25 Burst results for "Oprah Magazine"

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:10 min | Last week

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

"Well you've heard me raving about cozy earth lounge. Wear their leggings joggers. Super soft pajamas are amazing. And they're sheet sets are just as incredibly soft and comfortable. Both cozier sheets and lounge wear are made from viscose from bamboo. Here's why that's important. No toxins harsh. Chemicals or dyes oprah has called cozy earth sheets the softest sheets ever in the december two thousand eighteen issue of o the oprah magazine these sheets. They're lightweight thir- so breathable cozier promises. You'll sleep less humid and cooler than cotton whether it's cozier sheets or lounge wear and you should get both i did. You cannot go wrong. Go to cozy earth dot com. Now save thirty five percent off their source. Bamboo bedding in lounge wear with the code. Stephanie at checkout. That is thirty five percent off. Hurry this is a limited time offer. Go to c. o. z. Y. that's cozy or dot com. Don't forget that. Promo code is stephanie. That's cozier dot com. I love my sheets and my jammies you will to its cozy earth dot com. Well if you shy away from self fees in those dreaded zoom calls because of bags and puffiness under your eyes. Here's the secret for looking fabulous. Onsumer anywhere you it's genucell from the makers of shammy genucel is patented plant stem cell therapy specifically targeting eye puffiness and bags. Genucel is an incredibly powerful natural serum that works instantly genucel guarantees. You'll see further results as little as twelve hours and dramatic improvement in just twelve weeks or your money back. Get brilliant long-term results its cruelty free. They offer free shipping and free returns. You can save fifty percent right now off all genucel packages during their summer clearance sale. I said at fifty percent off. Go to love genucel dot com slash stephanie to receive fifty percent off all genucel packages. I'm telling you it works. I always get told a look years younger than i am. It is because of genucel. Love jian u. c. l. dot com slash stephanie's for men and women and you will look fantastic. Love genucel dot com slash stephanie..

oprah magazine stephanie Stephanie
Hormone Help And Weight Loss Wins With Dr. Mariza Snyder

The Essential Oil Revolution

02:13 min | 6 months ago

Hormone Help And Weight Loss Wins With Dr. Mariza Snyder

"I'm here with the amazing dr marissa. She is a functional practitioner. A women's health expert and the author of seven books the number one national bestselling book the essential oils hormones solution the smart mom's guide to essential oils and the dash diet. Cookbook dr says upcoming book the essential oils. Menopause solution focuses on women in peri menopause and menopause. She's been featured on. Dr oz oprah magazine foxnewshealth mind body green and more. Dr maria also hosts the top rated. Essentially you podcast designed to empower women to become the ceo of their health. Which by the memories. That since i've read that line become the ceo of your health. Ivan stealing that i've been using everywhere because it's brilliant and i love it and it's just what we are all about here on the show so thanks for being here with us today and thanks for all the amazing work you do. You have such a girl crush on you. You're just amazing. Thank you and i mean. I think every woman i've ever met is the ceo of so many roles is just like it's the thing we get to reclaim to our health. 'cause we run the show everywhere exactly exactly. We juggle ally and yet sometimes. The last thing that we choose to put on our plates is our own health when really it should be the first thing because it allows us to keep juggling right. Do the other things. Absolutely exactly so marissa. Tell me about your defining moment that led you to your passion and women's health Women's hormone health specifically by. I think we just just just talking about that. Like how we put our health on the back burner and then to do all the other things and take care of all the people and that's pretty much what happened you know. I spent a big chunk of my life being a stressful hollick and it had a lot to do with with worthiness or lack thereof. I always thought that my worthiness as a woman was tied to my productivity and that came from a lot of trauma. When i was a child. And so i blew past my twenties. Like a freight train

Dr Marissa Cookbook Dr Dr Oz Oprah Dr Maria Ivan Marissa Hollick
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

Exponential Podcast

03:19 min | 9 months ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

"At. Is that like big. We have to be intentional about. Understanding the power of what's perceived in our society often as normative was perceived as normative is often wide and so is often the question of how can decentralise to where whiteness is not front and center all the time in in that i am. I am allowing a where. I lead who i lied to hear. Different voices two to communique different values and and at the white way is not the only way in is not always the right way right and it is not always the wrong way either right in toronto correct able to decentralize that really really important and requires himself awareness that requires a level of sensitivity. Because it's not that in a multi-ethnic movement or in a environment where there are people of color in the majority is not that people will hate. Whiteness is that the challenge is man. Whiteness often Envelops me and causes me to not be able to be me in so there's a part of like this resistance of like being able to disagreed can be myself or do i have always assimilate to something that is considered normative or something. That's considered the right way and so is not hey is is just a sense of can we can. We share can be equitable. Can my voice be as equally important as yours and so in my experience as well as the divesting is really not about devaluing route is about equity right is about this understanding that we have to decentralize right there as well in like s showed these images sometimes when i'm doing workshops and Some of them came out of oprah magazine. We have these the scene of a little white girl who's looking up at a baby dolls and all the baby dolls black right or you have this moment. Where on your enemy. What people getting their nails done in all the women who are getting their nails done our asian and all the women who are doing nails ally an old images kinda create this disruption. Because like we're not used to seeing that because Whiteness has been centralized in our society right to ask somebody like what would you think if if superman was black what would you think is batman was expanding right. Like if you don't see color right what if all these heroes is she. Rows of of your life didn't like you. Would you still say that you didn't see color. And the reality is centralized to whiteness. So much it's become normative and anything that disrupts that is seen as divisive reality is. We're not trying to be divisive. We asked him for equity equal a place at the table. And sometimes that feels like we're being divisive chadwick mattered. So much right like it's it's surreal. And i'm not even brown skin bro. And i couldn't watch the movie without crying. I got to imagine the hero. My friends i grew up with becoming the euro.

oprah magazine toronto batman chadwick
How O Magazines Arianna Davis Made It, on Her Own Terms

Latina to Latina

02:28 min | 9 months ago

How O Magazines Arianna Davis Made It, on Her Own Terms

"You're right anyone yearning for more creatively fulfilling life. Shouldn't strive to emulate or be. Frida the most impactful art is created when you tell your own story. What is the story. Then that you would want to tell me one of my goals in one of the stories. I want to tell through my career as a journalist and a writer is inspiring other women particularly women of color. And i think that. That's that's my point here in drawing from fritos life is not to say. Here's a blueprint of how to live your life. But it's more here's the story of a woman who lived her life boldly very far ahead of her time. And hopefully just by reading restoring gets no her. You'll be inspired to live your own life your own way but boldly treated a mascot a different way. Which is if you were telling your own story. Where would you want that story to begin with being a little girl. I grew up in outside of baltimore. Data's black my mom's puerto rican to grew up by racial. Ed grew up in the suburbs around the white kids and with the private school. So identity for me was always a very complicated thing especially as a kid. And i was also really shy kid and i was the kid who always heather nose in a book so i think my story would probably start with being a little girl and just finding such solace in such escape in the pages of a book. And that's really what i think kick started my love of writing and reading and storytelling and it would then kind of take me through. This journey of wanted to be a writer. Going to penn state in setting journalism thinking that i had to go down the newspaper track because that was what was accessible at the time versus magazines. What i really want always wanted to do. But the road of magazines so inaccessible. It was this glamorous world that only to be frank women who had access privilege and could pay to move to new york city in intern. Not make much money but it was. Thanks to I was a scholarship student at penn state in at a dinner that we had the publisher of seventeen magazine spokane. She gave this really inspirational speech. And afterwards you know this was either crazier genius. But i basically would follow her to the bathroom and told her i would love to break in journalism. I would love to be magazines. I asked her business card her name. Is jane jamieson. And once i moved to new york. I reached out. Should we had coffee. She was super helpful and she basically long story short helped me to get my foot in the door and get my resume to apply for postgraduate entertainment oprah magazine and that's really. What kind of kicked off my career

Heather Nose Frida Baltimore ED Jane Jamieson Frank New York City Spokane New York Oprah Magazine
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

"So on the one hand, of course, you know most people here they've experienced this kind of violence and this kind of. Oppression for a quarter century now, and they've never really had any sort of change that happened in any of the things that the government has said certainly benefited them. So I don't think that many people really believe the government when it now apologize to people and says that that things will change and I think a lot of people have simply had it with the Lukashenko Administration with the Alexander Lukashenko's regime that's been in power for a very long time here and they're saying look. Change needs to happen now because of course, they are afraid that if SHANECO stays in power that changed may never happen at all. Well, those who have had include the main opposition candidate who has fled to Lithuania's Lana Tia Noski. A-. Her I. In days in a video, what are we hearing from her? She was silent for several days obviously because she was put under pressure before having to to leave the country, and now for the first time she's come out and she's essentially giving her respect to the people who are still going out on the streets here. Obviously, a lot of those people going out at great? Danger to their own lives to their own safety and she's also calling for mass demonstrations over the weekend. So we're from so for people to keep coming out and at the same time, your position is also calling for some sort of body to be over for a form for some sort of roundtable forum to try and get some sort of transition of power going here. Obviously, that's something. That can only happen if and when the government realizes that it doesn't have the support of the people of Belarus anymore. So it certainly seems those kind of guy coming out shows that she's feeling re energized after you know when when she fled, she's certainly looked like she wasn't a lot of distress because we have to remember that her husband is still in government custody and she certainly. Seemed as though she was very, very afraid for maybe not her own safety but certainly the safety of the people who battled politically on her side and then also her family as well. Right and she has been described as being more appearing to be more confident in that video that came out recently meanwhile, international pressure is mounting the EU says that these elections were neither free nor fair Ministers. They're considering sanctions today. What's the rest of the world doing responding to this? Well I mean the rest of the world is condemning the election and I think a lot of European politicians whether there especially in the eastern European countries. But also the big European countries like for instance, Germany they're really angry at Alexander Lukashenko because over in the past couple of years, they've actually taken back some of the sanctions that they had against looker. Shangqiu. In. Return for him releasing some political activists in return for what they believe was maybe a bit of a softening up of his regime. But now after this happened, you could see the anger among some of the foreign ministers in Europe, some of the the political leaders in in Europe as well they just feel that all of that has gone out the window and so now they're saying look, there's GonNa be a tough line the talking about new sanctions against Lukaschenko's government. And they certainly are very much criticizing the election which as you say, they don't believe is free or free or fair, and they certainly seem to say that there were a great deal of irregularity. CNN senior international correspondent, Fred Plotkin speaking with us from Minsk the capital of Belarus Fred. Thanks so much. Appreciate it. Thank you. The attorney. General of Kentucky met with the family of Brianna Taylor this week to express condolences, and this comes five months after Taylor was shot and killed by police officers in her apartment. During a flawed forced entry raid prosecutors have not charged any of the officers involved and calls for those charges have now grown with support from several prominent figures including. Oprah Winfrey, this week Oprah paid for twenty six billboards across Kentucky one for each year Brianna Taylor's life, and for the first time in twenty years someone else besides Oprah that being Brianna. Taylor will grace the September issue of Oprah magazine. Arianna Davis. Digital Director. Oprah magazine joins us now with more welcome to hear now. Thank you so much for having Kinda. So Arianna. Oprah said that if she could, she would be marching in the streets with black lives matter and that this action is her former protest but this is a departure from Oprah and the magazine what prompted this decision to act now with the cover and billboards this moment just felt so urgent I think given that we are in pandemic given that with the murder of George, Floyd and Brianna Taylor it just felt like enough is enough you know we can't let these names continued to just be hashtags on social media or be new cycles that just die down and our. Staff was talking a lot about you know how can we make sure that we are continuing this conversation that we're doing our part with this platform and it was actually are visual research editor who came up with the idea of this might be kind of crazy. But what if we were to put Briana Taylor on the cover and our editor in chief loved the idea and immediately took to Oprah Oprah loved the idea as well. Immediately was on board and it kind of went from there. It went from the cover to within the issue. There's a lot of great content about. Stories everything from letter that Oprah road about her conversations she's had with to make a palmer. That's Brianna Taylor's mother as well as a package about how white women are for the first time really confronting their white privilege. So it just felt like a moment where you the time to have some of these tough conversations but in a big way. The magazine will no longer be in print after this year I'm just wondering if this move into more. This direct action with this cover is made possible by this indie. Can we expect more atypical covers as you all wind down? Wasn't actually directly related in any way. It was something that we just felt like was a strong statement I. think that Oprah you know fell that she does have this platform as the magazine and print will continue just in a different way in twenty twenty one, it might be more like special issues that may be away a place where we can do more topical content but we launched in two thousand eighteen, OPRAH MAC.

Oprah Oprah Brianna Taylor Oprah magazine OPRAH Oprah Winfrey Alexander Lukashenko Belarus Lukashenko Administration Lithuania Lana Tia Noski Europe Briana Taylor EU Arianna Davis CNN Germany Kentucky Arianna Minsk Fred Plotkin
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and Wbz Im Tanya Moseley, I'm Peter o'dowd. This is here. Now there's new data out today that shows one bright spot in this pandemic economy retail sales rose more than one percent from June to July but unemployment still at historic levels had ended the fall meanwhile president trump said, he would not fund the Postal Service ahead of this fall's election. He then walked back those comments. The president has made it clear. He does not want a lot of Americans to vote by mail this year amid pandemic that. killed more than one, hundred, Sixty, seven, thousand people. He's reportedly made false claims about mail in ballots being fraudulent. He has repeatedly done that and he said that expanding access to voting could mean Republicans never went office again for more on the postal service and this fall's election national correspondent Pam fess ler joins us now and Pam let's listen to the president. He said he wouldn't give Democrats funding for the Postal Service and then he said this. So therefore, they don't have the money to do the universal mail in voting. So therefore, they can't do it I guess right. Are they going to do it even though they don't have the money? And pay 'em he he then walked this back a bit. Can you explain what's happening here? Start start with that false claim of universal mail in voting. Hi Tania Well, as with many of the president's remarks, it was a little confusing. Democrats were seeking twenty five billion dollars for the postal service that they could be universal mail in voting. But no one's actually trying to do that most states expand existing mail in and absentee voting, but still also allow some in person voting during the pandemic. The president ultimate is comments in the context of negotiations with Congress over a pandemic relief package he said that he opposes the funding increase but then last night he also said he'd be willing to sign a relief package with some new funds for the postal service. So it's not really clear where this is all gonna end up. Yeah, and and this is not the first time that he's talked about this. He has made a number of statements as you kind of alluded to about the postal service can you take us through some of some of those previous statements? Right So he's made many about the postal service and mail and voting and and he repeatedly said he doesn't think that the postal service can handle millions of absentee ballots this fall without more money, and we certainly are expecting a flood of absentee ballots. Put. The Postal Service said the exact opposite that it does have the capacity to deliver all the election mail this fall, the president's. Comments Mail in voting have been even more contradictory. He said it would lead to the most corrupt election ever and as you mentioned widespread voter fraud even though there's no evidence of that Then later he said absentee voting is okay but mail in voting is it even though they're basically the same thing and then recently he said male voting's okay and state some states that are run by Republicans. But Not in states run by Democrats I should also note that the president and the first lady. Do Vote Absentee in Florida? Just this week they got ballots for next Tuesday's primary there. Although, they could probably have a pretty difficult time getting those balanced back on time if rely on the service because the deadlines Tuesday. Oh, interesting. So absentee ballots. Though we'll start going out for the presidential election to state to some of the states in mid-september. You know I actually spoke with the USPS union head earlier this month, and he said that there's no question. The Postal Service will be able to securely deliver ballots but that cuts to service will actually hinder the speed of delivery but there's no concern about fraud from his view what have you heard from state election officials about whether they are confident in the Postal Service Well, the ones I've talked to say that they're they're they're confident that local election offices are going to do everything. They can to get the mail delivered on time they actually quite closely with those. Postal officials but one problem is that a lot of states have very tight deadlines. So for example, in Pennsylvania voters can request their absentee ballot as late as October twenty seventh. But then it has to be received by November third to count. So that leaves very little turnaround time and the postal services warning that it can't get ballots out and back in such a short period of time. And is telling voter advising voters that they should mail in their ballots at least a week before the deadline even though there is this close relationship with one somewhat disturbing sign is that I just learned this week that a bipartisan group of secretaries of States they they run elections in each state. They asked to meet this week with the new Postmaster General Louis Joy and he's yet to agree to meet with them and he might still but some election officials. Say That's pretty unfortunate considering the elections only eighty one days away. Absolutely, so much to work out here. That's NPR national correspondent Pam Fest Slur as always. Thank you so much pam thanks Tanya to Belarus. Now, where authorities have released at least two thousand people detained during demonstrations against the results of last Sunday's presidential election and protests continued today with people chanting go away. Directed at the authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko CNN's senior international correspondent Fred Plotkin is in Minsk, the capital and Fred. What more can you tell us about the release of these protesters I think this is something that the that the government really needed to do I mean they were under a lot of pressure. A lot of people are very angry about these detentions there were. Almost seven thousand people who had been detained by the security forces, and there were widespread reports and also things that people are still told us of people being tortured while they were in detention people being beaten put into stress positions win being made to distributing humiliated protesters being humiliated on state. TV. So there certainly was a lot of anger about that, and some of those people were then released they showed the the bruises and the wounds that they've had and the. Protests that have been going on here. Of course, on the one hand, they call for a new election because so many people here believe that the election was rigged, but they're also calling for an end to violence against the protesters and I think that that's something where at least two protesters have made some headway against what is normally of course, extremely repressive governments will the top law enforcement official in the country has apologized on state TV for those beatings that you described they won't buying. That I mean wh where's that coming from? No I don't think I. Don't think anybody's buying that I think that many people here most people here believe that that is essentially the Lukashenko regime. Sir Trying to calm people down a little bit and maybe by some time for itself but certainly doesn't appear as though from what we're hearing that people are buying that..

Postal Service president Democrats NPR Tanya Moseley President Alexander Lukashenko Pam fess Peter o'dowd Tania Well USPS Pam trump Wbz Pennsylvania Belarus Pam Fest
O, the Oprah Magazine Features Breonna Taylor on Cover — Its First Without Oprah

Jason and Alexis

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

O, the Oprah Magazine Features Breonna Taylor on Cover — Its First Without Oprah

"Cover of O magazine, she's always on the cover of her magazine for a Briana Taylor tributes. Very nice. Yeah, I just saw that cover is the first time that Oprah has ever given up the cover of her magazine. For the last 20 years. Oprah has been the cover subject of Oh, But she wrote in her column featuring Taylor, who was fatally shot by police in Louisville, Kentucky, on March 13th. And she said What I know for sure we can't be silent. We have to use whatever megaphone we have to cry for justice. And that is why Briana Taylor is on the cover. That magazine becoming digital on Ly at the end of the year. By the way, Young Elizabeth It's

Briana Taylor O Magazine Oprah Elizabeth It Louisville Kentucky
Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

"I guess. Today is the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller American wife in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl a thinly disguised Laura Bush who found herself married to a president. It was long listed for the Orange Prize. As was her debut novel. Prep her other books. Include the man of my dreams sustained eligible and the acclaimed short story collection. You think it I'll say it. Her stories of appeared in the New Yorker Esquire Oprah magazine and The New York Times magazine her latest collection of stories to be published in the UK is help yourself. She's also the guest editor for the Twenty Twenty Best American short stories anthology. She lives with her family in the American Midwest. A brand new novel is rotten. And it's been described as bombshell while I couldn't agree more. This is a book that will demand. Attention Curtis Sitton fell. Welcome to meet the rices. Thank you for having me. You'll novel begins in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. Is Hillary Rodham Graduates College? And it brings us right up-to-date in Contemporary America. But I'd like to go back to Cincinnati in one thousand nine hundred seventy five when when you were can you tell us about the second stance surrounding you alive? Oh my goodness it's funny. I'm so much in the habit of of talking about Hillary's lay right now. You'll warm familiar with that than with my own will. I'm the second of four children. I have a sister. Who's less than two years older than I am. And I would say a have not led a very personally dramatic life which might be why I'm a fiction writer instead of a memoir rest but yeah I grew up in Cincinnati. My parents are both retired but still live in Cincinnati and I have two sisters one brother my brother is actually holds elected office in Cincinnati. He's the he's a member of the city council in his third term. So so I guess. Different members of my family are interested in in politics in in different ways but I was very lucky to go to excellent schools in Cincinnati elsewhere. And I would say my family Sort of obsessive readers like we didn't it's not like we. All six sat around each of US feverishly reading a book of our own but there were lots of books in the House. We did sometimes read is a family. My mother was a librarian for a long time for you know middle school or junior high students so ages twelve and thirteen and fourteen and that strong feminist streak. That comes to your writing that being influenced by her. That's an interesting question. My parents have almost opposite personalities. From each other where. My father is very great Gary in very opinionated and my mother is you know I think she has strong opinions and viewpoints. But she's. She's not a very assertive per cent. And she's not she's not she's a very private person even even by saying this should not be. I think she'd rather that like I never talk about her. Other than you know maybe acknowledging that she exists described as relatively progressive. But you know I think there are some families where the children grow up going to protest rallies in that was not my family You'll schooling was obviously a hugely influential. In fact your first book prep which is I. Think long list for the Orange Prize loosely based on that. Would you say so? I went to a boarding school in Massachusetts. When I was I had just turned fourteen and it was sort of strange given you know the area of the country where I grew up. Which is the mid west and it was a little bit unusual to go to a sort of fancier elite boarding school on the east coast just in the sense that a lot of students who go to that school are more from that region and also the other thing is that. I was the only one of my siblings who went which I think sometimes makes people think that I must have been the most academically talented in fact. I was the least academically and by my siblings. Were all you know much more. Well rounded students like. I did well in English but I definitely struggled with other subjects so those a little bit. I feel like I certainly. It was privileged but it was also a little bit random or arbitrary that I went to boarding school and talking about coming from a different at least geographical background from the rest of the students. The story is sort of more than coming of age. It's it's more perhaps one could say it was about a study of of social class. Was that something that you found was very apparent there that it did feel different. This whole kind of I mean I think the thing that we all have this horror of being a teenager comes across in dairy well a particular field and that you didn't fit in that. I think I felt at times that I didn't fit in. Certainly I mean I would say that. It wasn't the main character in prep. Leave your experiences going to boarding school as more of a sort of class shock than I would say I did. And you know class is sort of the air. We all breathe. It's maybe especially obvious. Una Boarding School campus. But you know I think it's it's obvious everywhere you know. You can have a sort of exchange with a person like delivering a package to your house and the two of you could probably like assess each other's voices are accents and no things about each other's class or like defied that one of you is in a house receiving a package one of US delivering. The package also says things about class in our society. You know doesn't necessarily say very good things but I think the To like one yet like I was aware of class. And I don't think I was quite as much of a fish out of water as my protagonist. Although certainly I'm like erotic person was even more neurotic as a teenage you write about teenagehood again in in your next book. And I think we'll come back to that because it will say impacts on on the subject matter of Rodham but you went off to Stanford then and you studied creative writing night. You wrote the College newspaper. You registered magazine. What's being a writer? Always the the obvious career choice. Well I think writing was always really important to me and it was like from a very young age for about six or seven. I spent a lot of time reading and writing because I wanted to. I think it helped me make sense of the world and it held my attention and there weren't as many options on net. Netflix back. Then so entertain yourself a little more so definitely writing always played a huge role in my life. I don't think I grew up with the expectation that I would be a full time novelist. I think sometimes I thought I won't be a lawyer or as I got older. I thought you know maybe a social worker or an English teacher or something. I always the closer my adulthood. I think the more it seems like I would do something writing adjacent. But I just don't think anyone can count on being a fulltime writer as you know how they pay their mortgage and I mean going to someone as you did to study at the Iowa. Writer's workshop is no guarantee of coming out. The other end is a fully-fledged writer. But that does give you a better chance than most doesn't it's a huge success rate. It's a it's a wonderful program and I like I loved being there. I learned a ton but the the thing that people don't necessarily realize is not only. Can you go to an excellent writing program the Iraqis and after that you know not have a stable writing career you can be a writer who has had multiple books published in that. Still not the way. You're supporting yourself. And in fact new writing is my full time job. But that's that's an incredible privilege and it's not. It's not something I take for granted. It's very I know that it's very unusual on special. I feel

Cincinnati Writer Orange Prize United States American Midwest Twenty Twenty Hillary Rodham Graduates Colle Sunday Times Bestseller Laura Bush New Yorker Esquire Oprah Una Boarding School UK Editor Curtis Sitton Hillary President Trump America Massachusetts Netflix
Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

The Addicted Mind Podcast

08:32 min | 1 year ago

Sober Sex & Recovery with Stacie Ysidro

"I'm Stacey CETRARO and I am a sober sex coach or sex and recovery coach for over ten years. I've accumulated over ten thousand hours of education and Experience. And all things sexual. I have studied a lot of contra sacred sexuality and sexology the DSM and also the erotic blueprints. I am acknowledged by the World Association of sex coaches and also by Jaya who is a world renowned sexologist. That is the founder of the erotic blueprints. And I've been working really closely with her the last couple of years. You may have seen her as a speaker on Tony Robbins or on Good Morning America. Or even the view or Oprah magazine and I've been working with her to expand my understanding and my application of the erotic blueprints to help my coaches and to help myself and my personal life and my clients awesome. I'm so glad that you decided to you. Know come onto the podcast. I think this is a topic that so many people need help with especially when they get into sobriety. So let's just jump in. Let's how how? How did you start this work so I had started sex coaching over ten years ago on I started out with just a business and life coaching certification that I was using and the salons. I was the salon professional working behind the chairs. The stylist and training stylist and working with our leadership team and being a partner in salons and as I was going through that process business and life. Coaching kind of vague. And they always want you to find your niche so I went through a few processes and all the common threads were around spirituality and sexuality. So that's when I started taking this deep dive into the world of Spirituality and Sexuality and sex coaching which led me to get a couple of different sex coaching certifications and studying sexology and I also have experience with addiction and recovery in my personal life so after about ten years of working with mostly couples and men around Sacred Sexuality Contra mostly helping men with premature ejaculation or rectal dysfunction energetic orgasm. I got to a point where I really wanted to move into something a little different and deeper and that's when I found the erotic blueprint certification and I did that and Since I started going on that journey with Jaya I have really come into this new space of seeing the need for people to get some coaching around sexuality and so Brian Easy or Saxon recovery. That's that's great You know I think our sexuality is so much. A part of our spirituality. Such a core part of who we are and so for a lot of people who struggle with addiction and maybe have a lot of that I guess I would call it. Wounding of the spirit their sexualities impacted by by that trauma absolutely Sexuality is such a huge part of being a human being for my perspective. I guess it's kind of Taoists but I believe that orgasmic energy as the life force energy in it flows through US and makes us alive and so we can experience that and a lot of different ways on a day to day basis in different levels of intensity but that sexual orgasmic energetic exchange that occurs is something that's so deeper so much deeper and brings us to something that's bigger than us and for me addiction has really been about isolation and being disconnected with spirit and so going into recovery and being able to reconnect with my higher power and with Spirit. It just was natural to recover my sex life in the process so I just really felt that it all kind of blended together right. Yeah definitely I think you're absolutely right. So tell me a little bit about when someone is in sobriety and they're starting to look at their sexuality. What are some of the issues that you see in that? Come up and then our common with the that process so for me. Sex was not always conscious and honoring. It was more about power and manipulation control. It was about feeling needed or seeking. Validation was about people pleasing others and it was through sex so I've seen people go through similar things also once getting sober like kind of feeling like you're a virgin all over again like everything is new right. And so you know there's a lot of challenges with defining what are my sexual values. And how do I get out of my head and into my body because now my mind is racing and I'm not using a substance to escape. Do you find a lot of people. When they're in their addiction that they have hidden their sexuality in it like their true sexual self is hidden by the addiction. Does that make sense? I think that addiction can definitely cloud who we really are inside To me it was definitely like a spiritual death and disconnection with who I really am so yes actuality as part of that and I think that a lot of times when people are using. They're doing things sexually that. Maybe they wouldn't do consciously sober or they're using sexuality and away that is not honoring and Present with themselves right or others will. There's a lot of that trauma that interpersonal trauma. And if you're if you're self is hidden from yourself. I guess if that makes sense by an addiction you can't really be yourself their present. You can't be whole. Yeah it's about being all of us and honoring and accepting all of our selves and allowing someone else to see all of us you know especially when people have had traumas. It's hard to even honor yourself to begin with and that's incredibly vulnerable to to be yourself to come with your full self with all of your sexual desire and fantasy and all of that. I mean it's to me who we are sexually as like a window into our our very deepest selves absolutely. I always tell people that sexuality is almost like the outer layer of why people start reaching out to me but what really happens as this deeper personal transformation that you never could have plans for or even asked for to begin with because it is so vulnerable and it gives you access to all parts of yourself your self worth unconditional love and acceptance. So it really. It really goes so much deeper than just. How do I have a better orgasm? Yeah yeah definitely I mean. That's that's part of it but that's not the whole part. That's not in some ways. That's a great part and in some ways that's not always the best part right and I found that. Yeah I can tell you some tips and techniques and tools to do all day long but if you don't really do the inner work you're never going to access that part of yourself that's going to bring you to experience that deep connection and intimacy with someone which really expands your orgasmic energy. So it's almost like you can't have one without the other. I definitely agree. I I work with a lot of people who struggle with compulsive sexual behavior. And what's really you know? We look at it as an intimacy issue. It's this fear to be vulnerable. It's a fear to bring their true self to the relationship and so their sexuality is in a in a in a way hidden Their true selves are hidden.

Spirituality And Sexuality Jaya World Association Of Sex Stacey Cetraro Tony Robbins DSM Founder United States Oprah Partner Brian Easy
"oprah magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Oprah's magazine which has a really big milestone for the business yeah we talked to Sarah Blakely three years ago on the show and you know that was the Oprah effect for Spanx what happened to swell after action like people all of a sudden your web traffic it went up so much that we and I say we are still the only point I had to really work on the back end of the website because we crashed immediately so there was absolutely an Oprah fact but I would say more than anything it was sort of this stamp of confidence in the business that either gave me more confidence as I wanted to retailers or give retailers more confidence to try the product and put it on the shelf I made a little sign that said you know as featured in Oprah's magazine and that certainly helps you know opening up retail stores now I read that like a year after you start it's well you he went to China to go visit the factory that was making the the bottles for you and then you went to a trade show in Hong Kong and you literally set table with knock offs of your bottles or is it is that right that is a true story what was your first reaction like what's going on I almost passed out I should believe that and I was there with my boyfriend at the time who's now my husband and luckily he kept his wits about him and went over and started talking to someone standing by this you know display case what he says Hey what are you doing here he said oh hi tell me about this and that the gentleman that was working the booth was super smiley and happy and he pulled out his business card and gave it to us and said oh hi I'm from swell in his business card also had swell on it of course I had never seen this man before so would you do I can't imagine you had a lot of the budget to hire lawyers at that time no I mean I had done the you know the initial registration of the patents and design patents and intellectual property but but certainly didn't have a lawyer on staff or really the budget you know unfortunately we did have to hire some attorneys and we really didn't have to try to get to the bottom of it to make sure that this was stopped immediately so as you got to a point where you are you know you kind of grow the company and you got to build it out and you got to get a space and and how did you.

Sarah Blakely China Hong Kong Oprah
"oprah magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Oprah's magazine which has a really big milestone for the business yeah we talked to Sara Blakely three years ago on the show and you know that was the Oprah effect for Spanx what happened to swell after action like people all of a sudden your web traffic it went up so much that we and I say we are still the only point I had to really work on the back into the website because we crashed immediately so there was absolutely an Oprah fact but I would say more than anything it was sort of this stamp of confidence in the business that either gave me more confidence as I went into retailers or give retailers more confidence to try the product and put it on the shelf I made a little sign that said you know I featured in Oprah's magazine and that certainly helps you know opening up retail stores that now I read that for like a year after you start it's well you he went to China to go visit the factory that was making the the bottles for you and then you went to a trade show in Hong Kong and you literally set a table with knock off of your bottles or is is that right that is a true story what was your first reaction like what's going on I almost passed out I should believe that and I was there with my boyfriend at the time who's now my husband and luckily he kept his wits about him and went over and started talking to someone standing by this you know display case what he says Hey what are you doing here he said oh hi tell me about this and that the gentleman that was working the booth was super smiley and happy and he pulled out his business card and gave it to us and said oh hi I'm from swell in his business card also had swell on it of course I had never seen this man before so would you do I can't imagine you had a look above budget to hire lawyers at that time no I mean I had done the you know the initial registration of the patents and design patents and intellectual property but but certainly didn't have a lawyer on staff for really the budget you know unfortunately we did have to hire some attorneys and we really didn't have to try to get to the bottom of it to make sure that this was stopped immediately so as you got to a point where you are you know you kind of grow the company and you got to build it out and you got to get a space and and how did.

Sara Blakely China Hong Kong Oprah
Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

Anxiety Slayer

09:01 min | 1 year ago

Understanding what is at the core of suffering with Dr. John Demartini

"They. It's my pleasure to introduce you to Dr John De Martini. Dr De Martini is a human behavior specialist international bestselling author educator founder of the De Martini Institute and the author of forty books that have been translated into thirty six languages. He's been featured in films including the secret is appeared on Larry. King Live and regularly contributes to Oprah magazine. And he's so much more than that when I was reading his Baiocco at that. What like three sentences. I mean this man has so much experience. He travels all around the world helping so many inspiring so many welcome to anxiety. Sleep Dr de Martini. Well thank you for having me. Thank you in. Today's fast. Paced hyper connected society. There's an undeniable increase in people experiencing varying degrees of anxiety. We get loads of email from our listeners. About how they are suffering from all types in at the top of the list health anxiety followed by the fear of having an anxiety attack in social anxiety. I'd love for you to share your view about anxiety being a form of fear. So can I give you a snarl to kind of build out the formation of anxiety? Yes please let's imagine that a mother and father are having an argument home and there's a little one after two year old baby. That's having to endure and listen to the screaming and the baby had quickly crawls off runs to its room. Hide under a bed puts his hands over. Its years closes. Its eyes and just feels a bit shaken by the screaming match this this initial perception of pain without pleasure lost out. Gain negative out positive in the child's perception is stored in a subconscious mind as an instinct to protect away from that response and an impulse to whatever That child procedures. It's opposite of peaceful safe environment now. The next morning after the only match the father goes off to work. The mother comes and gets the baby out of the bed and goes and gets it dressed up and takes shopping out when the when they were screaming the night before the father was wearing blue jeans and a white shirt. Had Brown Moustache Brown hair. The mother was wearing a particular outfit. The child had taken this in an filter this nuclear of the Chalice and filtered information going into the corona before it goes into Cortex to be conscious so child's got filtered response there now the next morning. The mother takes the baby with her shopping to the grocery store. And the baby's fine and it's sitting in the basket you know relaxed in a time and all of a sudden they turn a corner. There's a man with blue jeans white shirt brown hair brown moustache. The baby has an association with those stimuli and the baby now has a reaction because she the baby will one of fight or flight response Eliezer getting further the mother protected turning. Its back on the mother to try to protect it or it'll get behind the mother and try to create a response to pull mother away from that thing that associated with the original night before experience. And so it'll have a what is called a an association with the primary one because of associations may with the blue jeans a white shirt brown hair brown moustache so the child is not even aware that it's actually a result of the night before but it just has this instinct to protect itself from this thing that's walking by because of the associations made while the the boy I walked by with blue jeans white shirt goes down the island at NAP. Feel safe and it gets backed. It plays the mummy wonders. Why did the Child Act out for just a second man walked by then it goes around the next quarter and there's a guy with a blue? Jean Yellow Shirt Brown hair brown moustache now. The child has a little less response but still a bit of a response. His now societas with blue jeans and Brown hair and Brown Moustache but now the child has a secondary association with yellow shirt. Now goes down the next aisle and there's a guy with a blue jeans red shirt brown hair brown moustache now. It's Gone Association. Red Shirt then it goes around the corner and sees a guy with a blue jeans. A white shirt blonde hair blond mustache and that associates blindness with that and all the sudden without even realizing it there is a hundred stimulus as stimuli in the environment. Triggering varying degrees of response to the original fear so these secondary tertiary ordinary pit Associations eventually have stimulus to our act a stimuli to create a anxiety response and anxiety responses a compounded original fear that's never been neutralized so now what happens is the child has started to having a hundred different things because now music is playing while they happen to see a guy with blue jeans and a white shirt. Brown Moustache now. That of mood music is now associated and after a while there's hundreds of things in the environment without even being aware of the original event triggering an anxiety response. This can be occurring in health because we could have a scare with some sort of a health response and then we can have secondary association to that it can be social. It can be learning at educational institutions. It can be fitness Exercise to every injury and it can create secondary injuries. Anything that is compounded an associate on top original event that hasn't been neutralized can create anxiety response triggered now if I go back and take that child to that original event and ask a certain set of questions. Make the unconscious conscious of the opposite at that moment and neutralize and balance perceptions. The cascading of the secondary church events dissolve. It's quite amazing how it's done. So there's a way of liberty going back to the original primary event and asking questions to make us fully conscious of the opposite sides. Let's say that you beat somebody that you're infatuated with their. You're a single person or married acting single and you meet somebody and you're highly attracted to him. You're kind of in a fantasy about them. And you're now conscious of the upsides. Things that are attractive. And your unconscious the downsides and as a result of you know you stimulate dopamine oxytocin Kevin's endorphin. Serotonin estrogen. And you've got an attractive response of impulse towards but now you're unconscious of the downsides. That's why you're vulnerable to that impulse or you meet somebody that you resent you. Perceive consciously this way more downsides because of previous experiences in Toronto. And there's no upsides and now you're conscious the downsides unconsciously upsides and now you create a nor peninsular never cortisol. Osteo cows in testosterone response. Now when you do that those chemistries get skewed. You get subjected bias as a as a protective mechanism to accentuate that. And now you split your full consciousness and the conscious unconscious hats anytime you store that you store all of those imbalances in the subconscious mind as impulses toward things and instincts away from it will run your life irrespective of time or space until they are neutralized right doing as you're now asking questions to make you. Cognizant conscious like. Your intuition is a typically do that? He'll you trying to ask you information. That would make you aware of the unconscious at the time. We're conscious of your infatuated. What's the downsides current at that moment if you resent the upside and once they're balanced you free it from the subconscious mind in its liberate into what we call the super conscious? Mind a of love and attitude when it's in love and gratitude is wellness. There's no response. There's no impulses there's no instincts. There's no anxiety secondary responses etcetera. So what I do is I go to the moment when you perceive the original event occurring and you go in there and you identify what you think is more negatives than positives with a father's yelling at the mother and go and find out what's the upsides because I you think well there's no upside. Its downside there's more negative than positive withdraw from it. You try to protect yourself etc. But at the same time you might find that. The mothers disempowered and all of a sudden yelling as she's communicating in a way that goes against his values She's maybe overspend money and he's now reacting or maybe that he's she's had an affair. You don't see the whole picture so you just respond until you ask enough questions to try to find out. What the real dynamical

Dr John De Martini Dr De Martini De Martini Institute Brown Oprah Magazine Larry Eliezer Founder Toronto Jean Yellow Gone Association Cortisol Testosterone Dopamine Endorphin Oxytocin
US Oprah Favorite Things-Intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

US Oprah Favorite Things-Intro and wrap

"Oprah's just in coveted time for list Christmas features Oprah seventy Winfrey nine products has released all available her list of on favorite Amazon things favorite things Oprah's team coveted and I list search features for the seventy absolute nine must products all give available gifts on Amazon Adam Glassman favorite with things all team the Oprah and I magazine search for says the absolute the favorite things must team includes give Sarah gifts Jessica Adam Glassman Parker sat with all idea the for a Oprah back magazine back I said says go the for favorite it things team she designed includes Sarah one Jessica that Parker is not sat only idea for a backpack just I acute said back go for back it it's convertible she designed five one different ways that is you not could wear only Glassman says just lady acute Gaga's back back favorite thing it's convertible is I shadows five called different house ways you could laboratories wear Glassman there says is lady also Gaga's food favorite chocolates thing and is pretzels I shadows and pajamas called house because laboratories if there could is also food she chocolates live in over John and is pretzels every day and Oprah's pajamas favorite things because are featured in the December if issue could of all the Oprah she live magazine in over John is every the holidays day Oprah's everybody favorite things I met are featured Donahue in the December issue of all the Oprah magazine happy holidays everybody I met Donahue

Oprah Adam Glassman Jessica Adam Glassman Parker Gaga John Donahue Oprah Magazine Winfrey Amazon I Magazine Sarah
"oprah magazine" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:18 min | 2 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on AP News

"Oprah's coveted list features 79 products all available on Amazon favorite things team and I search for the absolute must give gifts Adam Glassman with all the Oprah magazine says the favorite things team includes Sarah Jessica Parker sat idea for a back back I said go for it she designed one that is not only just acute back back it's convertible 5 different ways you could wear Glassman says lady Gaga's favorite thing is I shadows called house laboratories there is also food chocolates and pretzels and pajamas because if could she live in over John is every day Oprah's favorite things are featured in the December issue of all the Oprah magazine the holidays everybody I met Donahue

Oprah Adam Glassman Oprah magazine Sarah Jessica Parker lady Gaga John Donahue Amazon
US Oprah Favorite Things-Wrap

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

US Oprah Favorite Things-Wrap

"Oprah's coveted list features seventy nine products all available on Amazon favorite things team and I search for the absolute must give gifts Adam Glassman with all the Oprah magazine says the favorite things team includes Sarah Jessica Parker sat idea for a back back I said go for it she designed one that is not only just acute back back it's convertible five different ways you could wear Glassman says lady Gaga's favorite thing is I shadows called house laboratories there is also food chocolates and pretzels and pajamas because if could she live in over John is every day Oprah's favorite things are featured in the December issue of all the Oprah magazine the holidays everybody I met Donahue

Oprah Adam Glassman Oprah Magazine Sarah Jessica Parker Lady Gaga John Donahue Amazon
"oprah magazine" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"And along with my executive producer, DC Taylor. We will be your guides on this learning journey. Let me tell you my super objective and being with you today. I want to those iast ethically, share stories and information to inspire leaders that you, by the way, so you can inspire others. Mike guests with me today is coming back because I love him in his work. So much is Sean Askin? Oh hi, Sean, welcome back. Good to be back. Thank you for having me. So I'm going to do a very brief intro. And because as we talk. You'll all hear all about Sean and his work in all I kind of good stuff. But let's start this way Askin. Oh, see chocolate. Recently was named by Forbes, quote, one of the twenty five best small companies in America. Ask an OC chocolate has also been featured in the New York Times the Wall Street Journal on Bloomberg MSNBC and numerous other national into end international media outlets. Sean Askin OSI was named by o the Oprah magazine, quote, one of the fifteen guys who are saving the world. Well, Sean, you hit the big time now you're on the business builders show. Right. Of course, of course. All right. So let's let's kinda start at the beginning. I guess so Eskenazi chocolate. Tell me about your company and kind of how did you get there? So let's talk about that to start, you bet. Well, I was a criminal defense lawyer for twenty years, and I specialized in really serious felony cases. Love the courtroom loved everything about it until I stopped loving it. And I think twenty years is a good term of service and, and I needed to find something else to do, and I couldn't find anything having a lot of trouble really finding something that would be inspiring and would really be a project that I could be passionate about. I tried other areas of the law that didn't work looked at all kinds of businesses. This was five year long process of trying to figure out what I was gonna do next. And I had no idea. It would take that long at the time and it was it was a struggle for me during those five years. And but I started to have some hobbies because hobbies it's a good idea. You know, to have some thing else, something besides work. So I started grilling on my big green egg. Then I bought another one, and then I just did a lot of that. And then I started baking mid tons of cupcakes, and then I started making chocolate, desserts. In one day, I was driving to a relative of a distant funeral. And even though I'd been working with chocolate, I had no idea where came from, but this idea came to me. Hey, what about just making chocolate from scratch, not knowing anything where came from but within three months of that idea, I was in the Emma's on and studying, how farmers influence the flavor of chocolate by how they grow these cocoa beans in parenthetically? I would say I just got back from the Amazon two weeks ago. And so it was my forty third. Word origin trip since I started the business, but that's how it started. And then now here we are we have seventeen fulltime employees and us we're a very small company, and by design. And, and we sell our chocolate all over the United States. You know, I, I like I like everything you're doing, but the that journey that five year journey. Part of that journey was I guess, I'll call it a spiritual journey. Am I correct in that talk to me a little bit about that Trappist monks and things like that, talk to me a little bit about that, right? The. It was a spiritual journey at the time. I didn't it was almost a spiritual journey by force, or by default, because I was desperate and I at that time was really experiencing some depression and anxiety related to all of this. And so it seemed like the harder, I tried to find my next thing further out of reach it was, and that was really just. You know, day by day, a lot of difficulty. And so, during this time, period, I decided to go to a nearby Trappist monastery in southern Missouri. And the reason I went there is because it was the place where my dad spent his last night on this earth. And he when I was young, he died of lung cancer, and he was my hero. And, and anyway, he'd been on a men's retreat at this church in the earth. Sorry this abbey, and he came home and died. And so I thought fast forward the tape twenty five years. For those of your listeners who don't know what tape is. It's a thing we used to have back on time ago. But anyway, and, and I went to that monastery. And it was really a part of the threshold that I talk about this really really to me it really. And so I have a lot I now I have a twenty year relationship with that monastery in family brother there. And it's influenced in reespect of my life, and my business Yan credible and in two thousand seventeen I think there was the year you'll publish your book at the book title is meaningful work. A quest to do great business. Find your calling and feed your soul. When did you decide to write the book and, and what kind of inspired you or what was the desire behind writing this book, what was driving that? The, the the first thing that drove it was in all candor an agent. That's I, I, I've been approached by a number of people over the years to do that, to write a book, and I never really sell led to do it. And I also never really talked to an agent that I thought was really credible. If I could say that. And this person was and, and the person who introduced me to her was a real inspiration to me in Britain several books in. So I felt this this is a real possibility. And then I would say there was also a countervailing struggle with. My spiritual director at the abbey, who I ride a lot about in the book. Said timmy. He's very wise man in his mid eighties. Upper eighties now, he said, you know, I've never felt called to write a book. I felt called to live it out. And this is a guy who if he wanted to could have ridden thirty bucks, but that really that really stuck with me. And so. I had to really just be the right place right time. And it took three years, and it was with my daughter, Michael author, Lauren aunt. And so, and I was running a business at the same time. Yeah. And, you know, traveling all over the world buying cocoa beans, but it was a great, you know, all in all it was a great experience. I'm so glad that I did it, and I wouldn't have changed anything and I wouldn't have written a book sooner because I probably wouldn't have had very much to say. Well, I'm glad you wrote the book too, because that's how we started our relationship. And, you know, I love the book in follow what to do and all that kind of good stuff has anything surprised you since the release of the book comments. I'm sure there's been lots of comments as anything any responses rece- surprised you in terms of feedback on the book. I think one of the things I do is I catalogue the people who write me about the book and I told myself before the book came out what my measure of success was going to be, and that was. People writing me who said that they'd read it, and that it had influenced them in some way related to some action that they took smaller large. And so, I would say, maybe not so much the prize, but I would say hardened or, or grateful that, that that has come true. And so I have really really enjoyed hearing from people who've read it and just for whatever reason decided to share with me. What it is that move them in the book to some action. And then, and that will often lead to. Dialogue, and I've really really enjoyed that. And I think I've enjoyed it more than I thought I would. And it's in some cases, I've just asked for phone number picked up the phone and called the person in some way to if I could be of some assistance in some way, you know, I mean, I'm not a coach or anything like that. But I have really enjoyed those conversations and maybe of some help Tim ways how how rewarding is that. So my guest is Sean ask a nosy, he is with asking OC chocolate, the book, we're talking about is meaningful work. A quest to do great business. Find your calling and feed your soul. You want to get the book, you want to follow Ashkenazi chocolate, Sean, is on most social media, definitely on Lincoln on Facebook and probably on Twitter. I'm assuming. So sure. So you're, you're there. I'm seeing you and I'm grateful to see everything you're doing there. So along the way, apparently an opportunity came along to do a Ted ex talk. So I'll give me the back story there. How'd that happen? And what was that like, and let's get into the content in a minute. Yeah. Well the. The people there was an organizer of Ted ex conference in Oklahoma City, who'd read my book, and that led he and his committee to reach out to me and asked if I'd be interested in doing Ted ex talk in Oklahoma City in. So that's how it all started. And, and it was a really long process in terms of there's a hole inside part of Ted ex that I had no idea of very organized. And I had to have a Ted ex coach. I was really happy about that. I loved that experience and he was just amazing. And I had to have the script approved it had to be word for word, I had to memorize the whole thing fifteen minutes. No notes. No props. No powerpoint. No images nothing. Oh. And I'm fifty eight years old and memorizing stuff like that doesn't come as easy as it did. When I was in high school. And so. That the process in itself. And they my coach said, if I'd like for this talk to be view going gonna give a talk of a lifetime in this was gonna be what would it be? And that changed the game for me really hard on it, and I spent several nights, and I have to say that in my wife really helped me she helped me, edit this thing, and she listened to me, give it hundreds of times. And she was just very patient and really helpful with me and, and because of the content, which I know we're gonna talk about the, the biggest surprise. I wrote the book, and it took three years strike the book in this writing this talk, and preparing for it took, you know, maybe three or four intensive months if not longer than that, and I was surprised how the content of the talk.

Sean Ted Sean Askin Sean Askin OSI executive producer Mike Trappist monastery Amazon MSNBC Oprah magazine United States Missouri Forbes New York Times America Oklahoma City Yan timmy Britain
"oprah magazine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on KOMO

"And KOMO News Radio is so honored that Holland America asked us to be on board this ship during it's fun festivities, and it's dedication ceremony that just take place earlier with Oprah Winfrey herself. So tell us first of all congratulations on being named the first cruise director of the ship. It's going to be an honor. Absolutely. It's it's always a challenge when you bring a new ship out from the point of the built through its inaugural. Of course, it was very unique for us as well. Because we brace borough and you'll go straight across to Fort Lauderdale and ensuring to Christmas into new years. We had a few. Normal cruises. At least the o the Oprah magazine skills getaway crews. Yeah. So it's been it's been a rollercoaster ride, but it's been masks massively successful the sale on out of the yard was incredibly smooth at probably one of the best in our company's history. I mean, it's hundred and forty six years now that we've been around. So it's been incredible. The has been amazing. I can I cannot say enough. So it to be a cog in that wheel or a Lincoln that chain has been amazed. Is this your first inaugural team? It is for me personally. It is. Yeah. My ten years nervous. Were you nervous ever? I mean, really, and truly you can be honest with us. No, no, no. It's it's the pure excitement of being able to start from scratch. So you get to set the standard to make sure that the bar is raised high. And this the ship has been been producing some of the highest ratings. The reviews have been amazing. And it's it's always difficult with a brand new ship with new concepts on it because you don't know how people unnecessarily gonna react to it. So it's been great so Foucault tell us. What we can expect. What are some of the new things that are here on board that passengers have absolutely raved about well? From the perspective, we go tinged use the full dimension to our award award-winning music walk. So you know in existence. We started off with a B king's blues club, which has been a big part of our programming for many years now all of your ships. Right. Most of them it's on most of them. It's not on all of them. Because of course, the space needs to be there. So we'll signature and vista class ships. Obviously lot pinnacle as well. So all of the ships that pretty much leave out of Seattle have that on there. But tell us what BB king's is all about what what is that? So the BB king's blues club. It started off initially just as the rhythm and blues, you know, we had a five five six piece band we experimented with our member? I was it was on the new Amsterdam and the euro damn at the time where we trialed it out. And it was it was incredibly successful two point where we said, okay, we need to put this on all of ships. But when it comes to anything that you're putting on a ship. It comes down to cabinet availability. It down to the actual space to ensure that you can produce a high quality product. You know, with some of our ships that we had that are necessarily have the space full that which is why it's not on all of our ships because you need to have the right room in order to produce a quality product, you can put musicians in any room. But that doesn't mean that you're going to get a good product because it needs to be, you know, the room needs to be designed for it. You need to have the space the acoustics, you know, that's what it comes into play. But that was the very first part the inception of music walk. That's where it started. As I said, it's been such a huge hit that becomes synonymous with with on America line fantastic. Okay. So the newest things here on the new starting with the music, of course, you have Rolling Stones. Yeah. So in addition to the BB king's blues club, we have billboard onboard and Lincoln center stage Lincoln center statute, given a new venue from what was the cuttings damn simply because it where it was before we need to make space for the rhinestone rock from and to be honest the space where they are. Now is better designed for it. If you go into the BB king's blues club known as Lincoln center stage performing I mean, the room itself is to tears. It's designed like the inside of a violin. You know, the walls have these beautiful beautiful wood and metal styling it looks like the inside of an organ, so it's it's just has that feel to it. It has a bigger room. A biggest Spacey more people can actually come and sit in the lessons. You have more people. They get a chance to listen to the beautiful music from Lincoln center stage. And then on the other side, you have built on board where we have a GOP playing chart topping hits off billboard. And then just on the other side of that. We have a new sedition the ultimate live rock vineyard see the Rolling Stone rock room, which has been a huge hit so far. It's it's shake things up a little bit. You know, some people some people are into its, you know, some people are not so rock and roll. But that's why we have the variety. Everybody has something. But no matter what happens in the evening. You can go from one day to the next and the next to the next, and it's wolf Kloss entertainment. No matter where you go and the live music aspect is so great, especially when you're at sea. And you've you've explored a something's for so long outside. Then you come in and enjoy a fun relaxing. Evening of live music. And you've got John RAs pretty much all over the place. We're gonna have Ross come back after the break. He's gonna talk more about the dining venues will you can expect plus a little western Washington twist coming up after the break, we all try to be healthy. Once upon.

Lincoln center Oprah Winfrey KOMO Oprah magazine Holland America Fort Lauderdale director Seattle wolf Kloss John RAs America Ross Amsterdam Washington GOP forty six years ten years
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Video with these kids. Call cash camp they did a dance to to superman and that went viral. Watching him online for awhile. Already online. You said you wanted to be in his video. Now, what happened was college? This. No, no. He had a video shoot right college me up. You say, Amen. May we shooting the video for my young do this? And that's. I got a picture. Soldier boy tell them. Have you had shirt? Mark. Fat kids come on. Komo. Let's play I wanna play. The radio. This week. What was I hear? No. So you don't want to open. Is like seventy eight seventy. Yeah. We only ninety markets move young. Interview. Now. Pressure for you to have another number one hit song after you've had one because I just do it for fun. I just tried to put out the vibe out the I'm not trying to be the best thing. I'm not trying to be the best rebel. I'm just being Duval. But not the energy putting out that little putting out the happiness. The joy king aren't energy. Talk. Sleeping. A remix to live with my best life now Will Smith don't do. And how you doing? You got it was going to happen. Inside words from a couple of people telling me he wants to do he going to do. So I if you do it is cool. And if you didn't angle be married, and he was buying into it on his grandma everybody vibes to hype man today. Do you? New homeboy? Did you see over by over Oprah been been curve me says that tried to hit up in the DMZ? You really wouldn't. No, nah. Oprah hit me was she she left a comment was she comment. Magazines. Same thing. A win is a. Steal my on. Magazine. When they let that come. There is a chain. DM and all the time. She never. Send the Oprah magazine account..

Oprah magazine Oprah Will Smith Duval Mark
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Earn Your Happy

Earn Your Happy

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Earn Your Happy

"And we know that amazing quote that I'm obsessed with right now, that's like replaying in my mind is life is hard for two reasons you're either leaving your comfort zone or you're saying in it and always pick the one with the reward on the other side. Like literally, this is I'm just. Living this quote every single day because life is hard. That's the end of the story, and you can either choose the hard with the reward or not so amazing question. I love that question. She has a not so serious question to ready for she wants to know where you find your incredible seventies, inspired clothing. All my God. Well, that's show me your MU and this is not an ad note. So at show me your moo-. I dunno guys. It is like the I'm obsessed with seventies. Clothes I think if I came back again another era it would be in the seventies. And I would be a singer you absolutely should be. Yeah. Well, I'll I'll work on that next lifetime. Oh, which by the way, and we'll do a quick little update. Because I think those last question last question, so quick update Evans, and I just spent seven days on a boat together on the Oprah cruise, which was crazy amazing. So we did the Oprah magazine cruise for seven days, which we thought that we were going to have separate beds, but we actually shared a king bed. So I asked her when she came into work today. If she missed me last night. We did not get to cuddle on a boat that was rocking all night long. Yup. Yeah. The legit. I was rocking all day yesterday. He too. Yeah. But how great was your workshop that you lead? And you've got to leave. You got a great talk on Monday. It was really awesome. So I got to talk on the seven agreements, which is all about what I'm going to talk about on the book tour again. Yes. So that was really really beautiful being able to talk to everybody in that. Awesome theater. Like, I've always wanted to speak on a theater stage, and I got to some beautiful theater stage. And then we did a breakout which was really incredible for empowering connections. And we had a bunch of people in groups of four doing a breakout on the ship. So it was a really awesome thing to work with the Oprah magazine team and also be on a cruise for seven days with Evans seventies with Evans everyone, but your member there are also a lot of men in your audience that isn't that wonderful to see them. There were so many men in the audience, and they were. Were they were into it. Just as much as the women is not more. So this is so important for you guys to know like when you do this work, and you live this work, and you show up in this work and just being you and stepping into your late. I really believe that. That's when the men really show up as well. And they feel it they feel like well, this was so cool. Congratulations. Thank you. I'm a bit like just freaking out about. It's still my Mary. You said you put that on your vision is on my vision board it was not a ship. But you know, what that was little added bonus little added bonus in that crew up. Yeah, for sure. Well, you guys thank you so much for all of your questions and right in your reviews. You could get a shout out next week. Send us your questions. We'll give you a shout out on that. Until next time. Everyone earn you're happy from Evanson. I yes. Bye. Bye. Thank you guys so much for spending this time with me on the earn your happy podcast. I am. So glad that you stopped by if you could take one second to share this episode with someone you think would love it. That would be absolutely amazing. And we would be forever grateful. Also, please leave us a review if you feel so moved by going to I tunes and leaving us an honest thought and honest comment, tell us what you think tell us what you want to hear more of it would really help us out on our journey to helping thousands and thousands of people until then don't forget to earn your happy thanksgiving guys. Bye. Bye.

Evans Oprah magazine Evanson seven days one second
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"Day after day after day in which she started painting would go for fifty one hundred bucks and now they go for thousands of dollars and you can do math and then she was featured on oprah magazine and then i wrote about her in one of my books and now there's a waiting list to buy a painting by abby ryan because she's famous so the work was not to make her painting better her painting was already good enough like lots of people's paintings are good enough what was missing was her story and she found a story now if you want to own your career you can't copy somebody else's story you can't say i'm just like abbie ryan except i paint a painting every nine hours not every twenty every that's silly that's not gonna work that the opportunity is to say famous to who who is this for what change in my seeking to make these people these people i seek to change who i see to touch i seek to have residents with what story do they tell themselves and when you put all of those pieces together that's where for example bobby brown comes from i would bet that in you can't do a blind test for cosmetics but in an package test most people who by bobby brown stuff could not tell it apart from stuff that's just like bobby brown stuff all right but so they're paying extra because she made it while who is she well we know she's not charles revson and we she know we know she's not killed she's bobby brown bobby brown has a story and you know chelsea at sugar paper has built a story she's down the street from you in la and she like many people bought a letter press printing machine or whatever you call them a letter press but she uses it differently and she brings her taste to differently and she goes to market differently and this is the lonely journey it's.

oprah magazine abby ryan bobby brown chelsea charles revson nine hours
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"It's just by what's how vets and then your cat is going to be a world star belie well i hope some swift cameras and so let's go out there go nuts cut him that iraq so you you you started this job the village voice yes over you fulfilled in terms of like i was very talents i did so suggested direct me so i graduated in why are you m then i got a job at lifetime magazine a women's magazine lifetime gabar there at the time oh that's on her smack hearst magazines it's a company pair company so hearst magazines own oprah owns oprah's channel i mean oprah magazine in so they were like well was another big cable network that we can create a magazine said he decided lifetime at the time was like vegas basic cable networks a decision translate well because it's like i my you know i had my daughter's baby like shit like that was linked lifetime movies with the stories we did we saw we came out of the congress or wants to have a lifetime billboard across the street and um there was these like two women detectives in front and then another woman detective in the back of that undue detective on the back there in oil just like the just tough like go gutters yeah and it's like and he just looked at it with these like tough lemon detectives beginning it goes lifetime is sifi for women only guy tear it's ridiculous yeah so yeah so i was there and i did not like that experience because there was ridiculous and then i left there in and out went from they are went to the source magazine which fits fun was a really well i'd interned there in college so i knew the people but it was a lot of turnover and you know the two owners are like you know these large didn't life personalities and a lot of like sex drug in rock and roll mentality and also at the time like hip hop culture was making so much money so it was kind of like the tail end of like the golden era of like big open bar parties in you walk out at here with like a free cell phone is like a grabbag.

iraq lifetime magazine oprah oprah magazine congress source magazine hearst
"oprah magazine" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"Cleans i probably would never subscribed to and i certainly never see on the newsstand what's a newsstand and if you see a newsstand anymore but i love that it's there and i can and i can read it they're curation fantastic stories just for you these are stories that i dunno for some reason they're recommending the oprah magazine article what defines you for me i'm a you know what is that why is that is it your job your hometown your love of seventy soft rock of they know we so well now look when you when you open it up it's every page in the new stand magazines but i have to say it's much more beautiful than the magazine the print version you consume in on images if you love photography national geographic her are shudder bug the ability to resume in on an image and see every pixel so much better than the print version easier to read to because of course the text can also soum so it's you know big text if you want you can turn the page is just like he can on a magazine even the ads are there i know some people say well i don't want the ads but that doesn't you know it's just it's easy to swipe by a but sometimes you read vogue i think half the magazine is about the ads rate's not just about the the the the editorial you get them all in here in texture i am a big big fan let's go back to the front page here new inert were these stories daily news from writers and others uh hugh grant settles phone hacking claim against newspaper owned trusting off to read that tomorrow kathy griffin on our exile from hollywood will lady bird make academy award history as we get closer to the academy awards i find them reading more of the gossip magazines entertainment wreak lien people magazine the dow you've you following what happened last week on the stock market fortune reuters money mcleans aarp the magazine oh i'm actually if i i don't subscribe to 'cause i wouldn't want to admit to it but i actually like the wfp magazine and so i can read it secretly picked a lot of these magazines i'm i'm reading in texture might be too.

hugh grant kathy griffin hollywood academy awards wfp magazine oprah magazine reuters
"oprah magazine" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

"You are listening to from the hearts conversations with yoga girl magazines are great resources to keep us informed on news and social issues from credible sources and they give us moments of inspiration and comic relief just when we need them with a new abc called texture you cannot have unlimited access to over two hundred premium magazines all on your tablet or your phone and right now you can try texture four for read the text your app has gone beyond the live ring just the magazine itself texture makes it easy to find and enjoy the articles that you wanna read with exclusive interactive features like marking what you liked easily find it later viewing bonus video content than even experiencing curated articles and magazines just for you or whoever you are gifting texture to this holiday season said the texture app is entirely digital is an environmentally friendly way to consume the best magazines and articles out well texture is the new smarter way to read there are so many great ones included like my favorites women's health oh the oprah magazine and time magazine in imagine having your favorite magazines and they're back issues any time any where start your texture free trial go to texture dot com slash your girl if you choose to continue after your free trial all from the heart listeners will get texture for just ninety nine a month that's over thirty percent off the list that price they're also great gift options available for the holiday season just go to textured dot com slash yoga girl to start your free trial today that's texture dot com slash uber girl texture dot com slash girl.

time magazine oprah magazine thirty percent
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Finding Your Frequency

Finding Your Frequency

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Finding Your Frequency

"I can tell you first hand how much little girls love those bears yes have a fouryearold at home and she had a little bear when she was born two well she's still got a big bill the end users as you age shared daddy bear she sits in it and that's pretty cool yeah so let me ask you you're going back to the uh the book the other book series uh you've written so many bestselling books what is your favorite book that you didn't right that i didn't write to he has oh my goodness well obviously probably the bible would have to be the number one from collective of my favorite thinking greenwich obviously is is something that i read when i was nineteen i didn't realize the impact it would have on my life until i was in my mid midthirties i still think today is his ballot today as it was i was released in 1937 so second to the bible would be thinking rich excellent excellent k of find out i noticed that you have an article in a very big very big magazine the oprah oprah magazine in an fortune tell us a little bit about that yeah is is a huge honour they reached out to me and said that were one highlight women and business in that phoenix greater phoenix area i think there's three or four of us that they highlighted and to provide that kind of opportunity m it was wonderful they want to talk about the work that i've done make big titled the article making a difference and um it's it was a huge honour and and to have that.

greenwich oprah magazine oprah phoenix
"oprah magazine" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"oprah magazine" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

"Create somewhat of a business vision a plan of where they are now and where they want to go next and how they can position themselves and so that they can attract more dream customers in ge embrace their expertise and so yeah branding in business visiting is what we do but i really also found that through my work on that work and life itself are not so separate when a reworked for yourself and so i started and doing a lot of creative coaching actually got some life coaching training from martha back who has a column in the oprah magazine she's fantastic and so i've been able to integrate some of the things i learned from her into my creative coaching um so yeah branding business vision ing and creative coaching love it we house m e courses and m a couple of digital products from hoping to expand so anyway this podcast is all about being being the boss right being an guys can listen to but i think that it is about being the bus lady rallies were bus ladies i completely agree i i as i just asking david my my baby daddy embassies manager the other day as like what would your calming and at home on oath one question legend watch what you how you answer by a but i've looked boss lady is is sort of a sort of a good word for for what we are these days bosley so this podcast is going to be us talking about well i guess giving sneak peek says behind the scenes of what it's like to run our own businesses everything from talking about money to how we grow our teams too.

martha oprah magazine ge david bosley