35 Burst results for "Onset"

Joe Biden Agrees With GOP Governors: 'There Is No Federal Solution' to COVID

Mark Levin

01:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Joe Biden Agrees With GOP Governors: 'There Is No Federal Solution' to COVID

"Joe Biden well what is not going to take place in New York City this week is going to take place Starting next week right With the vaccine mandate Hold on Now Joe Biden agrees with GOP governors This was fascinating today Fascinating So quoting President Biden on a call today with governors he had this to say There is no federal solution Well praise be I mean thank you Joe Biden It's taking you a little while Perhaps something that I don't know just about every Republican governor especially mine Ron DeSantis in the free state of Florida has been sane since the onset of this thing There is no federal solution So today Biden says on this call with governors there is no federal solution Continuing with this quote this gets solved at the state level Okay so not only is this what Republican governors have been saying since the onset of the pandemic it not only is that the literal antithesis of what he's been saying and what he's been directing it comes 8 days 8 days in advance of his one size fits all Anti American policy of getting facts are getting

Joe Biden President Biden Ron Desantis New York City GOP Biden Florida
The Reality of Omicron: Increased Cases, Decreased Deaths

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 3 weeks ago

The Reality of Omicron: Increased Cases, Decreased Deaths

"On November 29th the U.S. averaged 899 daily COVID deaths entering this week The U.S. was averaging a 1055 daily deaths Okay so that's an increase of 17% Got that So again I know it's a lot of numbers It's gonna walk you through the end result here again Over the past month plus bet I'm a cron has made its way into the U.S. We've seen a 232% increase in cases But only a 17% increase and related deaths according to the CDC's data All right so what does that tell you In fact it's even more dramatic when you look at what's happened worldwide since the onset of this variant Since the first diagnosed case the first one popped up in November Daily cases of COVID worldwide Are of 51% But get this Debts worldwide They're actually down 13% over that same time Got that

U.S. CDC
"onset" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:41 min | 2 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Sorry. Somehow I turned on Siri. There we go. Anyway, as my mom started showing what I thought was her earlier symptoms she hurt she just seemed to be more intolerant of things. Which was really interesting. And it was a family business, so it's hard to know was it just all the dynamics of all four of us working together coupled with possibly the early onset Alzheimer's. And as I was saying before I somehow woke up Siri without touching my computer, she did not consent to being diagnosed until she was like midway through the disease. So she's not officially did not have a diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer's, but she was diagnosed officially at 69, so that's pretty young. Yes. That was a long statement. Yes, but I think you get to a point that I think is very, very important. I don't want to wait for you to start taking this product when you're 69 and faced with early onset, right? And so we really, it's my mission to really educate people along the way. What's interesting to me is we know what our demographic profile of who's buying our product. And it's right now the 40 to 50 year old age group that's buying our product a lot. And that is our largest demographic of purchase. And so it could go a couple of ways. It's also female. The female 40 to 50 year olds so they're buying for the household. Buying for themselves, they're buying one way for their family and maybe they're buying for people that they're becoming caregivers for. But the point of the matter is that we really need to start sooner, not later, because what we're doing is we're building the base to help fight. And that's important. The other thing that, you know, unfortunately, we don't see it, right? We don't see the effects of oxidative stress on our bodies and our brains. We hear about it. When we talk about taking aspirin a day for your heart, you're under stress. We never talk about it from the brain perspective. Same thing. My partner loves to say, we are writing a check, you know, for the experience of life every day..

Alzheimer's onset Alzheimer's
 Israel opens to solo tourists for 1st time since pandemic

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Israel opens to solo tourists for 1st time since pandemic

"Israel has begun a welcoming individual tourists for the first time since the onset of the corona virus pandemic authorities hope the return of solo travelers to Israel will breathe new life into the nation's struggling tourism industry before the pandemic the Christmas season has seen hundreds of thousands of people visit Bethlehem the traditional birthplace of Jesus in the Israeli occupied west bank Israel had planned to reopen to tourists last spring but delayed the move amid a spike in cases driven by the highly contagious delta variant Jerusalem

Israel Bethlehem West Bank Jerusalem
"onset" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

04:03 min | 3 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"At any point it could become an af- lactic it may not but it could and you know that's pretty scary. Both as an allergy suffer or as a parent of someone with an allergy that uncertainty there. There's a lot of uncertainty or what feels like uncertainty when it comes to living a life with a food allergy. And i think because it is a a pretty intense diagnosis if we as soon as we put life threatening or potentially life-threatening into that sentence. That's going to induce fear anxiety and panic understandably so so it's a parent who's getting this diagnosis for their young child. Or maybe it's an adult with an adult onset allergy. Who's hearing. Hey you have to change your entire lifestyle to avoid xyz allergen because it could be life threatening that is going to induce that fear and so now things feel uncertain. And what do we want for uncertainty. We want predictability and certainty. So it is. It's it's when you get that diagnosis. No matter where in your life you are. It is life changing. And i. I want to talk about this line between you know. Obviously a certain level of anxiety and fear is adaptive and healthy. And i know correct me if this is wrong but it's my understanding that teenagers can be at the most risk because they tend to be less anxious and kind of half that sense of what sort of looking for invincibility and that like because they tend to be less worrying less anxious about their allergies. It is the most dangerous time. Do i have that right. yes so so. Research has shown that You know because of a variety of a very abilities during those teen Adolescent years at does tend to be a higher risk time. I think you hit the nail on the head at that age right. You've got the developmental stuff going on. They wanna fit in. they wanna belong. They want to figure out who they are. You know be with their friends and not caused a scene either by a reaction or having to ask questions at a restaurant right so maybe they don't want to carry their auto injector because they don't wanna where do they put it. And i don't want to have it in my purse. And i don't want to be different so those pieces added onto the fact that you know one of the key things that you have to do. When you have an allergy is to carry your auto injector and your emergency action plan. Should reaction happen. If teens are unwilling to do those things. I just wanna fit in. You've got all of these potential risks. That kinda come together in a perfect storm situation. Should the teen have an allergic reaction. They don't have their auto injector on them. You know they're friends. They haven't talked to their friends. They aren't aware that. Hey i have this allergy so yeah it does potentially become riskier because of that time in the development for for kids but again with allergies no matter what age you are and and so obviously for parents this is going to be put more on them when the kids are younger whereas as the child gets older and becomes an adult that's going to become. Their responsibility is teaching them the basic skills to keep themselves safe and how to advocate for their own self needs to speak up when they need to and to learn how to identify friends and support systems. That are going to be there in case of a reaction. So it's a lot to to manageable but it's a lot to.

allergy adult onset allergy
Queen Elizabeth "reluctantly" takes doctors' advice to cancel trip

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Queen Elizabeth "reluctantly" takes doctors' advice to cancel trip

"Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth the second has reluctantly accepted medical advice to rest for a few days and has consulate trip to Northern Ireland the Palestinian offer specifics on the decision but says a ninety five year old monarch is in good spirits and disappointed that she will no longer be able to visit Northern Ireland for engagements Wednesday and Thursday the palace said the queen sends the warmest good wishes to the people of Northern Ireland looks forward to visiting in the future she is resting at Windsor Costa which she has stayed since the onset of the code nineteen and then make last year service

Northern Ireland Buckingham Palace Queen Elizabeth Palace Windsor Costa
Some NBA Players Have More Courage Than Senate Republicans

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Some NBA Players Have More Courage Than Senate Republicans

"These nba players many of them have more courage than most senate republicans. I have to tell you. Kyrie irving someone that i would usually agree with. But he's standing his ground here. I have to tell you. This is pretty amazing. He says to reporters please respect. My privacy irving told reporters in zoom meeting monday regarding his vaccination status. What are these reporters doing asking people about their vaccination status to be a real demented person to go around asking people about their medical history. Let's play some tape. Cut forty eight jonathan. Isaac who. I have to say when he goes through this he is articulate. He is wise. He is clear far more than most senate republicans that i've heard on this issue and they have something to lose. These guys are willing to forfeit their salary millions of dollars in their career to not take the vaccine and the media doesn't really know how to deal with this people. Kinda call balls and strikes. They say Is this are these anti vaxxers or two black voices in black lives matter play. Cut forty eight. What is it about the vaccine that makes you Hesitant to to to get our start with I've had covert In the past and so our understanding of antibodies of natural immunity as a change the a a great deal from the onset of the pandemic and is still evolving. I understand that the vaccine would help if you catch kobe and You'll be able to have less symptoms on from contracting with me. Having covered in the passing to having antibodies on with my current age group. A fitness physical fitness level. Amish not necessarily a fear of mine. Very very articulate very moderate position of had coverted. Our position of. Antibodies is developing. And yes if you look at jonathan isaac. He's in pretty good shape. It's not exactly a massive nor should it

Kyrie Irving Senate NBA Irving Isaac Jonathan Jonathan Isaac
Report: Climate Change Could Move 200 Million People by 2050

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Report: Climate Change Could Move 200 Million People by 2050

"New research from of the World Bank warns climate change may lead to major movements of people the study by the nonprofit ground swell for the World Bank finds climate change could push more than two hundred million people to leave their homes in the next three decades increased migration hot spots unless urgent action is taken to use global emissions I'm bridge the development gap the research also examines how the impacts of slow onset climate change such as water scarcity decreasing crop productivity and rising sea levels could lead to millions of what the report describes as climate migrants by twenty fifty I'm Charles collect as mom

World Bank Charles
The Risks of Using Bleach for Cleaning

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:04 min | 4 months ago

The Risks of Using Bleach for Cleaning

"Cleaning. Products can be hazardous landing hundreds of thousands of children in us. Emergency rooms and the product. Most commonly associated with injury was bleach. Which can be toxic even if used as directed. We've known that those with asthma. Who work with cleaning products day in and day out can suffer adverse respiratory effects of worsening of symptoms declining lung function inflamed airways but even cleaning workers without asthma can be affected even below so-called acceptable exposure levels cleaners with or without reactive airways can suffer a substantial increase in lung function. Okay but that's people who clean for a living. Although we've known that occupational use of leech may have adverse respiratory health effects but it was unknown whether just common domestic use of bleach in the household may book lungs at risk until now bleach use was significantly associated with nearly five times yards of non allergic adult onset asthma as well as ongoing lower respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough. The way bleach works is as such a strong pro oxidant that the thought is that can lead to like leaky longs and allow allergens to penetrate this phenomenon of cleaning product induced. Asthma has been known for decades. Three quarters of the dozens of population is looking into it. Found increased risk of asthma or nasal inflammation. Ideally safer clean products should be available. Unfortunately this body of evidence has been largely ignored by the manufacturers and commercial cleaning companies and most of workers put at risk. Are women in fact. That may help. Explain some of the gender differences and asthma. The relatively high frequency of bleach us for home cleaning by women around the world together with a strong association between bleach using non allergic asthma emphasizes the need for reconsidering the use of bleach for cleaning.

Allergic Asthma Symptoms Declining Lung Allergic Adult Onset Asthma Chronic Cough Nasal Inflammation
The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

The Voicebot Podcast

04:28 min | 4 months ago

The Alexa Prize Story - Professor Jan Sedivy on Winning the Alexa Prize SocialBot Challenge and 40 Years in Voice Tech - Voicebot Podcast Ep 225 - burst 05

"I start date group and there were many students who got through Applause am giving the who worked with me. Owner fees asuncion Step by step We have been following the progress in the industry and i was You know get inca people who are more and more interested than who are willing to cooperate and in some i would say like plenty fourteen. He decided to do question answering. So he did the Different knowledge database as son view slowly but surely giving questions like typing questions Did voice until Land the very basics of or the students learn the very basic so unhappy like do data extraction duties on the And then sunday in twenty sixteen. All's own came up with this competition and the competition or the main task of the competition was to create a social boat. Which would engaging louis and also entertainingly talking to users so and the target or the goal of those to talk as long as possible to survey difficult to convert into functional end to any a system function so it was something which is a entertainment as well as mathematics and many many different algorithms in it and a deadline We once of the road is meant a muslim put on there but they just resold so we should try and the weaver very pessimistically plus weaver. starting beautiful He can do these universities. We are admiring from here that they have a much better team. Sunday would be those who would lead. But the thought okay. Let's give it a try so we put together a proposal and the we mainly based on our work in the question onset. Inca believe me or not. We made between the top twelfth. Who was elected as these semi-finalists that time and is brought us like two fifty For students and This money this was something fantastic because this monday helped me to keep the key people on board and no students receive money therefore four day fully concentrated on the problems. We were interested in which was the social. We stopped the to put it together. In a very practical by firestone stopped with trying cody allies debts time grew and neural networks and after a few attempts we thought. Okay that is. This does not work. It's very difficult. And we opt for very simple based system and started to grow a simple system and it worked it did something is and people were able to talk to it so we went on indie competition. The uber very surprised that we were doing very out. We saw on the leaderboard by Even two or the competing sites and we've had been we have been leading so we continued. We ended up in the final on the second sports which was unbelievable. Fantastic success v about twice in seattle Received the mind price in In las vegas so unbelievably nobody for a while. I was in las vegas but none of the students was ever in las vegas. Which is again something you cannot note. See anywhere else. Except in las dos.

Amazon Alexa Prize NLP BOT Conversation Finalist Semi-Finalist IBM Socialbot Cybernetics Robotics Firestone Cody Las Vegas Seattle Las Dos
UN: Humanitarian Situation in Afghanistan Expected to Worsen

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

UN: Humanitarian Situation in Afghanistan Expected to Worsen

"UNICEF says eight concerns are growing in Afghanistan the U. N. agency for children expects the humanitarian situation in the country to worsen due to a severe drought the onset of winter and the corona virus pandemic the agency says ten million children in Afghanistan already survive off humanitarian assistance and around a million are expected to suffer from life threatening malnutrition this year it says some four point two million children including two point two million girls are out of school I'm Charles de Ledesma

U. N. Agency For Children Afghanistan Unicef Charles De Ledesma
A Lifetime of Lymphedema

Lymphedema Podcast

03:17 min | 5 months ago

A Lifetime of Lymphedema

"My journey with lymphoma over the past twenty four years has been a complex emotional convoluted just rollercoaster That has occurred as i said before my lymphoma was onset from infancy because of male video. Actually i was emergency. Section baby Since my lymphatic system had not formed properly in the womb all of the fluid in my body had gone to my head. While i was upside down in the womb and because of that i got stuck in the birth canal and an emergency c section operation preceded My dad says that once. I was removed from the womb. My head Resembled a bowling ball So that's nice. Thanks to but upon removing knee and seeing the baby for the first time the doctors were unsure what was going on with me. They thought that. Maybe i might have down syndrome. But just because of the way that i looked but also they were like. Maybe you're just a chunky baby. They just told my parents that i was fat and that there was not much more. They could do in terms of diagnosis. My parents took me home thinking that they might have you know this healthy but fluffy baby And that was not the case because immediately they noticed that all of the fluid and my head had started to go down my body and really gather on the left side of my body and especially in both of my legs and my feet so my legs and my feet were very swollen. My would take me to doctors and the doctors were just repeat. You know. Mr and mrs eggers. You just have a fat baby. But no i actually had primary lymph dima. I was diagnosed at nine months old by dr witty with primary lymphoma and that kicked off a whole life of complex feelings pain managment lots of medical treatments in just a lot of confused emotions. I would say because of my lymphoma Now big things to know about me is. I actually grew up in a military family. And i'm the oldest of four so my family was often moving. We would really only stay in the same place for two to three years. Which means it's hard to find consistent long-term medical care for a child with a disability. The other interesting thing that i noticed a child was that no matter where we went whether it was hawaii whether it was new york. Virginia the culture around my lymph dima was always going to be the same. Everyone would regard me in a similar way of. There's something wrong with this child and it is not attractive and it is not good and that was a big part of my life for a very long time it was honestly incredibly interesting just to see how cultures would change in certain ways. Demographics would change as we would move but this able ism and this pervasive sort of understanding of my condition as a negative thing stayed

Lymphoma Mrs Eggers Dr Witty Bowling MR Hawaii Virginia New York
Symptoms of Mold Exposure

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

02:21 min | 5 months ago

Symptoms of Mold Exposure

"Two questions one. What are some of the symptoms of mold exposure and to can a family that lives in the same house. Have one person that has symptoms of mold exposure while other people in the family don't and then to expound on that. If i'm thinking answer's yes if so why does it happen. Okay so yes. You're correct answers. Yes basically how this works. Everybody has their own you know immune systems and their own. Let's call him talk city levels right. You have thresholds certain people are gonna reach those thresholds fashion others and there's so many variables right so for instance if the husband or wife getting. Let's say and they're not feeling well a could be because when they were a kid they were exposed to environmental exposures. That kind of are at that helped them reach that threshold sooner than the other person so not point there they have. They're having these exposures they're starting to just it just gets triggered it gets exacerbated and essentially they start feeling these effects way worse than than some other people i. I noticed usually in a family of four. It's usually one of four or two of the four that are not feeling well and the other two are typically fine which can make things a little difficult in terms of just getting that support system that you need. It's hard to. It's hard to support someone around. Something you haven't experienced yourself aren't human nature. Essentially what are the symptoms of a range. I would say the biggest implants that year of our brain fog. Chronic fatigue syndrome have eczema skin. Rashes is etcetera. You have definitely cognitive impairment on top of the brain fog. Were you know you're it's not just like you're taking longer to come up with thoughts. You're losing trains of thought entirely. I'll have from on the phone. And i'm asking questions Like just mid stride dif- completely forgot what they're talking about or were they. Were you know we just obviously have the patience to kinda talk things through in and get them back on track. I it's really. It's really sad and scary. Stop while the other things respiratory infection in respiratory disease a you have basically the onset of cold never quite goats those away. These allergy like

Eczema Skin Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Respiratory Disease Cold Allergy
Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

Software People Stories

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

"One. Kushner was ability leader anga product year in caterpillar inc. You would hear this very stock in talk later and the passion he phone. I'm lita remove and woods park thinking and you embedded software and really moved him. Athletics medals the woods thinking realistically and thinking from a customer's angle and he also her is ashen words not just romar respected. Although from using his as as dolan onset listen all high blend welcomed the software people stories. Thank you so much for doing this. But when the high that's being pretty good fashion of the deal and Thanks for having me in decision. I want you to introduce yourself for our listeners. I know you along absolutely absolutely so i Actually lead the one of the divisions of character. India have been working company for quite a long time before that. I started my company called meaning now for five years and then i moved out love. What for lost twenty or so. So i be working in Cat and i've been non genetic leader and caterpillar of going engineering Either ship for right from a what be infused with playing that software. Studies rely staggered. Mike idiot us a software engineer. A little beat. Her family moved into engineering product. Looking plus no need pretty large.

Caterpillar Inc. Woods Park Romar Kushner Lita Athletics Dolan India Mike Idiot
Lineage, Renunciation, and Engaged Buddhism

The Wisdom Podcast

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Lineage, Renunciation, and Engaged Buddhism

"So rampage a welcome and thank you for joining us on the wisdom. Thank you for inviting seven. I was thinking that Maybe we could start with talking a little bit about the shrunk by lineage and perhaps You could start with talking about the Founder of the chungbuk lineage. And then also maybe a little bit How trump. Akagi differs from mapa kagyu. Okay festival daniel and the whole team wisdom publication all online participants In thank you very much for this wonderful in brief introduction about myself and my predecessor appreciate a lot so so the founder of this book julian agent. What the distinction between the martha in So since that is you're pushing I my onset is I think people have done to stand that. Lineage is not just like one particular practice that defines unin edge. Lineage comes down to combining all the different practices from the great different. It does and putting together and then transmitting that to the next generation that defines as such as mark buckeye ju- gunma guidry. Sean guide drew and all the different images you know. So it's not just a one practice and therefore distinguished as lineage. It is different in moscow. Does practice combined together than transmitting to the next generation so so therefore i just wanted to say that the founder of the shumpert guy drut is Trump landreau himself. Because he is the one that who extra league public or or broader to the to baton and an indian and nepalis and and then also the chinese and mongolian. You know over the time.

Akagi Mark Buckeye Julian Daniel Sean Trump Landreau Moscow
"That's Not What Fauci Said..."

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"That's Not What Fauci Said..."

"Highly how are you. I'm doing great. Thank you might I am i guess. I don't know how many people can't get the vaccine. They're having conditions Called gamma-ray central. Gps where i cannot get a flu vaccine including the covert. I mean this is oh infuriating and on top of it i already had cove it. I had it in november. So what about us. What about the people that already have the antibody and can't have back. I mean if you went to again if you went to geraldo is grandchildren's home. He would assault you. I guess i guess he kick you in the rear end. At least i gotta ask you. And i'm fascinated by your particular experience and with your medical condition. You have you spoken to your doctor about the vaccine Yes actually went to my neurologist. It's a neurological disorder. And i stopped seeing my neurologist. I'm actually looking for you because he started quoting me. So much about articles perfectly safe and. I looked at him. Say that to me. I don't want to disagree because you sound like such a nice lady but help me out here so you ask your physician you ask the neurologist if you should get the vaccine and the neurologist recommended even with your condition that you should get the vaccine what he told me and i looked at my. I was told when onset which was over ten years ago that i should never get flu vaccine because they could give me another onset of the same number central. I don't know if you're familiar with see. What did he or she said that He looked at me and said well. That's not what vouching says. And i just looked at him and like okay so you have the fainted.

Geraldo FLU Neurological Disorder
"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"Ourselves that the other person being happy and wanting to pick us up in feed us is more important than us being happy because we can live without happiness. We can't live without nourishment right. And so this is a pattern that again most of his carry without realizing it and it just grows and grows and repeats and repeats and then when some realizes there are people pleaser and they want to shift that and create stronger boundaries and. Start taking care of themselves. There's all these underlying layers of energy held in the body that again. They're unaware of and so they do all the right things and they keep trying and it might work for a while but then they regressed and again. They think there's something wrong with them. There's nothing wrong with them. It's just that all of this trauma is being stored in their body and it's like trying to break through a brick wall totally it's costing. Yes for sure. I'm sure many women listening to this can definitely relate for sure so my last question for you every time i have anybody on here who does any energy work or medium ship or anything like that. I always love to ask for some tips in terms of how we can connect more to our intuition. Okay so intuition. Also is our gut feeling right and i find it's easier for people to relate to tuning into their guts because we can see we can touch. We can feel or physical bodies yup and the word intuition although we all have it have access to it. It's again at intangible. It's hard to create a concept around it so the best way and this is how i tune in to my intuition so i'm not just giving you something that i would never do myself right. Zip put my hand on my heart rate. Whenever i'm trying to get an answer make a decision decided. Something's right for me. I put my hand physically on my heart. And the reason why i do. This is again. It connects to my body which is again that gut feeling. It's a physical sensation of vibration. It also reminds me to get out of my head because ego is the biggest thing that keeps us from connecting intuition. It's there to keep safe to keep us out of trouble. Its job and whenever we tune in we will get our answer always we will get our answer immediately. And maybe a millisecond later ego kick sense for yup and so when we put our hand in her reminding ourselves. We're not thinking about something. That's your brain feeling about something. And that's our intuition or a gut feeling so that's my first tip is to do that and then again ever since station thought sound memory emotion comes through immediately. Fats your answer and you.

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"Whatever and the energy that is coming in your body with it is one of negativity that's not going to digest. That beautiful salad is gonna hit your stomach and your stomach is gonna go. This is gross. Oh we don't like this right and then your digestive enzymes aren't going to be released properly and then everything else is going to go to pot and has a different example. Let's say i get a burger. A cheeseburger ray dairy and read knee gluten sugar and all the stuff delicious. And that's good for you. And i sit down and i say oh i love burgers. This is going to taste so good. I'm treating myself after you know a month cleansing or whatever doesn't matter but i'm choosing to really enjoy this food. I guarantee you that broker will digest easily the not salad because the energy that's going in as of being happy of being joyful of giving yourself pleasure not denying And i'm not saying to burger everyday and think it's good and you'll be healthy right right. Just general concept yes. The food is important. One hundred percent but what is equally as important is the energy that we digest with it totally. I love that. I send so much love to all of my food whether it's treat meals or non treatment you know how everyone a look. I don't wanna labor food as good or bad. It's just yeah. If i'm going to indulge in some sugar or whatever it might be amazing. This is so delicious. Like i'm yeah i'm so lit up about it and it's interesting because my partner he's the office it and he you know it's something also worked on for many many years and having come from the bodybuilding industry in the fitness industry physique. You know and it's You know eating a certain way and all these things and then here i come into the mix and it's just like enjoy all the things everything in balance all of it in moderation and of course like i eliminate the foods that are very highly triggering to me even if were somewhere like italy and we're joined those things it's again the energy that goes into it and just you know enjoying it and yes. I'm always conscious of sending positive vibes to my to my food and my meals her. She makes a massive difference. It does it. does absolutely you. You feel it. You legitimate likely physically. F- feel feel that food in your body and like how you know. How your digesting it the lightness of it. That's what i'm trying to look for. It's like it's a light feeling right and you can even take it. Further depending on how into the energy of food you wanna got but if you are someone who eats meat and you eat meat. That is from a factory farm writing the energy..

italy
"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

04:08 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"Of. What is holding you back from your body healing itself right. Does that make sense. Yeah that's amazing. It's an intangible thing so it's hard to put into work. It totally totally is and i mean this is why like you just have to dive in and do it. You know i just have to experience it versus trying to comprehend it and put all these words to it like you just have to experience it and then you'll know yes. Yeah and that's what i hear from. Most people is. I was a little unsure to work with. You didn't really notice getting into now. Get totally you know. I just think about like when. I go to my acupuncture appointments and i've shared this a couple of times before how like literally i'm lying on the table. I have all these needles. And there are times where i feel like i'm a levitating and there's this like flow there's energy that is literally moving and i'm lying there and i could feel this like saying i can you know like i can't intangible just like moving through me and i literally feel like i'm limiting and that's my chee right that energy for us and it's the the acupunctures like opening up these channels and it's exactly the energy to flow and you can physically feel it. It's wild a lot of people can yes not. Everyone can and the reason why i mentioned that is that sometimes people will expect to feel that right incredible energy and then when they don't they think oh it's not working or i did something wrong and we can get back into that negative mindset of what's wrong with me so sure some people and i'm like you. I feel very intensively With acupunctures ball. It's the same process is acupuncture. Works with meridian's rather than shock res- yes but it's exactly the same thing it's opening up the flow of energy yet but yeah i feel it..

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

03:47 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"I guess if i get i like that would be the best way because we feel it. We can feel energy for sure. It may be intangible like take the past life example. You're not gonna have a memory of that past light. Necessarily some people do not gonna be able to see it. You're not going to have been told about it from your parents but we can feel in our bodies the stuck from that past life for sure for sure. Thanks for asking because now i know it's a vibration. Yeah i totally love. And i totally resonate with that. I'm sure many people do so. How would somebody like start to do that. Work in terms of identifying past life traumas or anything like like how. Because you know. I don't think it's something. We can just navigate on her own per se. It would be challenging to navigate on your own for her. What i find the best way to heal. And i believe this is true. Physically mentally emotionally answer actually is to just tune in to yourself. That's the first place to start because there's so much information that comes at us from the outside world from society in a lot of it. All of it is good information. I don't believe that there is bad information or bad advice. It's whether or not it aligns for what you need in that moments right right so it's really helpful for you. If i do the same thing could actually make me sick. And because of that when we tune into our bodies and start listening to those vibrations feeling that energy those emotions even that starts to shift things within our system and starts to open that energy up so that may be will be guided to work with a healer. Or maybe we'll be got into the nutritionist. Or will be guided to go and see a therapist. The opportunities that are going to support in healing. That will start to come forward when we tune in rather than out for sure that makes sense. Yeah absolutely i love that. I mean it's like you're ultimately saying like the answers. lie within. yeah. I know cheesy right. No but it's so true. They do they know they do. We just are always looking for the external. Yes validation and that's one of the biggest problems in the world on a whole planet today because we have lost that innate trust within our own wisdom and even if we get her answers even if we learned to tune in if we don't trust that right it doesn't make any difference that won't help us at all. Yep absolutely i totally agree. And i've done work with you so i totally get it. So how does energy play into the onset and healing of disease and imbalance in the body. So as we've been talking there's all these different levels of energy and there's lots of different ways of that energy can play into disease. One of the biggest ones is trauma. And this is the word that people throw around a lot. Kind of a buzzword. These days totally i believe traumat- is energy is fall so when something bad happens to us. That's not the trauma. The trauma is how our bodies hold. Aren't you and process what happened to ask Right so again. It's felt felt within the physical body and we all have trauma. It could be something that happened before we were even verbal. Say we were crying because they were hungry and our mother didn't hear us so she left us to cry..

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"That's so wild. Oh i love that okay. Well i want to switch gears. Sure i wanna talk about you. Know more of the work that you do and working with women and i would love to know with the women that you're working with right now. What you feel is sort of the biggest component. That's missing with women's health right now that you find so. The biggest component listening simply is energy the understanding of what is energy how it works and how it affects us so there are so many different places that this can come in like. I was saying earlier. Everything is energy. It could be past life that we've had where the energy is stuck and when we have a lesson we need to learn in a past life. We don't quite get it. That energy follows us into the next lifetime. So you can work as much as you can do everything right. But not shift pattern if the energy is still stuck in the past life It can show up through epigenetics. Or what's called generational trauma right where when we are born. We get the physical dna for parents. But we also get this energetic information that carries patterns and traumas like alcoholism Putting yourself last having an explosive temper all of these patterns ripe and those are present in our body when we're born so we often have to fight against the energy of that. It can be stuck emotions where we were not listened to. We were not heard we did not fully express was fouled. That's energy they get stuck so there's just so many different layers of energy that is held within our physical bodies and if we are unaware that it's there it's impossible to heal it And then when it remains unhealed physical symptoms. Start to show up. That's so wild so okay. Do you have like a definition for energy. Like how would you really define it. Oh my goodness. I've never been asked to define like i guess 'cause like there's an emotional energy a psychological energy like ride just based on what you're explaining like it takes different forms. It does right so energy. The way i talk about it really is just scientific energy. It is this by brations Existence i guess i mean not using the proper terms to explain it. I'm sure but..

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

03:10 min | 6 months ago

"onset" Discussed on Healthy Hormones for Women Podcast

"We truly get out of alignment and it impacts how we manifest things in the world impacts just how we show up for ourselves in our relationships and so let's just my little message of the day. I don't even know how i started getting on this conversation about human design. But i'm excited that we went that way because i will be diving into it. More and more and my guest today melanie. We have chatted about human design on our personal coaching calls. I worked with melanie. She is an intuitive energy coach. And i've worked with over the years and we've chatted human design. That's not what we're talking about in our episode today. Fbi but melania and i have had some amazing conversations about design and just intuition and she's really helped me to connect to my intuition and just really helped to know clear bad energy and she's also a medium and so she's Brought forth some really awesome messages to me as well and in the past year. As i've been experimenting and playing around with plant medicine and mushrooms and i wa- ska and you know just like psychedelics. What has shown up for me. Is channeling like i've been channeling ally and getting a lot of messages and so. That was one of the reasons why. I also have been working with melanie because just having somebody else who really understands that helped me to understand. It has been really helpful and really really insightful. And it's really interesting. Because i'm a self projected projector and so what that means is i find my answers and truth through my voice and the messages that are coming through. It's it's interesting because it's like a self projected projector to really honor my design. I need to be speaking my truth and really honoring that. But it's so interesting that i'm also channeling these other people these other messages that are coming through and needing to speak those as well so i do promise. I will have another episode where i dive deeper into all of that and my journey with plant medicine and and psychedelics and what that has looked like but for now. We are talking about energy with melanie. My guest today. We're talking about what energy is and how energy working really help to support her health and balance in in our bodies we also talk about one of the biggest missing components from women's health. Right now we talk about positive self talk and how this helps with hormonal balances period problems. We talk about like energy work and just playing with energy and how energy plays how it can play into the onset and healing of disease and imbalances in the body. We talk about all sorts of juicy things today. I'm really excited for it and really excited to introduce you to melanie. She's an intuitive energy coach with a big heart and a mouth to match. She's a straight shooter with a knack for helping women turn their amok into magic by empowering them to drop the old stories wounding and bs to make room for what really matters. She uses a combination of energy healing medium ship and compassionate coaching to help.

melanie melania Fbi
TV Producer Holly Rymon on Dealing With Sexual Harassment on Set

51 Percent

02:20 min | 6 months ago

TV Producer Holly Rymon on Dealing With Sexual Harassment on Set

"Hollywood directors and producers being accused of sexual harassment in the workplace in recent years and the uprising of the metoo movement. I ask raymond if she ever felt uncomfortable at work. Because of a man's advances or comments a little bit you know. I've always been sort of headstrong as far as like not putting much stock in that Wearing what. I want to wear doing what i wanna do. Not worrying about looking feminine or trying to be like a man. I just kind of always had sort of strange center confidence But yeah of course you do but up against it you see it happen to other people you try to. And once you get into management have the added Sort of responsibility sometimes getting into conversations with people And trying to make sure that doesn't happen on your set or how to solve it And there's been instances especially in some of these larger stunt driven shows. They're very a lot of men in the room. I mean there were instances where there were twelve of us all making decisions and i was the only female And that's fine You know you know it. It sometimes feels a little lopsided and but honestly i you know for whatever reason I just i just never let it get to my head. And i was fortunate enough not to have any sort of bad interactions personally With with anyone in there's always a little bit of that. Underlying ryan says the instances of inappropriate behavior. She witnessed where less often onset and usually in the office. There's someone who's making comments to someone else that might feel inappropriate or there are You know in a couple. Instances there were older men and younger women and there were there. Were comments made to people that the younger women didn't feel comfortable with and how you delicately go in there and try to try to stop that from happening in educating honestly people who who have maybe grown up in a time where these things weren't as As something that you talked about his match or tried to solve it was just like. Oh that's just you know whoever doing whatever they do you know and and now there's a lot more consciousness as a mother of two young ladies Who that that's just not acceptable and so Those are those conversations are an enjoyable. But i think they're important

Raymond Hollywood Ryan
Tom Hiddleston Has Hit Song in Loki

Donna and Steve

02:10 min | 6 months ago

Tom Hiddleston Has Hit Song in Loki

"Tom Hiddleston. Who is local. Okay? Yes, is having a moment because Loki, as mentioned is cleaning up, Uh, on Disney plus doing really, really well, but Tom Hiddleston Just scored his first hit song on the Billboard chart in Episode three of the show. Did you get to three? No, that's okay. Tom sings a song called Very Full. In Norwegian It's only like a minute and a half long, but it's just not as Loki. I think it is. I can't have you keep going off in the corner and singing. I don't think he's going to break character and go. Hello, And now I'm Tom Hiddleston. But maybe it was just Tom Hiddleston in the background. Oh, I see what you're saying. Yes, um, just the god of mischief breaking on the song number 10. On the world Digital song Sales chart World digital songs. Sure, man. Father is that of our citizens and I was saying and saying Come, ye m mantra, honored Answer, Arsonist answer and what you think what you're saying? You think I'm home on an answer of awesomeness dancer? I'm saying anything to come, Um Mantra and an onset of our school. You're saying these things come home when you're saying she's saying Come home what you're saying she's saying? Come home. Where do you see these things? Come home. Poor. This is interesting. Knows some English. Maybe. I North North Scott of Mischief. So what it is? Yeah. The North God of mischief. Yes, we have You seen, um Gosh, Eurovision song contest, Rocco a little bit. You're talking about the actual contest or them know the movie with Will Ferrell in? I haven't Oh, my gosh, I should watch that right. It's pretty fun. Just pull up. Yeah, yeah. Ding dong. There's a lot of similarities between that song gives me vibes of Yeah, Yeah. Ding Dong. I think they are from Norway. So I think that's what you're hearing. Is that Yeah, that's neck

Tom Hiddleston Loki Disney TOM Rocco Will Ferrell Ding Dong Norway
The Inspiration Behind Joygage: The Streaming Service for Dementia Patients

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:35 min | 7 months ago

The Inspiration Behind Joygage: The Streaming Service for Dementia Patients

"I'm excited to bring to you today. A service that we've all desperately needed. In the past year i'm going be talking to craig fowler about the streaming service joy gauge since the combination of the word joy and engage him. Assuming so help me. Welcome craig to the show. Thanks so much craig for being here today. Thanks for having me jennifer. So i always not always but for a long time. Especially during this whole cova craziness that we've all lived through really felt that a streaming service was something that we needed for entertainment education and anything else related to older adults and caregiving. And obviously you had that idea because you made it happen. So do you wanna tell us your background or sure. Good place to start on how you how you came to. This is probably not something that people just generally think unless they've been caregivers I'll i'll start with the story of my of my mother. My mother wanda absolutely wonderful person. She was She ended up being diagnosed in the mid. Two thousand with early onset dementia likely a vascular. They weren't really sure the time But she had had a number of symptoms and actually retired early early sixties. Before you we could tell my father night could tell that there were some things wrong. But i think like many people we sort of avoided the issue until she had a series of. Tia's which released through for a loop and when we took her into the for that they Diagnosed her as having dementia and she lived at home with my father for around ten years after that and The very end of her life just really the last six months wing to memory care unit To a couple of different ones but in ten years that my father cared for her. I was living in an eight hour. Drive away so. I would fly in all the time we try to help him but i kept finding as she got further into dementia that the biggest daily struggle that he had in the she had was really just staying engaged in staying active so many of the things that my mother wanted us to do Before dementia in her early stages dementia just weren't really accessible to her and she was very involved in church over the volunteering. Opportunities became intimidating to her. She used to love movies tv. That certain things that a number of things used to enjoy became confusing to her and she had a hard time keeping up with botts. She liked to do certain types of games early on that Word search games but over at some point in time those who came to challenging for her and frustrating for her so The the the thought of joy gauge was to was. Hey we know that there are actually quite a few things in the world available that will fit people of different cognitive abilities. People with different levels of short term memory but there are scattered around and not really usually very accessible so are thought with joy. Gauges what if we could curate and bring together All of those options and can use technology modern technology to customize those bring into individual People so that they actually have the ability using the streaming service to access a specific types of entertainment engaging activities actually fit them where they are without frustrating them but still provide enough challenge. Where they're going to enjoy them.

Dementia Craig Fowler Craig Wanda Jennifer TIA Botts
A Look at Chronic Pain in Obesity With Dr. Sheetal DeCaria

Decoding Obesity

02:18 min | 7 months ago

A Look at Chronic Pain in Obesity With Dr. Sheetal DeCaria

"She took people with obesity. Often suffer from gender body aches and joint pains. What are the common aches and pains that you see in people who are suffering with obesity in your practice. Sure so there's actually two different. I would types of pain that i see so. The first is mechanical pain. And that's what you kind of expect to see. In obese patients due to the extra weight. Some additional stresses on their joints so in those patients. We see a lot of hip pain. Knee pain back pain. And that's a result of just the extra stress causing kind of an accelerated arthritis and bone breakdown of their cartilage and early onset arthritis. But then we're also seeing a lot of other syndromes that happen. In a higher likelihood in an obese patient versus a non obese patient and those are things like headache fibromyalgia of domino pain and nerve pain actually have nothing to do with the mechanical causes right and all these beans really depend on the movement or lack there of or is there something else that also precipitates. These paints sure so joint pain. A lot of times is dependent on movement especially the hip and the knee joint pain however as their kind of arthritis of the joint really progressiveness to becoming end stage or bone on bone arthritis in those people. I actually see them having pain even at rest. The other types of pain. I talked about like the fibromyalgia. The nerve pain. Those can happen at any time because those are actually more related to biochemical ties to obesity rather than just the mechanical resents. Let's talk about the biochemical pot of it because that's very interesting very commonly. We see that the pains that are there are very commonly we think about the pins that are there with. Obesity are primarily because of the stress on the joints or the weight bearing joints that we would see. But let's talk about the biochemical factors at play over here. What really causes all of these other pains sore. So they found that in studies done on both humans and animals that obese patients have higher inflammatory markers in their blood versus people that are not obese so one example of this is something called. Crp and this is c reactive protein. It's an inflammatory marker so it's elevated in patients that are obese and that leads to a lot of extra joint pain and different types of pain syndromes just from the inflammation

Obesity Onset Arthritis Headache Fibromyalgia Arthritis Bone Arthritis Fibromyalgia Pain Syndromes
"onset" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"onset" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the onset. It was designed to fail a segment of the population it was designed to run through banks about Lena Gonzalez Burrito is executive director of the California Reinvestment Coalition, a bank watchdog group. Ballerina says the P P P program is another example of banks excluding communities of color. Thanks say they were responding to an unprecedented emergency with P P P. Bank of America was one of the first major banks, the first major bank to begin accepting applications. We reassigned 10,000 employees to work on the program and provided a quarter of a million loans in the first month of the program. So what went wrong? Reveals Emily Harris reports. Here's Paulina Gonzalez burritos. Short history of banks When it comes to communities of color banks have historically not served our communities and we've seen it throughout through redlining and through the subprime mortgage crisis. You know, we've seen that has failed our communities, time and time again. Redlining dates back to the 19 thirties, when banks used maps drawn by federal agencies to deny home loans in mainly black neighborhoods. Practice lasted for decades and to some degree continues today in the subprime mortgage crisis. Lenders did the reverse, offering easy loans on predatory terms Black and Latin. Next people in particular lost their homes during that crisis. So when you have a crisis like cove it like a pandemic. When you say Okay, we're going to put together a recovery program. And you run that recovery program through that same system. You're going to see the same result. Right? You're not going to see an equitable recovery. The Community Reinvestment Act was supposed to address inequity in lending when it was passed more than 40 years ago. It says banks must meet the credit needs of people in all communities. They serve as long as that doesn't go against sound banking practices, not just two people who happen.

Lena Gonzalez Burrito Emily Harris California Reinvestment Coalit 10,000 employees two people 19 thirties Bank of America Community Reinvestment Act one first month Paulina Gonzalez first major bank Latin today decades more than 40 years ago first major banks of a million loans Ballerina P P
"onset" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"onset" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The stories that matter to you, Sean Hannity is on right now. 25 to the top of the hour. All right, straight to our busy phones. 894 1. Shawn Ryan, Utah. What's up, Ryan? How are you? Sean. Great talk with you, man. Hey, I've got some friends in Denver, Colorado, and I was a couple weeks ago and I was talking to him and I I kind of made a jag about Joe Biden's dementia. And their liberal and she says, Wait, wait, wait. Do you think he has dementia? And like I said, early onset? Of course. I mean, have you seen him and she goes? No, no, Ryan Ryan. He's got a speech impediment and her and her husband were like Digging in like he's got a speech impediment. That's why he's got these problems. It was very interesting. I don't have a lot of liberal friends, your adult talk politics with him. Talking these guys and like that's what they believe They literally don't. They don't think that he has any kind of onset. Dementia is like no, He's got a speech impediment. I'm not gonna go ast far as you I'm not a doctor, and that would be a medical. Um, diagnosis, okay? And when I'm not gonna make medical diagnosis of anybody, here's what I can tell people to do. And then they can decide for themselves because the mob the media, It's so funny. I mean, they all think that I just came out of after since Biden is inaugurated, Hannity starts saying he's weak, frail and cognitively struggling. No, I'd actually been saying it a lot before the campaign, but I guess they're just noticing or that they're now greatly offended that I just say it, but everybody I know Here's the test. Okay, pull some tape of Joe Biden 10 years ago, speaking and then compared to today. Look at Joe Biden and how he moved and walked around 10 years ago. His energy level etcetera is mental acuity. And compared to today, I'm not making any medical diagnosis of that. Not a proper authority and I stand by my statement. That compared to four years ago, 10 years ago. He looks weak to me. He looks frail, and it's obviously struggling cognitively. Um, look, I guess you know, you could say it's just forgetfulness. I'm not gonna make a medical diagnosis, I said, but our people in denial about it, not anybody that I know. People ask me about it. Democrats Republicans all the time, and I know Democrats that want to Joe Biden. The win they confidentially. Tell me every time he opens his mouth and like, uh, Don't put your foot in it again, Joe, you know that, you know, we hold these truths to be self evident. All men, women created equal endowed by their the thing. The thing It's like, everybody's they're on pins and needles. Afraid. What's next? Look at this week, he said twice. We're gonna take all we're gonna increase the number of Ah, vaccines available to American before 100 to 600 million and And we're going to guarantee by the sum of the 300. Americans are going to get the vaccine. Expect these additional 200 million doses to be delivered this summer, and some of it will come as early began to come in early summer, but by the middle by the mid summer that this vaccine will be there. And the order and then on that increases the total vaccine order in the United States by 50%. From 400.

Joe Biden Shawn Ryan Sean Hannity onset Denver United States Utah Colorado
"onset" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"onset" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Partying and investigating the stories that matter to you, Sean Hannity is on right now. 25 to the top of the hour. Alright Street to our busy phones. 894 1 Shawn Ryan, Utah. What's up, Ryan? How are you? Sean. Great talk with you, man. Hey, I've got some friends in Denver, Colorado, and I was a couple weeks ago and I was talking to him and I I kind of been made a chat about Joe Biden's dementia. And their liberal and she says, Wait, Wait, wait. You think he has dementia? And like I said, early onset? Of course. I mean, have you seen him and she goes? No Ryan Ryan. He's got a speech impediment and her and her husband were like Digging, and I think he's got a speech impediment. That's why he's got these problems. It was very interesting. I don't have a lot of liberal friends, your adult talk politics with him. But talking these guys I'm like, that's what they believe. They literally don't They don't think that he has any kind of onset dementia is like No. We've had a speech impediment. I'm listen. I'm not gonna go ast far as you I'm not a doctor, and that would be a medical. Um, diagnosis, okay? And I'm not gonna make medical diagnosis of anybody. Here's what I can tell people to do. And then they can decide for themselves because the mob the media, It's so funny. I mean, they all think that I just came out of after since Biden is inaugurated, Hannity starts saying he's weak, frail and cognitively struggling. No, I'd actually been saying it a lot before the campaign, but I guess they're just noticing. Or that they're now greatly offended that I just say it, but everybody I know here's the test. Okay, pull some tape of Joe Biden 10 years ago, speaking and then compared to today. Look at Joe Biden and how he moved and walked around 10 years ago. His energy level etcetera is mental acuity. And compared to today, I'm not making any medical diagnosis of that. I'm not a proper authority and I stand by my statement. That compared to four years ago, 10 years ago. He looks weak to me. He looks frail, and it's obvious he's struggling cognitively. Um, look, I guess you know, you could say it's just forgetfulness. I'm not gonna make a medical diagnosis, I said, but our people in denial about it, not anybody that I know. People ask me about it. Democrats Republicans all the time, and I know Democrats that want to Joe Biden. The win they confidentially. Tell me every time he opens his mouth and like, uh, Don't put your foot in it again, Joe, you know that, you know, we hold these truths to be self evident. All men, women created equal endowed by their the thing that thing it's like everybody's. They're on pins and needles. Afraid. What's next? Look at this week, he said twice. We're gonna take all were to increase the number of Ah, vaccines available to American before 100 to 600 million and And we're going to guarantee by the sum of the 300 Americans again to get the vaccine. We expect these additional 200 million doses to be delivered this.

Joe Biden Sean Hannity Shawn Ryan onset Denver Utah Colorado
"onset" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

16:10 min | 2 years ago

"onset" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Affects the lives of hundreds of millions dedicated cardio nerds everywhere are working hard to fight this global epidemic. These are their stories I everyone Corinna Dan here. We are really excited to bring you a phenomenal discussion with director. Ed Casper at Hopkins on the evaluation of new onset heart failure during the show. We talk about Dr Casper's Mentor Dr. Ken Baumann for contacts. Dr Dirk Ken. Baumann served as director of the cardiology division at Johns Hopkins University. School of Medicine in Baltimore Maryland before being recruited to bring him hospital L. in two thousand and two however unfortunately he died at the young age of sixty three when he was struck by a car while jogging the AJ scientific sessions in Orlando now in two thousand and nine doctor. Boffin was such a hero in cardiology. And we talk about him all the time here as he is really inspired a whole generation of cardiologists at Hopkins. Dr Myron Weisfeld cardiology great in his own. Right call Dr Boffin a physician physician and an exemplar of how you can lead and teach as a model to others. His thousands of patients knew him and benefited from his great expertise and his care doctor. Gary got leave. The President of Brigham Hospital at the time said that Dr Batman's oftens passion for his patients was woven into the fabric of the hospital. He represented the very best in medicine and that he cared so deeply for each and every person he touched not only was he a an extraordinarily clinician but he was respected and accomplished researcher and a brilliant mentor to dozens of young men and women who benefited from his nurturance and wisdom. With that in mind will jump right in to the episode. Everyone Danny Green here again. We're back in the office of Dr Catherine for just another phenomenal talk this time. We're here for our special series dedicated to heart failure awareness. Week if you I haven't checked it out. We last met with our capacity for episode five. As part of our hypertrophy cardiomyopathy series. The episode was wildly popular and it is must-listen to as Dr Casper delivers bucket. Louis with tremendous pearls. It was one of our most popular episodes. Dr Casper is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University with a B natural sciences. He earned his empty degree at the university city of Connecticut. School of medicine his internship and residency in internal medicine and served as assistant chief of service of the fair service as well as fellowship in Cardiology were completed completed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Where then joined the faculty in Nineteen ninety-three? He's currently the director of clinical cardiology. Johns Hopkins Medicine. He served as director of heart failure from nine hundred ninety three two thousand three and then again recently for two years Dr Casper Welcome back to the show really excited to get going and team before we jump in remember remember this podcast is not meant to be used for medical vice views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of our employers. The goal is simply to enjoy learning more about cardiology directly from from expert cartoon. We are going to jump right into our discussion on the evaluation of new onset. Heart failure. I we'd like to start with. What is your our approach to the evaluation of a patient with new onset heart failure? So we'll be I say a thank you to my fellow Cardio nerds for asking me to talk again. My approach has changed dramatically in the last two decades. When I started off as a cardiology fellow if I was known for anything in research it was as for the causes of cardiomyopathy? My Mentor Ken Baumann. And I had set up. Plant Evaluation Program for new onset cardiomyopathy that included -cluded heart biopsy and a lot of blood work and a number of other things and through this. We evaluated some two thousand odd patients. Johnson we publish these results in the New England Journal of Medicine and at that point. Everything was very stereotypical. If you had a new onset cardiomyopathy you did X Y Z and as the years have gone by have realized. I think we've all realized that most of the things that we find in the workup of cardiomyopathy is actually directed by what we find in the first hour of meeting the patient so it's directed by the history. It's directed by the family. History Street is dragged by the social history. The physical examination. So that's where he is stocked in terms of history. Here looking at chronicity. When did this to start? How has it progressed? What were other salient features? That went along with us. We're their skin. Rashes were there are three rightous. was their chest pain. Whatever you go through past medical history as their past history of being treated with a keep cancer? Chemotherapy agents for breast cancer in terms of social. History do do they drink to these recreational drugs in terms of family history. I think this is where we get the biggest bang for our buck. There was one thing that I wish we've done at the very beginning of this. It was. I wish that we had taken a more complete family. History dating right back to the beginning of this database. I personally think could more than thirty percent of IDIOPATHIC dilated. Cardiomyopathy is actually familial. And thirty percents is sort of the low a wind of the number that you hear published about so kidding genetic counselors involved making sure you get the good pre generation. History is a critically important and then on physical exam. You're looking for things that might indicate hypothyroidism hyperthyroidism things that might indicate lupins vis things such as that when we get to the lab exam. I think it all starts with an ekg. It is very rare or cardiomyopathy to present with a you stone cold normal so you're going to see something and the more chronic the more likely it is. You're going to see the left bundle. Branch Block wore something similar to that. I like a chest x trae. The first time I see a patient helps give me a handle on. How big the heart is inside the chest wall look at pulmonary vascular and of course everything hangs on? ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC is heart failure with preserved ejection fraction heart failure with reduced ejection fraction sort of mid range ejection fraction. And from there you branch out in terms of how you're going to work this up power you're going to treat this as part of the first evaluation I always like to get a CBC and conference about a ball panel. Urine analysis sometimes said rate for new admissions to the hospital opprobium p. and orange opponent level. I think these help you in terms of prognosis. All of these are things that I'm thinking about within the first twenty four hours of meeting impatient the third for the first time that was a really great overview and definitely highlights the importance of talking to the patient which we often take for granted So so were traditionally thought to always start the evaluation within schemic eve. Al When thinking about your approach to that how do you you evaluate frisky. Mia in terms of the different options of testing where we know have a lot of different options only yes back in the old days it who is a stress test and cardiac catheterization in that set and there was lots of left Bundle branch block in this population and some of the stress testing wasn't particularly accurate accurate. So you're really ended up doing cardiac cath that I still do. A lot of cardiac cath particularly those people who are wondering about what the right Heart Cath shows. Normally right atrial pressure tracks who left atrial pressure so someone has high right atrial pressure or low right atrial pressure. You know the left atrial pressure is going to be either high or low but there are those with a low Pressure Rachel pressure of one that you can easily we see on physical examination and yet when you do right heart catheterization you measure the wedge pressure all of a sudden you find twenty eight and so there's this big discrepancy so towards the end of a hospitalization that's required a lot of diarrhea. Says I think it's still a good idea to measure filling pressures in cardiac output. And if I'm going to be doing that sometimes I just tack on coronary in geography at the same time however you could just as easily do quarter C. T. and geography and only a right heart catheterization reservation. And does he end up only in vain rather than an artery innovate. And there's something to be said for that as well. We're really blessed Westwood. Having great imaging with I wonder just how much we really need to look at coronary arteries. In the Cath Lab. But I know that disappoints you you damn business. It's all patient right. Art catheterisation still has a big role to play in writing patients treating patients. It sounds like you to think about reinhard cats often in sort of the end of it. Sounds like the end of the admission once. You feel that you've diaries the patient to sort of get a sense of their baseline pressures. Do you do that all patients that you're that you see admitted with new onset onset heart failure or almost all I would say it would be very rare. Covert of people who get away with that. Two three five percent ninety five percents in all likelihood we are GONNA end up with some sort of invasive crushers at the end of their hospitalization. What do you see that helps you? Guide therapy at some curveballs. That you've seen they wouldn't have been able to assess via echo or diagnostic skills in the in the clinic. Room gotta remember on relatively old and because of that relative the old school so I'm not sure that I completely believe all of the echo guided indices of left atrial pressure so oh I prefer to measure it directly for exactly the reason that I mentioned before. Sometimes there's this big discrepancy between right atrial pressure left atrial pressure. I think we do a reasonably good job at perfusion. I think they're looking at right. Atrial pressures probably one of the last things is that comes to most cardiology fellows on the physical examination. They learned to date hearts pretty quickly. But for whatever reason right atrial pressure sure just lags behind everything else. So there's also something to be said for standing there with your fellow looking at the right atrial pressure and saying Hi think it's eight for the measuring and actually so there's something to be said for that kind of education I mean that's how I learned doc log Wittstein an eye. When he was a follow would look jugular venous pressure than measure directly right? There Khalikov was invaluable terms of word. Absolutely so let's say that you pursued schemic evaluation and that pans out to be negative. So you're working. Under the premise of the large umbrella of not a scheme at cardiomyopathy. What additional testing thing do you pursue at that point to delineate that further end? Sort of what guides your decision on what to pursue mentioned initially history family history. So will that probably comes into play. But how else do you approach. It actually comes into play them big way. Yeah probably the first thing I'd do. After for finding out that the coronaries or cleaned to go back to the patient again and ask them about their family history. Hopefully while twelve other family members it technically a family member will often say. Oh remember uncle bobby side. Suddenly and an aunt susie had shortness of breath thanks Willett ankles at the end of her life. So all of a sudden you begin to play out a story of familial process. So that's probably I'll be the first thing I do. I think there's something to be said for. TSA INCH AN HIV particularly if their risk factors for HIV TSA can be rather apathetic. And so you can be fooled by that makes sense for that all of the other stuff that we once did the workup for lupus repairs. I can't tell you the last time. I found a patient with lupus presenting as cardiomyopathy. The Carney Bob. The presented Lupus all present people who have Lupus for years. And so there's usually no question about it. The ones that you can occasionally get fooled. The BY OUR CIRCLING MAC circle can be a great mic. But we've got much better much better. Imaging modalities than we did. Even ten years years ago an ambulance can sometimes be a little fluky amyloid slash fabregas other things such as that that plays into the question of okay okay. What did you do heart bypass and there was anything that can offer tonight? Were known for the fact that it was if you sneezed wrong. You got a heart by in some volunteers ended up booths heart biopsies because walked past. That's true it's the Labor not true so I'm looking for very specific things on the heart biopsy that I can't find any any other way. It's unlikely that you're GonNa make a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Based upon the heart biopsy his heart biopsy the radio longer to patchy so. That's not actually one of the things I'm looking for. But amyloid is easy to diagnose on a heart biopsy one of the things that bad to this is giants Almir craziness and for somebody who presents fairly young. Perhaps with other autoimmune diseases with lots of intrigue your attacker Cardia this. This is someone who I think should be biopsy to make sure that we don't Miss John. So market is because it has its own special treatment and then once we get past that. There's probably a lot of things that you're GONNA learn from a heart biopsy. Interestingly Kavita Sharma has shown in in her heart biopsy series of patients with preserved ejection fraction relatively high incidence of unknown Amel percent is what she found and this fits with other people in the country. And there's a fairly high percentage twelve fifteen percent of amyloid low flow gradient aries. So there's another group that we might consider doing a little bit more work before we just attributed all to the stenosis. Yeah folks to a tune into episode. Nine were Dr Virginia Hi actually goes over that study that Dr Casper disillusioned with Kavita Sharma and biopsies during half path in terms of additional imaging though before let's say before you're pursuing a biopsy what would guide your decision on whether to get an MRI or a pet scan. Sure sure actually the the Verein the pet skin sort of define who going to biopsy so it would get a cardiac MRI and or a pet scan before runoff to do a heart biopsy so again if there's a thought there might be cardiac sarcoidosis here. Here's where imaging really has come to the forefront both CARDIAC MRI in Penn Skin. I view them as sort of complimentary. They tell us slightly different things with pet scan telling us more about inflammation cardiac. MRI telling US more about the results of inflammation which is fibrosis. So I see a reason to get actually both at a baseline I'm thinking about an infiltrator process..

cardiomyopathy Ed Casper Dr. Ken Baumann Johns Hopkins University director Dr Boffin School of Medicine Dr Dirk Ken sarcoidosis Dr Myron Weisfeld Hopkins left Bundle branch block Johns Hopkins Medicine Johns Hopkins Hospital Dr Batman Dr Casper Corinna Dan lupus cardiology fellow Dr Catherine
"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

20:28 min | 2 years ago

"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Upstairs the almost world-famous Warren store colledge Fremont it's the Dave Ramsey show on wgn and we are back talking about the subject of adult onset hunting with Joshua Morris who is an adult onset hunter here in Vermont and Nicole Nicole Meyer of the Vermont Department of Fish and wildlife and she you are also an adult onset hunter you tell me Nicole and tell me about that your you've been hunting for how long now well I only touched my first gun after I graduated from College so about ten years Yup and I grew up in a I grew up never had guns in the house and we never thought about hunting and when I got one of my first jobs out of college it was working for the New York State Department environmental conservation doing their Hunter Chuck Station programs and and working in their wildlife and hunter education divisions and when I told my mom was interested in starting to hunt she said I thought you wanted to save Bambi not kill it which I think is a really common sentiment from from folks who don't know that hunting and Firearms Sales Fund Conservation through the Pittman Robertson Act which funds a lot of what we do in the fishing explains to her how I felt that it was after after doing a lot of research and a lot of learning I felt that it was more ethically and I I really really wanted this second year to make sure that I had a clean shot and an ethical fast kill and that that did happen I harvested be you know a clean shot as quick kill was was both really a release in a feeling like I've I've done it right have the most fun making roasts now I've been cast iron I put it on a bed of carrot sort of poor in half a bottle of red wine salted well arrested D._v._d.'s terrific programming throughout the day have a great day afternoon everybody.

Joshua Morris Vermont Bambi D._v._d. Warren store Dave Ramsey wgn Nicole Nicole Meyer Vermont Department of Fish New York State Department Hunter Chuck Station Firearms Sales Fund Conservati ten years
"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Their foods fruits vegetables come from and so they're also interested of course in in where their meats coming from and so able to harvest and animal that was living this beautiful wildlife is is something that they wanna WanNA pursue we when we certify through hunter education around four thousand people each year and traditionally in Vermont that's been kids right around the ages of like ten to well you think about taking their first hundred course and going out for youth season on things of that matter but but more and more the average age of someone going through hundred education has has been on the increase so right now the average age of someone going through hundred education is around twenty four twenty five years old so a lot higher than we've seen in the past and traditionally the kids who are going out hunting and that into twelve th twelve or so age group are really being introduced chewed family are they yeah absolutely usually they have strong family ties. It's usually mom dad an aunt and uncle Grandpa who's who's you know reminding them hey you've got it you've gotta take this or they've been going out hunting with that kid for for years without a without a gun in their hand in showing them the ropes and and things of that nature yeah absolutely but these adults don't don't have that same kind of support structure built right in and what are you hearing from the adult onset hunters of about what mode evades them I mean I I get the in fact we headed discussion on the show a few months ago about about local the idea of of the local movement kind of merging with with with hunting on on the theory that doesn't get much more local than the day you bag on your back forty yeah absolutely and so but in addition to that what do you think are some of the other motivations for somebody who's twenty five thirty thirty five years old to get out there for the first time so so food is certainly number one right food food is is the big thing especially here in Vermont where we have a really strong tradition of local local foods and pride in local out of state they've cited that they want to they've seen hunting as a positive thing in Vermont where they might not have seen that where they're originally from and they're interested in acting to nature that way as well as there's there's kind of like a a self sufficiency and getting back to kind of more a more self sufficient more hands on doing things yourself kind of mentality and learning those those basic skills that people are interested in too all right well I want to bring in Josh Morsch into this conversation. Josh is an adult onset Hunter Josh how old are you now yeah I just turned thirty over the summer and smack in the middle of age range that you cited an stand tell me you you went out hunting for the first time win last year a year before that actually so here's here's my experience as an adult onset hunter I come from a family that's quite divided over hunting is being interesting growing up experience Mom's side or down in Western mass and they do hunt actually Dad's side are more based in eastern mass increasingly Western mass now and they are quite uncomfortable around hunting so I never hunted growing up but around college I got to get started to get really serious out at night joined my uncle in the field a few times to see what it was like that peaked my curiosity enough that when I when I moved here to start my graduate work the VM. I thought I might as well really give this a try if I'm going to do it and so when you when you decided you're going to try hunting what did you do I I did you reach out to somebody you knew hunted and collected join you out in the field or how did anybody make the move yeah well I had actually had a kind of wonder a built in mentoring network Nicole made this great point the challenge for people who come to hunting as grownups as that accessing mentorship can be difficult but because of what I research up at UVM which is how people value Naturerbe I had been talking to a lot of people in the hunting community here and also in other in other states red masters field work so I reached out to to folks when you through research but who I knew interested in mentoring hunters Jeff Johnson who's actually out in Wyoming Superman masters was working and Eric News who is here and I I went to them for feedback about everything from how do I stay in a muzzle loader to pick a good spot to to sit and wait for deer yeah I would gather I mean there there are any number sales are I and I have to confess up front right here I am I'm not a hunter myself I I I don't oppose it the way some people do I actually I have less than great eyesight and I've always feared that that'd be shooting the wrong thing out in the woods or something anyway So I I just not a hunter so I'm going to probably ask some pretty pretty dumb questions here of Unin uninformed because I don't Outta I don't know how to use a muzzle loader and I don't know what makes a good a good tree stand or or or that sort of thing but I I am curious about it for sure and and I'm interested Josh to find out when you went out in the woods for the first time if you can remember that day or you start out early in the morning other yeah let's see here's here's actually an interesting flavor to that first day story as a my first in Vermont was magical I I'd been invited by a lecturer at the university who I was helping with the class to hunt on his land swayed spent a couple of days walking around there with my dog looking for gear sign and finding your sign and I actually attribute that to my dog for the most part uh-huh and I will say we we really don't condone hunting deer with dog from obviously so she was joining me on the scouting walk nothing else but when when I got out into the field sort of having a sense of where your we're moving on the property on on the beginning of muzzleloader season's early December I sat down with my back to this big windblown pine And I was looking down a little draw towards the stream where I knew there revere crossings and right around first light right when I was getting cold enough really want to leave the woods I heard crunching and crunching and crunching behind Kehinde the pine and so I- slowly stood up and probably twenty yards away there were four though and they were become the opposite direction on the trail that I had been you know the examining extorting trips and had plans to watch and we looked at each other for what felt a long time it was probably seconds I didn't even raise my day they walked off shortly thereafter and I sat the rest of that day I didn't the anymore gear that day but I had this incredible feeling of having sort of gotten something about what these creatures are doing in the world now were they were going to be and I I was there when they were there at first light it was magical and I also came away with a really healthy respect for there's a lot that I don't about what they're doing they came the opposite direction you know they walked up behind me and that sort of hammered home to me that this was going to be. not a really intense learning process but it was it was a beautiful invitation to a very intense learning process I bet yeah now this is All two years ago last year is when you got your first deer right that's correct and do you mind telling us where that was or yeah Senate big secret and saw those dear on my very first morning in the field okay it's probably just about two hundred yards off a little hill from that assist spot I've spent a lot of time on on this piece of land since that I fit and so I knew very dear go a little bit you're getting to know where they go a little bit better throughout the or has been one of the the most sort of immersive in joyful things in my time in Mont and so I to my spot a little bit accordingly now I'm up on top of this sort.

Vermont Josh Morsch Hunter Josh twenty five thirty thirty five twenty four twenty five years two hundred yards twenty yards two years
"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

26:31 min | 2 years ago

"onset" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"You know I am one of the things that strikes me is really interesting about this is the longevity in this too in this and the fact that you're all still at beautiful functional clothing for every lifestyle brands you know and love cool towed Inco Royal Robbins share the space with fashion forward brands like Tony de Bellas and comfy smart darn tough and more upstairs. The almost world-famous Warren store warn village Vermont now back to the Nave Graham show on Ev fm Ed Hale and we are back entering the second hour of our program this morning and we are going to talking about adult onset hunting in the last part of the show here but we've got a few minutes right now to open the phone lines and see of listeners out there wanNA weigh in on anything in the news this morning or anything else really two four four one seven seven seven is the local number here in Waterbury the toll free number is one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five live and what we think about the fact that the president of the United States yesterday referred to the phony emoluments clause it's a phrase that that Donald Trump used the monuments clause essentially is part of the US Constitution says that the president's in other than government or not supposed to use public office for private gain they're not supposed to make money off the fact that they're serving in public office for instance and there was a lot of concern about this when the president just weak or so announced that he was going to be hosting the G Seven summit this is the leading economic powers in the world gather each year in different spots around world he wanted the United States is turned was coming up in twenty twenty and president trump announced that he wanted to host the G. Seven summit at his own resort the Durrell Golf Club in Florida and A lot of people got really up in arms about that I think there was some sense that you're piling this what this this this on top of all this impeachment discussion in the US House right now on top of the issues with the the action of withdrawal from Syria and the green light for Turkish invasion and and Lee Kurds over in Syria to their own devices a lot of people very very upset about that and then along comes the president and says I want to have my own property be host of this very very one would assume lucrative event where a lot of people would be coming in not just government officials from around the world but there would be Journalists and other other folks who were probably lobbyists a lot of these events draw any number of people who want to be near the action and that would be a quite a coup for any hotel or resort owner which the president of the United dates remains to be to this very day three years into his tournament off nearly three years into his term of office the volume has claws yesterday he called phony while it's there in black and white in the constitution folks and so I don't know whether the monuments clauses phony the constitution is phony or the Oh th to uphold the constitution taken by this particular president was only out I invite callers listeners to call in and tell us which of those three which is which is three things was phony one of them has to be clearly just logically we have it was either the oath the oath that the president doc was phony or the constitutional phony the clause is only Michael from Waynesville what do you think question about that oh I thought that the trump hotel was put into a blind trust and the president had no control over it now I heard him on television saying that he would want to host an at cost the the the party and then the next day he said not did I not only host courts are now hosted at no cost that means to me that he has control that he is not in a blind trust complete control properties and he's doing both jobs well I'll tell you my Michael you know I think it's a moving target you know whether whether the president has these hotels in a blind trust or whether the fact that his kids are still in charge of them make makes a difference eh WHO's actually in charge you never really know exactly what the facts are with this president because of course the Washington Post is documented something like ten thousand during the course of his administration today and so I guess the bottom line is here we don't really know how this exactly what the details are the details seem to change from day to day I mean you go from we're going to do it at no cost to at cost to who knows so again I think that the these details are designed to be lost in the haze and you're exactly correct now yesterday he also he said again you know that he's losing between two and five billion dollars and he also mentioned the fact that he does not run the hotels he said that so so you know he says anything it's really almost ridiculous to listen to anything to to report anything about him on the news it's because they're loving it's back okay when last question which of the threes phony the Constitution the emoluments clause or the oath this particular president took aw I I think the Oh said he took okay thanks for the call appreciate Salmon Williamson in Williston Good Morning Sam we wanted to talk about the class can you explain my understanding of the emoluments clause basically says that a president or Republican Sean Government is not supposed to be profiting off of his or her job and it's not supposed to be running US foreign policy according to the weather on tell say Istanbul Turkey and is not supposed to be running a US foreign policy according to whether he wants to build a hotel in Moscow etc and there's been a lot of questions raised about exactly what are the motivations behind some of the US foreign policy moves made by this administration and I'm not really sure what the motivations are because obviously there's significant lack of transparency attached to all of this but Boy I just think that question after question comes up now we have come along and say hey I've got this nice don down in Florida why don't you couple thousand people or whatever it is coming to stay there in June outside of Miami not exactly the price I'm Tom Prime season for hanging out outside of Miami but I own the place come on by what do you what should we make of this ah in Ireland originally was so we wouldn't take titles didn't want us to become like Europeans we didn't want the passed on aristocracy of the of the European so we're like they when they were trying I figure out what they were GonNa Call George Washington you know they is a is a men's Hind Highness they were making well they they broke it down to either Semitic Mr President Eisenhower ran into a problem when they wanted the Europeans him a title from the tator of Europe or something of that nature there was there so then you know the profits thing is pretty now on the scale there as far as I would I read this is that you know it once again hey the original people in positions were Entrepreneurs I mean Washington had a brewery ladies and he was selling stuff to the army's reactions and things of that nature but as far so they in Washington took a profit Adams had some yanks about the whole thing I know that but I trump rosie he kind of took it off the table anyways he said as long as the hell with us it's not a not a hill I wanna die no matter what it does she do understand you going to be attacked has been attach day want fish from day one they were looking for speech there is a a question of whether it's all just a matter of wanting to attack this guy because he's this guy or wanting to criticize because he owns a high end hotel down the street from the White House in Washington DC where foreign dignitaries whether they are expected to stay there or sort of assume they are expected to see there they come to Washington they stay at the trump international hotel and the trump organization makes a profit of that stay that's how hope as that's his problem you know his problem is he came into office with money went into it like the Clintons like the Obamas search for and then come out and then get all the money you know it shouldn't be going into these places with money and any knowledge how to make L. Living outside the governor there's a problem the the Mayans clause does basically prohibit let's Gosden domestic emoluments clause which prohibits the president from receiving any quote emolument from the federal government states beyond a compensation for his services as chief executive and so once again. You're you're not supposed to make any money in addition to ah the president is being president pays four hundred thousand dollars a year and then run there because he doesn't take any money for his his services well take any money for his services but actually the free golf trips that he's taken on taxpayer many many times the cost of everybody takes vacation in that office everybody goes for their golf at officers there's there's an extent there's a degree difference here you guys replace any phase itself so he's flying on Air Force One he's got a whole entourage of secret service with them it poses a lot of costs every president has done but not to the same extent no I mean you can look at the stats and it's crazy degree to which but hey that's okay have Sam on the bottom of this great so I thank you for the call and I believe that we are in either in or find out a moment either in or just completed run blow hunting season in Vermont and we're coming up on on the regular rifle deer season next month November and I so we're starting to think and talk about hunting in the great state of Vermont and I wanted to I I like to hunting segment or to this time of year and I want a to find a new angle and one new angle is that there seems to be phenomenon going on in these days of people trying hunting for the first time as adults they go out with friends or they they they find maybe a distant relative with whom they never haunted his kids and say hey uncle so and so go hunting this year because I want to try it and I'm hearing it called adult onset hunting which strikes me as kind of an odd phrasing I usually think of adult onset onset that phrase in connection with disease or something but adult onset hunting seems to be the term of art here and so one of the bringing a couple of guests who is very involved in the kind of overseeing and managing and just counting up all the adult onset hunters out there and that would be Nicole Meyer of the Vermont Department of Fish and wildlife she joins me in studio this morning Nicole thanks very much for doing so thanks for having me and I believe we have on the phone Josh Morris who is here he is an adult onset hunter and so we wanted to get somebody who's kind of got a good statewide the thing that sounds like it would be Nicole and somebody who's in it for the joy of being out there in the woods and I think I heard Joshua Baghdad's first dear last year so we can find out all about that thanks for joining me josh yet it'd be on the radio and Nicole Louis Start with you and ask you for this kind of the broad picture out there right now how many what what is an adult onset hunter in how many of them does Vermont half so right now we don't really know we we we the only just begun Becoming interested in in adult onset hunters we don't quite know right now how many of them are out there on the landscape in the wild her but but we do know that adults are becoming more and more interested especially in Vermont adults are becoming more and more interested in hunting from a local food perspective and also in Nature Connection Perspective folks who are interested in obtaining wild local meat are are starting to be become really conscious of of where.

president Vermont Inco Royal Robbins Tony de Bellas Ed Hale Nave Graham Warren three years four hundred thousand dollars five billion dollars
"onset" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

14:42 min | 2 years ago

"onset" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right. So DM t- what you mentioned at the onset, the, the, the one part of this concoction, the P Veritas contains the Mt. You're going to pronounce that. Oh, yes, it's Di methyl trip to me. Oh, what could you just rolls off the tongue? Now, doesn't it? So this is something not exclusive to p of it's found in a bunch of psychedelic substances in this is something that can cause listens. Perhaps changes in your perception, your state of consciousness, your sense of self which will really get into it as a lot to do with the I wass ca journey. However, if you just eat the DMV, it's not going to have this kind of affect on you because there's an enzyme called mono. Amine oxidise and that's going to break it down in your digestive system before it gets absorbed. See have to combine it with this copy vine, which prevents the uptake of it. Yeah, the copy vine has an alkaloid called the harm all alkaloid and harm liens are Saipa psychotropic, and of themselves, which is why the, the copy vine alone used to just be Iowa ska. But the fact that it prevents your, the mono Amine oxidises to break down the DM, t it allows your body to absorb it and all of a sudden you trip in balls. Although I hear it's not all of a sudden, I think it's it takes a good thirty minutes to come on, and then it takes a supplementary boost. An hour or so later to, to really bring on like the kind of transcendent experience that people are looking for when they take. Yeah. For sure. So you've got the you've got the DM t being absorbed. That's the one two punch. Right. You've got the DM itself, and then you've got the plant that allows the DM t to be absorbed in when you put those two things together, the P Varietes and the b- copy. That's what the that's the Iowa that you read about vice. That's what they're talking about. Yeah. In these, you know, this is administered by shaman, someone who ideally, as shaman that knows what they're doing. And they're sometimes there are other plans that are brewed in there as well, but not always, and sometimes it's brute separately, and then combined later, sometimes it all depends on, which shaman you go to what the ritual is, like, sometimes you're included as part of it, sometimes it's like a thick liquid t-. Sometimes it's a paste, it's been described, no matter what it is. It seems like around the horn. Everybody says it tastes awful so awful that that you can very easily through. Up, which is something that's pretty common with the with the Nyawosa experiences. I didn't get that from the from the taste though. That was like, once it's in your body. It makes you nauseous and you throw up. Right. But, like, oh, this tastes so bad. I'm gonna puke it up. No. Because then it wouldn't be in your body long enough to be absorbed. Right. Yeah. But I think the taste in the memory of the taste combined with the nausea is enough to throw up. But the whether whether you do throw for not it's not necessarily like hundred percent. You're going to throw up there. The point, one of the points of Iowa ceremony is to throw up your meant to throw up, and you're, you will actually be forced into this either. If you don't do it from the Iowa, ska, you may also be given something like tobacco juice, like a water with tobacco. That's soaked in it for a while. And you'll be told the drink that so that you will throw up because this idea of purging whether it's throwing up. Or diarrhea Zaveri, frequent side, effective, Iowa, very frequent, you are, you are meant to be purging your body and it's meant to be this kind of symbolic spiritual purge of your ego of all the nastiness of all the horrible nece. That's a part of you getting it out as part of the trip as trip sets in. Yeah. In the taste has been described the New York Times said it's like a muddy herbal taste someone from vox dot com took it a gun, Sean Illing. He described it as a Cup of motor oil diluted with a splash of water. Right. So I read I read it's almost as grosses a neck. Oh, wafer. Nikko wafer. Good on you have, you know what am I crazy? What are they go away? For like old timey kind of like chalky candy comes in a role. You seen them probably. You've seen them in my old, timey candidateship. Exactly. Sure. I did. Yeah. So. All right. I guess we should talk a little bit about. Like you said, it's orange as origins in the Napa river basin by this Ruina tribe, like you said, and it's called the vine of death or the mother vine this copy. And they think that early on, they may have just taken this copy by itself. Right. Right. Because the brew it's got the hormones in it. That's not only an M A O, but also has its own kind of psychoactive stuff going on. So that was the original ska. Yeah. And we have written accounts from like the seventeen hundreds when Jesuits would go to the Amazon to try, you know, Christian is folks and trip balls. Yeah, because I'm sure the entry was like, whoa. And that's it. Hear about the guy that was just killed the missionary. Yes. On senegalese. The sentinel island. Yeah. He. It's like something from a movie he went at first and a child shot an arrow through a bible that he was holding. Apparently I hadn't heard about that. Yeah. Because he had he went back a few times journaling about it. Instead, he basically like held up his bibles like some from a movie and an era was shot through it. And like dude if that is not like if you believe in God, that's a sign from God. Well, you remember turned around the man in the whole episode we talked about them. Yeah. They were the ones that like you like everyone knew you just don't go anywhere near them. And some fishermen had been killed like years few years back, and this guy, I guess had tried he decided he was going to be the one. I don't actually know enough about the story, but he clearly was trying to gain access to them. Yeah. Yeah. He was trying to spread the word of Jesus and paid like you're not supposed. It's illegal, I think even trespass there, but he paid. People sort of under the table to take him there, and they did. So in those people were arrested and his family saying you need to let these people go because he like, really wanted to do this. I see three interesting. Yeah, it is crazy. But I just like that sounds like something you would make up from a movie like shooting in ERO through the bible holding up right now. So we got a little sidetracked, but we were talking about the Jesuits like having this on record in the seventeen hundreds, right? When they went in there, like, hey, there's something going on down here. That's very interesting. Yeah. And even Williams, Burroughs wrote the letters in nineteen sixty three and it was about his experience with the Iowa divine in. Apparently they the practitioners at the time new well into the to the the twentieth century that you could combine it with the peeve Varez and have a completely different experience. But that wasn't necessarily the point that was like in optional ceremony, you could perform. But the most the most widespread traditional ceremony was just the vine of death, right? Yeah. And then it some point somebody started putting them together in word about this. God out in the mid two thousand is when it just I ask kind of hit the public consciousness in the west. Yeah. I mean, in the sixties, of course, in, in certain, you know, subcultures in America, they knew about it because of William Burroughs, and people seeking out things like peyote and all kinds of psychedelic experiences. But it definitely was not sort of in the mainstream until, you know, not too long ago, and even still, I think even at the time it was strictly, the harm liens, and just, the, the vine that was being used the copy, vine, it was it wasn't somebody started putting it together frequently with the, the Beretta's plant in, that's when it became. Hugely popular. Yes. So popular now that there is Iowa. Tourism, big time like going on in South America. In said the central part is Peru's roomba valley. And if you I mean, if you going down for an Iowa experience like a spiritual quest is, is the reason you're going down there. I don't fault you for that at all. Sure. The you have to understand the you have to do your research can't to show up in South America and be like, all right. Give me some Iowa ska because there are a lot of intergroup Yetlis in Farias outfits that have come up to take advantage explicitly of that kind of western tourists. The ill-informed, western tourists who is going to have a horrible, terrible trip and not going to get these spiritual experience, you're looking for so you have to do your research, because there are some legitimate Iowa scout fits in South America. But you they're, they're not going to take you just show up down there and you're going to end up in some in a bad situation. Yeah. For sure. So taking part in, in one of these ceremonies. Let's say you do find like a legit shaman, who's willing to take your American dollars or whatever. However, you're paying. Your gold ingots and hits. It's still, it's sort of funny at all goes back to Burroughs with the set and setting thing, which is what he famously preached about any psychedelic experience is to really put a lot of thought into the set in the setting where you're going to do this goes well for you. So as this concoction is being brewed, like I said before, sometimes you're taking part in this, and helping the mash it up and brew the t-. But what they're really trying to do is the whole ceremony isn't just like for show. It's, it's all part of the thing to get you settled in and on kind of the right things going in like what do you want to accomplish here? What do you wanna find out about yourself? What questions do you have about yourself and really get into that, that frame of mind as they hand, you your puke bucket, although I would recommend bringing your own. Oh, yeah. I hadn't thought about that. I would not want a reused puke bucket. Good. Lord. I hadn't even considered that that'd be for me. So, yeah. I can just totally see how as a as a westerner, you would just be like, come on. We don't need the ceremony stuff. Just give me the good stuff. Right. But like you said, that's the point is the ease you into it to get your mind and body prepared for this enormous trip. You're about to go on, because if he's get dropped right in the middle of it without any kind of preparation or with out any kind of systens you're going to lose your marbles pretty pretty well, yeah. So that is a big part of going on in Iowa journey is, is having somebody who's competent trained and empathetic in willing to stay there with you to prepare you to stay with you to keep an eye on you, you need to be monitored, you can't be up like just running off into the jungle by yourself because terrible things are going to happen to you in that situation and then to help you afterward, as well. And from from some of the preliminary research that starting to come in if you undertake in Iowa. Journey, I guess it was the best word I can come up with. Under the right setting under the right guidance with the right support both pre during. And after it can have profound effects on your spirituality, and your sense of connectedness to the universe. It can also possibly help you with with diagnose mental illness, as well. Yeah, we'll we'll get to the part mental illness part at the end, but just your standard sort of a truth seeker. Let's say, okay. It's very much tied into like what the in ideal conditions like the sixties and seventies with just beyond. But the LSD experience in that those a lot of talk in the sixties about the ego, and every, you know, hip musician in the United States talked about stripping away the ego. From Brian Wilson to the mamas and the Papas to Neil young. Is stripping away that ego of yourself, basically, which which means kind of getting outside yourself to the point where you're not looking at the world around you and how it affects you? But there is no you there is. No, it's a loss of self such that so profound that you can only see the world and people around you as they exist in reality. It's a pretty sort of deep trippy thing to try and describe in words on a podcast. But I think that's sort of the general thing is, is washing that ego down to where it's not around anymore. And you get a true sense of the world around, you. Right for the maybe for the first time. Yeah, yeah. The ego in and of itself, isn't a bad thing. Like it's they think that it developed among animals is that your sense of self awareness. That's the thing that leads you to want to preserve your own life to get away from danger to realize that like. You can die because there is a you. Right. It's a very basic thing. The problem is in humans, as we've evolved are ego, has also volved in it can get to a point where it's unhealthy. It's kind of toxic. It can help you develop Badra, bad relationships, people don't wanna be around. You can also affect your self esteem..

Iowa William Burroughs DMV Di P Veritas New York Times nausea South America diarrhea Mt sentinel island P Varietes Beretta LSD Peru Napa river basin United States Amazon
"onset" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"onset" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"I'm Doug Stephan with a focus on watching television. And how bad it is all the way around if you sit for a long time on your arse. You're going to have a problem with all kinds of things including something to do with colorectal cancer Kenya. Exactly. Colorectal cancer. It's different in the young those under age fifty than those older age fifty and this comes at J NCI Kansas spectrum medical journal just this week that there's a connection between prolong time spent sitting while watching TV and increased risk of colorectal cancer for younger Americans, Doug Young onset. Colorectal cancer. This is diagnosed under age fifty is increasing in the US and globally sharply. Contrasting with the dramatic decreases among older people largely as a result of cancer screening, initiatives, young onset, colorectal cancer. Is typically more aggressive and found that a more advanced stage than those in older patients resulting in greater years of life lost the news this week is that more than one hour of daily TV viewing time is associated with a twelve percent increase in risk compared to those who watched less, but stand by the results were even more striking for those watching more than two hours day with nearly seventy percent increase in risk. This is young people. You're talking about underage. Dating younger could be people with devices in front of computers. Not just television. Exactly where I saw something the other day. And I thought of you the expert advice is to make sure you're up at least five to six minutes every hour and moving every hour euro wake up and moving in order to get away from things like this. Exactly. Yeah. You see this whole business?.

Colorectal cancer Doug Stephan Doug Young J NCI Kansas spectrum Kenya US seventy percent twelve percent six minutes two hours one hour