18 Burst results for "Opoku"

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

04:30 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Talked about at the very beginning but economics. Such a cool subject guys. And if you're in college or even if you're not somebody who wants to go to get a higher education degree i encourage you guys to really learn more about the subject in there some really cool ways to do that Npr has a show called the indicators. Like ten minute episodes that basically summarized in what it means in very real terms without usually a lot of jargon and i think the atlantic also does a great job of talking about issues related to the economy. That are interesting if you're somebody who likes reading teen vogue teen vogue politics section is actually really good in terms of giving people information about. What does it mean. What does it all mean how. Why should we care. And so i think for me. What i love most about economics is that you know when you have a really good understanding of its impact you can really change the world. Economists advise everyone from technology leaders to presidents to grow governments to teachers stats. There breath you know and they can cover a lot of topics from sex work to education to health. Care in so this idea of having a certain set of tools that kinda give you a lens to look at the world through is really really powerful and i would hope that more people would kind of learn more about it and maybe even join the profession. I mean we're all economists to a agree. Exactly i would say you. All are honorary economists. So that was economist. Anna gifty poco audran. Thank you so much for doing this. This is great. You're amazing thank you so much for having me. I'm so humbled to be here in so excited to talk with you and freakonomics author and host of the podcast people. I mostly admire stephen levin. Thank you so so much for doing this. thank you. Exposure was all mind fantastic too smart to whom. I asked the most basic naive questions. Because i did not know jack shit about the economy or the stock market but now i have an mba and five yachts at fourteen billion dollars at harvard asked me to be the president of their school place. Now if you wanna hear more from steven levitt. He the podcast people. I mostly admire. You can also find him on freakonomics radio you can look into his books on freakonomics and check out his organization risk which is linked in the show notes and follow him on twitter at steven. D levitt you can follow anna. Gifty opoku agyemang at on twitter and instagram She so great on both and her website is also linked to the show notes as is the organization that she co founded the sadie collective and we are at all allergies on twitter and instagram. I am at allie word. Just one l. on both platforms so deuce say hi and if you wanna find some other sites in the wild there are allergies. T shirts and hoodies sweat shirts and totes and masks at allergies merch dot com May also suggest checking out the comedy. Podcast you are that which is hosted by portland. Sister duo shannon feltus and bonnie dutch. They also manage all the mattress. Aaron talbert admins. The allergies podcasts. Facebook group which has off-shoot groups such as flirt taller singles. Getting on officiate. Your winning but no pressure and the incredible. Emily white runs the transcribers group. Wonderful people who take this show and make transcripts available on my website for free for deaf or hard of hearing folks. Anyone who needs her wants him. Caleb hatton has been bleeping them and those are also up on my website in case you need kids safe episodes noel. Dilworth helps me schedule. All the interviews. She is a lifesaver. As is assistant editor and a fulltime fiance church sleeper who hosts quarantine calisthenics on twitch every weekday morning nine. Am in case you'd like to do squats and kettlebells and see our garage. We have some gymnast. Paul brings that look very sexual. And i assure you that they are not. And of course steven rayle morris lead editor also hosted the podcast about cats and dressing. Right about dyno's he's a treasure. Nick thorburn made the theme music. If you stick around to the end of the episode you know that. I reward you with a confession of some kind this week. My secret is that. I bought a share of game. Stop at three hundred and forty two dollars. And i'm just hold.

Nick thorburn steven levitt Paul Caleb hatton stephen levin Aaron talbert steven Emily white shannon feltus steven rayle morris twitter instagram Facebook Dilworth both fourteen billion dollars Anna gifty poco audran anna three hundred and forty two do twitch
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

09:18 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"I would say more so so obviously you hear in the news that people say the economy is recovering. The stock market is doing so well wine. The stock market is not the economy. Those guys are rich. They're just getting richer cocaine so it's not a good indication of what's happening with everybody else n to around the question of recovery. The question is who is the economy recovering. Four right if it's recovering for just white guys. Who are ready had stable jobs and we're already working in asserting sector then. It's not really recovering. It's just recovering in a very specific way for very specific group. And so this idea of black women. Best says the most marginalized group or one of the most marginalized groups are black women and so if we can get black them into a place where there economically stable financially secure and empowered in the economy than perhaps everybody who is less marginalized. We'll be better off. When thing i love is how many great people anna has mentioned these past two episodes and i've put links to find those people on my website which is linked in the show notes now on the topic of marginalized populations advice that you would give for people who are entering this field who do not feel welcome. Or who typically don't see themselves represented. Yes i would say tap into community. I believe that community is powerful. I am a product of people who invested in me and community that invested me in. So if you're a black woman or someone who was from marginalized groups such as black latinx x. native or if you're lgbtq plus or somebody who has ability. I would say tap into communities within the profession somebody can name off the top of my head. the sadie collective of course is for black women but we also invite allies. Join our community. I would say research in color. Foundation is an asian. That's trying to get more black and brown people into the profession with one on one mentoring. It's incredible there's also the a summer program. The economic association summer program. it recently moved to howard university. It's basically a summer camp for minority. Students who are interested in learning more about what economics is in how they can get prepared for it. You could also get college credit and it just recently moved to howard university. Which i think i might have said twice but my whole point was h you and so being easy and being around other black students in having black professors is something that will change your life. I know for me meeting. Dr cook Even though she wasn't my professor at the time was fundamentally lie. Changing in so being part of communities that you can see yourself later on as visualized through a mentor or somebody who's just a role model is critical. And i would encourage you highly to get involved with these communities again. More links in the show notes now wrapping things up the thing that you hate about your job the most. It could literally be anything from something. Petty to something huge. But what is one thing that just vexes you so you act like i have a job. I actually don't have a job really fucked away. I have hobbies some of which pay which don't pay. That's actually how i think about my life So the only really vexing thing that i have in my work life is that i run this little center cult risk and we just take on projects and we try and go in do good things so the amazon project that i talked about is one of the things that we've been working out and we're trying to change education in in schools how we do math education and to get data science introduced and whatnot and the only thing that i despise more than anything is raising money and it's like some people. Don't mind it. But i grew up in the midwest. And the idea that you'd ever ask anybody for anything in helping really foreign and almost the whole reason. I went into academics. Is that i. I didn't wanna have to have clients and kowtowed people and do what they wanted. And pretend i like people. When i don't like people like i'm really bad at that and so God i like the one miracle for me. If if somebody else could raise money for me i would be like the most wonderful breath a fresher. So yeah i really what i knew. I need a billionaire. I need a billionaire. St you you're awesome. You do such great stuff. Why should you be troubled with actually having to worry about raising money. But it's funny. I've talked a lot of billionaires but somehow none of them have had that reaction to me possible. It's not risk as a nonprofit right. it is just part of the university of chicago. Yes we are in the. I'm not serious but like people want give money to us They can deduct it but people have a lot of. I understand it. Complete million great things to give your money to spend on yourself too so it's hard to ever convince people with their money. We donate to a cause of the allergist choosing every week. So we'll donate it that way. How's that more. That would be awesome so good. We just saved you a little bit of fun. What is an i hate. Okay things the to hate about your job. The most it can be anything can be petty. It can be systemic. Can be anything. I think what i don't like is the fact that there are people who fundamentally believe that. Black and brown people are less intelligent and therefore cannot participate in discussion around the economy. And what it means for us. There are people who have like carved a- place online in they just talk shit basically you know about folks because there are different from them in that they think differently from them. I apparently am a very popular subject In those interwebs. And i'm always the person i'm like. Oh if you wanna pull up pull up and let's have a conversation. I'll but you clearly don't wanna do that. You you come into my you know my little mentions or whatever Anonymous you don't have the guts to actually have a conversation in so i don't pay any mind people like that but i think for me. I have built a pretty thick skin. And so you know for me the priorities just to make sure that people were coming after me. Don't have to deal with that bs. So that's the part of the profession. That i really don't like that's very valid when you're coming in and representing people who have been historically unwelcome in that space. You're bound to rock the boat. That's working for them. A boat that needs to be rocked. Quite frankly one that needs thousand rebuilt so to quote indigenous fashion allergy guests riley couture who said well. The emails aren't great but the racism is probably worse so stitch on a pillow my friends but what about positive things. What about your favorite thing. Among all of your jobs you get to talk to people who you mostly admire for living. You have hobbies pay but what do you love the most about economics freakonomics about your career out right now. This new podcast. I do people. I mostly admire is fun in a way that nothing else. I do it particularly that nothing else. I'd do is fine. But i think you probably would say the same when i have to interview someone i i really prepare a lot. I become completely and utterly absorbed in understanding everything i can about that person. And it's hard and it's draining. And then i find the actual interviewing to be harder than anything i am. I i've talked about. i practically comatose after my interviews. Because i'm thinking so hard and and it's really hard for me to be friendly and and so it's really like demanding and so what i love about. It is that you know there's this concept of a flow and the idea that you get completely embedded in something so you kind of forget the whole sense of of time and space and the only place i get that my life is in podcasting and i don't for you. It's probably easier than it is for me but for me it's re- podcastone is hard and it said exact cardis which is is so much fun so i really only spent maybe a day awake doing a day a week doing it but but that day is a day of intensity that that i really relish because it's it's some i don't know maybe have organized my life about avoiding intensity. Those bursts of intensity are are are really really rewarding. That's great to hear that from someone else that something difficult could be so enjoyable. Has dorothy parker says. I hate writing but i love having written and what does anna love. And what about your favorite thing about economics about what you do you know..

amazon twice dorothy parker howard university one Four million two episodes anna one thing one miracle black things a day a week most marginalized Anonymous university of chicago God a day asian
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

06:25 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Or with disabilities folks who can't work from home out of a podcast closet for example and so the idea is that especially when you're young and so you aren't so worried about short term ups and downs. The stock market provides an excellent vehicle for you to invest your retirement savings so that they are large when you're old and historically the returns on the stock market have been higher than returns on other assets so you could invest in cold say k. Gold would be something that you could buy so my mom for instance. My mom's kinda weird. My mom bought a bunch of gold coins and hid them in the house thinking. That was a good way to store our wealth. When i was a kid turned out not a very good way to store your well. You could buy housing in you know. That's another thing to do. Is i could invest in the house and if housing appreciates then it's A valuable investment but but the simplest way to take your money and with a high probability grow it into a much. Bigger of money is invested in the stock market. And that's why regular people should care about the stock market so regular people should also care about the stock market because this is the most nutty few weeks we've seen in quite some time. And if you're like what is happening. With the game stops and the robin hoods what the. I'm gonna break down okay. So short-selling or going short is when an investor borrows a stock waiver to fall further like in failing companies like a say a brick and mortar retailer. That sells games that are now mostly purchase digitally so the investor borrows stock from someone and then sells the stock and then buys the stock back. After it's fallen to return to the lender and the investor gets to keep the difference so hedge fund managers make literally billions gaming. The market like this also hedge funds are less regulated by the sec or security and exchange commission and who can play the game is gate kept to accredited or qualified investors. Who make more than like two hundred thousand dollars a year or have over a million in assets not including their houses so millionaires so knowing that the rich are getting richer selling shorts a guy on the wall street bets sub reddit username deep fucking value. Real name keith. Gill a thirty four year old insurance firm worker in massachusetts so d- fucking value says. Hey let's mess with the rich guys. Let's all by game stop. Let's drive the price up like two thousand percent. So what does steven levitt have to say about all these developments. I emailed him and he said. I think the game stop phenomenon is fascinating and i find it bizarre. That robin hood stopped delaying purchases. But have anything to say. That hasn't already been set at thousand times by others. He said well which others. Let's hear anna's reaction. She put out a tweet thread late last week. And i'm just gonna read it to you. She said essentially happening now on wall street is fucking amazing and a thread because history is happening and wall street for the first time ever is kind of losing we love to see it so if watch the big short short is basically a bet against a stock becoming so low that the company basically goes out of business. If you win that bet your returns are like many times. Whatever you bet. Basically people who usually short against companies are already pretty frigging rich. So i think that's part of the reason why wall street pets did what they did. Here's what they did. I think they said okay. These rich people are getting richer. So what if we make sure they lose this bet if we artificially force the price up because the stock market is basically magic in fairy dust then they will lose big and that's exactly what happened. Came stop basically was worth five dollars or something. Two weeks ago and wall street bets drove up to almost five hundred at its peak. Yesterday this was last week. Wall street is now panicking because people who are playing the game aren't supposed to be playing the game wa in a rights and so trading platforms like robin hood are probably getting pressure from big banks to stop the traits. That's why don't sell and hold. The line is trending in it continues. Here's why this is history sheriff. i'm pretty sure. There has never been collective action to ensure that bets against declining companies. Don't fail and this was orchestrated by people not on wall street quote so okay in all of this. Who's winning. Well some folks who hopped on game stop before it hits peak or just regular people who sold it off and were able to pay off student debt and finance a pets operation etc but my favorite stock trader in the ongoing game. Stop saga is jason. Car he's ten and his mom bought him ten shares of game. Stop when it was just six dollars about a year ago. And according to new york times article quote miss car handed her son of certificate she created from an online template to explain to him that he was the owner of tiny part of game. Stop she told them. The gift was in keeping with the spirit of or cooperative economics. One of the seven principles of quanta. This was december. Twenty nineteen cut to this week when that stock is worth thirty two hundred dollars jaden said he felt shocked and excited the same time to learn how much it was worth. He cashed it out. And he'll reinvest it might want to check out. Amc stock nokia. Just see what people are posting on the hash tag stocks. Now if you did not hop on this wall street bets sub reddit. What do you do gen. eth- wants to know. How much money do i really need to retire at sixty and live to be a I'm forty three and have two dollars in savings. How i really don't know but let me tell you who does the broke. Millennial is a blog that if you're a millennial agenda person you should be following So basically is this woman who gives advice on how to save why you should save had to pay off debt in that sort of thing. I really don't know the amount by definitely a two dollars is that's not. That's not good so you might want to follow that account and get some tips from her. She also has a book as well. I would go for the not fully loaded avocado toast. I guess because it's yes must be where it all went. Exactly you know student. Loans or or.

five dollars last week steven levitt ten two thousand percent six dollars two dollars ten shares Yesterday keith december thirty two hundred dollars Two weeks ago jaden Gill massachusetts reddit One thirty four year old over a million
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:25 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Saying how dare you. You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words yet. I'm one of the lucky ones. And like i don't know if we would have seen something like that even just three years ago so we are in a really unique time where the younger generation is kind of. You know waking up and has enough information to say. Wait a minute the been living. And i remember. I actually tweeted something like this. Recently when george floyd was killed basically and our economic twitter was quiet like really quiet essence. Wow really trash. Because y'all a lot of power especially in the policy world and y'all don't have anything to say about y'all trash like miss me with that and surprisingly that actually woke up. Okay so what i do here. But it's like that's kind of what our generation is about at this point or generation z. More specifically we're just saying. Hey we're we're done with that. We don't want to deal with that. We know there's a better way to do this. And we're going to demand it and if we have to push for it we're gonna push for it and that's kind of what the sadie collective is to at some point. We were like so. You don't have a congregation of black woman. Economists and people who are related field okay. We'll just create it ourselves in like a lot of people doubted us. They were like. I don't think you guys can pull it off and then we did. Oh wait a minute. So i guess we should pay attention to you now. Well yeah because we demand attention. So i think that's what gen z is doing. I'm happy that they're informed and there are making moves based on the information that they have. Yeah and for this episode. The donation going to sadie collective. Is that cool. Only god we donate to a cause of the Choosing every episode. And i'm going to guess it's going to be the city collector. Great can i ask you some questions from patrons sure okay. We had good economic questions. Are you okay. Thank so are they both ready for next week's part to Can i ask you a few questions from patrons from listeners. chorus would love that okay. They're very excited on. And next week we will be donating to a cause of stevens choosing as well as peppering the both with more questions. And so now that you're obsessed with these two you can follow anna gifty poku on twitter and graham at its afro. Nomex there's a link in the show notes to her website and her nonprofit sadie collective which we donated to this week and steven levy's website and social handles are also in the show notes and he hosts the podcast people. I mostly admire. So that where we get podcasts and honestly get pumped for part two out next tuesday where we take your questions and my word. You had good ones so we get into it so we'll see you next week for that. And in the meantime there is all ogies merch available at all ogies. Merch dot com. Thanks to you. Bonnie dutch and shannon feltus are of the comedy podcast. You are that they manage all the merch. Thank you to birthday babe talbert. Men's the olives podcast facebook group. She has been superb friends since we were four. I can't imagine my life without her. Love utilise lady. Thank you to emily. White and all the transcribers making transcripts for these episodes. They are available for zero dollars on my website..

george floyd anna gifty poku steven levy facebook shannon feltus three years ago twitter next week Bonnie dutch sadie collective emily next tuesday zero dollars this week talbert two one graham both stevens
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

05:15 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"If you're like. I didn't understand some of those words that's okay. That's why he wrote a book called the index card to explain it. Now if you're not an econ major you just learned the bare bones of what you need to know or at least where to get that information but wait. There is more so lebed. Shares a boggling tuition-free lesson. So i took a class at the university of chicago with With my colleague. John list which is economics without any math is called economics for everyone and it has zero math in it. It's just the ideas. And i think the single best lecture i have given to my students ever in any of the classes i've ever taught. Is the one on financial literacy where i just walked them through. Essentially one index card. Worth of information. And i do this calculation. Which is what really blew my mind completely. I wasn't even ready for the answer. So here's the problem. I'm picking the math a little bit wrong. Because i i'm just doing the top of my head but here's a scenario. I set up so you have a one hundred thousand dollars and you want to invest it and you're faced with two choices you can either put it into like a a mutual fund that miers the s&p five hundred that just like tries to get an average return of what the market will return and you put it in that mutual fund and then you let that mutual buy and hold and in fifty years when you retire. You'll have a certain amount of money k. The other opportunity is you can hire me. Professor love it to be your money manager and you will pay me a standard money management fee. I think it. I can't remember if the number one percent or one and a half percent. That's the kind of standard if you if you have someone manage your money for you and unbeknownst to you what i do is i just take all your money and i put exactly that same mutual fund that you would have put it in on your own. I just take one percent a year as a fee for managing your money. Okay so then. The question is at the end of fifty years. How much money have you paid me. Okay and so the simply thing about wall two hundred thousand dollars that first year. You're going to pay me a thousand dollars. Because that's it's one percent you pay me one percent of your money. I get paid a thousand dollars to manage your money and out of your hundred thousand get paid a thousand and so if you're kind of naive you say well two thousand dollars the first year multiplied by fifty you'll end up paying professor at fifty thousand dollars over the course of the shift years but that ignores the power of compounding so markets go up the value of your portfolio goes up over time and it turns out if you just took those hundred thousand dollars and at the standard kind of increases that we've seen in stock markets over the last fifty years that if that happened over the next fifty years at the end of the day. If you manage your own money that hundred thousand dollars turn into seven point three million dollars or some some number verify really big the power of compounding investments is really really important if however you let professor levitt it manage your money and take one percent eight is incredible but i will get paid about three point five million dollars so essentially about half of the value of your portfolio would go to me over those fifty years because the money would never get to compound because it was well it would compound compound in my mark in my account not in your account. That's the problem. And so like that. Little exercise. Which i thought i must have done it wrong because i couldn't believe it myself but the math is right I put that in front of the students and it's really hard to get an aha moment with college students. Mostly they're on the computers. Do not like that is a moment. Where like the whole room goes and and it's shocks people so really look. I think the answer to into literacy is super simple. You need to save some amount of money like you need to save. If you're young. You should say five percent of of what you're earning say and you should just put it into stock markets and you should not let other people manage your money by hold. They five things. You should do that if you do it. You're you're more or less guaranteed to have relatively good outcome like never have credit card debt. It's really simple. Thanks okay so if you're doing the calculations and you're thinking of retiring at sixty five that would mean you need a sock away a hundred g's at the age of fifteen when you need a car and can barely grow moustache so i get that this seven million dollar advice is not actionable for everyone who wasn't born into royalty or at least got one of those racecar beds. We all wanted to skits now. Some people are handed money just for being alive and being related to someone else who had money from someone else and some are not especially if your family moved to this country and desperation or had their land stolen or was shipped here not of their own volition. And when you're barely scraping by even five percent into savings is a lot but those calculations are just an illustration that when it comes to socking cash away it may feel like stealing from present you but anything you can save to shift the perspective into giving future you a shitload more money. At a time..

hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars hundred thousand fifty years two thousand dollars John fifty sixty three million dollars two hundred thousand dollars five percent five million dollars one percent one hundred thousand dollars five things one one and a half percent seven million dollar first year seven point
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

08:18 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"I bet you haven't taken a or assign In in your adult life until we spent years and years like the the interesting years of people's math development teaching them things that they don't need to know until my view want to teach people things that maybe they'd use a lot of people use excel. Wouldn't it be nice to teach people how to use excel. When they're in high school. It might be boring but at least it. At least it will be functional or you know just to think about data we're bombarded with data and really there's been a data revolution so what about the basics of understanding data. And then you know someone shows you some data and can you look at the data and see whether it's got errors in it. And how would you organize it into a little little craft so you could kind of understand a little bar chart or how do you visualize it. I tell stories with it. So much of what we do in life storytelling. I mean you're storyteller obviously but we can also tell stories with data and what about Teaching people to do that. So that's really what i have in mind for the math curriculum. And maybe some financial literacy in there as well and when it comes to economics. I also think economics should not be equated with math because i think the basic ideas of economics have nothing to do with matt through these things like what i just said. Marginal cost and marginal benefit or daddy of comparative advantage. Like idea in the world. It's just that if i'm good at one thing and you're good at another thing then their gains from trade that if if you're really good at making conversation dinner parties and i'm really good at cooking then i should be in the kitchen cooking. You should be doing the dinner party. And i not. It's like there's no math that it's really obvious. Comparative advantage. People honestly hearing this from two world. Renowned economists changed the way i looked at my relationship and i adore jared. I love him so much. Were very different though he for example knows how to chill out while i have exile eighty about taking a relaxing bath. Because i can't work in the bathtub. He goes to sleep when he's tired. And if we're at a place that sells empanadas. He doesn't ring his hands over which flavor to pick he just gets what of each and he enjoys them all so this realization of comparative advantage of a duo being stronger than the sum of its parts of understanding. How team members can really complement. Each other made me appreciate my relationship partner so much more but But there are maybe ten principles comics that are along those lines that i think it would be a good idea if we thought everybody those things. They're not hard to teach them in sixth grade or eighth grade or tenth grade. And if it were up to me if i were the czar the education are i would i would really. I think. Switch education away from so much memorization technicality. To try and focus more on ideas and and on on on asking questions and trying to go out and find the answers yourself as opposed to having some canon of of brilliant. That's handed down that we consume i. I was really in favor of producing ideas instead of just consuming them. So anna and stephen changing lives but who changed. There's do you have any role models any heroes in terms of economics either. Contemporary or historical or anyone. Who's doing economics differently. Anyone anyone come to mind any books. Anyone should read short. So there's somebody called esu do flow and she's married to. Someone called allergy ben jari and they have written a book. They're actually nobel prize winners. That kind of talks about economics in a broad sense so they cover a number of different topics but essentially they kind of talk through. Why does economics matter. What does it matter to the real world. I highly highly recommend it. This book side note is called poor economics a radical rethinking of the way to fight global poverty and on the site for the book. The authors posed the questions. Why would a man. Morocco who doesn't have enough to eat by a television. Why is it so hard for children in poor areas to learn even when they attend school. Does having a lot of children actually make you poor and the book lays out that around the world in two thousand five. Thirteen percent of the world's population lived off less than the equivalent of a dollar a day and a little excerpt from poor economics. If i may just read some because it so brilliantly written what is striking is that even people who are that poor are just like the rest of us in almost every way. We have the same desires and weaknesses. The poor are no less rational than anyone else quite the contrary precisely because they have so little we often find them putting much careful thought into their choices. They have to be sophisticated. Economists just to survive to progress we have to abandon the habit of reducing the poor to cartoon characters and take the time to really understand their lives in all their complexity and richness and quote again that is from poor economics. And i will link that book on my website at allie dot com slash gs slash economic sociology linked. That will be in the show notes and anna says another rockstar of economics. And i would say in terms of people who i am very much inspired by so i recently wrote a teen vo. Op ed on. Dr lisa de cook. So dr lisa de cook is my mentor. She's my sister friend. She is a collaborator. She was actually my educator. At one point you my research advisor at one point and essentially this woman is a boss like i. I don't. I don't know anybody in the economics. Profession who bosses up like dr cook right in the sense that her research has been very very influential and so she recently wrote a new york times op at around the fact that racism actually undermines our entire economy. People stop being racist. We might see a lot more economic growth. We might see a lot more economic stability more jobs more opportunities more. You know improvements in how we treat certain people well as how those people flourish in the society and so she made a really great case on that based on her research that sort of linked african american innovation to violence against african americans so she show basically that during heightened times of violence against african americans african american innovation went down and she looked at patents that so again super dope work in addition to that she somebody who has just been critical to the number of black and brown people who have entered the profession in the last five years. I am obviously a result of that. She's actually somebody who i approached at the very very beginning of my career and said hey you mentor me. She said say less. I got you and she has gotten me sudas point so i checked with her tomorrow honestly. She's somebody who amazing she's currently on biden's transition team most likely going to be on his administration at some point and so again. I'm just really happy to know her. And sadie alexander who the sadie collective is named after people don't realize that sadie alexander got her phd. When she was my age he was actually twenty two when she got her. Phd guess insanity. She was really really young. A modern day. India will you know and so the idea here was she was somebody who just like dr coke was really interested in civil rights and seeing african american people flourish in this country and so unfortunately because of racism and sexism in the early nineteen hundreds. She was not able to do the work that she set out to do. So instead she decided to pivot into a different career. That would allow her to do that. Work and so that ended up becoming law and she ended up becoming the first black woman lawyer to practice in the state of pennsylvania and later on was actually very integral to the us army..

sadie alexander Thirteen percent two thousand excel twenty two anna tomorrow jared dr cook dr coke esu do flow stephen first new york lisa de cook nineteen hundreds Morocco pennsylvania tenth grade each
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

09:58 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Y'all so more on that in a bit but now let's get back to anna though. I wanna know how one of the world's best and brightest economic minds approaches the sociology versus the cold hard mathematics of the field. Would you say that when economics is taught or thing that drew you to it How much of it is the number crunching and the the new miracle results versus how much of economics when you're a scholar like you are is the sociology and the decision. Making the psychology of it. You're asking says good questions expected. I expect long so you know that is actually a really great question for a couple of reasons wine the economics profession right now is having a very public sort of reckoning and it's having a reckoning on a couple different fronts but one of the places where it's having this reckoning or having this come to know jesus moment or whatever is around how economics is taught it kinda comes back to what you just asked is economics more numerical or is it really talking about the effects on people and i would say historically as a student of economics and as somebody who knows economics. Professors taught really about kind of the numbers and the graphs. And do you understand why we are taking this derivative. Do you understand why we are using this math equation but it doesn't necessarily connect those numbers and those equations and those concepts to what is happening in the real world and a lot of us are saying well that might be why y'all all look the same because you know like if you're not connecting into my experience. I won't feel empowered enough to really say wait a minute. This is a tool that i can use to really explore the world better and i will say from my experience. I took an economics course intro to macroeconomics with a professor at my school. And what really did it for me. She was throwing up these equation. Thousand eight hundred newbath but the lecture that did it for me was when she introduced me to human capital the idea of human capital the accumulation of skills and knowledge amongst population and. I was like wait a minute. This is stuff that i'm really interested in and mess. You went so far to say. Wait a minute. You can measure this and let me apply it to the situation in sub saharan africa if we think about investing in the educational infrastructure some of these countries you might see an increase and human capital and i was like this makes so much sense. Why did anybody ever told me this. This math is being connected to this concept. And i'll share one more example. One of my friends who. I got me into economics. Name is brandon. Says he's now mit. When i first met him. I said hey man you know. The president of our university told me to reach out to you. Because you're doing math. Say you're doing this thing called economics. I don't know what that is. What are you doing and he said. Well i'm actually using math to understand educational outcomes among students and community college and said how are you doing that and he was like well. It seems like if you take these numbers and then you apply sort of the sociological context. You apply of the decision making context into these questions. You can come up with a really robust answer that might give give us a better insight. I asked what the solution is. And i was like yo. This is exactly what i wanna do with my life and that is sort of like bringing those like quote unquote humanity kind of aspects into the numerical aspects. I always say that the marriage of math and social science is economics at its core so yeah to repeat. The marriage of math and social science is economics. edits core. what i quote. i'm gonna tattoo on my face now. Qualifying our decisions. How exciting is that. Okay on the topic of quantities. I feel like the way that we learn economics. We are not econ. Majors is something about supply. Demand scarcity being the red line of economics. And i think that that kind of makes a lot of people financial anxiety. Because you just think we're based in an economy on of like everything scarce everything scarce. What is economics actually. Teach you about scarcity. That's a great question. The big idea around scarcity is that we have a limited number of stuff You you can replace stuff with anything. Computers quite frankly lives you know resources or whatever and so we have to maximize that right and some people would say. That's actually a really great way to think about the world because obviously people who have had that sort of mentality have exploited it and that's why we have capitalism zone and so some people are thinking well another way of thinking about economics. Is you know there are groups of people who are trying to maximize their wellbeing. And that sort of this boat like very abstract idea of stratification economics heterodox but scarce the ultimately boils down to that. You don't have a lot of something. So how'd we make the best of it. Quick jargon buster here so stratification even refers to how social classes are stratified along economic lines and one huge voice in this field is economist and duke university. Professor doctor william dirty junior who has studied everything from workplace discrimination solutions to generational wealth gaps and even colorization racial distinctions. His focus is and he seems hell so hello to him and heterodox. Economics is a broad term to mean anything that's outside the neo-classic ways of looking at supply and demand economies so kind of fringe ideals about economics but again as an says if we have a lot of something how do we make the best use of it. What is stephen say about scarcity without scarcity. There is nothing interesting in economics because economics is all about the trade offs. When you can't have everything what and absence scarcity. Then there's there's no there's no trade-off there's nothing hard right. So if i can if i can have as much money as they want as much leisure time as i want and all of the the most beautiful surroundings then then there's nothing hard everything's easy so ultimately is about scarcity of but honestly it's it's almost impossible to think about a world in which gear city isn't fundamental and binding if nothing else time. So so the the even even bill gates and elon. Musk face a real constraint in limited time until they can buy anything they want That is used to be a trade-off bud but time time is the great equalizer and And i think so the tools of economics even absent financial constraints. Which of course all of us are under these time. Constraints are really interesting. Wants to use the tools connects on. I was actually wondering about that. I mean we hear more and more. Obviously that it's an attention economy. Do you find that the over the span of your work. You've seen with economics. The product is more and more our attention in our time. So the choice to answer that within academic economics. Absolutely not so. I don't think academic economics is really so much focused in the here now. And so it's not reacting with lightning speed to what's going on in in our economy so maybe not academically because there's a bit of a lag there because research and paper writing and publishing Relatively involved process so academics can't always reflect real time. What i do think is in life. Which is the guy actually. Think about economics about life rather than about. I think absolutely what has happened like take. Tv's the best example. I'm i'm much older than you. But when i was young four. Channels plus pbs. And that's what you got. And then you didn't have to make a lot of choices. And you often sub optimize. I mean the landscape of tv now is absurd first of all. You don't have to watch it. You know at the time that the tv executive prescribes what too whenever you want. But the amount of content and the quality of content and the instantaneous exit has completely changed and and then you combine that say with how amazing video games have become and streaming music and facetime and do man. I mean like it's exactly your point which is that. The set of options available to us and said of good options available to us has exploded and that has put a demand on our attention that i think didn't didn't used to be present even even thirty or forty years ago. There was something called boredom and like young people. Don't actually know what that is you know. Were you actually wouldn't be doing anything you would just be sitting there so just imagine sitting there scrolling for a few hours. But there's no phone you're just looking at a wall because a new book is like fifteen miles away at a library and you have to ride a donkey in a bonnet to get to it back. Then you are. Just as my grandpa walter willis ward used to say. Oh you know just watching the wind blow kinda good..

fifteen miles Musk thirty brandon william dirty first One four sub saharan africa Thousand eight hundred one forty years ago anna one huge voice duke one of the places willis ward stephen jesus
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

07:44 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Really like economics per se so let me go back to the beginning so i had never thought. Oh i should do economics i. I had no particular interest. But when i was in college my first year i was the worst kind of college student and that only cared about getting good grades. I didn't care about learning anything. And i was strategic and i figured i'm just going to take whatever classes everybody else takes because those must be good classes because other people have invested in trying to figure out what the right classes and it turned out that i went to harvard at harvard. Took this chorus called. It was the beginning economics class. And so i just signed up for it. Maybe three weeks into that class. I would say. There was kind of a low ebb in the sense that i sat in the lecture and it was on something. We call comparative advantage. And it's a really simple concept and honestly it's a concept. I knew when i was five years old. I think everybody understands compared revenge. And i remember sitting in that lecture and doing some calculations to try to figure out how much my parents were paying for me to sit there and listen to this like kindergarten level material and i was completely disgusted with economics at that point and i walked out of the class and my good friend Bats bang so my by my best friend essentially We're in the same class with me and we're walking away. He said oh. My god that was crazy and i said i know so stupid obvious. It's like what are you talking about. I didn't understand a single word of it from beginning to end. And i said what did you like. That is the most confusing thing i've ever seen. And it was like a moment of revelation for me. Because i realized that that moment this easy for everyone i just was born with a brain that worked like an economist and it suddenly started making sense to me that That that was just the way. I was wired and so even though i've never been interested in in money or inflation macroeconomics any of those things. I forgot i just realized. Wow this is the only thing i'm good at. I better just ride this. As far as i could go so stephen levin new in college that he was good at this and at this stage of my life i was wearing fish-net shirts and my favorite food was powdered. Mashed potatoes choices now. Let's ask another harvard. University economic scholar when the econ- bug bit we get over some dongle problems. That's okay no. I mean the dangles. I hated dongle i- hear you i hear you. Can you hear me. yeah i can hear you. So my name is anna cocoa ashman. But i go by anna and my pronouns are the she series she her hers coke. Have you always been economically minded. You know it's so funny that you say that yes and no so growing up like i was very on this happened. My dad and my brother would talk to me about politics. And you know. I'm originally from ghana. And so my dad would of just say off marks about you know. I think the future of education really will shape kind of the political atmosphere in ghana. And this needs to happen to make sure there's development in the country just like off the cuff remarks. And when i got to be a little bit older i would say sometime in middle school. I was able to respond. Because at that point i had taken like a history class. I was a little bit more well-versed in what was happening in the world. And so i can kind of talk back and forth about. Yeah you know. I agree with that and when my brother comes in as i started watching the daily show as a middle schooler so it was not by choice at first. My brother was watching the tv. So i'm watching the daily show if you wanna watch. Tv you gotta watch it with me. Is i like okay fine but it was like fascinating at a certain point. I was like wait a minute. I kinda understand what this you know. Very angry white man. John store at the time. I was not elected to serve one party. You were not elected is talking about like. Yeah that isn't fair. Or i like the fact that he brought on people that were kind of familiar in the pop culture space but weren't like celebrities per se. They were thinkers and people who were kind of in the space of politics and economics. But at the time. I didn't know what economics wise and i was also watching ten talk so i spent a lot of my time in high school for example watching a lot of talks you know found out several years later. That was washing economists. And i had no idea. I was like what is that. Maybe there a lawyer or something. I don't know but i like what they're talking about. I think they're using numbers in a really interesting way. I'd never thought of before but yeah. There were serve like early points whereas introduced economics. Unbeknownst to me and eventually found my way back to it was their economics at play. When your i'm guessing older brother yeah just said if you wanna watch the. You're you're watching it as well if i'm watching it is there are not economics factor in that i think to some degree right because you know there's a level of trade off there right where it's like. I could've spent my time doing something else. But because i really wanted to watch tv i made the decision that you know like i wanna watch tv. Might as well just like sit here and enjoy whatever he's doing and it just turns out that that ended up being a huge part of my journey. And why would i do today do you. Do you think that we make economic decisions more times than we realize are a lot of our decisions of matter of economics when it comes on thousand percent. Yeah one thousand percent. Every decision you make is mentally economical right so like the idea of offs is what we talk about it in economics more in an economics class people are like oh god this is like such an abstract idea but when you think about it it just seemed like what i rather do this or would i rather do that and every single day we make those types of decisions what i rather eat a donut. Now would i rather goes to the gym right. i would say do both. But obviously there's comparative advantage and that's another economic constant where it sort of like there are certain things that you are stronger in that you feel like you're more comfortable in than somebody else and so if you even if you're sitting on a team you're kind of exuding that economic principle as well so i feel like economics is one of those things that many people don't know how ingrained it is in our day to day is mainly because the people who call themselves. Economists are very you know now all of them but like the people you see in the news and stuff seem like they know way more than everybody else and it's like completely above people's pay but truth be told it's it's you know these are the decisions that are making these decisions. I'm not making and then if we're talking about companies it's the same thing we're talking about. Countries governments is the same thing. We're really just asking. What kinds of decisions are you making in. How is that going to affect outcomes that impact people ultimately so economics not just about making a grocery budget you may not even know urine. Econ heard at heart. What if you are and stephen. Both kind of occupy and niche in economics that really serves as a portal assuring people into a world..

stephen levin ghana thousand percent today first year anna cocoa ashman three weeks both one party several years later Both harvard anna one thousand percent ten talk John one of those things five years old single word first
"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:37 min | Last month

"opoku" Discussed on Ologies

"Mostly admire and he's currently a professor of economics at the university of chicago. He's the co founder of risk the center for radical innovation for social change. He's been named one of time magazine's one hundred people who shape the world. And now you're gonna listen to me talking to him while. I'm in my pajamas but wait. There's more the other allergist for this episode because there's too is a huge rising star in the field of economics. I'm so excited. She is an activist. she's an economist. She's an author of two upcoming books. She's also the ceo and co founder of the sadie collective which is a nonprofit. The first of its kind. The representation of african american women in economics and related fields. She's a university of maryland. Alum and eat twenty nineteen twenty twenty. Harvard university visiting research scholar in economics. She's been affiliated with the national bureau of economic research. Last year she became the youngest recipient of an award from the un convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women. This is an honor previously bestowed upon our vice-president kamala harris and also nancy pelosi. What she's talking to us. So you may have read about her in fortune or cnn or the economist. She's written pieces for the new york times and newsweek. During blackburn's week. I tuned into a facebook panel. She was moderating. I was like who is this. I was smitten. I have never seen someone. So engaging and charming dynamic so good at moderating panel keeping the energy and the tone flowing. She's brilliant and hilarious and confident and humble all at once mark my words despite her being more lauded in her twenties than my whole life combined this is just the start of a huge career for her so learn her name now. Because you're going to be hearing a lot in the future so you may think economics is all about math and accounting and that economists are dry and robotic neither are true. These interviews changed the way. I look at my life and it led to a really big decision in my life so naturally i wanted to milk this and make it a two parter so tune in both weeks and change the way you look at money and the forces that lead us to make decisions and choices the current and future effects of this pandemic how to hack your retirement savings. What makes a really good partnership when to dip out of a situation and went to stay and so much more next week when we answer listener questions with to fascinating groundbreaking economists who would probably not call themselves economic.

nancy pelosi kamala harris Last year next week facebook two upcoming books one hundred people both weeks twenty nineteen twenty twenty twenties one first two parter Harvard university african american maryland university of chicago new york
"opoku" Discussed on GG Over EZ

GG Over EZ

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"opoku" Discussed on GG Over EZ

"Couple of hundred years that's some yeah that's like a less the thing too with Colorado especially the mountains Zombie outbreak. You go the mountains. Because once it gets cold they gotta trudge through all that stuff their muscle tissues and stuff. We're going to get cold freeze over boom easy and one thing about 'cause I hate being so when Opoku but I don't want to be cold rather take my chances over there. Yes with autism. I hate being cold. I hate fire for unknown. You scraped off your car. That's the worst feeling in the world and you're GONNA say no because I have a garage now found like when I scrape offs and off cars the worst thing in the world and a Hainault you WanNa know what is great. What being cold. Because then it's so nice to curl up and be warm but when you're hot I find it's so much easier to be warm when I'm cold. Then they get hurt coming in after a hot day like a nice cool room than I do coming in after being reasoning. I'm just a hour. I'm a cold blooded creature like my. Isn't that right like reptile? The No. That's what I'm saying is called. I'm going to be caught like whatever the room temperature is like. I'm not a hot earth there. We'll come to this city. The green and the drinks are in our winters. Like forty degrees. Sick Yeah you could go down there. We got great tacos Song Guitar so anyways about my car car so I'm like looking any.

Colorado Opoku
Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin all Cazenove the name is synonymous with a reputation for romantic. Let's say excess but a new study suggests that the real Jacome Cazenove may have exaggerated his sexual exploits none in terms of their sheer volume, but in their infectious aftermath because though Cazenove claim to have suffered several bouts of gonorrhea, researchers could find no traces of the responsible microbe on the pages of the womanisers handwritten memoir. The findings will appear in the journal electro freezes casanovas memoir completed in seventeen ninety eight fills twelve volumes and its English. Translation, runs to thirty five hundred pages in this tell-all casanovas tally some hundred twenty two lovers then confesses to recurring gonorrhea relapses to investigate these claims. Researchers turn to a technique they'd previously used to. Positively identified the bacterium that causes plague on the pages of death registries from seventeenth century Milan. Thus we thought we would be able to detect the gun Opoku on Kazan Avas pages. CC candidate meted in use memoirs have been been infected by gonorrhea in his first sex intercourse at the age of eighteen and having suffer from relapses of the sex Peja his lifetime as a gun lover. Giorgio Righetti, professor emeritus at Milan, polytechnic Righetti and his colleague glib Zuber Stein. Who has a company called spectra fon in Israel developed a hand held device that allows them to capture characterize protein, fragments and other macromolecules from the surface of historical documents such biological materials. Can get stuck to a manuscript when say someone licks his fingers to more easily turn the books pages leaving behind traces of potentially infected saliva, but in the case of Kesse. No. Ova that goes not racist caucus could be detected. They did however find traces of cinnabar a red pigment containing mercury sulfide at the time that chemical was used to treat these sexually transmitted diseases. Do your including syphilis gonorrhea quite likely that cousin Alvin been using macrey suit, find to cure relapse, his taraji. So it could be that as infection was in remission when Cazenove pen the three or four pages of chapters one and two that the researchers were able to examine and that in addition to his way with women Cazenove also had a deft hand with eighteenth century pharmaceuticals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Gonorrhea Karen Hopkin Cazenove Milan Jacome Cazenove Relapse Giorgio Righetti Israel Kesse Zuber Stein Opoku Syphilis Professor Alvin Sixty Seconds
"opoku" Discussed on New Player Has Joined

New Player Has Joined

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on New Player Has Joined

"Well, I offered to reimburse you if you didn't like it didn't know, I I'm a I'm a dice roller, man. Okay. So real quickly kinda came at the time. I was really getting back into conflict gaming like taking, you know, everyone takes that weird like blackout period or maybe didn't I used it in play for a little while. What have you what made you stop playing? I think looking college I kind of played a little bit. And then after college I was just poor like, honestly like sleeping on people's catches. My I moved LA just so like such vagrant. And then wouldn't we able to afford something like a PS two anyway about borderlands? I became a big halo player. So when halo was dry there have nothing coming out. I wanna shooter game. So just like picked up borderlands one. Yeah. I was like oh my God. I love it. I love the love it is. It was borderlands one was an amazing game. And then with borderlands two they just took everything I love about borderlands and made it incredible was more refined much more interesting the writing I mean, we'll probably get into that. Because like it's the funniest game layer. What the first one was just the style. Like, it's the first cell shaded first person. I've seen an awesome that RPG elements every time he shoots somebody. There's like action points. Yeah. What was that? Like to see I was I thought at first I was like kind of an eyesore. Not used to that those game. I kind of like really like played that was like that. And so it was really confusing to me. Yeah. Just kinda random rolls. And like, you know, comparing the attributes of the guns and stuff like that. I was like, whoa. This is a lot myself really kind of getting into and. Yeah. All the other games. I was playing this game like a summers where the tell me what one other game you're playing that. You're like, I don't have time for this. I libor. Definitely halo three. Yeah. Online competitive. I used to play every night, you know, way into it. Yeah. Interesting. Awesome. Okay. So you're playing this and then borderlands two came out. And you're just like, okay. Just the stories that much different is at the voice acting like what was that? You're like this is the first one man, I would kind of well, you kind of nailed the the story was so it's not like a clean linear story. I'm not sure if I could tell you really what it's about. Yeah. But it's so funny info weird in filling it the very fact villa game in very surreal. It's all the notes I love I'm big David Lynch fan. When she and Opoku. Only. I just want to spend time the world building in those games. I guess it's gearbox, right? Such a good job. It's really doing that. In a Berlin to it was it was just more immersive. It was more PG the guns were much better. Yeah. I thought the level cooler the graphics and the graphics were like better. But it wasn't like a huge in the first borderlands. You're basically just in the same kind of landscape the entire exact steps up. So now, you're in you're in the desert snow you're in the mountains. Like, oh, yeah. It's it's just much more varied. And then for I think for me the big change. The borderlands story is pretty simple. And there's one to us at the end. The board land story too is way more complex. There's way more characters. They were like, let's make a movie, and then let's make it a very fun game. Exactly. It's such a baller game..

David Lynch LA Opoku Berlin
"opoku" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"To Cleveland Opoku Rb blue in Slovenia. If.

Slovenia Cleveland
"opoku" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"Com. Here's a beautiful thing. It's the most difficult worse last name on the planet. And yes, I'm the owner of it. So there's two shortcuts. They got there. You can go to Google and type in Mike. That's my first name space bar MC. Am I see drop down? You'll see the longest Most Polish name ever. That's me or my nickname in high school was Mike motorbike dot com. Here's the irony Tiffany, I've never driven a motorcycle. But if you go to Mike motorbike dot com, they'll get to my site. All my books are there chapter downloads for free? Of course, I used to write for the Wall Street Journal that Content's up there too for free and Opoku myself. Excellent. Will thank you again. Mike, and thanks to all of our listeners for listening. That was so much fun talking to Mike. I hope you enjoyed having us talk about the pumpkin plan, which I just love that metaphor and thinking about building these colossal pumpkins, and what that means to business and how we can apply this passion and customer demand focusing on what you do best and then moving and starting to discuss profit because that's what it's all about. And really thinking about how do you flip that on your head and put profit first, and then all the expenses and selling behind that? Then you start making very different decisions. And then without a doubt, my favorite was his new book clockwork talking about designing your business and really designing your career. In being able to eliminate yourself for a couple of weeks, remove yourself from business and trust that it will just survive. Your teams will survive everything will continue going and really in the end everyone's better for it. So I hope you enjoyed that conversation with author and entrepreneur Mike McCullough wits. Please check out all his information. Thank you so much for listening into the what's next podcast. Don't forget to subscribe. If you enjoyed the show, please leave comments because it's always great to hear what you think you have an amazing rest of your day. Thank you for tuning.

Mike McCullough Wall Street Journal Google Opoku
"opoku" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Capture led to kind of odd stalemate the spanish allowed him to continue acting as emperor while he was captured in the inca continued to behave toward him as they had before woke up promise the spanish that he would provide them with vast amounts of silver gold and other treasure if they would just allow him the time to gather it it's not clear whether he intended this as gifts as show of goodwill a lot of times it's written about as him ransoming himself regardless though with this offer vast amounts of silver gold and other treasure the spanish thought it would be in their best interests to keep alive and treat him pretty well like promised now treasure meanwhile up ordered wasco and any of his remaining supporters to be killed to stop them for making their own similar deal with spain after several months during which he got reinforcements for his fighting force declared that is ransom had been paid in ordered everything that had been brought for it to be melted down this was a massive destruction of inca our work artifacts but it didn't buy freedom since the ransom had been paid there was no longer any particular reason to treat him all that well at this point he was just a prisoner the strife among wayne opoku sons also was not over two young men arrived in markelle and said that they were the sons of capac and one of them to said that he was legitimate heir perot kept this revelation secret from ottawa and he kept the two men hidden in com arca what followed was an attempt by wasco supporters to try to use perot and his fighting force to their own ends one of scars former supporters went to zero in claimed that wolpe was plotting against him including having a military force approaching markelle without really looking into that claim pizarro level becky's ation against outta wolpe he ordered a trial with the inca leaders who were income markelle as witnesses at a wall denied there was any plot going on an only afterward pizarro send anybody to investigate whether there really was.

spain markelle perot ottawa wolpe becky wayne opoku wasco pizarro
"opoku" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Uh a new york times reporter went to this dinner that was being given on his behalf and at this dinner that's what fleming said yeah moral responsibility will be attached to people or entities that caused resistant bacteria to come into the world and it's a really really powerful and and much less wellknown warning and it seemed to me that given the entire history of antibiotic use particularly in agriculture that this was a warning that deserved to be sounded again i totally agree i will encourage people to note that section of this book in particular and share those words because they are so critically important you want to paint a picture of what it was like before we had antibiotics i will i think it's so hard for us to imagine ourselves into this condition but it shouldn't be hard because if we're not more careful with antibiotics we may find our way back there again but almost every one that i know and you know would born within the antibiotic era rayo fleming the accident the lab accident essentially that causes fleming to identify penicillin happens to 1928 when opoku flee he leaves a window open in his lebar tree in london and something blues in the window onto the petri dishes of staff bacteria that he's working with and when he comes back later to clean those dishes off and reuse them because it's 1928 metal have plastics so they have to wash the glass often or use it he discovers that they're a little deadzone on the staff and let's caused the deadzone is at the centre of each deadzone there is a tiny speck of pedophilia mold and it has excreted a chemical that killed the staff so that's the very start of the antibiotic era even though penicillin doesn't really get developed as a drug untold 1943 gets rolled out on the battlefields of world war two and 1943 becomes available to the general public in about 1944 and is so remarkable that the nobel prize is awarded just one year later and 1945 so before penicillin the mildest infections things that we would not think twice about now were lifethreatening the first per them to get penicillin experimentally was a british police officer named albert alexander who like a lot of middleclass british people loved at the garden and he went out in his back garden.

reporter penicillin world war nobel prize officer albert alexander york times fleming opoku london one year
"opoku" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Q u i n t e in quentin and i was like a wait a minute i'm a little confused shannon it looks like quite the pro style quarterback that they've got their act thirty setback in opoku through the ball right that has right where through his reasoning took that help it off it up like oh wait a minute that that's that's quentin from burn texas that's that's that's that's that's him like right there although she edited did appear that he got his beards shaved up with the rest of the clintons bruce sharp air yeah there are five doubt that up pittsburgh suspended a linebacker name quinton were genesis i dunno i pronounce it w irg i in i s and and i'll i hit at last name looks a little a common limit google it up shannon to why quinn's in same weekend to why quinn's and they're by the way i said a tweet about it said apparently quinton has been gentrified and then the reporter who had that story because they do get suspended said well he got suspended so maybe it has it and i'm like osce dago taking shelter for all come on the go signal to fatah ego day gobert up white quitting is in effect we are white quinton we also uh shannon had a um a is a depot of life zakir a lotta i saw that i was watching to give me it is you state and also the describes named was dibo i'm my what i we just call it a depot geoff colvin of devote rarely.

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"opoku" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"opoku" Discussed on Bizarre Life with Dan Wootton

"That with the sultan on done we walked in and he was asked we will have dinner with with michael jackson's radical he was sites way his lovely on or he wants to talk about was music and i walked in i said tie on from opoku quote stops and you i'm always fascinating obc fostering can judge lobster and my best friend took a picture of mean michael and she shaking so much blood so it's all right goods out that hold the it was for you've got a great story right brilliant this is now digital detox so if you had to choose just one of these things for the rest of your life so again one of you just take this first thing that comes in you and hate so one contact in your what's up for the result you ally on cape relieve your group steps what sets great that works one spotify playlist on repeat the rest of your life i like i love to nashville series yeah i love that i'll play a little songs that's that's good one after still me on spotify playlists have we will delman iso i'm gonna come santa anita vologda one app on your phone train line various one catch you come without phone i won't be fighting federal nausea and one tv channel sky atlanta cb bee's now this is going to be really tough few god's guidance is shuffle delete repeat mccabe when you get three famous psalms probably stepped songs and you have to choose which one you'd put on shuffle which one you delete forevermore and which one you'd keep playing so.

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