yeah I I absolutely am bummed that might not be sold here but it's that's that's where the volume goes that's where the.

"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

Motor1.com Podcast

38:30 min | 11 months ago

"optima" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

"But news and I wanted to mention it and get your thoughts on it and that's the announcement that Fiat Chrysler that was just announced yesterday really even last night that the merger was APP see which side turns out to be maybe the the one acre in the world and the number of brands actually have to count them I have enlisted two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve and we actually counted yesterday of course the valuable thing that FCA brings to the table is Ram in meanwhile FCA which is and then of course they're going to get the economies of scale that come with found the news yesterday as soon as it happened what was your first reaction to hearing didn't tick and I have a little bit of PTSD from it from the DaimlerChrysler cars coming back to the US I think Peugeot and Citron and Diaz either absolutely everywhere over there I think it'll be great for Chrysler as well so he and the reality is that you eight so I think the idea of of French commercial vehicles coming excess to PSA's light of crossovers I think it's it's very exciting like the camper vans scene and in the camper vans seen in the US which has van life it was really popular and I've learned some advantage that has over the sprinter and can things like that so I'll be interested to see if they replace official vehicle segment has really grown way more competitive in the past a small piece of the pie so that's a really good good observation I I wasn't even thinking French commercial vehicles come over here especially Citrin because they have the best names Marshall vehicles there's no way they're gonNA come over with those neighbors though I wish like that appreciate what the prime minister is but it is far and away one of the worst driving vehicles really a big part of the biggest unanswered question are these European brands do the American brands to sell under their names. I don't think we know the answer to that all time the space tour Camman who doesn't want to drive something called Lee I love the way they look and really when we're talking about all yet asking for a merger with me personally but it was it was coming so I'd be we benefit FCA in terms of some of the smaller crossovers because really they don't but I mean certainly wants to get away from jeep though that yeah no you're right it's it's really starting to kind of split some hairs when you see automakers like offering crossover there there's there's no ram crossover period there's destructs there's no there's there's there's the Durango but but below that you have the journey which is not even worth talking about and the below unity for Fca to just you know what do a little bit of badge engineering stoutly I don't even think it has to be quick and dirty as a badge engineering got vehicles like the Fiat five hundred x and the jeep renegade I'm so I think they can I think they can still take advantage of everything and not necessarily have to go the badge because my my reaction was pretty like pretty much like Ma- and twenty years Chrysler has merged with Daimler cerberus because we've done this so many times and so I you know I think it's interesting I enough that I think brand use that they were shopping for FCA there it is for for PSA I I tale become the new CEO of joint company has been looking at coming back to the US with an eye towards easily federalizing them so I think that WH- back to the US kind of in line with their merger so returning to the US market is definitely I mean just through the the American brands that are already here also I wanna I'm he hasn't been I don't know if they don't like the giant American truck in Europe and far and away the most common American pickup truck is the ram they're not driven through Stockholm and I've seen a dozen a dozen of them in a day my guess is is totally the one I would go for me I I completely agree I don't think I don't Waller Ram model you could call it a code F. Yuan it doesn't need to be called that but a Europe right now yeah I think that's we already know comes at more of a global product than than just a North American one so let's move the mid size sedan and the teaser that was released got a lot of particularly the front end and for from my perspective my reaction I think whether you like it or not I definitely get the impression that lots of people are going to have an emotional reaction one of the really large grill trend that's going on so I look at this and I it seems like every time they evolve it the focus it in a little bit better I was get interested in what they're doing with the with the headlights with a with a little led strips around production car but it I mean the only thing that I really have questions on this far more on the on the production car how about you Braden what did you think when you saw it I now this there's the Sonata when I first saw this Tanada the new Sanada segment and the car segment in general and then you see Hyundai just put out a killer car like that and autumn is the to the Sonata is is the OPTIMA I think it's it's out of styling details here that are interesting that I'm excited to see how they I think this will be a really welcome injection of he cleaned cockpit like very segmented with that high transmission tunnel ars Sur sharing the same platform there they're highly differentiated in and then there's this guy that sits above both of them as the head of design design their own each pushing the boundaries I think of design and making some really incredible designs and both look great they've the and they're both selling well they've been received well would do a better job the other there'd be like a a ranking like you said kind of growing up in the nineties and watching the US automakers who multiple cars on the same platform right and and that's the thing I mean that's what we got used to the same vehicle the same sheet metal just with different badges some you know you know we'll start generally with the Chevrolet and then we'll move up to the Pontiac and then we'll move up to uh hold this person for their life and starting in their they're not exercising that formula they're using the same vehicles underneath but they are Sonata Sonata has the big grill I'm not as big of a fan of the Sonata the same car but they're not at the same time so well well pete they compete directly with each other directly there's there's a genuine rivalry take there's healthy culture between those two companies that you know the eighty and ninety s Chris about the US automakers were where GM wasn't trying to terms of a sales strategy where here you have with each other but I think the Hyundai their so you know it's not I think it's not as simple as just you know their strategy versus and Hyundai get better and better and it's almost like it's like clockwork for maybe where the business case was there but maybe there were other factors go and it turned into a huge success so I have to exist at the expense of cars I think the reason Ford and GM away from cars and crossovers if you look at cameron a cord and all kind of wither on the vine and get older and they just watch the sales got lower and then they used that it's real easy to come like oh man these products aren't you know it's it's never crew thing though I mean not our fault it's your fault concisely or some other factor craters as and and I and in the sixties and seventies everyone bought station wagons and now they're getting into crossovers I think eventually we're going to reach a point where buyers are coming local enough that we're going to see some sort of body style that's fallen out of favor and my or they can afford a really nice car they'll say well you know what I want a people went from wagons minivans to Sev's two crossovers what's always ben what's interesting though is it really hasn't been cyclical because we it hasn't returned to anything that is left yet so I another body type or if it's if it's a jump to electrification and again we have the Americans going all in putting all their chips on on on on seventies the eighties and the nineties and even the two thousands and that's modular platforms it might not be a you know say it's five or six modular front-drive platforms modular rear-drive platforms it so it might be that they're in general absolutely not I think it's terrible idea but I think the automakers see it's still not going to be enough one agree especially too bad years about a month ago and I asked the salesman what do you think about for getting crossover and that makes the vehicle harder for me to sell and he also and Americans just aren't financially intelligent enough to recognize that that's a bad thing dancing he felt bad because it's his job to sell cars it's not his job talk people and so he was bemoaning that and I think just the lack of choice I think while they're also clearly not able to afford the this was earlier this week that the sixty day delinquency rate for auto in Carlisle it's not gonna be as bad because you know it it's cars real estate real estate's the same road again and the thing is fuel prices will go up they always go up it's always going to happen. The market is not going to change overnight necessarily people are there's going to be signed that that's what I think I'm going to be looking for is signs for what is the next what is going to be the thing that causes those cracks Reagan's people bring them on bring all signs but before we get the favorites there was a vehicle I can at the stage so it was actually before Peter Schreier arrives at before two thousand and two and they were terrible really they look like fish on wheels achieved as Hyundai going from kind of immature silly designs for Kupa just looked really really sharp almost sophisticated and I think this is probably the more common one is the two thousand nine Hyundai Sonata there was lots of curves not a straight line on it and that's when it started it was one of the first designs ushered in this era of really great South Korea weird that I like some of the older terrible ones I want to say it was the I asked me the Optima I mean from the from the time it rolled out I always thought I thought the sun the sun roof of the blackout roof or whatever and it it seats that now are you talking about the third third generation one that lines up it was a very modest redesign it was a very very light redesign you're looking car yeah absolutely I agree Chris what about you I'm yeah yeah I remember the days I'm not I'm not I'm not gonNA pick that at high school he managed to get one and it was yellow and it just y'all got a parked in my barn because the repo guys looking for it so talking to my mind it's like it's like how rough to got to be to be you know hunted my wife almost least a Hyundai Elantra in the late Nineties Brennan the Hyundai dealer in Kalamazoo Michigan I don't know if you guys are still around but you at the home depot treated her she got she got a ninety seven Mitsubishi Mirage good lease deal and I mean she was just young and college at the time and driving tour shows at the time so she was she was used to as she get in the mirror is so it's like oh this doesn't go anywhere the answer at that point which we couldn't get in the state so I always thought a chick the was the first one the first one remember but the favorite I I'm not the one that you just called the most boring I actually rather like that it was the camera to the period but I rather just kinda liked the simple focus on that was this Hyundai Sonata they got caught by a speed camera going one hundred and forty seven miles this holiday really a goes so that turn my head and that hey that's what woke me up I don't begrudge you that because I think that generation it wasn't dynamic but it was clear when you go back to the to the fourth Jan that just it exciting in any measure but man the fact that people were asking can this car even go one hundred forty.

"optima" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

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"optima" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Optima Tax Relief. Restrictions apply. For complete details. Please. Visit optimataxrelief dot com. W MVP AM ESPN one thousand is a part of the Walt Disney company any organization or educational institution. That maintains. Job Bank for by employment information or gives job referrals may ask. To receive our stations job listings for further information, call three one two nine zero one thousand or this website at ESPN, Chicago dot com. That's three one two nine zero one thousand or ESPN Chicago dot com. W MVP AM ESPN one thousand is an equal opportunity employer. Confessions ape attention perfect parent brought to you by adoptuskids dot org. I might look like an adult like a person who could possibly be apparent. But I have no idea to talk like one. And everyone knows that. If you want to be a parent, you have to sound good when you say things like don't make me turn this car around or because I said, so or don't make me come back there. I don't even really know what those things mean. But I know that I actually believed my parents when they said them to me out if they manage to sound so convincing here, we go don't make me come back there. That's not tough enough at all kids can sense weakness. Don't make me come back there. Yeah. That's better. In fact, that kind of sound like my dad. Weird. You don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. There are thousands of teens in foster care who would love to listen to your practice. You're dead voice. Call one eight eight eight two hundred four zero zero five or visit adoptuskids dot ORG for more information. This message brought to you by the US department of health and human services, adoptuskids, and the Ad Council. We are Chicago's all sports.

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"optima" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

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"optima" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

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"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Optima Tax Relief for answers to all questions about aging joined Bob Scrivano and assets and aging Sundays at five AM on KFI PK building a better Sacramento. An iheart radio station. News Radio KFC. Traffic. Live live. Winter comes this spring. So he. See what tomorrow? For living. My. Some left forgiving. In many ways. You. Yeah. Some. Come from.

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"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

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"optima" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"optima" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

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"optima" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"optima" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

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"optima" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"optima" Discussed on CarCast

"Durban already testing a durability break the battery we uh we do we went up pikes peak we made it all the way up to the top we did not roll down the now which was maybe request from kansas do if they really like in the battery right james james brass now that's the second best durability testing job ever condom company number one battery number two yeah but so you're you're top five interpreter ability test going up and we're doing good nurburgring last question and i i don't know the answer but everybody's getting in from aftermarket in two the actual automobiles when their soul from the factory produced whatever where's optima with that and i i'm i'm assuming their cars that are coming with optima optimize but are we in two forwards and chevy said big 3s lot of the newer vehicles do have egm technology which is a similar technology the two optima in we are parent company johnson controls supplies those batteries are okay so you're it's essentially it's it's optima family owned or parent company as long as your wedding there pre gone fine is there gonna find those little montpon companies who do the shrouded make it look like an old diehard crushe crushed him all right are we miss anything is there any business we need to take yeah all of you that are here at seem i should come up here during the week and check out there there are augmented reality thing that's going on this things pretty awesome definitely check that out and visit optima batteries dot com to learn more about this battery and their entire line of stuff the video do you just saw off for use for you that are here.

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"optima" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"optima" Discussed on KCRW

"In of in a mixed feelings gone away because to packaged you literally hearing him lower buying himself to death his death you know i mean it that's the track that's on his him talking about there and and it's it's melodic and it's for about a minute and he's lower by himself right into his death but you also see the marked the death march he see his actions you see that in on i i can identify with this in and in different ways but he was a massive fan of like myth making he completely understood that he studied easy easy he was the grand master of it but easy easy new with a line was in fact all those guys and the basically with exception easy those guys are all middle class kids who took on these guys is and got sucked into the whole vortex of danger in south straight up yeah i mean it exceptionally easy in snoop the rest of them you know optima most a big time guys weren't really doing all that stuff let's just be really it's a movie you know and in including two pack you know um to buck comes from of areas of seem rough stuff but he wasn't a streaky like that you know he was he was he's a good do you know we will ridoux in each it's eight is mythical now what a great performer how great he was and so he just didn't understand where the myth making stopped in reality he just he lost sight of that and so you can see and parthree the last about the last twenty minutes of the film you see him literally running into the fire was he talk about that we can't and defiant ones confronts had on.

optima twenty minutes