35 Burst results for "Opera House"

The World Economic Forum Hides in Plain Sight

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 3 months ago

The World Economic Forum Hides in Plain Sight

"But what's interesting about the World Economic Forum is they hide in plain sight. You see, instead of trying to do it all secretly, the elites of the world said, well, what if we actually lead with our greatest vulnerabilities? You see, the World Economic Forum led by Klaus Schwab, a German engineer, they engage in their activity in forums and in panels and speeches instead of smoke filled rooms or private meetings. Those happen as well. But you see, they've decided to design a paradoxical communication strategy. Where the treachery is televised. Listen to Klaus Schwab and cut three, say the future here is built by us by a powerful community as you are here in this room. The stakeholders of larger communities as we collaborate. Now for those of you that are James Bond fans as I am, I love the James Bond series for a variety of different reasons until they've gone woke, which seems they are going woke. There is a, I think rather entertaining and well written James Bond film called Specter. The villain in that film is acted out by an individual by the name of Christoph Waltz, who is also German, and he dresses the same as Klaus Schwab the entire movie is about how the world elites all meet hiding in plain sight at opera houses and other public areas to design how they are going to take over the world. Play cut three. The future is not just happening. The future is built by us by a powerful community as you here in this room. We have some means to improve the states of the world, so that we act all a stakeholders of larger communities that we serve not our only self interests, but we serve the community and second that we collaborate. Straight out of central casting for the Bond

Klaus Schwab World Economic Forum James Bond Christoph Waltz Specter
"opera house" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:28 min | 7 months ago

"opera house" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"So you were totally. I talk about someone asked me the other day and an interview about how did being a refugee effect you. And I said it affects me every day. I don't see it as an event I see it as a life experience. It is, you know, there's a exercise psychologist do or start to describe yourself, what's the first word that you would use? And I would say refugee before I say mom before I say woman before I say leader speaker author. It is the defining. And everything, including my achievements and my downfalls and my burnout and my challenges, it all I can trace at all to that, not just to that event, but it's who I am. Yeah. I mean, and that's everybody's life. It just isn't very varying degrees of intensity. Yours is probably up there on a scale of one to ten at 11, you know, for someone who's 13 to be thrust into that and to see that to see your parents and the fear and the stress and the courage, I mean, all of that, you saw the negative, but I mean, that's just the ultimate encourage, right? And also, you know, the story I love to tell and actually I've been talking a lot about the story recently, it's a lot of leaders that I do work with and I speak with around gratitude and finding the ability to be grateful for things when life sucks. And the stories that I think you and your listeners will appreciate. So we were in Vienna and we were living in this dilapidated building with a bunch of other refugees in the red light district because that's I guess where they could hide us. And my dad who is the most brilliant Russian scientist just imagine like the Russian genius, my dad was totally that crazy, but amazing. He's a PhD in polymer physics and like the biggest brain I know. He got a job at night unloading crates at a local market just to make a couple of dollars for food. And so he comes in one morning. My mom, you know, we all share this tiny room. My mom and I just waking up. And he was like, okay girls, get up, take, you know, let's get ready. We're gonna go see the Vienna opera house today because they have free tours. And my response I'll never forget, it was one of those moments where I looked at him in Russia, but I was like, you are crazy. You are insane. We are in this disgusting place. We don't even have any money. We don't even know if we'll get to America. You want to go sightseeing and I'll never forget one doubt said to me, said, you know, you're absolutely right. Life is awful right now. And we have so many things we could sit here and just cry about. But also, we could go and walk around this beautiful city and see something beautiful and enjoy doing it as a family. And if you think at that time, I was like, oh yeah, dad, that's very wise. No, absolutely not. I ignored everything you said. And I had to go, they made me go. We went to the opera house. The whole time I was very angry that I had to do this horrible thing because the way that I thought is when something is wrong, you gotta own the struggle. So how could my parents be enjoying something? We have to sit and cry over this horribleness we're in. My dad with all his charisma befriended this gentleman in line. Who offered to buy us ice cream after the tour. So here we are in Vienna. There's a photo from that day. We have no money, but this guy just bought us ice cream, we're in a cafe in a beautiful city. Everyone's smiling in the photo. And that photo I have it, my face is cut out because a couple of years after we came here, I cut out my face 'cause everyone was smiling and on my face is the.

Vienna opera house Vienna red light Russia America
Kennedy Center Honors back once more, Biden attends

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 9 months ago

Kennedy Center Honors back once more, Biden attends

"The the Kennedy Kennedy center center honors honors have have made made the the return return both both from from the the pandemic pandemic and and from from partisan partisan politics politics it's it's gone gone since since twenty twenty sixteen sixteen no no president president had had attended attended the the Kennedy Kennedy center center honors honors but but that's that's now now changed changed as as Joe Joe Biden Biden and and First First Lady Lady Jill Jill took took their their spot spot in in the the presidential presidential box box at at the the Kennedy Kennedy center center opera opera house house last last night night that that alone alone was was enough enough to to prompt prompt the the audience audience to to erupt erupt in in a a sustained sustained standing standing ovation ovation by by restored restored another another tradition tradition that that went went missing missing during during the the trump trump era era as as he he welcomed welcomed the the recipients recipients to to a a White White House House reception reception where where he he praised praised the the honorees honorees musician musician Joni Joni Mitchell Mitchell Motown Motown founder founder Berry Berry Gordy Gordy Saturday Saturday Night Night Live Live creator creator Lorne Lorne Michaels Michaels active active Bette Bette Midler Midler an an opera opera star star Justino Justino D. D. as as ex ex president president tropic tropic skews skews himself himself his his first first year year in in office office after after some some recipients recipients threatened threatened to to boycott boycott the the event event if if he he came came he he missed missed the the next next two two years years and and last last year year the the pandemic pandemic led led to to the the events events postponement postponement until until after after trump trump left left office office Oscar Oscar wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Washington Washington

Kennedy Kennedy Center Center Joe Joe Biden Biden Jill Jill Kennedy Kennedy Center Center White White House House Joni Joni Mitchell Mitchell Mo Berry Berry Gordy Gordy Saturday Night Night Live Live Lorne Lorne Michaels Michaels Bette Bette Midler Midler Justino Justino D. D. Motown Oscar Oscar Wells Wells Gabriel Gabriel Washington Was
The International Ramifications of the U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

The International Ramifications of the U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan

"Black In in that case in you just said that we cannot compare The events of the last few days either to saigon. Oh even to. Jimmy carter as somebody who is a. Pm of the of the british opera house is somebody who is a canadian as well. What are the international ramifications of what we have just seen when you'll blaming our allies our partners in the country prior administrations went already. The media organs of the chinese communist state are saying quote unquote headlines. Bidoon will surrender taiwan. Next how how can send a you. As an observer of presidential politics that there will be very very serious ramifications. I'm very concerned. And i think the parallel there is with the bay of pigs President kennedy was fearful of fiasco at the bay of pigs few months after he was inaugurated in nineteen sixty one would embolden the soviet union. That's precisely what happened. And they you know they. We now know that the head short range. Nuclear missiles already deployed on the launcher before it was discovered by. Us intelligence that four hundred thousand two old divisions a soviet armed forces in cuba in-country and they've been there for some months before american intelligence defected. This right under the nose. Eight minutes away in a jet aircraft from for miami and and And then he was afraid that it would embolden the russian su something impetuous which is what happened. He and we of course will settled very. I would say we didn't quite statesmanlike manner but but that sort of thing does encourage those who have an appetite to be aggressive. And if they think they're facing a vacuum or facing a completely irresolute opponent than it is extremely dangerous. And i mean you know. We got all kinds of historical parallels for this as hitler himself said after he saw chamberlain and della at munich. He thought he could do anything he

British Opera House Jimmy Carter Saigon President Kennedy Taiwan Soviet Union Cuba Miami United States Chamberlain Della Munich
Horace Fletcher: 'The Great Masticator'

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Horace Fletcher: 'The Great Masticator'

"Born in lawrence massachusetts in eighteen forty nine. Horace didn't play an instrument or hustle. Amateurs at chess no. He didn't cobbled together. Shoes in italy. Horace fletcher like the chew. As a young man fletcher traveled around performing odd jobs following his interests he worked as a writer and artist and even managed in new orleans opera house for a time. He loved to read and he indulged in many of life's pleasures mainly food. It was this pleasure. However that inflicted some of the worst pain he'd ever experienced in his life for one. As he got older he struggled with obesity and it side effects such as chronic stomach pains he also found himself being refused coverage from a life insurance policy or rejection. That sounded alarm bells for him. He quickly realized it was time to make a change one day while traveling to chicago on business the middle aged fletcher began chewing his food. He'd always shoot his food before but this time was different. He kept chewing and chewing and chewing until all that was left was a liquidity goo on his tongue. He believed that this was the key to proper digestion and weight management according to this new practice which he dubbed fletcher ism. All food needs to be chewed until it has been turned into liquid. Any solid particles were deemed unnecessary and could be spat out. It sounds absurd today. But at the time fletcher ism caught on. He became known as the great mass decatur and argued that his practice could increase a person's strength despite reducing the amount of food they actually eight. He also had strict rules about win. To consume sustenance followers. Were instructed to avoid eating when they were sad or angry and to wait until they reached the point. That fletcher called good and hungry. No midnight snacks for him. He started touring the united states giving lectures on his methods methods which were scoffed at by doctors and scientists as nothing more than self-important hokum. That didn't matter. Though fletcher ism had reached far more important spokespeople than doctors celebrities and titans of industry had begun shoeing with wild abandon among them. Were john d. rockefeller and author upton sinclair. Even mark twain was considered a friend

Horace Fletcher Fletcher Fletcher Ism Horace Lawrence Chess Massachusetts New Orleans Italy Obesity Chicago Decatur Titans Of Industry United States John D Rockefeller Upton Sinclair Mark Twain
"opera house" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"opera house" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"The first one was with the sf age foundation and black brothers esteem. A not was very low key celebration of sorts in which handed out free food. There were free covid vaccines for people to get a lot of information about aids and hiv in the black community but also resources for critical of color in particular because they're severely underserved population and then on saturday. The nineteenth the official juneteenth. We had a really really really beautiful event. That was in person. It was crazy but it was beautiful and held it on our outdoor stage and we had a bunch of local artists common play. there is a blues jazz. There was positive hip hop there was live poetry dance and again also making sure that folks had access to resources so cause of who stead just caused was doing information about housing resources especially with the upcoming end of the eviction. Moratorium things of that nature open-door legal was also there is really fantastic. It was interesting leading up to it because we knew that the city was going to reopen. So we knew that there was going to be not just pressure but like you know genuine request to see. The baby's opera house reopened in be acceptable again until we planned a very very small juneteenth celebration. That was like you know. Come here some jazz in the backyard. And then as things were like we're going to be reopening all the way you know the release of kobe restrictions and also just a lot of feedback from the community. We had a lot of artists that are actually come into us. Missile curated a really fantastic in person event and it was interesting to do something in person but it was also really beautiful to see people in our outdoor space enjoying each other and enjoying music and culture in our space in. That's really what we want to go for in the future with everything we do. So actually what do you feel has been the biggest impact of the baby opera house on the performing arts within the baby but also this workforce training with your apprentice program and then there's the education and community center aspect..

sf age foundation aids
"opera house" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"opera house" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community with vaccinations increasing cove in nineteen cases and deaths decreasing. We're now moving into the summer of twenty twenty one with the reopening of the economy and all of the uncertainty of ever changing indoor and outdoor vaccinated and unvaccinated protocols and politics. That will drive how we all come back together as a unified or fractured community. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is sustainability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality and became important for us to kind of integrate that into our technical artistry component. And so we've definitely been listening to the needs of artists and artists of color. Not only opening ourselves up as a venue for them but also making sure that we're helping them be successful out in the grand world and then also we have been re establishing ourselves as a community resource and so maintaining our food bank aren't covid testing and also being a meeting place for the community so that they feel like there's a convenient space for them. This is the program miniature of the bayview ashley smiley. The bayview opera.

san francisco bay ashley smiley
Storms in Germany Blow Roof Off Opera House and Flood Stage

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Storms in Germany Blow Roof Off Opera House and Flood Stage

"Germany is in the grip of extreme weather with the least one historic building badly damaged thunderstorms hit Germany late on Monday a differential rains pulled down on the southern and western parts of the country leading to dozens of accidents on hundreds of qualified to operations throughout the night institute guard parts of the roof and several statues of the city's historic opera house with thrown to the ground by the winds will together rescue teams were called in more than three hundred thirty times and so caught with regional train services also interrupted the house across much of the affected region felled trees about to be cut and removed by firefighters I'm Charles the last month

Germany Charles
Moulin Rouge! The Musical to Open in Melbourne

Evenings with David Astle

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Moulin Rouge! The Musical to Open in Melbourne

"Is scheduled to open in August in Melbourne and with me Ah, three of the cast members who will be on stage all of them who were in the recent production of the show Rent at the Sydney Opera House now I have a soft spot for rent. One Do I as I was part of the original production of rent in Sydney. Here with me, Tim. Margie. Okay. To my medic, Relleno A rock, Obara and Jared Draper. Welcome you fellas to the show. Thank you. Thank you. Yeah. Now, congratulations to you all forgetting your rolls. This is very exciting. Tell us about the audition process because the one for rent way back in the nineties was. It was a bit of a cattle call and seriously at Kinsella's in Oxford Street, the line just went rule the way down. Um, the end on bond. I didn't have to wait in the cattle cool to just go past everyone, but I still had to audition regardless of what my credentials were. Tell us about. Your own audition process. Was it grueling? And is it growing? You've got the longest you've been out of the longest. Yes, the tomorrows. Musical audition process was grueling because it was different. When I started auditioning, I think most of my auditions were on zoom. That was very kind of confronting to me. Especially being a musical audition, where you really want to be in the room and show you your physicality and work off another kind of human being. Um, So that was it was it was grueling, and it was long and it was. It was quite a few callbacks on Ben.

Relleno Obara Jared Draper Sydney Opera House Margie Melbourne Kinsella Sydney TIM BEN
How Pop-Up Magazine pivoted to (even more) experimental storytelling

Digiday Podcast

03:48 min | 1 year ago

How Pop-Up Magazine pivoted to (even more) experimental storytelling

"Locum chaz thanks candidates. Great to be here. So i guess it would be wise to start out with the beginning of Beginning of but the pandemic and twenty twenty and Pop up magazines pivot strategy I know at first you turn to video. Which wasn't typically something that pop up magazine did around its events You weren't recording them. You weren't sharing them in that medium but how was it you know. Moving to video and I guess you're for your first venture was shown on youtube. Live back in Does it like late summer. Yeah how how is that process. Well you're exactly right. It's sort of where we where we entered. Twenty twenty is a put together live magazine shows and toward them around the country and we would sell thousands of tickets and fill up a crowded opera house or lincoln center with fans and we would Perform a magazine live on stage writers and filmmakers illustrators and photographers radio people would narrate their stories live to an audience and we would accompany that with live music and with beautiful artwork and film and photography animation on a screen so all of that was shut down in. We finished our last national tour in february of two thousand twenty and The pandemic shutdown theaters in march. So we had been planning on going on tour with our spring show in may but we had to quickly change plans for that. And so we retooled the our spring show and built it instead as as a youtube premiere streaming show and It was sort of one example among many that that of things we did as an organization in twenty twenty in response to the pandemic. I mean at as you said at the opening remarks for a company that makes live events. The pandemic has been at a very direct a negative impact on our business the silver lining for us about twenty twenty in the pandemic is. It was an opportunity for us to be very experimental experiment with storytelling in different formats storytelling in different contacts. And most importantly a twenty twenty one year that kind of gave us permission to get closer to our audience in a variety of ways so I guess the new audience approach in opening up to the geography of of the internet. As you as you mentioned that would be the Video initiative that you that you took on Correct yes so. How did that Perform for you like how was being Youtube lives something that helped drive new audiences as mentioned here. I mean so. The the first the first video experiment we did was back in may and we elected to make it free to our fans through the generous support of google who sponsored the show and what it allowed us to do is to take what was take our spring tour. Our may tour where we were planning to sell tens of thousands of tickets and it allowed us instead to bring that show to millions of people and so we saw an expansion of the number of people we could touch from tens of thousands of people to millions of people and that was very exciting for us.

Locum Chaz Youtube Lincoln Center Google
"opera house" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"opera house" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I'll fill it. Whoa! Oh, God, This is great. So Uh, so we way got to the premiere, and it was like Lex said it was at the opera house and Kenny and don. It was so beautiful. It's opera houses was fairly new at the time just open and it was the arts the doubt Dallas Arts District. And Yeah, and Alexis and I were at the very back of this damn Hummer, and we're all we're all in these, like, you know, gowns, and I'm in a in a suit and Lexus and a little cocktail dress and And we have to like crawl because all the other obnoxious media including the reporters from Dallas, they all like demanded to sit in the front. Luxan are like we don't care what we care, and we had to crawl out of the very back of this limo. So we go up. And as as Alexis said, were they have us watch the premiere, um, in the theater of the Opera house. So where we get in, and they said, you know, you could sit wherever, but there are certain roads that were blocked off selection. I get in our row and Lex turns around she goes. I think that's Larry Hagman behind us, so we turn around and I said, Yeah, and I go. I think that's the governor of Texas. And then they were Dallas Cowboys. You know, I said, Lex, I think you've got to tell me or those football players. And so we're sitting there and all of a sudden we weren't sure if Larry was behind us. But then when the credits came up, um Larry stood up where he stood up and right, everybody on this stuff right here. He stood up and tipped his hat to everybody in the crowd went nuts and then, like, three rows behind us three rows behind us, and then we get out. And they have a little cocktail reception selection. I work in the room, and I remember and I don't know if you do like we were the people watching was extraordinary. Because the Dallas socialites, everybody I mean, now they have the Real Housewives of Dallas, and you can see why there is a serious there. The social lights at this thing were hysterical. The phrase everything here outfits the purses every the phrase everything is bigger in Texas is absolutely true. And we're sitting there just were watching everybody like just loving life. And then Yeah, they dropped us off with wrong hotel. So what? What's next to them and then annoyed by should Chicago girls and that's all I have for Thursday? Yeah. Friday breakfast at hotel Then we went to Southfork. We hit the gift shop in the Tour house. We did a rodeo with bull rides lasso practice. We met Sally at Southfork keeper and the greeter there which you saw again when you just went, didn't you, Jase? Yeah, he's still there. Sally still works there. And Sally was the one that helped Colin organized my overnight stay at Southfork and I reminded her of the junk and she obviously remember the junket. Not necessarily the two of us goofballs, But it was that day where they said Okay, we're gonna turn you guys into cowboys and Cowgirls. So we get out. We get out of the shuttle and they're like, OK, and they handed you a rope and you're worth one of the Southfork Hands, Ranch hands and they're teaching you how to lasso a cattle lassoed the cattle. The steer. And they teach and Lex and I go first, we volunteer first or like we'll do it. So the guy goes up two legs and I'm the one thinking in my mind. I'm gonna be great at this. I've watched Patrick Duffy do this for 30 years. So I'm thinking that Alexis is going to be the goofball like Lex won't be able to do it. So the convoys teaching Lex and I'm watching Lex going. Oh, she's pretty good. And then I can't do it like I'm not. It's not. Can't catch on. I can't get it. So then they go. Okay. Practice is over. Let's try it so like this gets out, boom first try lassos. The fake steer like in 11 rotation on Di Do it and I look like I'm drunk. I'm looking like I can't the rope. Kenny isn't even near the steer like I do it and they go. Okay. Jason, your turn didn't even get near the cow like and there's relax, you know, 11 rotation. She gets it, and mine is basically doing that. My rope landed on the other side of the ranch. It was like over there. It was so embarrassing anyone. Okay? So what? So far OK, So we're still at Southfork. There was a tent reception. The cast was there and we talked to Linda Gray with five exclamation points. And we got to know Jimmy and Gabe. Oh, who toured Jimmy and gave geese don't know Lex. Who's Jimmy and gave? Um well Oh, look at the time. The dirt alerts coming up least a couple minutes. I'm sorry. What dog? We saw a couple minutes is fine. Um, uh huh. Well, well, jeez. Well, we met Jimmy and Gabe and Jimmy Jimmy was the press person and Gabe was his friend. Yeah, his guest. And, um, so we hit it off with him. And when we were the both of them, and we got back of the bus, and you know, as you do on a bus, you know, you kind of sit next to the people you like. So Lex sat next to Jimmy and I sat next to Gabriel. And so we're talking and I'm like, Okay, girls come acute on time. Then he's Filipino. Huh? That was a connection. Yeah. So Oh, Now we do have to break on the other side of the dirt alert. I will just never. Oh, there's what This'll journal gets juicy. Well, I will tell you how a dinner and some bourbon drinking led to Lex and I Jumping up and down on the bed in our room and why I left elections for a couple hours on that night. Uh huh. And how it didn't quite end the way that I expected. Um, Yeah, we'll do that after the dirt alert. Plus, we have a winner coming up. So it's all next day.

Lex Jimmy Jimmy Southfork Alexis Opera house Dallas Texas Larry Hagman Dallas Cowboys Kenny Dallas Arts District Gabe Sally Lexus Chicago Linda Gray Tour house Patrick Duffy football Jason
Lucia Lucas: Cracking Operas Trans Glass Ceiling

LGBTQ&A

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Lucia Lucas: Cracking Operas Trans Glass Ceiling

"Begin with. I want to go back to when you were first coming out. Was there any president or other openly trans opera singers that you could look at to see how being out might potentially affect your career. No actually this is sort of been a rule book that i've written myself over the last six years. Because there wasn't there was some professional singers who previously have careers. Who then transitioned so. There was a little bit of an idea what might happen with my voice which is not much and there was a little bit of an idea. About how the business might treat somebody. Who is trans like examples of it but nobody who was on the stage performing. It was just sort of a. How does this all work. So i had to decide how i was going to handle each individual thing and hopefully it was in a good way. Oh in so in essence to use your word. You're like writing the rule book for every transfer. Sinha fall you. I mean it's my real book for me. But i do hope that if i'm doing my best that at least administration in different opera houses can see that. It's possible that it's possible that this private thing this this very thing very specific to somebody can exist only in their personal life and it doesn't need to exist on stage. The opera doesn't need to be reworked. Nothing needs to happen. You can glue a beard on. And i'll go out there and i'll sang an it's fine and i don't care and i just want to keep doing my job you know if i'm missing. Baritone i just wanna go sing baritone really well and so now you have been. Al came out officially in two thousand fourteen. How welcoming have you found the opera world. Well the public in opera houses. They're typically a little bit more conservative than the people who are performing. But i will have to say that they're way more understanding and willing to at least inquire instead of shutting down somebody who is not someone who they're used to seeing on stage. We're seeing more and more start to break down. I think that that comes with so many tv studios. That are existing. Now there's more tv studios than have ever existed. You know we have. We have netflix amazon. We have who. We have apple with their own series. You don't have to make you know forty million or opening weekend. You're not playing to that many people in a theater. You can play to niche audiences like everybody doesn't have to like it and it setup that we ended and it's beautiful that way we can tell specialty stores to specialty people. You know one. Massive difference between hollywood and opera in correct me if i'm wrong but you have almost only played male roles and that is how your career is likely to continue. Is that right. Yes the majority of characters that i play in my mainstream main stage career are men specifically angry men between the age of thirty five and fifty. That's that's my talk. So the focus. What type of voice you have. And so because of the characteristics of your voice of the timbre and like the notes you are in that category almost only for opera. Yeah i mean unless a new composer wants to right something else which is actually the case with tobias picker. She's writing the danish girl for me. You know that's kinda something special and that's because the composer said hey. I would like to do this for you

Sinha AL Netflix Amazon Apple Hollywood Tobias Picker
San Francisco War Memorial & Performing Arts Center

Voices of the Community

04:41 min | 1 year ago

San Francisco War Memorial & Performing Arts Center

"To voices of the community which explores critical issues facing Northern California communities. We introduce you to the voices of community thought leaders and change-makers who are working on solutions that face our fellow individual community members neighborhoods cities and our region. This is George Custer your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid-19 s impact on nonprofits and small businesses in San Francisco. We started the series back in April of 2020 during the whole page of the first phase of the covid-19 pandemic and the shelter-in-place requirements over these past nine months the covid-19 pandemic and economic meltdown has wiped out millions of jobs in both the nonprofit and small business sectors as well as shuddered tens of thousands of small business operations. The goal of the series does shine a spotlight on the nonprofit's small businesses wage under staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid-19 pandemic on their operations services and sustainability the series of interviews. We conducted features voices from across section of organizations that make up the fabric of our community. Each of them brings a unique perspective on how they and we are dealing with the issues facing our community during the global pandemic and economic depression. But at the outset of this and ongoing it's been people who are used to Bringing people together who have been forced to keep people apart Hospitality workers entertainers. We're the ones who have really had to click on other and keep people safe by keeping them apart and this episode. Our featured voice is John called in the managing director of the San Francisco war memorial and Performing Arts Center the San Francisco Memorial and Performing Arts Center opened in 1932 with a production of Tosca by the San Francisco Opera the war memorial name commemorates the people who served in the first world war zone. It is one of the largest Performing Arts centers in the United States covering 7.5 acres in San Francisco's Civic Center historic district and totals 7,500 seats. Mom gets multiple performance venues. I'm join remotely be assumed by Sean called in managing director of the San Francisco war memorial Performing Arts Center. Thanks for being here John. I would like to begin. And by having you share with us a little bit about the war memorial and Performing Arts Center. I think for most San Francisco people. They walked by it there a McAllister and Venice across from City Hall and they're like, oh it's a month old building. So it would be great if you could get a share or Memorial and how the memorial and Performing Arts Center work with Arts and Cultural organizations to say, we're just go. Oh absolutely. Thanks for having us on George excited to be here today. The San Francisco war memorial and Performing Arts Center is in the heart of San Francisco, right across Van Ness Avenue San from San Francisco City Hall. We have a number of performer venues here including Davies Symphony Hall the War Memorial Opera House and then inside the Veterans building. We have the Herbst theater. There was a center for Opera which hosts both the Toby Atrium theater and the Brian Crain station studio. And we also have a really fabulous event space called The Green Room all in all we can host over 7,000 patrons any given evening and pre covid-19 do that with juice. The ballet performing alongside the symphony San Francisco performances being in Herbst theater all that could happen in one night. So we're both a home for culture and art in San Francisco as well as a huge economic driver for the region. We've been here since nineteen thirty-two. Our resident company is the San Francisco Ballet the San Francisco Opera the San Francisco Symphony and then San Francisco performances, of course is off the primary users of the Herbst theater, and we've had a long partnership with them as well. So I think that we're one of the cornerstones of cultural activity in San Francisco and really proud to be a department of the city county of San Francisco and then fun fact a historical the charger for the was actually signed their trips theater. That's correct. All of the plenary sessions took place in the Opera House. The UN Charter was signed off stage of what was then the veterans Auditorium, which is now known as the Herbst theater and the Japanese peace Accord was also negotiated in the opera house. So we're really big site for history. A lot of folks don't understand wage. Why UN Plaza is called UN Plaza, but it's called UN Plaza because indeed the charter was signed here and for a brief period they actually almost put the headquarters of the United Nations here in San Francisco before they decided to place them in New York. Yeah, we host a lot of history here and still continue to provide a meeting space to Veterans groups and a number of other non-profits working on behalf of veterans causes here in San Francisco. So

San Francisco Memorial And Per San Francisco Performing Arts Center San Francisco City Hall San Francisco Ballet War Memorial Opera House Herbst Theater Largest Performing Arts George Custer Un Plaza Managing Director Northern California John Davies Symphony Hall UN Toby Atrium Theater Civic Center
"opera house" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"Is something that art can really offer the world right now is not just sitting on its hands and waiting but saying that art is GonNa find a way and creativity is not dead right now instead, it has some really challenging barriers to try and overcome, but I, think if. We can embrace those conditions that we can still find a way to be creative. We can still find a way to make work and we can still send a message to this community not only opera still here or that opera is evolving although i. hope that both of those messages come through we can also send a message of potentialities and what we hope the future is going to be about. A long preamble, but to your question I think in this time, we're going to be able to be in the upper house. Bud. We are doing a performance in the operas Parking Center it is a quite wonderful seven story parking center and what we're doing turning that parking the centre into a kind of an immersive performance for eight cars at a time the audiences in the cars will hear the opera on their FM radio and they'll move from level to level of the parking center on each of the levels of that parking center are singers, members of the not orchestra all telling one unified story based on the last opera of Wagner Ring. Cycle. We're calling it twilight God's. It's a piece that is completely within the. Boundaries of what is healthy and safe, and yet it is something that I hope most importantly it's not a kind of apology. It's not something that says we're sorry we can't be in the theater. Here is a consolation prize, but instead, we can't be in the theater, but we can still be creative and we can still find a way to make something memorable for this audience. So we're we're all pretty excited in fired up to really to make this project happened next month we'll and that such an intimate audience even though you're in a car and I'm thinking about it 'cause I'm pretty familiar with the Opera House and the garage.

Parking Center Opera House Wagner Ring
"opera house" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KCRW

"To officials, Syria has managed to avoid the worst of the Corona virus pandemic. The government says some 100 people have died of covert 19 in the country. The real picture is very different. Syrian health workers and aid groups say the disease is spreading through the country at an alarming rate, a fact that Syria's authoritarian regime would rather hide. NPR's Ruth Sherlock managed to reach one health worker who took the risk of being interviewed to sound the alarm. The health worker asks me not to use his name, say his exact profession or where he even is in Syria. And he asks me to distort his voice. Anonymity is necessary, even just to talk to me about the Corona virus, he says. Because in serious dictatorship, even this information is controlled their continuous warnings against doctor's about speaking on this issue. He tells me medical stuff so intimidated that they're wary even to talk about the virus with each other. Wait. We're all scared all the time. He thinks the regime worries that news of the sickness could prompt desertions from fighters in the civil war and anger and already destitute population. In the early months of the outbreak this past spring. The doctor says the regime tried to hide the effects of the pandemic by restricting which doctors could treat the sick. They would intentionally to specific people who are loyal to the authorities to enter these wards. Now the virus is too wide spread to hide. He says. The icy use in several hospitals in Damascus and other cities are full. Government quarantine centers for those suspected of having the disease. They're overcrowded, dirty and coolly equipped, he says. Some Syrians liken them to prisons and even avoid coming forward with the virus for fear of being sent to these places. There aren't enough supplies. There isn't even enough oxygen. They aren't even able to provide this, so people are dying, and we are reached a mortician in Syria through an intermediary. Who agreed with the doctors assessment, but was too afraid to go on tape. It's hard to know exactly how widespread the diseases because of the lack of official data. World Health Organization representative in Damascus. Doctor Jamal Mike came over, said in a written answer to NPR that there isn't a testing capacity to know exactly how many cases there are. But she believes that there has been a steep rise in the capital Damascus. It seems as though everybody knows someone who has the disease. Famous Lebanese one. Mahfouz died in July after this performance at the city's Opera house.

Syria Damascus Doctor Jamal Mike NPR World Health Organization Ruth Sherlock Mahfouz Opera house official representative
Opera's Domingo denies abusing power, seeks to clear name

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Opera's Domingo denies abusing power, seeks to clear name

"Opera singer Placido Domingo is trying to clear his name after two investigations found credible accusations that he engaged in inappropriate conduct with several women marches are a letter with the latest what to do to mingle denies abusing his power while in management at two U. S. opera houses during an Associated Press interview in Naples Italy to mingle deflected direct questions about whether he sexually harassed women he does say he tried to foster talent I have spent all my life helping I'm you know encroaching on driving people to make American concerts were canceled after the AP reported the allegations last year he is a full concert schedule in Europe in the fall

Placido Domingo Naples Italy AP Europe U. S. Associated Press
House Work with Peter Tucker

Arty Farty

04:18 min | 2 years ago

House Work with Peter Tucker

"Welcome to Ati. House. I'm Sean and Ardennes upon some people to help answer your. Questions, and this is a great question. I wonder who has worked at the opera. House for the longest time. Out Sydney Opera, House has been open for more than forty six years. I wonder if anyone's workday at that long. which is still enjoy working somewhere after all that taught. Well, let's go and make today's guest and ask them. Currently employed at the Sydney, Opera House on the building operations branch as. or I paid someone who's running with this question. WHO's worked at the Opera House for the longest time the if he gets paid getting close near forty he. Started here in March nineteen seventy-one as as library. So. You worked longer than the upper house was open because he helped to build it originally started in the drama theatre. Just drilling holes and that was surprisingly because what else drill Many holes. After a year later when they moved over scheduling and the White House, the holes where the Jays get folded into what an amazing feeling it must be the look at the theater now and know that you helped build it. Did you do any other jobs on the construction side I moved to the top of the console? As. A foil watch office because of work of welding up able new frames and there's not as far system so they had to put up. And that assisted me in nineteen, seventy, three to commencing September. For the Upper House I'll stop is the first volume for visit. The? Very Fist Watt. What's it like being? In a portfolio, I'd spend you. So all the horror is coming on. So strain oprah the belly. Or one of us. Special Effects. Candles flesh POPs sniping onstage and as the far off I have to approve it and that was all new to me. They come into the entertainment industry. So when your fun and in a theater you job is to make sure that any candles. Or fires I use safely still while you keeping everyone safe, it must be great to hear over music and see all the plays and dads and operas. Sales backstage ahead candles on the stage. The with the opera and John Sutherland. Was the principle singer and they'll a another singer on near and usually when I'm backstage that really listened to much of the music, just watch the candles and and they're singing away then. This mile sing singing all. Wait listen to this so it went. went the on the the front of the stage they moved around even recognize the singer. So, back to the staging and his. Body. How easy would sing it out of the shine John Sutherland Got Sydney audience said, he'll be in rousing the box office which happened, but I'll will sight. After listening to singing a Chinese views on opera. Fantastic with John, Sutherland and Luchino, have a Rodney in the same show. That make anybody. A fan of opera art paid off. Last question. What is your favorite thing about the Sydney Opera House the? Upper House. Is that everyday something different this here you come to work you don't expect there's a different show there's a live event but it's just the outlook of the place doesn't away you go out saw you see the ocean, you see all the theories going past all the boats and the activity that happens here it's it never changes especially on you walk around the western side of the which is Harvey saw the bill and you say the city of Sydney showing of the water is beautiful. Well they have pay the talker worked to the opera. House for forty nine years, which is longer than the buildings even hyphen for how amazing it must feel to have helped build one of the world's greatest buildings and still be working that day.

Sydney Opera House Opera House Sydney Upper House John Sutherland White House ATI Jays Harvey Rodney Luchino
Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

Travel with Rick Steves

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

"Let's start today's travel through exterior with a call to our friend, Fred Plotkin in New, York City his work on Italian. Cuisine and opera earned him special honor from the Italian government a few years ago. But like the rest of us, he's staying home and Haton Intel. The risk of infection improves. Giorno Fred. Great to be with you wherever you are, Rick. You Fred first of all you call yourself a pleasure activist, I love that term, and it sort of reminding me of your passion for Opera Your Passion for Italy your passion for cooking, and all the lecturing and writing and work you do. Turn people under those joys of life. How was your life like right now in new? York City I'm in the thick of it. In terms of what the epicenter has been in New York. And my philosophy became at the very beginning better six feet apart than six feet under so I've been very very responsible as I encourage everyone to be if people can get to the plays in world, wars and pandemics, the vast. We need to learn from what people did. Or didn't do and that's sustenance to me to study the past at times like this. Because otherwise we feel abandoned. The past there to teach us, and so I've been reading I've been studying I've used the opportunity to begin to work on a book. I've been wanting to write for years, but haven't had the time. Time is a gift. We need to use it very very well, and I tried to. And I've been reminding myself and my friends that rather than spinner wheels and try to do something. We can't do during this period. Find a way to make it a constructive time and a blessing when you think about your passions opera for instance to me I am so saddened by the notion that one of the most dangerous things. This time is being acquire because the worst way to. To spread this virus is by singing with Gusto, making a joyous sound that depresses me frankly that choirs could be deadly now I have to see them in these checkerboards zoom world singing solo right now and you know I have many opera singer friends who are very dear friends of mine, and I feel for them terribly some of the managing and they sing, and they practice, and they steady new music, but others feel that without the sound of applause in the presence of colleagues. It's not their work and my feeling is always been that when we go into a feeder or church where people are seeing where. Action happens and air shared. Is that sharing of the air the electronic current that happens between humans? That's a huge part of. Our experience at alive theater as a communal setting and something that virtual technology just cannot replicate I never. An opera on the radio or on video and operates a report from an Opera House. But I'm not saying. These things are bad and right now I, certainly enjoying audio operas well but communal gathering. Is something fundamental. You talked about the sharing of air I never thought about that, but I've been thinking about it without knowing it. It's the sort of a communion of course when pastors are struggling with. How can we be together at church if you can't have the sharing of the peace or communion or fellowship or singing? There's no sharing of air and when you go to a pub, you want to share that air when you go to a theater when I give a lecture I want the house packed. It's the sharing of the air, and that's going to be an adjustment for us, and we can hope and pray it will come back, but in the interim we can be singing solo and doing it in a community kind of way. I. Suppose think of the word inspiration. That's where that comes from. It's about breathing together. We do breathe together. I I WANNA make a point to that New York City during the complete lockdown. was incredibly quiet and I heard birds and all kinds of things. I did normally here and frankly the air was much. Cleaner city has slowly begun to try to read self up again. The air is kidding dirtier. This is the place you're activists in me that I'm very sensitive to these things. And although I would not wish on anyone what we've been through nonetheless. I wish we could learn that. There are ways to keep the air cleaner

Fred Plotkin Opera House York City Intel New York City New York Italy Rick
"opera house" Discussed on Q95

Q95

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on Q95

"Sounds like that could be from this week. Oh, great, exciting. All right, uh, Judd linens, handwritten lyrics to the song Nowhere man sold for $450,000 Elsewhere. A guy in a bar gave Ringo 10 bucks not to sing karaoke. Just got the rim shot there say that could be from this week. Well, uh, there are water shortages at Nairobi after floods tore through a damn Apparently, someone aggravated the God of irony. Yeah. Ah, The Royal Opera House in London recently canceled performance by an American soprano because she's overweight. The rest of show, of course, went on as scheduled, but without a fat lady's singing. Nobody knew what it was. A man broke the world record in the 100 meter sprint of men over 100 years old. To inspire the runners. They were chased by a guy dressed as the Grim Reaper. I remember that I remember. I remember that record. Yeah, it was. It's weirdly a big number. I forget what it is, but it's like it's 40. So it's like a big number, and I wanted to say it's like under a meant just under a minute, like 58 or 15 seconds or something. I don't know. I think I think someone else has set a new record, though. Since then I think that's that. Yeah, It's been a while. Yeah, I got If he's going for the over 110 record guy, it might be a little.

Ringo Nairobi The Royal Opera House London
"opera house" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"No Kurdistan and in twenty seventeen thousands of seats at an opera house in Barcelona were filled as an orchestra played to mark the lifting of a covert nineteen locked down in Spain the audience was not very lively the seats were filled a nearly twenty three hundred potted plants some socially distance a recorded message before the concert as those in attendance to show off their cell phones and not take photos with flash because you know the plans the second crash in mid city I think I got hooked problems as you know finance one to ten we're starting on the eastbound side coming up on Robertson Boulevard this wreck is been cleared off to the shoulder traffic's picking up away from national and that earlier problem on the westbound side right around Normandy it's out of points now as well and that drives looking a lot better coming away from the one ten freeway in Norwalk on the five heading north on a pioneer this racks in the center divider and trap it's pretty slow moving getting through as you approach the six oh five the southbound side of the five is also going to be a bit crowded getting out of the east LA easy travel back towards the six oh five Hey Anthony this guy gets you there faster financial markets you know that's well the technician that air inside your home.

Kurdistan Barcelona Spain Norwalk Anthony technician Normandy LA
Barcelona opera house reopens with performance to 2,292 plants

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Barcelona opera house reopens with performance to 2,292 plants

"An opera house in Barcelona Spain open this week for its first concert since March musicians played for a packed audience of plants the hill reports twenty two hundred plus seats were filled with live plants for broadcast in a prelude to its twenty twenty twenty twenty one season due to the covert pandemic following the concert the plants will be donated to frontline

Barcelona Spain
The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

Science Friction

06:25 min | 2 years ago

The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

"It's Natasha Mitchell here. With science friction with a question. Are you a two headed guerrilla? Now I ask this question. Because in eighteen seventy nine the founder of social psychology so an important guy right. The scientists gust of Lebron right these influential words in the most intelligent rices. There are a large number of women whose brains are closer in size to those of guerrillas them to the most developed mile. Brian's this inferiority is so obvious that no one can contest it for a moment. Only degree is worth discussion. Without a doubt there exists sump distinguish women very superior to the average man but they are as exceptional as the birth of any monstrosity as for example of a guerrilla with two heads. Consequently we may neglect them entirely. Well that was iding seventy nine but so it is today. Also it seems because cognitive neuroscientist Professor Jane Rippin from Aston University in Birmingham digs into the history of scientists efforts to pin sex differences on the brain in her light is book the Gender Brine the New Science that shatters the myth of the Female Brian. And just before Australia. Waiting to lockdown and boards closed. She join me on stage at the Sydney Opera House for this is all about women festival. Thank you very much everybody. My Life's work has really been looking at what makes brains different any brains different and in fact book started much more about the exploration of how brains to be different because I am an autism researcher. And there's a great thing in the autism community that if you've met one person with autism you've met one person with autism so we really thought we need to understand the variability. Everybody's brain is is different from everybody else's brain and in fact. I WANT TO CALL THE BOOK. Fifty shades of gray matter but publishers thought perhaps air. I needed to kind of tone down the brains of areas I was looking at a bit more Gravitas so the book is called the gendered brain. And it's really about how brains get to be different particularly with respect to whether they're male brains or they're female brains and actually it turns out once I got into the research and really investigating this given. Everybody knows that men's brains different from women's brains and that's why men behave different. Trim women and men are from Mars women from Venus? All of those wonderful sort of tropes that we've all come across so I went back and I had a look at the research. I thought let's really get into where these differences are can get a handle on how brains and different and I saw thinking I think time looking in the wrong place because I really can't find that much evidence and so eventually when I really gone through the research up brains and behavior. I came to the apparently startling conclusion that the differences between the sexes. A much smaller than we ever thought even with respect to brains so the question. Have you got a male brain or have you female brain? My answer was actually. I think a we're looking in the wrong place and be with probably asking the wrong question so I would say actually having come to that conclusion and our will warn you this in case you feel the need to leave. It wasn't universally accepted. I came across this really profound belief that we really have to acknowledge that scientists like me just you know get a life get out into the real world. You really don't know what's going on there. He comes conclusions like that and the kind of discussions. I was getting from the press when I was saying enthusiastically explaining the similarity between brains for example the Telegraph Telegraph in the UK. Quieter conservative newspaper. When Christina? Doni said this theory smacks of feminism with an equality fetish so. I love the idea that if you're interested equality some kind of perverse practice say this is the kind of response. I got to mind futuristic. My finding but this is my favorite full of carp which. I'm assuming this mistake anyway. So if anybody feels the need. This is dangerous information. They're about to hear time to go. But let's just move on this. Of course it is a very old question. Are Male brains different from female brains? But we need to remember that. This didn't used to be a question more than one hundred years ago when this research started when I started to realize that brains were in some some way the source of all the kind of human behavior we were interested in and even human places in society you found that the researchers at the time who strangely enough for male a distinctive view about what they were looking at they looked at the society. They looked to the status quo and they said women have an inferior place in society which they were actually right because they didn't have access to educational financial independence or political of power. So they said what we is. Brain. Scientists need to explain is the fact that women's brains are inferior so this was actually the beginning of what I call the hunt. The Difference Crusade where scientists were saying men's brains different women's brains. Let's why another coach from the two headed gorilla man. Lebron women represent the most inferior forms of human evolution and are closer to children and savages than to an adult civilized man. So if you kind of harbor ideas. This was allies objective scientific campaign to measure differences between two different groups of people lead to bear in mind. Some thoughts bit later on the idea. This complementarity trump being a bit rude saying that women are inferior. What we should say is that they have these wonderful skills. Which will of course complement those of men who are going to be ruling the world so we must start with the realization. That's as much as women want to be good scientists or engineers. They want first and foremost to be womanly companions of men and to be good

Lebron Natasha Mitchell Sydney Opera House Founder Aston University Professor Jane Rippin Australia Birmingham Brian Researcher Doni Christina UK
How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

Travel with Rick Steves

03:59 min | 2 years ago

How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

"Berlin has become the high tech and cultural powerhouse of today's dynamic German economy but there are still plenty of Berliners who can tell you about the difficulties. They faced back in the twentieth century as a divided city and stories of life under the Nazis during World War Two. We're joined now by German tour guides older Timur and Fabien Muga. Look at some of the most impressive monuments and memorials. You can visit to remember the lessons from Berlin past gentlemen. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having to live in Berlin as a tourist. You just come and go to live there. You're surrounded by all of this history and all of these memorials when you walk down the streets. Does it become just background and you just see through it or are you constantly aware of this happened there? This happened there and so on holger is part of everyday life. Yes but it's not like you kind of oversee it because it is there it is right in your face. I've seen most of the memorials like many countless times. As a berliner as tour guide here but they still are some of them are really haunting especially when it comes to divided city to the wall or to the time of the National Socialist period and in the case of Germany. With your complicated history. The memorials are almost there to not go away to be in your face. I mean there's even something called stumble stones right Fabio yes. There are a memorial stones to victims of the Holocaust who had deported from particular houses. And if you have a friend or relative was deported from that house you can donate some money to this foundation and they will put stumbling stone into the pavement Princeton pavement. Like you need to trip on this to never forget the horrible thing that happened right there when you think about Germany. A lot of our fixated on World War Two in the whole fastest thing but of course there's many layers of the city that was the leading city of of the PRUSSIAN empire and so on Fabio. And when you think about memorials of the horns period and Prussia what is there in Germany to look at our Berlin. I think the most visible that everybody know will know. Is The victory column. That's in the center of the main park often. The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building and was not looking quite some one mental there today. Six major streets of lead straight towards the listen to that part of a big access isn't it? I mean Hoeger. The whole city is built on this axis which lined by memorials. The East and west access really is this fascinating thing. You look up. And you see Golden Angel Hair and you think. Wow that's wonderful. Then you close in you. See while this is all candidates made cannons French cannons French cannons. Like as a AS A TO Z. Boy To as spoils of war multiple. Yeah so it is weird thing. If you you would think that's nice to call between can look at it that it has a little jab at the French. It's a big Jab at Big Jab at the French or the Germans the French and of course I in the next century. We've got the whole Hitler situation and a lot of memorials relating to the nightmare of Berlin being the capital of Nazism. What are some of the memorials that you'll see when you go to Berlin that way what I found very haunting as the memorial to the burning of the books right near onto the Lyndon right near the State Opera House? And it's basically a memorial that you wouldn't really see because it's underground and you would just maybe pastas Query Newton. We have no idea what it is but quite often you see consumerist groups looking at nothing really and then you look there and it basically is a hole in the ground. It's a glass plate in the ground and he looked down and there is an empty library like five by five five meters containing empty shelves for twenty thousand books. Symbolizing was happening in the tenth of May Nineteen thirty three. When the Nazis took all the books and literature that they hated that it didn't understand they didn't like and were putting them in a big pile and burning him openly for people to see and that's now empty. Shelves are very haunting memorial to that.

Berlin Germany Timur Fabien Muga Fabio Holger Prussia Hoeger Princeton State Opera House Hitler Lyndon
Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:30 min | 2 years ago

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

"On your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that

Prostitution Principal Russia Jockey Club Amazon Marie Tagliani Bally Bravura Ella Marie Tahiliani France Europe Louis Opera House United States Tahiliani Great Britain Yoni Princess Victoria Garner
Putin asks court if he can amend constitution to run again for president

Inside Europe

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Putin asks court if he can amend constitution to run again for president

"Russia's lower house of parliament has approved a range of amendments to the constitution the reforms allow president Vladimir Putin to seek re election after his current term ends in twenty twenty four not a single lawmaker voted against the reforms following approval by the opera house Putin would like to sign the bill into law on March the eighteenth that's the anniversary of Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimea region it will also go to a public referendum nationwide on April the twenty second for approval at Putin's insistence other changes introduced as part of the constitutional reforms include a ban on same sex marriage and listing a belief in god as a traditional

Russia Vladimir Putin Ukraine President Trump Crimea
"opera house" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on WJR 760

"You know I've seen the signs in my case all over a Grosse Pointe makes me feel good and it makes me wish I had a sign but I I don't know if we put signs up in our yard but whatever the the vote yes the I. A. it's pretty simple it's pretty straightforward and it's pretty important we just heard a DSO commercial I I'm trying to express to you having lived some other places like New York in like Philadelphia and and such we have an orchestra an art museum the D. I. A. the Detroit opera house the age and those three that just come to mind right away that stands up to any other major city in the country maybe the world and I want to make sure that we understand that that we appreciate that that we use that and that we continue to fund it not new funding continuing funding them to what talk a little bit about that the Detroit institute of arts executive director Salvador Sello Paul's and our old longtime friend Jinger kero who's been long time chairman of the D. I. A. and they're coming up this coming Tuesday will be the primary and though we are going to they will speak with Joe Biden maybe Bernie Sanders who who knows who else will speak to along the way coming up along with those important choices will be the choice for those of you to continue to support the D. I. A. regional millage and the renewal of that village and I wanted to what I wanted to check in with Salvador and Jean Kerr Garrow who I are both on the line as I understand it right now good morning gentlemen good morning Paul nice to have you that was well done you both said good morning at the same time instead of waiting for the other that's better that way because you could wait and wait and wait and then whatever so I hope that you since it's going well but I know you don't take this for granted Jeanne well first you will lead with a wonderful comment about the role that you and W. J. R. of played not only for the Detroit institute of arts but for all the cultural institutions in the city of that voice is very important we're not taking anything for granted eight years ago when we were fortunate at another time in the city to with the support of the voters in Wayne Oakland and Macomb we began building partnerships with leaders in those counties and the citizens and I know it's very gratifying for Salvadorans beach who hails the endorsement and support of Warren Evans Dawkins mark Hackel Dave colder Candice Miller all the county commissioners and the artists already is we're we're continuing to build this relationship with the citizens and I think everyone will acknowledge Paul they're getting a great return on the investment they made in two thousand and twelve and we're asking them to reinvest in the future of the D. I. A. we'll put to Jean please add to Paul W. Smith to the list of people who openly are supportive of this fabulous the I. A. end of renewing the millage in Salvador you even though you were here when all the the the sparks were flying all the trouble you've stepped into this position and done an incredible job as the executive director of the Detroit institute of arts back in the old days we had students pass through but the now we would probably with all of this three times what we used to have maybe ninety thousand students a year are taking advantage with their schools of this fabulous the I. A. the supporters from Wayne Oakland and Macomb counties that have been taking advantage of their special opportunities it's really been heart warming and I would hate for it to stop Salvador yeah it's been a great team work the museum is doing a fantastic job and have to say before the millage in two thousand twelve the museum welcome around three hundred thousand visitors a day with the militant two thousand nineteen we welcome almost seven hundred thousand we got to students before the millage we used to welcome around thirty thousand students now last year we welcome ninety thousand I'm we're working very hard to give access to these war collection in two thousand twenty four hundred thousand students so that's really amazing in the question the only question that's that's been out there and if there's any confusion I guess you could say it was this that you're coming two we the people a couple years earlier than you normally would and and I think maybe gene you can best explain what that's all about Paul I mentioned what the times were like in two thousand and twelve coming out of the financial crisis we've had a very strong years at the museum and and as I say building these relationships there are no elections in two thousand and twenty one next year we thought rather than wait another two years when the millage expires we would do as did the Detroit zoo seek renewal early and continue to build those relationships and as as we all know you just mentioned at the March ten presidential primary will certainly be a time when voters will turn out in strong number we thought that would be a very appropriate time to have our message delivered and have the voters in those three counties support our millage renewal well you know and here you go I I was ask the team off very soon okay what am I missing DSO D. I. A. Detroit opera house well of course the Detroit zoo I'm glad you mentioned Ron Kagan the work he's done there because we also have a world class Detroit zoo so in yes you're right they came early to make sure that their millage was renewed and Salvador I I suspect it will help you and in jeans for the board make your long term planning which everyone knows is very important and you really can't do long term planning if you don't exactly know where your budget's going to be that's exactly right we run the museum like a business we use our resources very efficiently and with austerity we are very transparent to how we use the funds and we want to plan is to make sure that those programs for the kids that are free and we pay for the buses those programs for the seniors which are free those community relationships.

Yuval Sharon's Not-So-'Sweet Land'

The Frame

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Yuval Sharon's Not-So-'Sweet Land'

"Sharon is used to getting some pretty baffled looks when he tries to explain the work of his opera company which is called the industry. Sharon's hopscotch for example took place inside cars driving around L. A. In invisible cities people listen to his opera on headphones as they move through. La's Union station. Sharon's latest piece is called sweet land. It's a collaborative air opera about colonialism. And displacement is set in the La State historic park which is just north of downtown in sweetland opera is used to challenge and dismantle some myths about America's origins. Here's Yuval Sharon. I have been speaking a lot recently about opera. This country being a remaining colonialist art form because so much of opera that we see in this country is the German French Italian repertoire in those languages telling those stories and here we are in America Retelling the stories over and over again and it seems like especially in our times now when there is so much to talk about and there is such a need for artists to be speaking about the kind of things that that we've taken on with this project and so much more. It seems strange to go into the privileged sphere of an Opera House and hear a story about nineteenth century. Italy There's something about that that feels so escapist And feels like it's a. It's trying to pretend like the situation out on the street in our daily lives. is not as dire as it really is So I think that that was for me. A real push to try and create a piece like like sweet land and one of the most important aspects of it was creating the conditions for collaboration To really flow something that would be not another iteration of a kind of hierarchical leadership But the idea that a more horizontal consensus based process would be something that I could offer a kind of antidote to some of the problems that we're talking about before we talk about the story and the music I wanna ask you about the venue it said in the La State historic park and this was native land. It was home to the San Gabriel Band of mission Indians then. It was the site of the Southern Pacific Transportation Companies River Station where migrants from around the world would disembark trains Ryan and now it said against the skyline of downtown Los Angeles next to a metro track next to the one ten freeway. There's like a little wine store across the street. It's got so much history. Why was it a good place for you to set the story to me when we were conceiving of this project we were thinking about the right site for where this this piece should take place and of course we started thinking about things like warehouses or alternative spaces but but you know still interior spaces and I was hearing from my collaborators over and over again how much The relationship to land with such a crucial aspect of what they wanted to explore with this piece and when it comes to that relationship with land it seemed to me that one of the one of the one of the places that that really hold so much of. La's cultural history and meaning. Is that sliver of land? That is now the state historic park. you mentioned it's a couple of its iterations but it had so many others for a long time. It was considered a Brownfield as if Meaning that they didn't think that anything could grow on it anymore because of how terribly it was maintained during industrialization during the railroad era So so thinking that. And it wasn't until Lauren. Bon came up with not a cornfield project. This really bold experiment in kind of replanting The land showing it's continuous fertility Before that people sort of abandoned it and thinking that that was the most important tongue village that it was the site of this crucial Spanish settlement that it was this a flood plain all of those things for a while were buried under layers of industrialization and thanks to Lauren and th thanks now to the park. It has It has this new life to it but those layers Still struggle to come out those voices that are still part of the archaeology that layering effect. That's in the land Still has a lot of voices that have been suppressed and a big part of what the opera was about was not to pinpoint any one particular language or one particular story to lift up but instead to think about and to invite the audience to contemplate Those stories that are in the land that were

Yuval Sharon La State Historic Park Los Angeles Ryan America Lauren Union Station Sweetland Southern Pacific Transportatio San Gabriel Band BON
"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Killed in the attacks virtually all the buildings in the city center on destroyed famous landmarks such as the phone kill him or church of Our Lady that swing up palace and the opera house line ruins the **** propaganda machine quickly swings into action it puts the death toll of the attack it's two hundred thousand a figure that is greatly exaggerated the state controlled media accuses the British and Americans of cruelty but it doesn't mention that Germany which started the war has carried out similar attacks on British cities like Coventry and London was monopolised the chairman of an independent commission of historians that later studied the disease attacks from seven side from god please bombard the importance we on the Germans were attacking London with thousands of rockets and bombs around the same time the trees and was bombarded so the attacks and raised in were a reaction to the German decision to fight this war until the very end and the allies thought that it was legitimate to take out trees and in order to end this terrible war yes most of strategic importance to the German army had been declared a fortress city a few weeks before the attacks it was meant to play a pivotal role in stopping an offensive by the Soviet Red Army aimed at capturing the capital Berlin and toppling Germany's **** government was mullah again the via my soul this you little before now this one problem the or the German army had started to transfer troops from the western part of the country to the east they were transported by train and Dresden was an important hub this real transport needed to be stopped in the allies had promised the Soviet Union that they would support the offensive against Germany by bombarding important infrastructure today the bells of the phones are ringing again its dome is once more an important landmark costly since nine one the church was rebuilt from nineteen ninety four to two thousand and five and the new phone kill should as a symbol of reconciliation the cross on top was financed by British donations.

Germany Coventry London chairman German army Soviet Red Army Berlin Dresden Soviet Union
"opera house" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on WTVN

"Is so I I was on the plane and I wanted to say to the store is because I was flying you know Qantas and and so she's lying good day and I'm like Hey so what should I see you know in Sydney I'm only there for a couple days and she said well you've got to see a nice I practically set with the opera house I got it don't have anything else but the damn opera house body verily the answer's no the answer is no I don't know it's a nice city again it's Berg is a great city five a fifteen hour plane flight and then being fifteen hour time difference no I don't not not for Pittsburgh now was the opera house really cool though was it a maze it is more cool than you even think really it really it was like why the architecture up close is it you know the white things now you're a sucker for a architecture too so I mean that's building yeah right white the outer shell those are all click bathroom tiles those are all titles really yeah yeah I mean it's really beautiful it's really beautiful because like you can go see a building because as you know it looks really cool and then you go inside there's something amazing here you go inside it's opera right so like if I don't hear it no no no no I flew to the other side of the planet and then didn't go in you can go inside inside there's no opera happening there's a you gotta go buy a ticket you go inside we went in we went inside we're like do you like a tour or anything and I like no the ticket counters over there if you want to see the operator no one wants to see the opera house I know that by now come on it's the only building that anyone knows in the continental to mingle is there and he's going to get you I don't want to take that chance yeah you know to.

Qantas Sydney Berg Pittsburgh fifteen hour
"opera house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:18 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And you perform old over the world at the royal opera house here in London at the mac to New York to Chicago never consumption Cisco Netherlands operas the list is so long thought it was winning a TV talent show in your homeland of Australia at the age of eleven that you want your career when you'll really supportive parents the news with you to Los Angeles in order for you to pursue your dreams and make the best use of your talents and by the time he was sixteen you've won an Emmy for your work on something called LA kids not come we start with that before we talk about you fully formed to develop face what laws and eight kids and the kids was the quickest way describing is like sixty minutes for kids current affairs and cultural arts showcase show for younger children to watch so teens basically and I was the guest host after that which happened quite by chance I was featured on the show and then the producer went the camera loves you to host the show and so she got of having a child host and not and it happened quite by chance and we won an Emmy for a fantastic episode which we did on children living with aids you know because they can get them through transfusions and obviously my birth but it we were looking at all the different ways in which you know a child might find themselves living with a terminal disease like aids I mean it's not terminal these days but did not make that want to be a journalist having done that sort of ring work yeah I I think in a way I really threaded that through finally enough even though I've been performing I've done lots of presenting for the BBC but let's talk about what you're doing that so you've got a recital coming up on July the tenth of the Chilton music festival here in the U. K. and you'll mixing cold porcelain go swim with classics from handle limit such and be safe I want to know how you begin to choose your pieces then which will do you do you sing the man I mean what's wonderful about concerts is that that's the one time you get to see me as me because when I do opera I have to be something else interpret something else I'm in collaboration with a lot of people so a concert a recital I love playing those programs because they can do you handle and I can do Rodgers and Hammerstein and it it it's like three concerts in one and it was so necessary have you ever been to the opera I have never been to the opera shamefully I think if you've never been and you've only seen it from the outside you know the the the kind of representations of it in popular culture make it seem quite exclusionary yes and and impenetrable impenetrable and and you're just I mean I would just be scared of going and not understanding what's going on and feeling a bit silly so what would you think someone yes yeah for those of you know what a lot of it is is finally enough it's old cliche I mean it's like it ain't over till the fat lady sings people still say that there that's not happening anymore we've gone past that but these cliches still remain because there are well no heart shape I tell you what nessie listen listen to this so you wanna Danielle playing Cinderella in Massenet's nineteenth century Oprah some dream for the sixth of July at the very English Klein born house and this production has been given an of an update to this might be your way industry so tell us in what ways has an open up Daschle I've been open elements well this production has been directed by Fiona Shaw Fiona had a really interesting idea the role of Prince Charming is played by a woman in this opera which is quite common for women to play trans roles in opera and that's what the cold weather with a cold trans releases that yeah yeah no it's great I'm but Fiona have this idea that what if Prince Charming wasn't Prince Charming if we're in twenty nineteen and we're looking for love and in an age where love is so accepted in so many different forms and with so many different genders what is love is somewhere else and if your love is somewhere else then who is your Prince Charming so this Cinderella has a different take it is how do you fix the old fairy tale template into the age of LGBT Q. basically and while you know that the prince is actually somebody that I he lived with in the house some may dismiss somebody who works with me and I have a dream that you know how did you ever had a dream where you you saw a person and they were faithful servant a suddenly had to face in you at all I don't think you where are my dads are I dreamt that you were my boyfriend in this film and you know it that's what we play around with and I so we ask a lot of questions about what that means with the symbolism of that means is that very challenging moment for you vocally or emotionally in this performance on the from most people who are the acting was singing there was one part that is a challenge is quite a few telling show one is that I never leave the stage so and I run around a lot and I am I can become very parts during the show and I don't I don't have access to water and the other challenges I have a big suicide scene so you know it's very telling in a very tells interest like whoa is me I'm going to go to the magic can die in and in very tells you think that's that so forlorn but in real life in twenty nineteen of Cinderella's rejected by who she believes is the prince is gonna do something about it that's suicide death pills that it's it's real she's going and it gets very very intense very very quickly this piece it's great I love it so you'll know you're married to Gus Christie who's the chairman of the climb boom festival of press so you actually live in line born house does this mean Danielle that you can stay in bed longer on performance space look it up by people streaming the gardener everybody waking up in the house to go to rehearsal because we keep all of the artistic teams in the house with us so there six offers a summer glide this was I know what else recently it just seems like so the it's it makes it a bit of a commute it's an artistic high where you know six operas times you got conductor director their systems choreographer of lighting designers set designers and their assistance and all the rehearsal pianist and they all live with us in the house and so I might have a premier one day or a performance but somebody else has a ten A. M. rehearsals so you know it's a it's a thing to balance you know this is the worst storm was a circle in the yeah and your parents have Sri Lankan roots and you have a phone to insulin Colossus you find a couple of times what did that mean to you it was incredible I never been to Sri Lanka my whole life I imagine Sri Lanka's this beautiful island and I'd heard always about rupees the currency and I thought they were rubies and I thought it was on the sad when it when I was a child just the rubies for my sand bucket and these are my sweet deal I heard so many Dilek stories about life in this paradise and when I met the people I've met a part of myself I met people that I went I now understand why people say this about Sri Lankans and my a particular mixes with Dutch and Scottish heritage because rock was calling I so we're called the Sri Lankan Buck as B. U. R. G. H. E. R. and it's very very small part of population were English the mother tongue but there's there's just so much to experience there it's such a beautiful country I'm very sad about what's happened with the bombings that happened and I was just there to celebrate seven years of independence and sign with prime minister and what did you say government I did a concert just like children I I I made a program that encompassed everything that represents me as an artist so I started with classical music and I end up seeing things really means and you know I mean it was it was a fantastic concert I'm very emotional Danielle I could talk to you for the rest of the show but sadly we do have to move on thank you you're staying with us to the end of the program don't go away there's lots more to come including Oscar winning director Danny Boyle and home runs David have would talking about his mental breakdown the outsells back after this.

royal opera house London New York Chicago Cisco Netherlands Australia sixty minutes seven years one day
"opera house" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on WJR 760

"Cadillac cafe that Detroit opera house across from the ballpark. Here's frank. If you're headed in the news, we mentioned just before that the business has been in the beef with Detroit. Over legal matters, Robert Karnak. Has apparently paid for three planes to plough ahead carrying banners? And the last one suggests one I didn't get a chance to mention it suggests that mayor Mike Duggan is soliciting sex to give out bribes give out raises to people, and I don't know what he's up to dick. But we're going to talk to Robert cardiac and find out what this is all about coming up in about ten minutes. So stay tuned. Buckle your seatbelt. It's it's just another opening day Detroit. Right. Any rate? We welcome in a couple of fellows who are looking to to help out those who might have a little too much fun at the opener today. Stanford blankets here, the co of wall side windows, good to see again, and Adam blankets here is cheap of staff. Adam going to see you could thing as well. So you you're lifting you're lifting people up who who are maybe down a little bit in the ballpark. Exactly drink too much. We're giving people a smart ride home from the game today. Smart ride with wall side partnership with lift offering half-off rides home from the ballpark using the lift up. It's a great way to give back to the community for opening day. Absolutely. And you did this last year Stanford. How many how many people did you help out last year? We have hundreds and hundreds of us. This is the third year. We've done it a third year. No, it's all right, but thirty year, and it's been growing and growing every year and hundreds last year we actually had to opening days. So we probably had. The rain out the right? So we did we did two days of smart rides with wall side. So it's still that's good. I mean, the, and here's what I like is that you're you're forcing these people to take responsibility for their own behavior in two ways. Number one, not getting the wheel of a car at a little too much. And number two. You're saying look we're going to help you out we want we want to make sure everybody say on opening day where you're gonna pay part of it yourself. You got such a handout, Nope complete. We'll give half off half. You have us. It's a great partnership. And we we love working with lift and giving people rides home from the ballpark. So what did you get out of it last year? Do you think last two years? What did we get out of it? Just the feeling of you know, helping the community saving maybe saving a lion. And that's no small thing. I know a couple years ago. There was an accident after the baseball game. And we just said, you know, it's too bad. They didn't take us up on take us up on our offer. Yeah. Exactly. And so how how do they do it all the info is on wall side windows dot com slash opening day. Use your lift up, and there's a code wall-sized twenty nineteen in you just put that into the lift app in half off the ride home. And we're simple as that starting out around gametime and and going through the evening. That's a great thing to do in the window business. Oh, there's a lot of new well at wall side were celebrating seventy five years. So. Yeah. Seventy five years. We started in nineteen forty four by my grandfather. My father's father, and we're celebrating three generations and seventy five years later so lot we're old in the window business. But we're always doing new things. He's he's following right in your dad's footsteps here. I just sit back and watch it all I used to have my own way. But now, I just kind of, but how has the the whole window business changed over time? Because it really has. Like everything else technology, and I don't mean just glasses sunglasses last. But I mean in years past people would call our office all day long to make appointments now. They all go, you know, people don't call. They don't pick up the phone. They go online and write two seconds. You have an appointment in your twenty four seven and set it up. How about the product itself though? Aside from the glass at the glasses improved a lot. It's definitely become you know, from years and years and decades ago when we started it was one piece of glass now, we got to energy efficient and can do more. The screens actually have been more improved. We have a flexible windows scream that you can take in and out super easy. So even though a window you say when your house, you you don't see the technology advances, but windows have changed considerably over the many decades we've been in business, but one thing that we that hasn't changed in over seventy five years. Is there a commitment to our customer making sure we do the job right in standing behind that work. That's how my grandfather an wall said windows on my father, and what he's taught me is you don't matter what type of window. You're putting in or the technology changes. The one thing that hasn't changed as making sure you're taking care of the customers. That's why he's been around for seventy five years. Exactly. And and that's what you see in family owned businesses. So often, isn't it Stanford when attended down generation to generation that's the most important thing. Yeah, they what we're all about. There's nothing we won't do y'all just for this. But there's nothing we won't do nothing. We won't do to make our customers happy. So indeed way try everyday and everybody's been there a long time. So I mean, they all they all know the drill. Indeed today, all the fans should know the drill. And does this goes along this? I hope it becomes a regular on opening day. And who knows maybe beyond that to help folks out. Of course is a couple of people who will just not even realize that they go too far inside you got it, but they can get that ride home to to save their life or somebody else's. Maybe you got thanks for what you're doing. Thank you very much. Tigers tiger's, right? No good start. I guess. Yeah. I would have never expected. They'd come home about five hundred ten games in Toronto day game. Yesterday was great. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. Knocking off the Yankees Allie in their ballpark. They deserved it. We need a good. We we need a good baseball team. Yeah. That'd be fun. Oh, yeah. Can't wait till they're contending. Hey. Thanks, guys. Thank you. Appreciate coming on the show, and especially for what you're doing with lift and giving folks ride home. Thank you. Thank you, very much Stanford and atom buying from the wall side with.

baseball Detroit Detroit opera house Stanford Robert Karnak Mike Duggan Cadillac Adam Yankees Tigers Toronto seventy five years Seventy five years ten minutes thirty year two seconds two years
"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No, don't get up. Evening. Mr President good fund raiser the JFK opera house. So. How are we fixed with Iran general? Well, I think we've discounted direct military intervention. I accept it. Now may not be the moment. Aren't imagine the right moment. There's a headwind in favor of encouraging the shot to share government with key opposition liberal such as Corinne sent Jobe Shapur Bakhtiar their own men all of them spent their lives dreaming of pow in exile jail. They have no popular base. Khomeini will eat them for breakfast. If the liberals have our support if the army are in place, if Khomeini acknowledges he is a mere figurehead is an awful lot of what do we think? Mr. who mainly walk fanatic, several one total control of the state even on the soles of his people achieve by means of a bloodbath. A medieval society, I don't see evidence for that. Nor does ambassador Sullivan describes him as a sort of Gandhi symbol scholar who will return to his books when he's allowed home and the shies is gone. What were essentially saying we don't know this guy at all have any of our people ever met with I advise strongly against that that will be leaked over the media. And the Shah was throw in the towel. If we meet him will legitimize we tap his phone, we maintain a watch on we speak to his associates. So what is he saying what kind of Iran does he want? Much of his work is on translated, and frankly, pretty obscure, but make no mistake. He is no mere symbol much of. It seems unexceptional Republic the Shah's abdication the restoration of the constitution. And you fall for that public relations belch. Snarlin shed. He wanted human happiness and peace, and he slaughtered millions in pursuit of it. Mr president. I must protested the bullish tone of my colleague here. I hear you are. But what are my about the big is he understands the world is not made of Democrats. Bad people out. There was strong patches. You can learn how to deal with Deng Xiaoping or Brezhnev or Baig. Ultimately, they are in the same game. They won't power. They apply. Largely rational means to get it. But every once in a while somebody else comes on the scene. Arm in CEO, a Hitler hokey min. Now, these guys are different. They are immune to strategy persuasion reason Batholomew. A faith week eight understand even as a believer who many in the same mode if so all bets are off. The mistake. We are making is to think of this as chess. Our opponent is a hurricane sweeping everything familiar from the scene. You can't stop a hurricane only. Limit the damage. How's the Shah? What would I be? Thank you. If I can make it to the new year to elections are bringing in say back deal, even in time allowing who maniac pardoning him, if I can exhibit to restraint and humility, maybe just maybe reason will prevail. Mr president. Look at the late sixties, assassinations rats disarm one way or another through concessions adaptations, we wrote it out. This is not the time to walk away from out ally. This is a time to send the clearest signal. We have that he has our support. And that clarity gentlemen starts here. We speak with one voice ambassador doesn't like it that way we recall it. Now, look it's late. Nothing can be achieved in the wee small out. Go home to your families in Amman. I would like to schedule a telephone conversation with the show, and let's pray to whatever God's we have recourse to that his regime.

Mr president Shah Khomeini Iran President JFK opera house ambassador Sullivan Deng Xiaoping Amman Corinne Jobe Shapur CEO Gandhi Brezhnev
"opera house" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KPCC

"Old rancher of the Detroit opera house as again, I say. How lucky are we to have landed in an opera house in the heart of Motown? Can you imagine two more beautiful? Worlds colliding than that opera. And motown. Once again, that's opera. Motown. Audra? This. Opera house in the middle of the Detroit. I am a kid in a candy store here in the motor city. Man. Then I come to find out when I arrive at the opera house for rehearsal yesterday that chimerical park where the Detroit Tigers play. He's Joe Rutley across the..

Detroit opera house Motown Detroit Tigers Detroit Joe Rutley chimerical park Audra
"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Amanda. Calmer. Yeah. Amen. Hey, man. Good people the Detroit opera house. Amanda, you got to tell us about that that lyric. There's a good story there. Yeah. The way I wrote a song was really interesting. So I have a I have a patriot on now. And if you don't know what that is. It's sort of like, it's a kick starter. But it keeps going it's it's more like a subscription to everything. I do. It's actually the best metaphor I've found for it. As public radio. It's like where where else in the world. Can you be a songwriter and just get some random ideas and do them and just put them on the internet where nothing is monetize -able and do it regularly with a regular audience. They will pay you for whatever you do. It's like, oh, UP Christie Lee, and you get on NPR, and everyone just kind of randomly trust you. So the way I wrote this. I mean, you do fair totally fair. So I have I have about fifteen thousand patrons. Now in every time. I make music I just put it out. And I got paid as soon as I put it out. And I didn't I didn't I didn't have something to put out that month. And so I just went into the studio I told my subscribers that I was going to have something for them in twenty four hours. I asked them to send me blog comments about everything that was going on in their lives and hurricane Harvey was happening in the eclipse it just happened. Everyone was freaking out about everything from climate change to their own little personal agonies and stories, and I also made a flippant comment that warning on Facebook about Taylor swift. Finally,.

Detroit opera house Amanda. Calmer Amanda hurricane Harvey Christie Lee Facebook NPR Taylor twenty four hours
"opera house" Discussed on Material

Material

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"opera house" Discussed on Material

"So also puts into mind speaking, speaking of like phoned indicators now, I had I don't know this is I had a I had a lesson in what the differences are between like putting your phone on silent and turning off like bringing in airplane mode and actually turning it physically off like I was I was doing radio last week. I was in the Boston PR studios. Ams doing my doing my techs. My tech talk, my, blah, blah, blah. And suddenly like, my phone's I had turn it on silent before entering the studio because you know, and but suddenly like I hear the emergency alert tone for the emergency broadcast system. And everybody's looking around because no knows for coming from and took me a while for me to realize that oh it's coming from my phone in my pants pocket. And hopefully, not indicating to anybody that I know that it's me who caused the problem and it reminded me of. Thing that I had learned a while ago. But never really acted upon that the emergency alert system is designed to say that look I don't care if this person has set their phone to silent. There's a tornado coming. They really need to know. And now, the the ironic thing maybe about this was that the reason why it was giving me an emergency alert was to tell me that nine one one was down in Boston for various for some weird reason. And so two it was putting me into a state of emergency to tell me that if I were in a state of emergency, I would have to like dial the actual like seven digit number with area code to get help. And so I thought about every single time where I I am the person who of course, Shusha's his phone during movies. The only time I actually powered down the phone is when I met like some sort of a live performance like when I'm out of a life theater. Or or opera or whatever like that? Because especially an opera like at the Metropolitan Opera house if your phone makes any sound that is like it's not like in a movie theater where people say oh, God what he then this tickets are expensive. Yes. And I have seen..

Boston Metropolitan Opera house Ams Shusha seven digit