35 Burst results for "Operations Manager"

Mike Gallagher Celebrates Early Birthday in Las Vegas

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:41 min | Last month

Mike Gallagher Celebrates Early Birthday in Las Vegas

"But after the long weekend I had in Las Vegas, Las Vegas to sort of celebrate my birthday with some dear Friends of mine. A little early birthday by a couple of days. And let's not talk about my birthday. I hate my birthday. I hate birthdays in general. I get in trouble because I forget my Friends. I forget my family. To me, I remember years ago, Eric Hansen, who's been my loyal operations manager for over two decades, used to take his birthday off. And I thought that was the craziest thing how anybody would take a day off for their birthday as an adult. Now if you're 14, I don't know, but people take birthdays very seriously. I dread them because it is a reminder of my grim march to the grave. I don't feel almost 62. Some days I feel 80, some days I feel 29. So good friends of mine, peg and Joey Hudson said, let's go to Vegas. We'll see Lionel Richie. And while we're there, let's carry Underwood. She was great Friday night, Lionel Richie, not so much because he canceled as we showed up to see his performance, which is something that would have been like a bucket list. Can you imagine seeing Lionel Richie in concert? He had a bad back. I literally said to the guy blocking the entrance when being told that Lionel Richie had a bad back, what? He can't sing with a bad back. What's in his back four to sing? I did shows in a hurt with a hernia. I did radio shows in my bed. I didn't say all that to him, but you know me. I'm selfish, and I'm impatient. And I'm instant gratification, and I wanted to see Lionel Richie, but we still had a great weekend, stayed at the Trump international hotel, great story from the Trump hotel, places packed, beautiful hotel, the Trump store, they can't keep Trump merchandise on the shelves. The lady told me as soon as they ship it in in the morning, it's gone by the end of the day. I would t-shirts, baseball caps, Trump golf balls, Trump paperweights, and people, you know, I'm sorry. Americans love the guy. And Americans are ready for a return to normalcy. Not just politically, but I've got to address this. I got to address how different Vegas is from so many other places, New Yorkers would faint. At how people in Las Vegas behave.

Lionel Richie Eric Hansen Las Vegas Joey Hudson Underwood Trump International Hotel Trump Hotel Trump Store Vegas Hernia Donald Trump Baseball Golf
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:36 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"The Lose daily basis. We're doing challenges and trying to find solutions. But where does it though. It's like it's you know you look at commodity prices right now. They're pretty good pretty from a couple months ago. Obviously people need operate within the cash flow bound. She rise investments and also so. I guess we're in. Do you see this industry not being such a storm to operate it if that makes sense so it's really is when the banks get comfortable with industry. Okay what's going to cause that stability really okay. I mean i see it every day. We know what we're dealing with. But i came to the injury forms. Listened to the pioneers. The you talk. And basically said the same thing that we're out of favor with investment firms of the banks because over the last ten years has been so many downturns and so until he know probably potentially two years of stability to the industry in instability in price you'll still have your investors who have always invested to get that new interest in it because investment is left. Yeah they they they deem is a tobacco or something like that. So it's kind of a dirty investment for them. But but but it's not yes. There's that perception. But it's not. I mean the truth is if i've i've talked to. I've got a cousin who who's the. Vp from merrill lynch. I've talked to him before last elections and stuff like that and he said when it comes money world. They really don't care you know they're into make money. Yeah they might say yeah. You might say oh this. Won't this today you're right. If generates money they can find a way in. Yeah and so. Unfortunately i mean i hope there's some stability and we see a set price or a range of a price for a couple years and i think that's when you'll have the big investments. Come back but i think it's i mean you. I've talked to guy maradonna the places and a public traded companies and they're going to stay flat and their operations they're not going to ramp up much Obviously staying within cash flows and making the banks. The banks want the banks. Don't want you to build up the debt like we built previously. What ramp up really fast is i..

merrill lynch maradonna
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:23 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"They were small private equity company. But they really weren't. I mean they're pretty well. Established stealing five You know if you look at our our management special. I see now. Ceo now eric. He's very well-known. He's on board conaco border. Valero order baylor hospital and in the way they do their business. they're very well known throughout the industry. So once i start looking at that. I was like okay. This is actually a perfect opportunity. They got a good reputation. They're involved. They're a dig. That yeah i mean. They're very strong company. And then the position interview for was they called it. I mean because we small. We're still a small company title. Don't mean all that much. But was area. Engineer for north dakota so basically i was gonna. I was coming in to run there. I was gonna be like in a assistant manager norfolk okay. I wanna hard on. I was running drilling completion. Workover operations from north dakota. There's not feel big field. Had and so i came in did that. I was technically that title guess. At through nineteen..

baylor hospital Valero eric north dakota
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:24 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"And it just gets boring and those appoints my career. I realize okay i need something different and so that's why i'm always keep an eye out for an opportunity but those are the specific times like okay. I need to find a new opportunity. Do you feel that your opportunities or the the the ability to make those strategic decisions or like. I'm kind of bored now. The higher you get the more you can kind of play with like you know what i think we can. Optimize is when we can look at this like you more power more of an umbrella to kind of impact. Yes because it goes with experience because the more diverse experience you have the more you know knobs are you able to twist understand tweak and optimize right and so the more diverse experience. You got the different angles you can go or you can get more involved in different things. I mean where i am now. A lime rock joins buddy went bigger smaller companies. And i like the idea of it just because you know less politics just smaller companies. Yeah and besides that. I want to be in control. More says my natural thing. I wanna be the one in control doing things. Yeah and so. You know operations manager. I'm primarily over completions and major workover operations but cracks member. something like a sales call guy saying hey. Can i get contact for your procurement department. Okay you're talking to them. I mean you know. There's no yes so some days. I'm contracts some days i'm dealing with invoices like that though you like you like the smaller Environment what i goes to keep me challenge because i'm continuously doing something different everyday the week you know. I've got a frac job going right now. My focus is on the job. But i've also got a vertical well operation on all west texas. I got a job. Going on and barnett I've got three workover rigs north dakota. There's a lot of things you can kind of..

west texas barnett north dakota
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:28 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"You know little antidote story. One of my dad's friends years ago. Back when i was like eight ten years old made a bet with me. I think i can remember the car bed or something out. You know young kids sure and of course he won. You know won the trick. Whatever and he told me any lesson learned never bet against the house basically. He's like i'm always gonna win. It was basically bet me. And i had to go get him a beer. Which was downstairs and stuff. So i was like okay i lost. I went and got a beer. But instead it's going to be are brought him the white chest sitting next to him. But i'm done for the night that is called. What is that under promising over delivering. That's all about so man that's sales right there and so i was eight years old. I think it's also problem solving. It all goes back to mercedes. They had five wives. You know when you problem solving. What's did you 'cause okay. And so sometimes operates. We don't know what the root cause is but we don't want to search company. Come in and tell us about our stuff but once we figured out or once we get to a certain point in its cover. You might have the solution for the root cause so as as being right place right time as well so is not just was again. Say that it's not just kind of getting there and trying to push a service or a product or a piece of equipment just kind of being there. Obviously you know what. I'm there for you know packers and all that stuff is just a question of okay will is building that trust with person. Okay well look. I need to pack her. I'm gonna call api. I know this guy. I talked to him sad with him. We played golf. I know this guy is russia's guy this competence and accountability. Yeah okay. Because i mean foreign i i know you got no. You have a relationship when the as a billionaire with you. I'll learn that you're competent and you know what you're talking about and then accountability to be able to be there when you and then you know. It's it's huge. When something up location someone owns up to it. I mean the world. What is it okay. So let's talk about that. What is what does that. Disconnect i guess once person once when someone gets sales and all that stuff and then i guess kind of like walks away from it like you. Just hold on to the next one. I mean it takes. It takes some account billions in staying in house. Yeah yeah yeah. I think that's important. I mean that's that's part of relationship to. I mean the relationships not there to get you. The sales is there to kind of team. Y'all up as business partners so y'all can effectively achieved in drill the best well or possible sales pitch that we won't be partners. Okay that's great. But i need you to fall through actions. And what's.

packers russia golf
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Because actually had bought. I bought a townhouse washington before washington's popular to aid. I remember those perot bar was there. Promos air and actually concourse loon was actually a hardware store lumber yard wash wa wa much further down that was assigned. Iraq's alibi yes. Yes okay the newseum chickens there remember that okay so i wanna towns a block behind. They're just like in the neighborhood and then six months later all those bars taps and lowest will spend a lot of time. They're eight bar to two one right next to a bricks bricks yet. I was thinking about breaks taps. I i lived there for about two years. Eh digging man. I dig it back. That's been washington with different time. It was two blocks away so you. Can you say how the bar bar work in bar bar bar oldfield. So mu backstage down. Oh a moody sound to become account rep. Did you like do you. Like the transition in sales. Yeah i mean it was good So percents engineer. By background technical like an inhouse role. Okay so. I initially went in house a bp for two years. All the people are trackwork. Okay so i was doing the sales technically we we do the giant tenders and then do a multi year contract so you more managing that versus actual like knocking on doors and going on. But i was more than house engineer to because we once we got the contract in place like okay. Now you're the technical guy you help them design all the completions and support you know what technical support so you already plugged in so feared keep keep you keep on with the project. Yeah okay i'm al schwartz. A little bit different because like you know fr jobs offshore big gravel package deepwater stuff or big deal because as much money involved. So you'd always remote them do these data remotes. We watch real time with the customers and all the time to start at two o'clock in the morning you know you d- be up at city west beltway. We had the room up there. Okay inside buy snacks. And we'd order food and we sit there for eight hours of time watching these jobs with different customers. That's good though. I mean at least you're getting kind of you're sitting there. You're watching the same thing you're solving the problem. Yeah meet these people kind of get know them a little bit. Yeah i mean there was a sales aspect because obviously still play golf guys a lot worse. Our surf stuff. I mean if you're if you're bringing snacks to him than yeah that's the sales guy to me. Yeah it was both aspects and during that time the halpern was trying to back creating like a train curriculum. Ohka for sales people. So i went through the training. They did scenarios that cold calls tried. Teach all that stuff and it was just wouldn't think about those it was. Yeah i don't take those. Because like look i understand like a provide people tools to kind of maybe two point in the conversation. But like if you're not yourself. You're not genuine near kind of doing this robotics script like i don't think that's to me. That doesn't that doesn't create any no arrest they were. They were hinting on the right thing though because they were. They had this like curriculum for First time customer to where you're supposed to ask them questions get to know. The root of their issues are there problems with their wells so it was hinting on building a relationship but i don't know if there's an a building relationships direction okay and we're talking about earlier i mean i've been sales i've been operator side. The first step really is to build a relationship some kind so i. let's take a pause there is..

washington al schwartz west beltway oldfield Iraq Ohka halpern golf
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:21 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Experience. And then you school and they do that every other semester. So you rotate. To these companies the companies loved it because they got a full-time cheap engineer. Yeah and they always had some on-staff because they rotate it all year long so end up working four semesters like that. At mercedes process engineer building cars where whereas the mercedes a plant that it was one row side tuscaloosa town. So it's actually great. I got paid forty hours a week. And then i lived still in college. Yeah not bad at all me homework z. Danny don't you knock knock knocked off. you know. i mean that's where. I learned to stay off to a good work six. Am house before days. I remember those days but yeah so that was building classes for a year and a half. Okay anything from the body shop. Well deans the process building all the components. Did you enjoy that i did. It was a great experience. I enjoy it more. Because i enjoyed the people i work with. Okay and i had it in my head. That's what i wanted to do. Just because like people what i knew through college but in beneficial. Luckily they only had one open position when i graduated. I mean of good buddy both applied for but he literally went back to college to work. Mercedes accused couple of years older. He went to work at a high school. Ilyas like i wanna work there. And he went back college so he got the job. Luckily but i think day later i offer alberton so so had had halliburton come up literally. I was getting close last semester. Got close to graduating. And i was like okay. You know smer saying may not work out anita have you know another job offer or something else and term member. I think i was asked around my sister's friend's husband and few the people to different people basically the same name of halberg manager in lafayette. Okay and i was going home for thanksgiving emails. Had come talk to you about possibly a job and assure stop by and so i went met him in person we talked for bid and he's like okay one back in two weeks for the second round interviews. It was like okay damn. We've chatted for like thirty minutes. Thank you really liked. The fact that i moved away from home and is willing to travel isn't then also. I think it says a lot about someone shooting someone. Email just wanna chat chat with him. I think this shows initiative. And so i went back. Two weeks later got job. Offer the dave graduation okay. That's pretty good. Yeah it's pretty good timing. Yeah the only thing that was a little bit rough was a..

tuscaloosa Danny Ilyas halberg halliburton Mercedes anita lafayette
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Things At one point in time also zone oil company drill wells my grandmother's property that she inherited in south louisiana. And so i would say my professional career started in two thousand five. But first time i was on a well location while probably four. That's what that's what i would tell. Every young engineer out there. Since i was four years old stuff so wait so is that what propelled you to get the oil and gas and no being around it. Funny thing is actually kind of tried to avoid it okay. Why not not that. I wanted to just you know you don't really know the ins and outs aren't really understand. It work in it. And i won't say i try to avoid it but basically you know my parents family all went to texas universities all in texas ago south louisiana had no connection to any school. So that's why. I didn't go local and i decided i wanted my thing so and completed in direction and went to yours. Alabama a so. I went completely. Different direction. didn't engineering and how. How did you pick engineering. It's something i always wanted to do like that. My dad actually doesn't have an engineering degree but he was at. Am so backup. It took me twenty eight years of my life. I sit down for my dad's college career. It was a interesting career he went to. Ut finally asked him what happened he told me party too much failed out. That's still happening to in today's world during transition to southwest texas which takes state now. Yes got a business degree. Then you decide. He want to get in june degree and went to. Am back we had to be in the core okay. And he was there. My uncle who actually played football at the time of him. Okay sir working judean degree and then that's when vietnam was happening and so he figured he was going to get drafted so instead of way to get drafted he joined from the core because he went straight officer yes and then he was in the army corps of engineers in vietnam so the nato engineer. We'll that's okay. That's i've never heard this type of training before..

south louisiana texas Alabama vietnam football army corps of engineers nato
"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"On whenever podcast while obviously you're listen to this nabet. Go ahead like in lee review to get feedback. Kinda see how things are going. It'd be appreciated. Were actually would also have to plug. Oh energy energy underscore crew on instagram. Check it out. We got a lot of content pertaining to the to the podcast an industry so go to check that out drops a means there occasionally so that should be enjoyable so we are recording filming this absolutely trump in the dining room with a beautiful skyline kind of a gloomy day. I'll take that coaching. My kid's first soccer practice today. We'll get into that too and a little bit but For those that are wondering. Who's on the other line of the mike right now. This is hank. Poor the operations manager at lime rock resources. That is it. That's that's it. That's it i'm done..

lee soccer hank
Marc Bernier, Conservative Talk Radio Host Who Opposed Vaccinations, Dies After 3-Week COVID-19 Battle

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:13 min | 9 months ago

Marc Bernier, Conservative Talk Radio Host Who Opposed Vaccinations, Dies After 3-Week COVID-19 Battle

"You got a lot of emails and calls from friends and even family who heard the news about the death of marc bernier. Mark was really popular a legendary radio host really in daytona beach. I was aware of his career as a lot. A lot of people who listened to him over the years. Here's the way. The guardian characterizes his death over the weekend at the age of sixty five. He died of a headline florida radio. Host who called himself. Mr anti vacs dies of kovic one thousand nine hundred conservative radio host from florida who criticized corona virus vaccination efforts before contracting. Kobe himself has died when bernier was hospitalized. Three weeks ago. The operations manager of the station told local media. If you've listened to his show you've heard him talk about how anti vaccine he is on the air. In fact back in december mark told one of his guests about the vaccine. I'm not taking it. Are you kidding me. Mr anti vacs jeepers. He died saturday night after battling kobe. Apparently for three weeks he was hospitalized. The first week of august and of course as expected the vile left mocked. His death actually celebrated his death on social media monitoring trolls and ugly vile comments about natural selection. And what a dummy he was. And i had friends asked me mike. He's in your profession. Obviously you disagreed with his decision. So what do you make. Why do you take your show and instruct people to get the vaccine. One of my friends said. And i said of course not. I can't do that anymore than i can tell you what your diet should be or what. What other meds you should be taking. What kind of antidepressant pills. You should take or what kind of. I'm not in a position to tell another human being what they should do with their body.

Marc Bernier Mark Daytona Beach Kobe Saturday Night Three Weeks Bernier December ONE Three Weeks Ago One Thousand Mike Sixty Five One Of His Guests Nine Hundred Anti First Week Lot Of Emails Virus
Different Methods for Structuring Teams in an Agency

The Tropical MBA Podcast

02:20 min | 9 months ago

Different Methods for Structuring Teams in an Agency

"I think dan if i was agency today i would hire a bunch of specialized people. I don't think i'd hire jack-of-all-trades you know. One of the common positions that people come to us and asked us to help them hire is an operations manager because it's kind of last holdout. Most founders are like the operations manager. They are the person that holds it all together. They're kind of the hub in the middle of this wheel and then they have all these spokes so the most sincerely hey. I'm kind kinda pulling the team together. Like i have all these contractors. But like i really need to go out and do something. Higher value generally as business development or sales so. I need somebody to come in here and do this operations role. One of the things. I think is interesting. Is this concept that was brought up in the forum and spin written a lot about on the web is are you going to have a hierarchical structure or a pod structure and of course there's like overlap between what the two things are but typically a hierarchical structure would have that founder. Ceo and then the operations manager. And then say you'd have an seo group with like the top seo person and then you know seo assistant number one number two and there'd be these sort of this hierarchical management of all the seo in the company goes through this like seo lead and then there's this alternative concept of pods where you have like an seo person designer. A sales lead all in one pod and then that pod manages a certain number of clients and at least for us as like bootstrapping a relatively new service business. We've only been sewing recruiting services for twelve months. The pod concept really resonated with us both from strategy perspective. You look at what you're able to charge for your service and then you say okay. Well you know ballpark. I'm trying to get my labor cost to less than thirty percent of what i'm delivering the service for so that you know. Have a margin leftover after all your expenses of executing the service and so then you figure out like what that fraction analyzed pod is going to be and you try to get your costs there and this is the way you can sort of brainstorm new businesses. So i think it's kind of interesting if you look at like a traditional agency you'd say like a recruiting agency say all right. Well i sold this to a client. Now i'm going to have a recruiter. Do all the work and like day cost this and so your rates are going to be a lot higher than if you had this cross functional pod that can essentially split up the work and do it for multiple different clients.

DAN Jack
"operations manager" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"operations manager" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

"Your people invest in the company now ever degree. Yeah the so many story. They're like progressive. Another one in container store where they have culture the p the employees as well. I think a lot of people spend so much effort to bring new employees then but they didn't company somewhat tend to forget The don't have a good on boarding system. Don't talk about the core values. Don't reinforce this core values in a regular basis. Oh On that that's is very easy to blame lack of labor out there but you must have to limit. Look the show. See what's going on in your company if you look at it from a sales perspective So only retaining eighty percent of your clients customers to grow. You've got to get at twenty percent back plus right and that's difficult if you're if you're losing sixty percent or fifty percent or forty percent of your employees and you have to continually What what is the cost analysis on that and so whatever company can do the on boarding process on roadmap of rear a culture that vice respect and diversity and all those sorts of things. We could control wrong when i hear about the labor. I know we have issues what it's lagging indicator and and so. Let's look at our blinds spot and and look at each other as leaders. Say what can we do to change our culture or improve our culture and employees involved in this movement of sustainable retention at town acquisition. great point. so we're getting close to the interior. But if you've got company listening right now who has done a great job of the culture. In the core values and retaining employees bought meanwhile the Desperately trying to find what would be the first one or two things would start to do a tangible way within a company just to try and get the ball. Rolling piston proved. The hotel is going to be good initially to Engaged their existing employees and and and bring them in and have more of an open forum with them on. How can we improve and and to get their. They're buying You know for for awhile. Companies were getting together and having task forces in coming up with with issues and problems whether it's equipment or people in and get task groups together and say here's your here's the problem. We want you to attack how it doesn't have to be just the leader doesn't have to be this the cto abdin cfo. It's everybody engaged in. And i think if they feel irritation just what they're your best recruits and so those simple things again. Is there a. is there a problem. I don't think it's as significant as over saying as as as a leader. There's these are things we can fix in internally. We do have control over this if we get away from our blind spots and look at it. Engage your voice ring. Them and talk about is how can we. How can we overcome this. And what part can you play instead of just in the truck in the morning. They're gone right now. Scrape fair severe hot topics in something that i think people should definitely consider if people went to reach to an event tap into your knowledge. Find out more deviant. They're doing best fees for them to do that. Sure they can just email me at exit dot gallagher at dot com. Also anytime love to talk It's time last years to get back to the industry and want to continue to do that. In any way we can and I love this industry and the people that are in it And the passion behind that. So let's continue to grow. Continue to grow our people and and do things differently. Change the culture agree hundred percent. Thank you really appreciate your today. great shot into. Hopefully we'll stay in touch will make you back on. I'm sure there's so many other chocolates to could dive into so thank you again. Have a great day. i'd too thank you very much. Robert was great. that was pure dead. Brilliant for you today. We reached careers for your business. Your life is robert clinkenbeard. Aloma david anderson would love to get your new friends to join us on our journey to quick things before who listeners chicken websites the commercial lonski dot com. You can subscribe. You can share with your friends. But more importantly chick sponsors we have site recon pure helps you. Capture measurements on your property and create a really streamlined process. And we have company come at dead simple to communicate document and problem solve with guys in the field. No matter where you are. Thanks everyone cheers..

fifty percent sixty percent Robert robert clinkenbeard forty percent twenty percent eighty percent today dot com Aloma david anderson first one last years two things dot gallagher hundred percent lonski dot com exit
"operations manager" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"operations manager" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

"So tim but more about your background time writing perfect weather devi jump into the agreement. String agreed quincy while i had nine brothers and sisters figure out a way to keep us boyd busy so he was on the board of a cemetery and decided sexy free. Robert delegates cemetery company and so at age thirteen. That's where we went and we worked on the grounds and You know guys think they have a hard now. We trimmed with insurers So anyway that was. That was the first part and i love you know working outdoors and seeing every day that i could walk away done something and so i continued my career and volved into the lawn care of business with with cama which was rolling leaps back the seventies and eighties. And it's still today. I think a a real platform for success in in the industry for a lot of people because of their training and so on and then moved into if they were required and then i moved into the commercial nathan inside and have been you know in there in that space for the last thirty years or so west outstanding companies and wrist the breakfast group. I debut we really actually started The commercial business in india and separated out in nineteen ninety six and continued to grow it. And then i loved a great company and went through to the worker bregman and and learn a lot of business methods and processes and again they've obviously required and unfortunately i still have some street. Cred a berlin richardson and and ended up back with this unique and in very very Culture company. So that's my background. Those creek impressive impressive. Say if we know the national operations manager in with your expedients on companies being the industry. I mean you've gone through. Multiple difference recessions dine terms and terms. I mean the last year year and a half of been challenging to us. What what things have you seen there. Being the current challenges challenges facing industry. I think the biggest challenges is our in. Our industry is really getting away from the past and looking into the future. And what i mean by that. I was looking up. Some statistics is week and the nightmare in two thousand six. Two thousand eight hundred where. I was working. We had a labor composite of five dollars and sixty two cents. So it's not that long ago and that that was the hate it and we made a tremendous amount of money on a very low Composite right has steadily inclined. And we're now seeing a minimum. What fifteen dollars an hour six. I think that Charted on fan of cosco. That's that's their minimum. So i think as a challenge is getting they're feeling pike eastern pay this and now i gotta pay. This is just reality and so we've got to change in how we we. We see the benefit of these employees and show them that. There's a real career example that there's many examples dating all these companies are our. They started with a lawnmower and end up their skills and abilities relationships and have done very very well in the industry and as a prime example of and so there is a career out there. And i think we have to look at it our when we're recruiting looking at it as as a career and have a career path or these people versus looking short term. That they're here. We shouldn't even calm labor. That's a bad a bad name. The team members or or you know that sort of and so. I think that is some of the problem is getting to that point and creating more than looking at our wage but looking at these folks to have a career and and And really am a process involved in in Sharing this story with people. You do the because you know heritage stories where kids coming to the lots of years of high school and turn rights pearson thinking thinking about working for landscape bay or i'm thinking of going to heart show on and you get the appearance. Fees is like you know they all. They have their imaging. The head is that beach landscape truck and new uniforms and look could telephone words Eddie change that perception. I think our industry has done a fairly good job of trying to get away from that old adage of oas landscape And i think when his safety with appeal with competitiveness You know. I think we take our industry at several different levels so if the perception out there is still that it's two guys in a truck and they're gonna pull up and and not have shirts on and do rags on out. I'm hoping that perception is for the most part gone up. You know they're even in my neighborhood. There's probably senator. Twelve different presidential. Mowing companies are going up and down and trucks look good or professional. And so i that stigma it's with people i. It's a minimum amount of people anymore right. There's up an opportunity to even enforce that by some landscape companies getting more involved to that than school level high school level of the gore and do some type of educational thing or just get involved in community programmes any any successful campaigns I have and unfortunately. I know the enrollment in our schools are down and and you know we really should be. Investing.

fifteen dollars Two thousand sixty india five dollars two thousand Robert Twelve seventies two guys Eddie eight hundred last year today nine brothers first part last thirty years thirteen six richardson
A NASA Mom

Innovation Now

01:14 min | 1 year ago

A NASA Mom

"The lead mom for the. Oh cyrus rex mission masses i e asteroid sample return mission. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future masses cyrus. Rex mission made history in october. Twenty twenty when it successfully collected a sample from asteroid. Banou naji. Castro is the lead mom for nasa so cyrus rex mission. That is she's the mission operations manager. Naji says it is bittersweet to say goodbye to the asteroid that was the spacecraft's since its arrival in two thousand eighteen. But she is very excited to know that scientists will have an actual piece of banou to study. although twenty twenty was a difficult year for humankind. Najji is proud to be part of a team that prioritized health safety and continued mission. Success milestones leading up to the touch and go sample collection proved the teams dedication toward a shared objective in spite of being socially distanced and more geographically separated than ever before. Now she and her team are now carefully preparing for the spacecraft's returned to earth and just like any mom. She won't rest easy until cyrus. Rex has returned

Cyrus Rex Banou Naji Naji Najji Cyrus Castro Nasa REX
OSIRIS-REx 'MOM' Says Goodbye to Asteroid

Innovation Now

01:02 min | 1 year ago

OSIRIS-REx 'MOM' Says Goodbye to Asteroid

"Masses cyrus. Rex mission made history in october. Twenty twenty when it successfully collected a sample from asteroid. Banou naji. Castro is the lead mom for nasa so cyrus rex mission. That is she's the mission operations manager. Naji says it is bittersweet to say goodbye to the asteroid that was the spacecraft's since its arrival in two thousand eighteen. But she is very excited to know that scientists will have an actual piece of banou to study. although twenty twenty was a difficult year for humankind. Najji is proud to be part of a team that prioritized health safety and continued mission. Success milestones leading up to the touch and go sample collection proved the teams dedication toward a shared objective in spite of being socially distanced and more geographically separated than ever before. Now she and her team are now carefully preparing for the spacecraft's returned to earth and just like any mom. She won't rest easy until cyrus. Rex has returned

Banou Naji Cyrus Rex Naji Najji Cyrus Castro Nasa REX
Interview With Michael Dougherty, Goodyear Chief Pilot

Behind the Prop

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Michael Dougherty, Goodyear Chief Pilot

"What's wally hey bob. How're you been tastic. Another week and other podcasts and another guest this morning on the show we have. Michael dougherty the chief pilot and flight operations manager for goodyear which means he's a blimp pilot. Thanks for joining us. Michael guys Pushy on so i. I've talked to a lot of people while that we were going to have this discussion and a lot of people were excited and they asked a lot of questions that i probably had my head before we started thinking about having him on the show. The do you know many balloon pilots. I do not. I know i can say i know michael but he is really the only plan pilot. I know my sure you hear this a lot that this is a very unique position that you hold and you've done it for fourteen years. Tell us a little bit about how you got into it and a little bit. What it's like in the day in the life of chief pilot. Goodyear store it is it is certainly a a very small group of people are are kind of famous. There's more astronauts than there are pilots out there especially with the age of of space flight. I guess but others We we have a full staff at goodyear's is about Thirteen pilots including myself. We've got twelve guys that are attached to accrue for on each crew in In that. I'm the chief pilot in flight operations manager so i do all of the certification stuff check rides proficiency checks that kind of stuff and then i do fill flying gear lair when we've got folks on vacation or short-staffed or something but Bailey we we have a few missions with the airship First and foremost kind of the the one we're best known for is our area. Tv covered so each has a crew of about twenty folks that goes down the road. That's generally four pilots. Each team A couple of crew chiefs we have five aircraft mechanics. That take care of their ship from those detail Through all of its major maintenance and field maintenance and all that kind of stuff. We do have a maintenance support team that that helps support the guys in the field of those guys in the field. Do great majority of the the work. We have Couple of mechanics. Because we've got a preview ground sport fleet we have a semi truck crew boss a couple of mass trucks which are used more the airship two. That's a basically sixty five thousand pounds straight semi truck that that has a forty foot pole. Attached to the that allows us to to attach rate to the nose of the blimp and then when the blue since on the field at night. It's like a big win sock

Michael Dougherty Goodyear Goodyear Store BOB Michael Bailey
The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

The World

04:15 min | 1 year ago

The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

"To be with you today. Tomorrow. It'll be one year that World Health Organization director Ted Rose get Racists made the official declaration pandemic. Is not a word to use lightly or carelessly for 12 months. We've been living with the word pandemic, and it's reality more than 2.6 million people dead and 117 million infected because of the Corona virus. Planet continues to battle the acute phase of the pandemic and what get braces recently called mass trauma. As we hear from the world's Alana Gordon. Psychologists say the trauma will have impacts for years to come. Christie Douglas, He's a paradox. Collectively, we're experiencing this very much together in this moment. However, we are also doing so when we are all socially isolated in distance, collectively together and yet collectively, totally alone. Dangler is a clinical psychologist and global health researcher at Harvard. She says. The pandemic has even disrupted how we mourn. People grieve very differently. Everyone grieves so differently. Some people grieve very publicly. Some people grieve very privately. Sometimes we do a little bit of both. It's a mixed process, so there's really no one right way to do it. Douglas says rituals are essential to be able to begin to acknowledge the reality of the losses. Ah, lot of that has gone virtual this year. She says it's too soon to understand the impacts. But she is worried digitally connecting doesn't replace in person connections. Reef alone is very painful and were not meant to grieve alone, and we're forced now to grieve alone. Oftentimes in isolation. It's a lot. There's the losses from the pandemic and then other losses were grieving was interrupted by the pandemic itself. In the U. S. Black, Latino and other vulnerable communities are already carrying a bigger weight of these losses. This is happening against the backdrop of compound it stressors. So we're sort of in a perfect storm. We worry for downstream, clinically impairing conditions. And what I really worry about is the impact on the most vulnerable among us All. This means the impact of the pandemic and the collective trauma could last for years. Wh o. Emergency operations manager Mike Ryan recently stressed that this sense of loss can't be anyone Individuals burden to carry mental health systems are maxed out. I think there's a point Where it just becomes unethical to continue to call something out as an issue but not actually focus on solutions. Solutions for joy. means re imagine the whole system for addressing bereavement, making it more holistic. She's director of ever more a nonprofit that focuses on improving conditions for families, You know, brief siblings, right higher risk of premature death, dropping out of high school or teen pregnancy. Brief Children experience higher rates of depression. There's a lack of understanding that the systems around the families you can facilitate Helpful, coping, functional, coping or make coping all that more difficult and complicated. Mulherin says. Policies can make a difference like employment and housing protections. Benefit transfers. Psychosocial supports things that just aren't a guarantee right now. Christie Dangler at Harvard is deeply worried, too. She also says it's important to remember when you're into this pandemic that humans are resilient, acknowledging the loss and stress is the first step. And yet, she says, there also might be another paradox. In this moment, perhaps a more optimistic one. It's almost psychologically impossible to truly process and absorb. This without hindsight, without some distance, Douglas says, many maybe feeling none to the magnitude of losses in this moment, and some instances that can actually help it can provide a buffer. It can help us get through a very demanding time. And then when we have the space, we might go back and start the process. But in the meantime, she really hopes that these overdue collective conversations about grief and loss Lead to long term support for everyone who's grieving for the world.

Ted Rose Alana Gordon Christie Douglas Dangler World Health Organization Harvard Douglas Mike Ryan Mulherin U. Christie Dangler Depression
NASA rover To Land On Mars Tomorrow

NPR News Now

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

NASA rover To Land On Mars Tomorrow

"Nasa says its latest mission. To mars is expected to arrive tomorrow. The rover as perseverance is designed to study martian rocks. It's a search. For what may be evidence of ancient life on the barren red planet operations managers for nasa say the rover aboard the nasa probe is prepared for tomorrow's landing.

Nasa
More new COVID vaccination centres open in England

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

More new COVID vaccination centres open in England

"Over thirty new National Health Service vaccination centers open across England as of the drive to accelerate immunizations continues the government says vaccination of the most vulnerable groups organized by the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation will be completed by the middle of February in Mansfield senior operations manager Nina Marshall says it's been a massive endeavor getting inoculation sites like close up and running so swiftly I am very glad that we need to be able to get the vaccine supply we need to have the way to do it and we will be delivering in excess of twenty thousand a week so far Britain has vaccinated over six million people Charles the live as well London

Joint Committee On Vaccination National Health Service Nina Marshall England Mansfield Government Britain Charles London
Man Arrested At Chicago O’Hare Airport, Charged With Trespassing

Bob Sirott

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Man Arrested At Chicago O’Hare Airport, Charged With Trespassing

"Man who had been living at O'Hare Airport managed to escape detection for nearly three months. DS Singh is charged with criminal trespassing death, police say he claimed he was too afraid to fly home to California because of covert 19. He arrived it Oh, here from Los Angeles and October 19th and allegedly lived in the airport security zone ever since then. Prosecutors say to United Airlines employees asked him for credentials over the weekend, he allegedly showed a badge that an operations manager had reported missing back in October.

O'hare Airport Ds Singh California Los Angeles United Airlines
California man allegedly lived in airport for months because he was afraid to fly

John Williams

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

California man allegedly lived in airport for months because he was afraid to fly

"At O'Hare Airport for three months before he was caught. He's charged with criminal trespass and theft, police say. 36 year old Adidas Singh arrived at O'Hare from Los Angeles on October 19th and allegedly lived in the airport Security zone since then, too afraid to fly home to California do to cope in 19. Prosecutors say it all ended Saturday, though when to United Airlines employees asked him for credentials, and he allegedly showed a badge. At an operations manager reported missing in October. They'll be G in sports. The

O'hare Airport Adidas Singh Los Angeles United Airlines California
LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

Business Wars Daily

04:30 min | 1 year ago

LinkedIn Wants to Help You Find a Transferable Career

"Lincoln has built. Its following of more than seven hundred million people by promising to help you find a job now at wants to help you find a new and totally different career. With millions of americans and employed right now an entire laid flat by the pandemic. It's undeniably difficult for many people find new jobs without changing roles and industries. The first challenges identifying your transferable skills. That advice is as old as the hills. The much tougher challenges to figure out how to apply transferable skills in jobs in industries. You may never have considered. That's where linked ends new career explorer to comes in if flip typical job searching on its head rather than searching for a particular job say operations manager you enter one of your most recent titles by mining linked ends. Massive data set the to identify multiple skills. You probably already have then. It suggests other roles where those skills overlap according to a company blog. Post tool references. Thirty six thousand career skills and six thousand job. Titles results are matched up by the percentage of skills that can transfer for instance enter the job of co founder. And you'll see that eighty percent of your skills are also used by board members. The example linked in uses is more common an out of work food server. It turns out a waiter or waitress. Typically has more than seventy percent of the skills needed to succeed in customer service role. The good news linked and also identifies high demand jobs as it happens. Customer service specialists or at the top of that list. Career explore then identifies open jobs in that new career in a third column. The tool suggest skills. You may need to build to help make the leap not. Surprisingly it directs you. To linked learning courses offering such clear direction toward a new career makes a lot of sense more than forty five percent of people never explore career change. Because they don't know where to start. According to a survey of two thousand unemployed professionals commissioned by linked in paul heads up economic policy research at linked and he told the new york times many members didn't necessarily know what job transitions were available to them. Moreover about a third of the survey respondents said they felt unqualified for other industries had no connections. There were didn't know how their skills translated the times reported linked in made the new tool available late last month. In beta to try it out navigate to opportunity dot linked in dot com. It's free not part of lincoln's premium subscription which ranges from thirty dollars to one hundred twenty dollars a month with more and more people using linked in as the pandemic continues to take a toll on the economy the platforms revenues are way up sixteen percent over the same quarter last year. But most of that growth is coming from lincoln's advertising business. not it's talent solutions which includes recruitment and job search. According to tech crunch reporter ingrid london by showing job seekers a path toward a new career and guiding them to link to ends classes the platform can build its recruitment business and it's training and education division simultaneously. London suggests although note that many of those classes are also free such a seemingly. Comprehensive system means the online job. Search business has evolved dramatically. It's far more complex and sophisticated than it was not that long ago when online platforms mainly mimicked classified ads. Like linked in smaller rivals ziprecruiter also promotes training to job seekers. Late last month ziprecruiter announced a new platform offering two hundred fifty different classes. The classes come from training companies collaborating with the company including core. Sarah skill share x. You'd acidy among others and this month ziprecruiter announced another kind of partnership altogether with financial services app acorns which helps users save and invest money. From within the acorns app users will be able to search for jobs. The job portal is made possible by ziprecruiter acorn. Ceo kerner tolsey net. The company wants to help its users. Earn more money since income shortfalls or the biggest obstacle to investing with. Us unemployment still at close to eight percent and record high. Pandemic case counts no. Recruitment executive says job. Hunting is easy but they do still see quite a bit of hiring forty million people search for jobs on lincoln weekly and three people get hired every minute company officials claim so for the unemployed all is far from lost but a better more comprehensive job search plan complete with training and a good dose of imagination about alternative careers should make a very big difference

Lincoln Ingrid London The New York Times Sarah Skill The Times Paul Ceo Kerner Tolsey London Acorn Lincoln Weekly Pandemic United States
Still struggling to find work

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Still struggling to find work

"Start the program today with our favorite four letter word. J o b s jobs. Unemployment is down as we learned last friday. That's good and people are coming. Back into the workforce after being let go or having given up earlier in the pandemic but what those people might find once they get to. The workforce is kind of not so welcoming because finding a job is not getting any easier. There's a monthly report. The labor department puts out. It's called jolts job. Openings and labor turnover summary just like it sounds what openings there are out there and the good news is that they were up a bit those openings last month from september but still there were a lot fewer openings than this time last year so marketplace's mitchell hartman gets us going by checking in with some of the job seekers. He knows to see how they're doing the key stat right now when it comes to finding a new job there are nearly twice as many job seekers as job openings. That's what twenty nine year old. Dana marlin is up against. She's been looking for a new job in sales since she got laid off back in march from a company outside chicago that puts on marketing events. As the weeks went by. I started seeing people who were my own managers people who had a lot more experience than me. Posted on linked in their teams were being laid off day themselves or being laid off so beautiful people. I'm competing against marlin. Says she's had lots of interviews but no offers that's also how twenty six year old bailey trips hunt for a new digital marketing job is going in suburban saint louis and she says cove is a concern if she does get an offer. I've had interviews. They've made it very clear about as a neil employee. I'm expected to be in office For a time. That's made me uncomfortable. But i have to balance you know finding a job and accepting versus my own safety and slogging it out in this pandemic afflicted job. Market isn't for everybody. Amy wilson is thirty eight and lives in longmont colorado. She's worked as an office and operations manager. She and her husband were both laid off in early spring and she launched her job. Search as the economy started reopening in may but just was not having much luck. hiring was depressed. I wasn't getting the call backs for jobs that i wanted. So yeah kind of just made this decision to go back to school instead. She's taking classes aiming to have her associate's degree in communications. By this time next year. I'm mitchell hartman for

J O B Mitchell Hartman Dana Marlin Labor Department Amy Wilson Marlin Saint Louis Chicago Bailey Longmont Colorado
How Staring At Clouds Can Improve Your Marketing Results?

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

05:15 min | 1 year ago

How Staring At Clouds Can Improve Your Marketing Results?

"So today I'm going to talk about how staring at a white clouds can improve your marketing but not the clouds in the sky that are white and fluffy. These are the kind of clouds that are on the internet. And what I'm talking about our word clouds, so if you've never seen a word cloud it's a collection of words from a series of or text could be an article could be a web page could be anything and the words get bigger. The more the word is mentioned and a lot of the times that are colored. So, you know, some colors are bright. Some colors are darker and depending on how you look at it certain words will pop up at you home. Now. I did an experiment this weekend. Since we're close to a presidential election, I put up to word clouds in this was actually graphic that I found that had both by objections and Trump's inaugural speeches and it had all the words that they mentioned and obviously the more they said them the bigger the words were and I asked people to look at them and give me the two words that popped out one from each candidate. And as I went through all of the results about eighty percent of the people saw different words now, obviously if she people's political leanings their expectations, maybe something they read or saw on the news that they might have changed the way they answered that question off. So, I think it can be the same when people are reading our marketing messages depending on their frame of mind or maybe what they just read off they may read them differently so it could help us to know what our marketing messages are saying to people And we could use a word cloud to do that. Now I found two different word cloud tools, and these are easy to use one is called word clouds. Calm down. The other one is called tag crawl. Word clouds. Allows you to import a your realm and then it gives you a lot of creativity. You can change the color theme you can change the shapes. You can do a whole bunch of different things with it and it can create some really cool graphics and different impressions of what you want to see above. The other one is called tag crawl. T a g c r a w l in this one is a lot more simplified. Yes. It gives you the ability to import a URL but it will also allow you to limit the word shown so you could say show me just the top 20 or 25 or maybe all the way to a hundred. So you have the ability with these two different tools to look at different URLs and see what words are popping up. So the first thing I'd like you to do before you utilize these tools is answer five core questions, and these five questions are about what messages you want to get across to your audience. So the first question you want to answer is who do you serve or who is this message for? Who is the Avatar? What is the special thing that you want to get across to that particular person? So you can use the word you but if you use a very specific term like operations manager or salesman or something along that line. It's going to resonate more with the people who specifically are in those positions. The next question you want to ask is what problem do they have? What's the thing keeping them up at night what's on their mind off? Can they resonate with the idea that you're trying to get across? The next thing you have to ask is why is that a problem for them? Can you define the specifics behind why it's a problem in their world home and do they even recognize that problem. Do you have to let them know it is a problem. So they have to understand and feel emotionally connected to what it is that you're saying.

Donald Trump Operations Manager Salesman
Some of Edward Hopper’s Earliest Paintings Are Actually Copies He Made From a How-To Art Magazine

Kottke Ride Home

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Some of Edward Hopper’s Earliest Paintings Are Actually Copies He Made From a How-To Art Magazine

"Zoom in art history doctoral student of the court hauled institute in London has just caused quite a stir in the art world. was. Shadwick has discovered that at least three of Edward Hopper's early oil paintings are copies of other artists work. Two. Of them come from a magazine for amateur artists that was published before hopper's paintings of the same scenes and a third appears to be copied from Victorian painted porcelain plaque. Painting by Bruce Crane that appeared in the magazine, the art interchange in eighteen ninety called a winter sunset is nearly identical to. Eighteen Ninety, seven old ice pond at Nyack. A painting that also appeared in the art interchange in eighteen eighty, six called ships by Edward Moran is a near identical match to Edward Hopper's ships from eighteen, ninety eight. And the Victorian Porcelain Plaque based on an unidentified painting I think needs a little bit more verification but it does look just like hoppers 1897 church landscape. You can see all of these side by side in the New York Times article linked in the show notes. But a couple of notes on this Carter, foster hopper expert and director at the Blanton Museum of art in Texas notes that it's not at all unusual for artists of the time to have gotten their start by copying other works it was part of the learning process. But the problem is that much of the myth of hopper that he leaned into a bit while he was alive was that he had a preternatural talents especially evident in his early oil paintings that he created all on his own quoting the New York Times for Kim Canetti curator of drawings and prints at the Whitney. Museum. In New York where she is. At. Work on a big hopper, show the copying that Mr Shannon with revealed has more important repercussions. It cuts straight through the widely-held perception of hopper as an American. Original. She said as an artist whose innate genius allowed him to emerge on the scene without a debt to others. The only real influence I've ever had was myself. He wants claimed and quotes. And importantly, hoppers version of old ice pond nyack is currently being sold by an art gallery for between three hundred and four hundred thousand dollars. Will these revelations change anything about that price points and other sales of his early works? Showed wakes discovery is still in the process of being compiled and peer reviewed but perhaps, the market and hoppers legacy will shift somewhat in the near future. You know hopper's art has become a symbol of everyday life in mid century America his paintings brought to life the predominant thoughts and feelings of the time quoting again from the New York Times critics and scholars have always been intrigued by awkwardness that hopper allowed himself in many of his classic paintings sees that looked more painted than liquid in his famous groundswell, the Awkward Anatomy of his female nude in morning in the city or the stony faces of the diners in nighthawks. Now that we know that hopper was never a painting prodigy we can think of his later paintings as deliberately revisiting the limitations of his adolescence and finding virtue and power there. There's a classic move in American. Culture to see the unschooled in Homespun as more authentic and especially as more authentically American than the sophist stories of those decadent old Europeans end quote. And yet this is something I think about sometimes you know oddly for a nation. So deeply entrenched in its origins in the idea of the Protestant work ethic does seem to be this pervasive narrative throughout the centuries in. United. States that someone who is just miraculously gifted born perfect in a certain field or talent without help or instruction from anyone else is so much better. So much more deserving of being glorified than someone who Had to work hard at it who trained in grew over time maybe made some mistakes along the way not only does that do a disservice to the true fact that many people do have to work hard to perfect skills and talents and lead many to give up if they think they're not perfect at their first shot, but it erases the many people who help someone hone their craft and make it to where they are. Leads us to only praising leaders, celebrities, Star athletes, people in the spotlight and forgetting all about the people, the coaches, the teachers, the drivers, the medics, the operations, managers, the custodial workers, the domestic workers, the caregivers. Who Make someone's life like that possible I don't think there is anything at all wrong with Edward Hopper copying other artists as he learned his craft. But I do think it speaks volumes that he chose to or felt he had to particularly as he became this emblem of Americana Incarnate, hide that he had had any type of early instruction or influence, and thereby taking credit over these other artists instead of bringing them into the fold with him the New York Times mentions that part of it was so revolutionary and captivating about hoppers work was his depiction of average everyday life in America and they conclude I. Agree quotes. If. Hopper claimed to be an absolute original uninfluenced by others, his greatest paintings work hard to convey a different image of their maker. Their studied awkwardness asks us to imagine him as someone who might indeed have started his career copying someone else as just your average American working hard to make good end quote.

Edward Hopper New York Times Edward Moran New York Blanton Museum Of Art Shadwick Bruce Crane Nyack London Whitney Mr Shannon America Kim Canetti Carter Director Texas
"operations manager" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"S you sort of flip. legacy systems Yoda introducing a high level of risk. I would imagine absolutely and and the the risk surface changes. Right. So we if you go from kind of Twentieth Century Model of Client Server set up with you know kind of the the older you know Oracle database and you've got climb machines that are interacting with it, and you now move to a more. Modern approach where you've got cloud based infrastructure where there's now an entire ecosystem of servers that are working together on to allow for things like streaming analytics. I am doing that real time analysis, the surface, the number of devices that you're using. Increases there for the attack surface opens up and the complexity of how they interact changes dramatically, and then when you think about how those are dispersed geographically now they're sitting in data centers that might be halfway around the world leveraging Internet based infrastructure and sewed opens up. Yet more. attack venues, avenues of of potentially disrupting your business. So it you know the word of the day here is complexity, but but that really is said in I think it's a real challenge for the operations manager in the future, right? Yeah. Both systems and humans are distributed geographically right. So it you know on the positive side, it gives us some redundancy. Black on the other hand, it increases complexity and possibly increases risk correct right and that's I think the real challenges that. I think conceptually, new business managers understand this, they live it every day The the challenges is, how do you how do you actually compute it and tried to address it in a in a fairly scientific way, and that could actually be really difficult even for people who are well resource and who had the motivation to do so get yeah I, want to go into another article that you have to prioritize strategic risks that affect critical infrastructure So you say many organizations struggling with focuses the broad set of risks stemming from cyber attacks against the nation's critical infrastructure roughly eighty five percent of the critical infrastructure in the US managed and operated by private organizations. And if I was one of basically, if yours is one of those forums, you'll have the primary responsibility for assessing specific one liberty and managing cyber security looks to your you'll network. So it's it's the entire sort of interaction with the Plethora all privately managed. systems that makes it extremely complex I would imagine. Yeah know I think that that's exactly right..

Oracle operations manager US
PRO TALK with Rick Watson

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

PRO TALK with Rick Watson

"Brick Watson is a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you so much for agreeing to do this all. Thank you for having me Pat and it's a pleasure to be on your show. we were talking before the show. The last time we ran into each other was with the home builders show in Las Vegas, and as you pointed out, the world has changed a lot since then. Things have changed as I said, just a little bit since then but you know what a great show you know. I love when you guys come in and talk to us about our new products and things like that. It's it's. It's an exciting show. I really love to do that show. I'm not in my white coat day. So sorry about that. We explain that you wear a lab coat when you're talking to folks at the builders show yes I do I am the Doctor Watch son if you will of paint. So are you able to to work from home or are you going into the office? What's going on with your work life? Well? I'm actually as you can see, I'm in my office I've been back in my office for two three weeks up to a month or so So we do have some people still in the doing their jobs from home quite effectively, and we have a a lot of number of folks still a coming actually down to the offices. Well. So where's your attended? Where's your office in downtown Cleveland Ohio? Can you tell me? What exactly it is you do for Sharon Williams and. If you've been there a long time and if you worked for other paint. Companies. Well my boss wonders what I do as well but no, that's that's just a joke. So. So when I, again, the Director Product Information Technical Services. So what we do in in my office is a number of things. One we help bring new products to life and you're aware of the new products that we introduced at the ibis So what we do is we help commercialise those products from data pages information from labels that you see on those cans to bringing that product to life in a number of our systems you we create, and we also maintain all of that information over our existing stores. product portfolio. So we also have under under my area. If you will. We also have what's called a product hotline and we have about ten agents that actually take a lot of calls from our stores and all of our field people when they have questions about product or say you would call in your store or something you would call in and need some help on. A. Specific Specification on how to paint this piece him aluminum or whatever it may be We have agents that will actually take care of that as well. How do you train those people? They must have to know a ton of stuff. Well yes. Yeah. Typically you know what we what we talk about is. When you're in the field, you kinda get It get trained really quick in the field. Put it that way you know you're dealing with contractors coming in a lot in there, asking all these questions. So it it's kind of like repetition. So if you've been out in the field ten plus years, you've seen a lot So all of our agents of. Roughly twenty I think it was around twenty two years of service with Sherwin Williams on average. So, we have some agents that are thirty five years and was Sherwin Williams I have thirty three years in with Sherwin. Williams. So you know what's a lot of knowledge that you gain over a period of time working on the phones or in the as well? Did you start in a paint store or as a painter or are you a chemist? What's what's your background? How does one become this person? Well actually. In order to get myself through college a friend of mine I started a paint company little paint company painting houses in the summer, and when we come home from from school and the brakes, we would go to houses and pain inside or outside whatever. And it just so happened one day. There was a career fair at Ball State University where I went school Sherwin Williams was there. You know I was a little bit cocky I said Hey I used your paint and a the manager there said why don't you come and interview I said Okay I will. So long story short I interviewed started as a management training person. And went to commercial store in Fort Wayne Indiana. And from there I worked as the operations manager for a few months and then became a sales rep and from sales rep. I did that greatest job in the company. I love being a sales rep going out talking with contractors you know getting my hands dirty getting closed you know closed dirty you name it a great job. But I wanted to change. So I went into managing a store. And then from a store, went to open up brand new store. And then realize you know i. you know that that's a lot of lifting you know my ankles and the knees hurt. So I said maybe I should use my head in my mouth and then came to Cleveland and worked in our product hotline for a number of years, and then just basically progressed up into the director of product information.

Sherwin Williams Cleveland Brick Watson Las Vegas Director Product Information T Fort Wayne Indiana Ohio Operations Manager Ball State University PAT Director
Washington, DC non profit bike shop targeted by thieves

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Washington, DC non profit bike shop targeted by thieves

"That fixes donated bikes for re sale has been hit by thieves recently, but staff members say that will not slow their role. For long. The booming bike sales has been felt. Retailers who can't keep bikes in stock. That's been the same experience for nonprofits like gearing up bicycles in Northeast D. C, where young people refurbish old bikes for sale operations manager Keith Jackson said. Crowds started coming in March. Kids in the program were stunned. They literally turned around and looked at me terrified. What am I supposed to do with all those people out there? The success was apparently noticed by thieves who stole bikes that were ready for sale This week. Staff volunteers and participants are working to get the weekly sales going again by July 20 5th Cake Ryan w. T. O P News

Keith Jackson Operations Manager Ryan W. T. O
Cyber Hackers Have a New Target: Our Schools

News, Traffic and Weather

02:53 min | 2 years ago

Cyber Hackers Have a New Target: Our Schools

"The knowledge shared to the personal data stored schools are a wealth of information they're trying to him all the time that personal information and an easy payday that as hackers finding new ways to break in I've seen three thousand attempts at trying to break into systems from the outside in a single night and it seems to be getting worse I do believe we're seeing a an increase in attacks April Martok is the cyber security and operations manager at Seattle public schools she says hackers see schools as soft target one is schools are generally not resource with a lot of cyber security staff and a lot of cyber security tools and systems to protect them another reason these criminal see dollar signs they can make money they can get paychecks redirected they can get paid for construction invoice they can get ransom it's been successful at many districts across the country ransomware attack is something leaders at the Moses lake school district in eastern Washington never saw coming why would a school district in Moses lake the interesting anybody in Russia that's exactly what happened we're counting on when they sent an email with a contaminated link a staff member clicked on that link leading ransomware in that encrypted their systems the district faced two choices pay the five point three million dollar ransom or rebuild they decided to start over very destructive we were you know will without technology in the network for quite some time when everything had to be rebuilt and I will tell you still to this day were we have some lingering effects of rebuilding even at Seattle public schools a large district with more resources and layers upon layers of protection hackers still tried to break in we have seen attacks would have had them to be successful in a very small number of machines but we we smash them format them and we continue on describes what's happening as an escalating the more the better cyber security experts get a protected in schools the better hackers get I do think there's going to be more and more intelligence in the attacks they're going to be able to customize it which means it's up to everyone to do their part to keep the hackers out Holly many now for como news last fall servers at the north shore school district were hit by a significant cyber attack we reached out to district leaders but were told they wouldn't be able to help with this story message posted on the district's website back in September read in part many systems remain non operational we anticipate that some systems may be unavailable for several days there is no evidence that student family or staff data has been

Operations Manager Washington Russia Holly North Shore School District Seattle Moses Lake Como
"operations manager" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:57 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on KTRH

"With his patented blend of humor and satire Mr Lobel was the MC for film festivals like blob fast and provides background on films with comedy games prices as well we're gonna talk about some movies we'll take your calls next hour about them as well Mr lowball always a pleasure my friend always a pleasure and Pete I hope everyone is all right with the giant monsters returning I can't say everyone is other been some injuries we don't know the extent of that yet but the unbelievable oh wow that is that is terrifying you know I did I did feel sad I'm in Pennsylvania and I did feel something but that was just because I was getting she's out of the refrigerator and when I stood up I hit my head on the freezer door knocked the whole freezer door on since March you'll hurt yourself so some of might have been knocked out of my head tonight but I'll remind you I'm very very glad to be back on the program I'm very glad that everyone at least everyone in your campus okay after this terrible earthquake yeah it's it's on but I just hope that sent god this was a seven point one that may be the biggest ever go through in my life out here wow time I sneak back to Saint Louis I mean I lived in California most of my life the first earthquake I really really felt was in Maryland in two thousand eleven I was in LA a couple years ago and went back to Saint Louis had not been in an earthquake in Los Angeles went back to Saint Louis and I was on a three point four and wow ended up being on CNN that night yeah telling them what it was like the feel and with the three four yes that's pretty extensive US seven one was unbelievable the one in and and Baltimore was forced seven and that that was pretty good I mean we could still driving but I don't know about I mean seven one that sounds like something out of a movie he does not by the time it hit us where we are it was probably down to about a five in terms of strength but still the building which is been built on rollers actually was rocking back in forth in you can hear the U. girders the metal going weird in you know you think for a moment man this whole building is going to go down and Danny our operations manager came running down making sure everybody was okay it's it's weird anyways let's talk movies let's have some gal now for what's out there these days you know I I just saw the new Godzilla movie and I really enjoyed it the king of monsters that just came out was a Japanese American made American made movie with but they can't but legendary pictures has the legendary believe this English company right but if the western film made a recently will recently did that is because only a few years ago and this is a direct sequel to the Godzilla movie from just a few years ago only this time he's got in row Dan and king Ghidorah and it's much more of a throwback to the movies of the sixties where he's fighting multiple monsters and it's kind of a hassle to look crafty an aspect to it where they they sort of redesign the origins of the monsters to where they're much older that they've been here before we were and now they're just coming back to reclaim the planet now Godzilla originally was a depiction in Japanese films right yeah yes I think fifty five Godzilla was it was Japanese film go G. right and then when they brought it over to America they simplified as Godzilla and then they inserted all the scenes with Raymond Burr as an American newscaster in Japan sort of make it feel more like an American movie did they create those movies Mister Lobo and because of the you know two bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the fallout with radiation first film is very much allegorical to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki from World War two this was like a mutant or something yeah the radio active basically kind of the folly of man you know the right sort of taking revenge you know almost like there is taking revenge for for our tampering with of you know things we don't understand like nuclear power that's kind of that it's interesting because the first movie is very much a Downer you know I I'd much rather show an audience Mothra the first monster movie than the first Godzilla movie because it is a kind of of the first one is a very serious very serious but I mean it it definitely is allegorical too that the shipment tragedy which which makes it a lot darker in tone why were the horror films of those past days the fifties the sixties why would they so weird why were they aware with these so weird that's a good question I think the world would you compare them with horror films of today yeah are you knowingly and stuff that we made it a lot more fantasy in our or films you know I think that there was a kind of almost to mystic kind of fairytale sort of quality that that sort of crept into a lot of those old women either even even in a Frankenstein and stuff like that they're almost fairy tales and I think that you know move after the sixties you know with the sort of the introduction of of you know you've got psycho in movies like The Exorcist and I think I think a lot more real world kind of horror kind of crept into it into the in the universe of horrible I think especially in the forties fifties and sixties there was a lot of fantasy inserted into the man I think also because they were more considered fair for children you know I I don't think quarter was not considered serious entertainment either was science fiction by the mainstream even though a lot of adults you know and very intelligent people were writing and producing and creating a sci fi and horror it was very much thought of as as as matinee material I think that that's why a lot of it was so weird and how we have why we have so many goofy bug eyed monsters and so many of those movies we didn't have a lot of television and in those days obviously we didn't have cell phones smartphones social networking so people's past time was truly going to the movie houses wasn't absolutely absolutely yeah you couldn't just pull it out of your pocket you had to you have to go downtown and and you know pay your five sensor or or whatever and you sit in the dark all day and maybe a double feature with a cartoon in a newsreel and a serial let's talk more about these when we come back with Mr.

Mr Lobel
"operations manager" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:01 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"I'm your host, Jill econom-. Oh, my next guest is Ben Barbera operations manager of the Milwaukee county historical society. Thank you for joining me today, Ben Franklin through so help us understand first of all what's the difference between the Milwaukee county museum, and the Milwaukee county historical society. Well, it's a difference in scope, and it's a difference in focus. The public museum is that it's hard to natural history museum. So their their scope is much broader than ours. It's an international worldwide scope, and they tend to look at anything from early indigenous cultures through to butterflies and everything in between dinosaur exhibit in the streets of Milwaukee, and thanks very a very broad scope, but at their heart it's natural history. Whereas if you count historical society are focused is very. Much the history of Milwaukee county, and as such our main focus is on collecting and preserving documents artifacts, photographs anything that sort of represents that history and helps to tell those stories. Okay. So what specifically does the historical society do and why are they so important? Well, are very are most important. Function is that we are the repository the historical repository for the largest city and the largest county in the state. So we really are the place to go to learn about Milwaukee history, Milwaukee county history. And so we do we do this in two ways, we have sort of two units of the historical society what we have a research library, and we have the museum unit and in the research library. We have a large archive where we have documents and photographs and essentially two dimensional things that people can come and learn about family, histories and business histories and learn about their house or property all kinds of things like that. And then we have the museum division where we do exhibits, and sort of bring our stories to the public through public programming school visits in all kinds of things along those lines. And so each each division sorta works together making uses of of the resources of our collection. Whether it be, you know, coroner's reports or it's. Old beer and brewing memorabilia, these are the things that we collect. And we show off to the public. How do you get the stuff that people just come in and say, hey, I've got this. This collective, you know, I've got this that has been around in my home for a while. Are you interested in it? Or I have these pictures I interested. I mean, how do you get your stuff? The vast majority of our collection has been donated to us we've been collecting as the historical society since nineteen thirty five. So our collection is is very large and broad because of that collecting time period. And so at this point in our collecting, we tend to try to be a little more focused but early on we tended to take pretty much anything and everything. So the joke. I make is that we were like the nineteen forties. Goodwill, basically when somebody was cleaning out their attic, or they had all these old magazines. Any weren't sure what to do with it? They said, hey, let's take it to the historical society. And though it causes me some difficulties now, I can understand how at the time they were trying to build their collection. And they thought, hey, this is great. We'll take just about anything, and we'll make a museum research library out of it. And then P large organizations like maybe Allen, Bradley, or, you know, some of the breweries do they say also, you know, we have these these things, and and come to you and say, do you want them or did you guys go out and actively seek things or again, I'm just curious how you get all the stuff that you have a perfect example in two thousand three they donated over twelve hundred items to us. Artifact items to sort a document the material culture of their history. And then countless I don't even know how many boxes of documents. And and they're they're magazine, and photographs and all these other things that really sort of portrayed the scope of their history that was donated to us Pabst brewing company donated a number of things to us over the years large organizations often do. Also, churches different smaller organizations will we'll either records and then families as well. And then it's the same thing with the artifact collection of really can come from any number of areas. We don't. Actively solicit in most cases, unless we hear about something really special that we think should be preserved a lotta times. It's people coming to us. But we're always keeping our ears than is out for opportunities. Have you ever had somebody come to you and say I have this old dust collector item? And then they bring it to you. And you find out. Oh my gosh. The value that maybe they didn't realize bringing before they brought it in that hasn't happened in the five years that I've been there. But what we have done is found some things in our collection that maybe people didn't realize at the time. How valuable it was found a Tiffany lamp shade? There was just putting a box at our offsite storage. And we realize it was a very valuable Tiffany lamp shade things. Like that do definitely happen. Well, what is it about? What you do that motivates? You know, we talk about home important, the why is and we like to uncover that with our guests. So what is it? What is it about history or or museums fascinates you? I've been interested in history since I was a kid. You know, even in fourth grade, when we I didn't grow up in Milwaukee button fourth grade, we learned our local history to and even those stories I was I was very interested in. So I've always had this this fascination with the stories of the past. And and how that influenced how we are today and making those connections. And so I mean, my favorite part of my job as the curator as well as a manager is essentially telling stories and so. My background. I came into museums a little bit differently than other people in the sense that I was more of a history focused person. I thought I was going to be a high school history teacher, then I took an education class in college and realize that they want to be a high school. And I went off and got headed completely different career. I was in the exercise I went into exercise science exercise physiology industry for a while. But all that time, I was reading historical books and thinking about history. And I realized that that was really what I wanted to do with the rest of my life was figure out a way to bring history sort of to the public in ways that maybe they weren't prepared for it. You know, you hear a lot of people complain about history's boring has nothing to do with me. Well, one of the things we do and one of the things we really focus on is trying to make that personal connection. And that's one of the great things about being at the historical society is because it's local history. It's very easy to help people make that connection to their family or their place of work or even a restaurant or or a concert venue that they like to go through. They can learn a little bit more about that. And see that personal connection to the history. Yeah. And again, I think we talked about that in the prayer segments. How important that is to make that connection? I was one of those kids. History was out my favorite subject, and there again, I was saying how does this apply to me? But when I went to the museum I saw things differently and that was super exciting. I also think as I age history is becoming more interesting to me, I've traveled all over the world. And I find that every place I go I enjoy learning about the local history. And so I've talked to a number of people to that say with them too as they age history is becoming more of an interest. That was prior prior tour. Maybe when they were were kid. We definitely see that at this society with people that come to visit. It's it's often sort of the later learners that are really interested in delving into the history or learning more about the family history. And with with the kids, I mean kids are always they're always waiting for the next big thing. You know, they're very very typically they don't necessarily want to look back and think about history, but every now and then you'll get a kid who when we tell them something or we show them an old. Telephone. And they realized there's no screen on it or even know numbers and the court. Did they have to try to figure out how how one would work this? Then you kind of see the wheels spinning, and you can see the connection a little bit more than if I were to just say Alexander Graham, Bell, invented the telephone, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. So that's one of the nice things about being a museum is that we have the physical artifacts the material culture that we can use to tell the stories and that that resonates better with the younger audience. Yeah. Do you have like a record player or an eight track player in your I bring out bring these what these things I have this wind up graph phone that plays wax cylinders. And I bring it out in the first thing I'd say is this is the original ipod is get really big. And then I have to explain how it's not really an ipod, but its functions in a similar way puts things in perspective. Absolutely. Sure. Yeah. They can identify. Well, you had said the Milwaukee county historical society has over seventy five thousand artifacts and more than a million photos and documents in their collection..

Milwaukee Milwaukee county historical so Milwaukee county natural history museum Milwaukee county museum Ben Franklin Jill econom Ben Barbera operations manager Alexander Graham Allen Bradley Bell five years
"operations manager" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You can as if you want to help you can spread the word about mission rabies. And then, of course, donations are always welcome. For mission rabies in general. This is been just honestly, I could talk to you literally per weeks about this. But this has been an absolutely illuminating conversation and the truth is we haven't even really scratched the tip of the iceberg because we could talk about individual countries individual efforts and just a day to day operations of what it means to be a volunteer. But if we could ever have the pleasure of having you back. I would really appreciate it. Would you ever consider coming back? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I could talk for days about this. And we would listen for days. So we appreciate it. Fred we want to thank you from the bottom of our heart from all the podcast listeners to discuss mission rabies and just spreading the good news about all of the exciting work that you're doing in all the countries. I look forward to talking with you again. And I hope you'll come back for part two. All right. Thank you very much. It was it was great to be there. And join us come out come out with us. Well, I'm already on board. I'm travel. I'm just looking at my schedule right now. Thanks again. Fred, I really appreciate it. We'll talk soon. Alrighty bye-bye. While folks there you have it the global operations manager of mission rabies, Frederick Lor veterinarian just outstanding global citizen. It's just incredible to hear the the work that's happening on the ground level, the educational efforts in different countries. Listen, we talk a lot about pessimists country and our human animal bond here in the states. But it's so important that we realized there's good work being done outside of this country on a global scale. We want our pets that are sitting right next to us in the living room to be healthy. But then it's also important to remember that keeping pets and animals healthy internationally all over the world can.

Fred operations manager Frederick Lor
"operations manager" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on KOMO

"Operations manager. Chris Johnson says they've worked with seven major cell phone carriers. Everything working properly. Everybody should have continuous cell phone covers through the tunnel. And the same thing for broadcast radio as well. We can actually invade your radio if you're listening to the radio in your car to issue. Emergency broadcast information. However, there is no wifi in the towel moments. After a tragic crash. Other drivers passed by passing by jumped into action. The first on the scene knew they had to work really fast. If they were going to save a life. One woman said they did everyday thing that they could until the paramedics arrived at the scene along the Sumner taps highway last night. Come most Keith Eldridge spoke with that woman, Picard stopped turn left and was rear ended. By what the sheriff's department calls an impaired driver of a pickup. And then that car was hit head on by another with two teens onboard. Rebecca hunt said she came up on the scene and jumped into action. Thinking must have saved this lady. God help me. God me say this lady, she said, she and two others rotated doing CPR until paramedics arrived, then she learned the woman didn't make it. I just said a prayer of. I just think that's the only thing you can do the examiner said she is sixty five year old Margo Garcia saboteur of Sumner. Sheriff's department says her husband is in serious, but stable condition, if he reached out to her hunt says this is what she'll tell him. I don't think that she suffer because by the time that we got to her. She was already passed the teens. The sheriff's office says they're going to be okay. At the driver.

Rebecca hunt Operations manager Chris Johnson Keith Eldridge Margo Garcia Sumner Picard sixty five year
"operations manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Yeah. We've had multiple conversations about it. And actually just started talking about it again last week. I'd keep going with the conversation. I think you're in a good situation. You're doing really well, financially and my instincts are your instincts because I think in the next three to five years. Hopefully, you're continuing to have more detailed conversations. He are you the are you the day to day leader of what your current role. Yeah. Myself and our operations manager handle day-to-day operations. Are you considering the president or what what what what's your title? Now, the current owner is the president on. I'm only estimated we have and only project manager that we have so making more decisions pertaining to the act of jobs of jobs. You know, my question is what could you do if you put your mind to it? Look, what would you do if you could just spend all your time on a growth strategy over the next one to three years? What's the key to this company growing in revenue? We're continuing to grow maybe not in size number of employees. However, since I started estimating and the jobs that are sold have been on the books, and then we've gone from two point three million a year to four million year. So we're continuing to grow annually which in turn as the margins are good. They helped me because I get you know, I'm involved in profit sharing and things like that. Exactly. So I would sit down with him aren't having more aggressive conversations than you're having overtime and start throwing some ideas, low pressure, ideas out and see what he see what he likes what he doesn't like and start moving AB some of that profit sharing into some equity, and you get a little bit more equity in his thing grows in you move. But I if you could personally start pointing to some of the huge growth office of new strategies and things that you've brought to the table, you know, I would keep having that equity conversation. I think it gets to a point where where you will be able. To to buy the company, and I feel much better about that than starting your own company. So, you know, keep your mind open and keep the conversation going. Well, today's quote and question brought to you by me every once in a while throwing on my quotes in. And so here it is for you today. A clear vision reveals direction and creates motivation, a clear vision reveals direction, and it creates motivations you. Gotta get clear. Do you have a clear vision of your future? Our time is almost up before. I let you go you matter, and you do have what it takes. Thank you. So very much for joining the conversation until next time. This is the Ken Coleman show press on. Hey, folks, I want you to check out our other Ramsey solutions podcasts such as the Dave Ramsey show. If you're looking for boring, financial, talk, you're in the wrong place. This is not your mother's for a one K meeting. This is life on the radio, and it's just downright entertaining. That's why there's about fourteen million of you out there today. Thanks for hanging out with us, America. Glad you're there to hear full episodes. Just search Dave Ramsey in. I tunes or go to daveramsey dot com.

president Dave Ramsey us operations manager project manager Ken Coleman America four million year three years five years one K
"operations manager" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"operations manager" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You can as if you want to help you can spread the word about mission rabies. And then, of course, donations are always welcome for mission rabies in general. This is been just honestly, I could talk to you literally per weeks about this. But this has been an absolutely eliminating conversation. And the truth is we haven't even really scratched the tip of the iceberg because we could talk about individual countries individual efforts and just a day to day operations of what it means to be a volunteer. But if we could ever. I have the pleasure of having you back. I would really appreciate it. Would you ever consider coming back? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I could talk for days about this. And we would listen for days. So we appreciate it. Fred we want to thank you from the bottom of our heart from all the podcast listeners to discuss mission rabies and just spreading the good news about all of the exciting work that you're doing in all the countries. I look forward to talking with you again. And I hope you'll come back for part two. All righty. Thank you very much. It was great to be there. And join us come out come out with us as well. I'm already on board. I'm wasted travel. I'm just looking at my schedule right now. Thanks again. Fred, I really appreciate it. We'll talk soon. Alrighty bye-bye. While folks there you have it the global operations manager of mission rabies, Frederick, Laura veterinarian just outstanding global citizen. It's just a credible to hear the the work that's happening on the ground level, the educational efforts in different countries. Listen, we talk a lot about pets in this country and our human animal bond here in the states. But it's so important that we realized that there's good work being done outside of this country on a global scale. We want our pets that are sitting right next to us in the living room to be healthy. But then it's also important to remember that keeping pets and animals healthy internationally all over the world can help.

Fred operations manager Laura