36 Burst results for "One Year"

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on Kap & Company

Kap & Company

00:38 min | 10 min ago

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on Kap & Company

"White Sox, one of their homegrown guys who was terrific Magglio left and they said, We're going to replace magnet with Jermaine Dye, and we could've very easily and I'm sure we did back then been like really Jermaine Dye's going to replace Magglio, but it weren't for that year. Germaine was terrific. Right? I mean, like Podsednik worked. For three quarters of the season enough for them to get out. We'd like the pitching. Cliff Politte was an all star for one year, right exactly and then sew like they used to build teams that way and it and it worked for one year. But that was the only year they went to the playoffs for the Cubs had the plan, though, because of soon he saw Theo come to the door you like. Oh, now the mood changes serious, like, Oh, this This team's going to win a World Series. I will know they won't. Yeah, feels in the door. He's gonna make it happen. This is what he's been good at. It's like sustaining. It has been the hard part five of six years in the postseason. It is. It's a that's an incredible feat. I mean, it is in its own right, and now it's you signed up for that. Right now. Your clothes already got it is over. Now. He knows what it's like playing, the more they think they're going to lose today. Who's the one? You think they're going to win? That? Who's the one picture with Chicago Cubs has been victimized most by lack of run support of the quarters of his career has been you In Yu Darvish. Alright, I'm still saying today they're going to win. I inform people thought yesterday was going to be all the cubs are going to roll and I think today they're going to look much better, and I think you is going to be good. You like the lineup? That's my I do like the lineup. I'm not sure about David Brody against the righty but Got to try some different kit Nous looked over, man. Yeah, he did A. He did. So here's the Analytics of the Games today, the Chicago White Sox. Win 42% of the time. They don't even have pictures yet. So how are they running Those analytics? Right? Don't know. Here's the Cubs. It's Dunning is Darvish win 68.8% of the time strong and they win by an average of over two runs. I feel good about the Cubs in the socks today, and he just said, is it done in today? Is it crazy to think that you throw Croce out there to start and say, Give us a CZ, many as you can. Yes, it's crazy. Is it crazy? Yes. You think they're thinking about it? Your backs against the wall donning that. So what do you do? Do you go Dunning into croquet? I would bullpen Deion 3333. I don't think so. She can give you three give you okay? So then do you do Dunning for three and two of crow? Shane. Then let your bullpen let's see where I'm at with Dunning. Okay, so Dunning Colony. Croce and Old bullpen Dax with their Khal Amazing, full bullpen, Daeso, not even start. Dunning. To see me and start Dunning and then gives saw from him. Was he tweeted it? Full bullpen. I wonder if they're thinking about cruciate guys like honestly, I mean, no, no, no. My friend Al called me and said, Why can't they just let him go? As far as he can go? So one game in college. No. Can't just do that. You have a minor leagues who's pitching shopper? All right, So let's not overthink this thing. Okay? Dunning is better than cease. Barely. Yeah, and sees pitched yesterday only 14 pictures. But like that takes you out for a start. Right? Sometimes we just put so much started this thing and when we had the look of the obvious Dunning. He goes far as done, He can go. There's base runners. You gotta get that bullpen going. Can you get you into the fourth? That's all. What about Rhoda? I know I'm a little scared of freedom out there. I don't want about that. I don't want I might rather take freedom. I don't want to be ladies out there. What big had cats out there? I want to take him over and I don't know. Now pitching. Put the cheeseburger down, Nick Free Del for the white. Please put your bacon double bacon cheeseburger down. I.

Dunning Chicago Cubs Chicago White Sox Dunning Colony Theo Yu Darvish Jermaine Dye Cliff Politte Croce Germaine Podsednik Magglio Croquet Daeso Rhoda David Brody Nick Free Nous Shane
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 7 hrs ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
A lesson from Trump's taxes: An underfunded IRS is outmatched

Planet Money

09:59 min | 14 hrs ago

A lesson from Trump's taxes: An underfunded IRS is outmatched

"And so part of the reason that president trump has been able to pace a little taxes at least according to the Times is because his businesses have lost so much money they've lost more than a billion dollars and he. Has, used the carry forward provisions among other things to reduce his tax bill for years and years. You know when you have business losses, it's like you have like money in the tax bank that you can use to pay less taxes in the future. Now, originally back in nineteen eighteen when carry-forward I started if you lost money one year, you could use that loss to reduce your taxes for next year but only for that one year and then a while later Congress said you know what you can carry over losses. For two years then Congress extended it further to fifteen years and eventually congress said you can spread your losses out. You can carry losses forward for as long as you want forever President Trump signed the bill that made that change into law in two thousand, eighteen and Isaac says there are good reasons to have this provision in the tax code it can be helpful for struggling businesses. So on the one hand, you kind of don't want your tax system to bankrupt a viable business just because it has a bad year. Right. So that's one. So it's useful but also but but depending on, you know how clever you are about your investments and how you go about booking what counts as a loss. There's lots of room to kind of gain with creative accounting. It is it is wildly open to abuse. So carry-forward is sometimes a reasonable useful thing and sometimes something that people and businesses abuse to pay less taxes than they should, and there are people at the irs whose job it is to figure out for every tax return that uses this provision you know which is this reasonable or is this abuse but as it says, the funding that pays for the IRS to enforce carry forward rules and the rest of the tax code, it has been cut for years it's been. A pretty substantial. block of the Republican Party in Congress has lined up behind the idea of really depriving the irs of teeth especially, the enforcement arm that that goes after. The rich and just like think about how expensive it can be to audit the taxes of the ultra rich fridge people do not have simple straightforward tax returns. They have a ton of paperwork fancy lawyers in. So look at the story we read The New York Times about the president's taxes right and and it was a picture that they have to assemble by looking at hundreds of different tax returns for hundreds of different entities. Now imagine having to do that for every even for one in ten rich people in the United States right Obviously, it can't be done. Except there's one congressional committee that specifically looks into the super-rich but only in some cases but but. One of those cases use the case of president trump. There was this one paragraph in the time story I mean there were a lot of paragraphs in the time story and a lot of it was interesting but there was one paragraph in particular that really I wanted to understand better. So the paragraph was related to this seventy three million dollar tax refund that Donald Trump apparently got in two thousand and ten and that he and the government are still fighting over. Okay. I'm going to read this paragraph it says quote refunds require. Blah. Blah Blah in opinion of the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation Blah Blah Blah and tax law requires the committee to weigh in on all refunds larger than two. Million dollars to individuals. So what this paragraph is saying is there is a committee in Congress that has to give an opinion every single time the irs is about to send some rich person, a multimillion dollar tax refund as I read this and I thought like why you know what is going on you have questions. So I called Dave Norton he's a corporate lawyer who used to work at this committee, the Joint Committee on taxation, and he told me this is not a normal kind of congressional committee. You know it doesn't right laws. It doesn't hold hearings where lawmakers ask questions that are really more like comments and the joint committee staff is. A non-partisan expert staff of economists. Lawyers. Accountants. So it's like it's like Congress's. Team of tax nerds. That is a good way to put it. Exactly, right mostly the nurse on this committee figure out what different changes to the tax code would mean for the government and for the economy, you know how different potential tax tweaks would work. But a few of them go into work everyday and review giant tax refunds that the IRS is about to send out it's it's interesting because it's so one by one right you don't think of Congress as doing. Anything on like we'RE GONNA get every big tax refund that goes out in America. But that is what they're doing here and I agree it is It is pretty unusual. It might be unique in terms of something that the Congress would get involved with Congress got involved with this back in the nineteen twenties basically because they didn't trust the person who was overseeing the IRS, the Treasury Secretary Andrew Melon. Melon was one of the richest men in America. Also, one of the biggest tax payers in America had all these business interests that he held onto he was treasury secretary, and so congress was like wait you're the boss of the IRS and you owe all these taxes and you have investments and all these businesses that the IRS is supposed to be taxing that seems very shady. You know we want to make sure that you're not just having the irs and you and your pals massive tax refunds. So what we congress are going to do is we're going to pass a law that requires this Joint Committee to review big refunds. Congress basically said tax nerds keep an eye on these rich guys in the refunds, and so here we are almost one hundred years later and the tax nerds. They are still keeping an eye on these guys, and that's why in two thousand eleven trump's refund made its way to this committee. Apparently, the committee reviews hundreds of these refunds a year. So it's you know. Sort of, but there are a couple of things in this case in the case of Donald Trump's giant refund that are unusual. One unusual thing is typically the committee reviews the refunds before they get sent out to tax payers make sense. Yeah. It would think you would think but there is this special corner of the law and it actually applies to sort of the twin Sarah of what you were talking about earlier in the show the twin of the carry forward provision right where you can carry forward losses. The twin is Keri back. Here's how Carrie backwards if you lose money in the year, you're filing your taxes for now instead of carrying those losses forward as you do in carry forward, you can look back to. The past, you can say, look a few years ago. I was making tons of money I was on the apprentice and I paid tons of taxes, and so what I WANNA do is I want to carry my losses from the present back into the past and I want you to give me a refund for all of those taxes I paid a few years ago. Right so that is what president trump in fact was doing in this case when he got this giant seventy-three, million dollar refund and the special provision of the law that applies here is actually something they call a quickie refund and so innocent. Cute little seventy-three, million dollar tax refund and what happens with a quickie refund is the IRS. Okay. We will send you the refund before we've done a thorough evaluation of your claim and you have to promise that. If we ultimately decide that your claim for this refund, not you're going to give us back the money. So that's what happened here. That is thing number one that was unusual to quickey refined I seventy three million dollars. Yes. Okay. So thing number two that is unusual is just how long it has taken to figure out whether the refund was legit. You know whether the president in fact qualified for the refund under the law so Typically. The Joint Committee Clears Clears Refund reviews. In about three weeks maybe a little bit more than three weeks in a kind of standard run of the mill case they've says that some really complicated cases might take a few months to figure out but the president's case is still unresolved and it went to the committee nine years ago years they've says, he never saw anything take anywhere near that long when he worked at the Committee I never saw years Adam okay. So a case that went on for years would be very unusual in your experience. That's fair. Say yes and you know it makes sense that once Donald Trump becomes president trump the case would become exceptional and more complicated and take longer but this was already going on for years before that happened and so it's not entirely clear why it's taking so long. So Okay we've been through what's going on with the president's case, and also where does this weird committee review come from The one last thing I wanted to ask Dave was does it even makes sense to have a special Congressional Committee Review You know individual tax refunds you sort of worked on both sides you you were describing working for clients whose refunds are held up by the committee you've worked on the committee holding up People's refunds as you study them. Do you feel like it's useful? I do think just from a from a revenue perspective the taxpayer gets huge bang for the buck out of the C. T. Refund review process it costs almost nothing to run. It's you know as I said, just a few people and they can be counted upon to spot millions and millions and millions of dollars of potential mistakes. The spotting thing. Hey, look this is this million here million there at this shouldn't be going out for this this this reason

Congress IRS Donald Trump President Trump Joint Committee Congressional Joint Committee America Dave Norton Andrew Melon Isaac United States The New York Times Republican Party Keri Carrie Sarah Adam
California approves task force to consider paying reparations for slavery

Larry Elder

00:22 sec | 15 hrs ago

California approves task force to consider paying reparations for slavery

"Reparations to black Americans under a new law. Governor Gavin Newsom signed the law. On Wednesday. It sets up a nine member test forced to come up with a plan on how the state could give reparations to black Americans. The task force must give its recommendations to the state Legislature one year after its first meeting. The law would not limit the reparations to slavery on Wall Street that out by

Governor Gavin Newsom
NASCAR Cup Series to run first dirt race since 1970 at Bristol in 2021

Terry Meiners and Company

00:45 sec | 19 hrs ago

NASCAR Cup Series to run first dirt race since 1970 at Bristol in 2021

"For the first time since 2011 when the when Kentucky held its first cup. Siri's a NASCAR race is not going to be at the Kentucky Speedway next year. Kentucky Speedway. Really? I mean, NASCAR released its 2021 schedule today was six road courses, the first dirt race for the Cup series since 1970, they added stops at Nashville in Austin, Texas, and one college basketball note. Jeff Gooden from stadium dot com reporting that Beller Mint in their first year of in Division one, will be playing in an event at Duke. In the preseason early season this year would be Duke, Howard, Ellen and Bellman. Beller with bellman would play Duke and Howard in Ahh, the count around Robin Event

Kentucky Speedway Beller Mint Duke Bellman Kentucky Beller Nascar Jeff Gooden Howard Siri Basketball Ellen Nashville Austin Texas
U.S. pending home sales rise to record high in August

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 d ago

U.S. pending home sales rise to record high in August

"Family Home Construction in August reached a 14 year. Hi Putz. 2020 on pace to be the first year total New home construction tops one million since 2007 The rate of new home sales has grown by 108% between 2010 and now, and the median price of a newly built house has risen 62% in the past decade, the lowest number of new home sales recorded in 2011.

Family Home Construction Putz.
Doc Rivers out as Clippers' coach, after seven seasons

First Things First

02:11 min | 1 d ago

Doc Rivers out as Clippers' coach, after seven seasons

"The LA clippers parting ways with head coach dot servers yesterday. Some would say it was inevitable after the way they collapsed against Denver many had this team winning the title. Don't even get to the conference finals doc did issue a statement yesterday thanking the fans and calling it eight disappointing end to this season are nick after seven seasons. Doc Rivers out as clippers head coach surprised the team made this decision. Surprised it took them a week or two weeks almost I. Felt like it was either going to be immediate or it wasn't going to happen. But while everyone respects dock and everyone likes dock and everyone's going to focus on the three one series loss third the most the only coach ever with more than one. Here's I. Think the biggest. Indictment on Doc rivers, not just this year but his with the clippers. And people aren't going to believe this but I promise it's true. Frank Vogel has won as many playoff series with the Lakers as doc rivers one with the clippers. Thing about that. So it wasn't just one year of underachieving, it was a better part of a decade of underachieving. and. So the question is, will the clippers get a better coach I don't know if they will. Tie lose going to be the obvious thing. We can talk more about that later but Jonah the real reason they did this in my opinion is because they were stuck like the brandon they don't have a good secondary pitch here they I know you would said, keep collide dock and Paul George and blow the rest of the team. I don't know if the rest of the team has that much value I think the only real shake-up you could do is trade Paul George whose values the lowest it's ever been or fire the coach I don't know that they had another way to shake the snow Globe Brandon. So I think they made the changer not for the sake of change, but because they had to change something and this was almost the only move they could do.

La Clippers Doc Rivers Lakers Paul George Frank Vogel DOT Denver Jonah Nick
A global movement to solve global problems

TED Talks Daily

05:01 min | 2 d ago

A global movement to solve global problems

"For years I have been working on a simple idea for humanity to tickets. Next leap ahead, we need to work together across borders to so global issues. In, the modern world new water bora can protect us from crisis. We have no other choice but to unite. And we need to do it fast in two thousand, sixteen I was devastated by the UK's decision to leave the European Union. I'm French for me. The EU is more open and global. Society. But sudden, these be shuttered and I wasn't feeling this way. My partner Andrea who's Italian and Damian a German friend also called the shock of seeing the world turning inward. We realized that despite being from three different countries, we witnessed the same challenges migration fluids being dealt with an inhuman. Mana. Climate Change. Well, how you employment And we also had the same hopes and dreams in everyday lives. We also realized that to SUV European issues the outdated model of always national interests I had to go. So we decided to act for a few months we west on the idea of launching votes, the first pan-european political movements, and then naturally we told facebook friends. And a lot of them responded saying that were up the challenge and wanted to help. People started holding small community meetings in parks, universities, and pubs to discuss common future and shed their solutions to the continent's biggest problems. We mobilized tens of thousands of people across twenty eight European countries, two years in. Damian was elected to the European Parliament on the campaign run by volunteers across borders on the idea that we just from together. We should that by collaborating across borders by nineteen and acting as one, we could start changing how people think. With the first ones to attempt something of this scale and to succeed despite this after the European elections in May two thousand and nineteen on drown I looked into, which is an asked that frank question that you never want to ask. Once you have what two years would something that actually worked out is this enough? No it wasn't. We knew that today's urgent challenges and not just your but global. We also knew that we couldn't even attempt to solve them by only focusing on Europe. A continent that represents less than ten percents of the world's population John Lying issue is that the way we see the world and the way the world works who mentally wrong. In. The span of two generations to what has changed more than in the previous twenty thousand years we can lend on the moon. We can wake up and Shane Guy in Gutu better in New York, we have access to a huge amount of information all the time every way. But we still see the world as I meet Ceti but issues like covid nineteen, climate, change migration, fiscal justice, human rights mean that we need to think and united beyond national borders. A global approach is needed to solve them. Countries need to collaborate share resources, information and solutions. It's not just the right thing to do, but it's also the smart one. So in the weeks following dungeons election on brand I decided that we would create a global movement to unite people beyond borders and so those issues that concern us all. We, call it now because we're not very creative and because it needs to happen now. So I know that going beyond national borders is not the easiest thing too. So here's the framework that has been guiding our work. I could think unites and it forward I. We need to change the way we think about the world whether we like it or not already live in a globalised world we need to stop thinking within national frameworks and start thinking globally take, for example, how we think about taxation. Multinational companies like facebook or Amazon or radio operate across borders but they pay very little taxes in very few countries because we think of them within national frameworks and as a result, we lack a global tax system due to this country's are deprived of at least five, hundred, billion dollars annually. Five hundred billion dollars to put it in perspective half of amount of money we could put an end to global hunger for one year, but we don't. Because of the way, we think about the world. At now, we want to change this. We connect people from all across the world who discuss work together and understand that global is the new normal and that they have more in common than what separates them. We host wiki events in which we discussed topics such as lgbt rights, pandemics, fiscal justice, or mental health. We've breakdown. This book challenges to see how they impact people in various parts of the world and I met this have already shown a global thinking actively rallying governments to solve those issues like ensuring a fetish abuse of vaccines across the. World.

European Union Facebook Damian European Parliament UK Europe Partner Ceti Frank Shane Guy Andrea Gutu Amazon New York
Takeaways from the NYT report on Trump's tax returns

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:46 min | 2 d ago

Takeaways from the NYT report on Trump's tax returns

"Never give a tax return when being audited. They're extremely complex people wouldn't understand him now the house goes and such defending they WANNA know every deal. I've ever done since declaring his candidacy for President Donald? Trump. Has refused to share his tax returns and gone to court to stop them being released. On Sunday The New York Times published an investigation into more than twenty years worth of Mr Trump's taxes, but not the documents behind them to protect its sources. The New York Times an explosive report despite receiving over four hundred, million dollars through two thousand eighteen report showed he paid paltry amounts of federal tax in recent years. The report claims that Mr Trump paid remarkably little tax since the turn of the Millennium. It suggests that many of the president's businesses are chronically loss-making. and it puts numbers to just how deeply personally indebted the president is. The revelations prompted a familiar retorted. News it's totally fake news made up fake. We went through the same store as you could ask me the same questions for years ago had a litigated this and talk about it. They are the same questions questions that arose in the presidential debates between Mr Trump and Hillary Clinton almost exactly for years ago maybe he doesn't want the American people. All of you watching tonight to know that he's paid nothing in federal taxes because trump's rebuttal at the time that makes me smart smart. Tonight another set of presidential debates this time between Mr Trump and Joe Biden. It seems certain that once again, Mr Trump's accounting practices will figure into the discussion. The big headline takeaways on that he paid. No federal income tax whatsoever intended the fifteen years through two, thousand seventeen and in twenty sixteen seventeen the year that he ran for the presidency his first year old in the presidency he paid any seven hundred fifty dollars in federal Income Tax James. Ashville economists, Washington bureau chief. His company's myriad companies were making truly enormous losses over these years. Presidents companies have been losing hundreds of millions of dollars. He's heavily indebted at the same time, and the the record also show us that hundreds of millions of debt. In fact, around four hundred millions of data he's personally on the hook for his liable to fall due mostly within the next couple of years. So it creates a picture of a heavily heavily indebted loss-making businessman on a truly Gargantuan scale who's been paying little or no federal income tax and has serious debt worries ahead of him as he faces a cash crunch meanwhile. But how can it be? He's paid. So little tax over all of that time. I guess two main ways one is that he appears to be setting a large amount of personal family expenditure against his business revenues. For example, he is setting his family home expenses, his plane expenses, even his apparently also colossal head writing expenses against VAT revenue but by far, the biggest means that he's avoiding paying large amounts of tax walls taking in hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue is by setting those revenues against the enormous losses that he's making overall to give you just some taste of the scale of that loss making it. Seems that the president has lost more than three, hundred, million dollars since the turn of the century on his golf courses alone he's lost more than fifty five, million dollars on his Washington DC hotel, which has become a sort of symbol for trump world of the president's firm hold on the capital, and yet it seems it's losing money hand over fist, and all of that is above board. He may already been some difficulty over the scale of losses that he's claiming to set against his revenues. The long trailed audit that his tax affairs. From the IRS we learn relate to attacks refunded that he received decade or so ago of seventy-three million dollars related, it appears to loss-making casinos in Atlantic city a business that he walked away from though we don't know it appears that there is an least an allegation or suspicion that he may have profited from those casinos even as he walked away from. Them if that is the case, he's not liable that tax refund that tax refund plus subsequent interest would now mean a hundred million dollar bill for the president. From the IRS, are you yourself surprised I mean that the president has been fighting so hard to keep this under wraps I just wonder how much you're surprised by what you see in these files. I don't think we're surprised by any of this. We already knew something of the scale of the president's loss-making. He declared a loss of nearly a billion dollars back in the ninety s sufficient to avoid paying any federal income tax for around a couple of decades that was in the sense is remarkable as anything that we've learned from this latest enormous cache of additional detail. But there are a couple of really significant scoops and then the fact that he could be on the. Hook for so much money from the IRS. If the audit goes against him in the fact that he's personally liable for so many hundreds of millions of dollars of loan that will fall due in the next few years. That also is a very significant detail in for those that worry that the president may be compromised that his indebtedness could lead him to make judgements that the American people might have calls to question for those worries. This is I think sort of additionally inflaming. But I mean the picture that emerges here regardless of the creativity of the accounting is somebody who is not running businesses very well. So. Donald Trump entered politics back in twenty fifteen claiming to things that he would bring his business genius to the Serbs the American people make government work better, and that he would sort of right the wrongs that lofty elite were habitually visiting upon the hardworking vulnerable American people and I think the of broad takeaway from this trove of tax information is either Donald Trump is an absolutely appalling businessman in which case is I claim is hard to support or he's bilking the treasury of millions of dollars of avoided tax that he should be paying in which case his second contention is also rather heart support. And do you think either I if either can be parched or or stood up, we'll have any influence on the election on the debates this week. Let's let's break that down Jason I. Think this is not going to be a sort of major vote moving scandal. We've had equivalent scandals that have that have not moved the president's support up or down much a tool and I. think there's no reason to expect this to do so and yet it's significant significant. Because the president opinion polls consistently tell us is substantially behind Joe Biden in this race with only little more than a month to go before the election. What this does is put yet another hurdle in front of his trying to re come on the news cycle get on the front foot, take the attack to Mr Biden nine. We may see some of that in the first presidential debate tonight where Joe Biden has really been handed the script by the New York Times as it of opening attack on a president who loses so much money in his business of as pays such little taxes and result.

Donald Trump President Trump President Donald Joe Biden IRS The New York Times Washington Bureau Chief Jason I. Atlantic City Hillary Clinton Washington
The IRS is auditing Trump's questionable $73 million tax refund

KCBS Radio Overnight News

02:34 min | 2 d ago

The IRS is auditing Trump's questionable $73 million tax refund

"Since Richard since Richard Nixon Nixon not to not release to release his his tax returns. tax returns. And now we And now we may have may some have idea some idea why. why. Here is CBS Here is CBS news correspondent news correspondent Ben Tracey, Ben Tracey, who said who the president said the president responded responded yesterday yesterday to the bombshell to the bombshell report report by The New York by The Times New York Times by calling by calling it it fake news fake news today he's today he's trying to trying justify to justify how he's how handled he's handled his taxes. his taxes. President President Trump is Trump not is answering not answering questions questions about tax about records tax records He's long He's long tried to conceal tried to conceal in a bombshell in a bombshell report report The New York The New Times York obtained Times obtained tax return tax data return data covering more covering than two more than decades. two decades. It shows It shows President President Trump Ages Trump Ages $750 $750 in federal in federal income income tax tax in 20. in 20. 16 and 16 2017 and 2017 the same the amount same amount a single a adult single adult making about making $18,000 about $18,000 widow widow and in 10 and in of 10 the 15 of the 15 years before years before that, that, he paid he nothing paid nothing because his because business his business is lost is lost so much money. so much money. The The Biden campaign Biden campaign turned the tax turned the revelations tax revelations into an ad into an showing ad what showing average what Americans average Americans pay. pay. The Times The Times report report contradicts contradicts Mr Trump's Mr billionaire Trump's billionaire business business guru image, guru image, and they paid me and they 213 paid me 213 million. Many million. of his Many of businesses, his businesses, including including golf golf courses in courses hotels in hotels report losing report large losing amounts large of amounts money. of money. The president The president also also Used tax Used deductions tax deductions to fund to his fund lavish his lavish lifestyle, lifestyle, writing off writing expenses off expenses for housing for housing aircraft, aircraft, You're fired You're fired and even and $70,000 even $70,000 in hairstyling in hairstyling for his TV for his appearances. TV appearances. It's total It's fake total news fake news On Sunday, On Sunday, The president The president denied denied the report. the report. He defended He defended his use his of use depreciation of depreciation and tax and credits tax credits in a pair of in a tweets. pair of tweets. Mr. Trump Mr. Trump has long has claimed long there's claimed nothingto there's nothingto hide in hide his tax in his returns tax returns while refusing while refusing to release to release them. them. I look forward I look forward to introducing to introducing that that I look forward I to look releasing forward to releasing many things. many I'm things. going to release I'm going to many release things many things and people and will people be really will be shocked. really shocked. The documents The documents obtained obtained by the time by the time show the IRS show the IRS is auditing is auditing a questionable a questionable $73 $73 million tax million tax refund, refund, the president the president claimed claimed and could and now be could forced now be forced to pay back to pay with back interest. with interest. The records The records also show also Mr show Mr Trump took Trump in $73 took in $73 million million from foreign from foreign deals. deals. During his During first his two first years two in years office in office and is now and facing is now facing hundreds hundreds of millions of millions of dollars of dollars in loans in loans Coming due. Coming due. This president This president appears tohave appears tohave over $400 over $400 million million in debt in for debt 20 for Whatever 20 it Whatever is it is Million dollars Million dollars in debt in debt to home to home different countries. different countries. What is What the leverage is the leverage they have? they So have? for So me? for me? This is a This national is a national security security question. question. According to New According York to Times New York These Times tax These tax documents documents suggest suggest that Ivanka that Ivanka Trump was Trump paid was $750,000 paid $750,000 in unspecified in unspecified consulting consulting fees fees while while she was an she employee was an employee of the Trump of the Organization. Trump Organization. How those payments How those payments could have helped could the family have helped the reduced family reduced its overall its overall tax bill tax bill that has been that has been Tracy Tracy and and

President President Trump President Trump Mr. Trump Mr. Trump Trump Organization Mr Billionaire Trump Ben Tracey The Times New York Times Richard Nixon Nixon CBS New York Tracy Tracy Biden Ivanka Tohave IRS The New York
Donald Trump 'paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017'

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:40 min | 2 d ago

Donald Trump 'paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017'

"We begin tonight with that bombshell report on President trump at his taxes the election just thirty six days away now, and this is the most extensive reporting yet on the matter reporters at the New York Times revealing, they have examined eighteen years of president trump's taxes eleven of those years they report president trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the year he won the White House they say he paid seven hundred fifty dollars in federal income taxes the same the following year. That's about the same amount of American worker earning twenty thousand dollars a year pace federal income taxes seven hundred, fifty dollars. The Times points of those eleven years in which trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the Times also reporting that the president is hundreds of millions of dollars in debt more than four, hundred, twenty, million, they say in debt that could come do over the next four years if he's elected leading new questions, who is that money Oh to? Of course, all of this just twenty four hours before the first face to face debate between president trump and Joe Biden here's our chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl leading off tonight. On the eve of the first presidential debate, the American public is getting what's been described as the first detailed look at one of Donald Trump's most closely guarded secrets, his tax returns in its Blockbuster Report The New York Times reviewed detailed information on nearly two decades. Worth of trump tax returns. The details are startling trump paid no federal income taxes at all in eleven of the eighteen years they review. Twenty sixteen the year he won the White House trump reportedly paid only seven hundred and fifty dollars for a first year in office. He again paid just seven hundred, fifty dollars seven hundred fifty dollars is roughly the federal income tax bill of someone who makes twenty thousand dollars a year at the White House the President insisted the Times report was not accurate well, first of all, I paid a lot a lot of state income taxes too but state and federal income taxes are two different things the president built his brand and his campaign on being a business genius with the MIDAS touch have great business sense I made a lot of money and I had great success. So I've had great success by the way really successful but the Times reports the trump businesses including his golf courses and resorts are actually awash in red ink. His Washington hotel reportedly lost fifty five point five, million dollars since it opened for years ago his foreign ventures according to the Times are among the few that have actually made money since he became president more than seventy, three, million dollars some of the most profitable countries with authoritarian leaders including the Philippines and Turkey when trump ran for president the first time he insisted he was loaded with money and had almost no debt whatsoever anybody I don't need that very interesting. I'm so liquid I don't need that and if I need but the Times reports the president is actually drowning in debt including more than four hundred, twenty, one, million dollars that could come do over the next four years the paper noting that if trump is reelected quote, his lenders could be placed in the unprecedented position of wing whether to foreclose on a sitting president today the president tweeted he has very little debt compared to the value of assets. He has repeatedly said his tax returns are under IRS audit it's. They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me. Well, the newspaper reports the IRS is in fact investigating a seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund the president received in two, thousand ten and whether he took improper deductions, the times found trump took tax deductions for money spent on his lavish lifestyle including seventy thousand dollars on hairdressers during his time on the apprentice and more than ninety five, thousand dollars for vodka trump's makeup artist. The President says he is entitled like everyone else to depreciation and tax credits. Refused to turn over his tax returns but he's also bragged about his ability to avoid paying taxes. The only years that anybody's ever seen where a couple of years when he had to turn them over to state authorities when he was trying to get a casino license and they showed he didn't pay any federal income tax so. Eight zero that means zero for troops. The Biden campaign points out that most voters do pay taxes releasing an ad today highlighting working class people who have paid more federal income tax than the self described. In the White, house.

Donald Trump President Trump The New York Times White House Joe Biden IRS Chief White House Corresponden The Times Jonathan Karl Midas Washington Turkey Philippines
Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:40 min | 2 d ago

Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

"Begin tonight with that bombshell report on President trump at his taxes the election just thirty six days away now, and this is the most extensive reporting yet on the matter reporters at the New York Times revealing, they have examined eighteen years of president trump's taxes eleven of those years they report president trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the year he won the White House they say he paid seven hundred fifty dollars in federal income taxes the same the following year. That's about the same amount of American worker earning twenty thousand dollars a year pace federal income taxes seven hundred, fifty dollars. The Times points of those eleven years in which trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the Times also reporting that the president is hundreds of millions of dollars in debt more than four, hundred, twenty, million, they say in debt that could come do over the next four years if he's elected leading new questions, who is that money Oh to? Of course, all of this just twenty four hours before the first face to face debate between president trump and Joe Biden here's our chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl leading off tonight. On the eve of the first presidential debate, the American public is getting what's been described as the first detailed look at one of Donald Trump's most closely guarded secrets, his tax returns in its Blockbuster Report The New York Times reviewed detailed information on nearly two decades. Worth of trump tax returns. The details are startling trump paid no federal income taxes at all in eleven of the eighteen years they review. Twenty sixteen the year he won the White House trump reportedly paid only seven hundred and fifty dollars for a first year in office. He again paid just seven hundred, fifty dollars seven hundred fifty dollars is roughly the federal income tax bill of someone who makes twenty thousand dollars a year at the White House the President insisted the Times report was not accurate well, first of all, I paid a lot a lot of state income taxes too but state and federal income taxes are two different things the president built his brand and his campaign on being a business genius with the MIDAS touch have great business sense I made a lot of money and I had great success. So I've had great success by the way really successful but the Times reports the trump businesses including his golf courses and resorts are actually awash in red ink. His Washington hotel reportedly lost fifty five point five, million dollars since it opened for years ago his foreign ventures according to the Times are among the few that have actually made money since he became president more than seventy, three, million dollars some of the most profitable countries with authoritarian leaders including the Philippines and Turkey when trump ran for president the first time he insisted he was loaded with money and had almost no debt whatsoever anybody I don't need that very interesting. I'm so liquid I don't need that and if I need but the Times reports the president is actually drowning in debt including more than four hundred, twenty, one, million dollars that could come do over the next four years the paper noting that if trump is reelected quote, his lenders could be placed in the unprecedented position of wing whether to foreclose on a sitting president today the president tweeted he has very little debt compared to the value of assets. He has repeatedly said his tax returns are under IRS audit it's. They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me. Well, the newspaper reports the IRS is in fact investigating a seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund the president received in two, thousand ten and whether he took improper deductions, the times found trump took tax deductions for money spent on his lavish lifestyle including seventy thousand dollars on hairdressers during his time on the apprentice and more than ninety five, thousand dollars for vodka trump's makeup artist. The President says he is entitled like everyone else to depreciation and tax credits. Refused to turn over his tax returns but he's also bragged about his ability to avoid paying taxes. The only years that anybody's ever seen where a couple of years when he had to turn them over to state authorities when he was trying to get a casino license and they showed he didn't pay any federal income tax so. Eight zero that means zero for troops. The Biden campaign points out that most voters do pay taxes releasing an ad today highlighting working class people who have paid more federal income tax than the self described. In the White, house.

Donald Trump President Trump The New York Times White House Joe Biden IRS Chief White House Corresponden The Times Jonathan Karl Midas Washington Turkey Philippines
Trump denies report he paid only $750 in income taxes in 2016 and 2017

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 2 d ago

Trump denies report he paid only $750 in income taxes in 2016 and 2017

"President Trump continues to bash in New York Times report that indicates he didn't pay anything in taxes over most of the past 15 years, in fact, only $750 in taxes during his first year in office. We talked about it with the GOP's Capitol Hill correspondent Mitchell Miller. Top Democrats very quick to criticize this. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer quickly issuing statements. Pelosi says the article shows that the president has sought to game the tax code and avoid paying his fair share of taxes. Will Schumer put out a statement with an emoji of somebody raising their hand asking people to raise their hand if they've paid Maurin federal taxes than President Trump. Also, the campaign of Joe Biden has quickly released an ad. Showing a lot of everyday Americans and suggesting they pay more in taxes and the president. Democrats will no doubt press this issue in the final weeks of the presidential campaign. President Trump, meanwhile, today accused the New York Times of obtaining the tax information illegally and with bad intent. He says he paid millions of dollars in taxes but was entitled to depreciation and tax

President Trump Chuck Schumer New York Times Nancy Pelosi GOP Mitchell Miller Joe Biden Maurin
Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

Radical Personal Finance

06:12 min | 2 d ago

Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

"The president's taxes long concealed records show trump's chronic losses and years of tax avoidance. I'M GONNA go through this story with you in an extremely detailed way I'm going to give you an overview. Tell you what's in the article was not in the article, and then we'll go through it in a an extremely detailed ways that you can get an idea of Some lessons that you can learn and apply to your own life, and I'll talk to you about what's behind the scenes so that you can feel much more competent when discussing this or really any other kind of of article this article in the New York Times is going to read I. Guess I should say, obviously, it's GONNA re differently depending on the political back on that you come. But it's going to be read very differently based upon whether you have any knowledge or familiarity with tax code in general how taxes work in the United States how business works etc or if you don't and. For that reason, it's really fascinating to look at People's responses to this article because the responses dramatically depending on. I guess somebody's exposure to it. So I, let me give you Joshua's summary of the article begin with Lead The New York Times Obtained Donald Trump tax information extending over more than two decades revealing struggling properties vast right offs an audit battle and hundreds of millions in debt coming due in short the New York Times of tained evidently all of trump's tax returns over the last fifteen years or so including returns from the business organizations that he is involved in. They've evidently analyzed those returns and they basically wanted to make a few basic statements number one. There was no evidence of malfeasance uncovered with regard to Russia or other kinds of of basic Allegations that have been been being made the basic arguments that they that they tried to advance in this article or number one that president trump has lost lots and lots of money over the years and I think that's the probably when the authors were riding trying to say, what do we talk about? They were basically trying to say, well, let's prove that. President trump is not a very good businessman because he's lost lots of money that would be number one with regard to potential areas of misdeeds. They talk extensively about a few basic things. Number one is the use of business losses across the organization including a seventy something million dollar tax deduction that had been claimed for and filed for from A. Number of years ago, talking to that number a little in a little bit consulting fees and also deductions whether deductions are are valid or not. Now I think for the anti-trump crowd. Unfortunately, there's no smoking gun in the taxes and this is hard hard to overstate how important this story is in political terms have been many political consultants who for many years been saying well, if we could just get a hold of the tax returns, then we could prove all of these things about president. Trump's crookedness and all the things that he's done wrong and then we'll. We'll be able to make that case as a slam dunk case that does not seem to be the case or at least if that is the case, the New York Times did not choose to profile anything in this initial story as a financial planner story and I said, Yep okay. That makes sense. Yup that makes sense. No surprise there. Yup. That sense that makes sense. That's make sense. Explain all the details of how. How that is but I don't see this is not a bombshell story for a financial planner and so I think that was that's one thing that's worth pointing out most of the techniques and and things discussed here is exactly what I would understand. In fact, much of what I teach radical personal finance. When I teach tax planning, the techniques are just simply a little bit grander in scale than what a lot of people do but there's not really any fundamental difference that I can see from what president trump has. been doing over the years versus what I teach people to do to save on their taxes. So let's begin and I'm going to give you a detailed analysis and I'm doing this just. So you can think about my brain of how I read articles like this I I'm I'm not I don't have a political horse in the race. I'm not trying to make go on where the other, but it is really interesting to read an article like this and think about the challenge of writing it I'm not. I'm not an anti, New York Times Guy I'm not a Pro New York Times guy probably read and and respect newspapers much more than I do many other many other forms of of news and I think that the Arctic the authors of this of this story. Russ boot Suzanne Craig Mike MacIntyre is the story of their lives right where they've been working hard to get it just right and you see that carefulness in the writing, but we'll still analyze A. Little bit of the land is a little bit of the details along the way through as well. So we begin with a with the lead. Donald J, trump paid seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency in his first year in the White House he paid another seven hundred fifty dollars. He had paid no income taxes at all in ten of the previous fifteen years largely because he reported losing much more money than he made. As the president wages reelection campaign that polls say he is in danger of losing his finances are under stress beset by losses and hundreds of millions of dollars in debt are coming do that he has personally guaranteed also hanging over him as a decade-long audit battle with the Internal Revenue Service over the legitimacy of the seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund that he claimed and received after declaring huge losses, an adverse ruling could cost him more than one hundred, million dollars. Now in that lead, we see these these themes that I've talked about and I just I give you my reactions to what it says here most of this is designed to have a good news hook, which is true, and that's what a new newspaper should do. It's pretty amazing that somebody who is renowned and purported to be a billionaire would only pay seven hundred fifty dollars in income taxes and to the average person. Who doesn't understand taxes that will sound like a shocking reality. A shocking number

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times United States Pro New York Times Internal Revenue Service Russia Joshua Donald J White House Russ Suzanne Craig Mike Macintyre
Donald Trump denies report he paid only $750 in income taxes in 2016 and 2017

KYW 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 2 d ago

Donald Trump denies report he paid only $750 in income taxes in 2016 and 2017

"Trump Trump says says a a new new report report from from The The New New York York Times Times about about his his taxes taxes is is wrong. wrong. Times Times reports, reports, the the president president reported reported business business losses losses that that reduce reduce the the amount amount of of income income tax tax the the 020 020 for for a a decade. decade. Report Report shows he pages $750 in federal income tax is the year he ran for president. And in his first year in the White House,

The The New New York York Time Trump Trump President Trump White House
Bill Barnwell on NFL Undefeated Teams + Monday Preview

ESPN Daily

05:25 min | 3 d ago

Bill Barnwell on NFL Undefeated Teams + Monday Preview

"Bill Barnwell. It is late Sunday night almost midnight, which means it's time for you to make me smarter about the NFL. I'm going to try my best Baba Bill. Barnwell is a senior writer for ESPN host of the Bill Barnwell show and he's procrastinating his deadline to talk to me. So we just watched the saints and the packers on Sunday night football and the saints lost without. Their Star Receiver Michael Thomas. But that did not stop us from getting a whole bunch of touchdowns drew brees and Aaron Rodgers. Each threw for three a piece. But in the end, the packers won the saints lost and they've now lost New Orleans says back to back games for the first time since two thousand, seventeen bill I know you are writing a new piece about drew brees coming off of the two year deal that drew brees signed in the offseason and what we've now seen from him through these first three weeks what did you see in Sunday night's games he regressing improving? What do we have with bruise right now? Okay. So public drew brees definitely improving this is a better performance from him. Me brees was downright bad on Monday night in week two against the raiders before we got to garbage time and breeze didn't do deep very frequently until this game was out of hand but I think the concerns i. have read or have heard about arm strength or how deep is passes typically go they don't really get how reason this offense actually worked. Breezes sort of like. A singles hitter in baseball like Tony Gwynn lagging time where a post player with no range in basketball he's not going to suddenly start throwing deeply. He's Patrick Mahomes at forty one years old breeze has succeeded. Over the last three years while throwing the shortest paths in the League because he's posted the three best single season completion. In NFL history. Now. The good news for the Saints Good News For Saints Fans is that brees was much more accurate on Sunday night it was twenty, nine, thirty, six for two, hundred, eighty, eight yards a lot of that West Alvin Kamara who did a lot of the work but still going to end up thirty six is still better than where brees was. The bad news was just about everything else. The Saints Lost Starters Jared Cook and Andres P to injuries while devante. Adams List Aaron Rodgers threw for two hundred, eighty, three yards and those three touchdowns you mentioned. The saints focused on adding veterans with nicknames Emmanuel Sanders and balcony. Jenkins this off season. But. Sanders hasn't been able to stand out with ankle Thomas Injured and Jenkins has been picked apart in pass coverage including Mercedes Lewis touchdown on Sunday night the attorney for more accurate breeze that was a bright spot. But if the saints continue to struggle with injuries and get disappointing play from their stars, the Orleans is going to need this version of free stick around to have a chance to compete in the NFC. So the packers emerged three no, and that's where a lot of focus the rest of our conversation here on the teams that are now undefeated through three weeks of the NFL season. So bill, let's push deeper into the NFC here because the Chicago Bears Be Chicago bears are somehow three you know and they do it by beating the Falcons thirty to twenty six Chicago was trailing by sixteen head coach. Matt Nagy Decides to pull quarterback Mitch Trubisky in favor of the veteran nick foles mister big bleep nick himself who goes on to throw three touchdown passes in the fourth quarter. So I have a two part question for you now. Why are the Falcons physically incapable of holding onto a fourth quarter lead and? Secondly, where does this leave the whole quarterback situation in Chicago? Let me answer the second part of that question I. The bears are going to flail by the seat of their pants for the rest of the season I would assume that nick foles is going to start until he struggles and the bears trailing by two touchdowns in the fourth quarter a couple weeks from now, I would point Mitch Trubisky will come in and lead them to victory and the cycle will start the new. Unfortunately I don't have one simple takeaway for our poor friends and Atlantic. Is Different From what we saw in week to as. Much. As the defense was disappointing in this game, the offense really deserves a fair chunk of the blame for what happened scored a touchdown on the opening drive third quarter, and then basically tried to sit on their lead, Matt Ryan and company REPA- total three first downs on their next six is before the bears took the lead back and the only scored one field goal over that time after bisky intercession back running back Brian L. dropped an easy third down conversion which would have put the Falcons and field goal range. Then on the next drive kicker, young coup miss a forty eight yard field goal attempt. I know. I mean let's be fair. The Falcons defense was very bad. I'm not sure the Falcons are gonNA make any drastic changes on Monday morning, but Arthur blank can feel great about seeing this happen. On his seventy eighth birthday and. I believe I'm not mistaken not the only person celebrating birthday on Sunday. Having Birthday Pamela. Day Pablo. Yeah this is a hard way to discover that you share a birthday with the owner of the Atlanta Falcons Bill, which feels like you just cast a pox upon my house.

Brees Saints Bill Barnwell Falcons NFL Packers Chicago Nick Foles Aaron Rodgers Atlanta Falcons Emmanuel Sanders Mitch Trubisky Espn Michael Thomas Matt Nagy Tony Gwynn Baseball Raiders Arthur Blank Patrick Mahomes
The Amazon Formula To Sell 8-Figures & Beyond with Jeff Lieber

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:01 min | 3 d ago

The Amazon Formula To Sell 8-Figures & Beyond with Jeff Lieber

"Jeff say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know hey, what's up fire nation? Jeff Lieber and yeah let's see. I. Guess Back in two thousand fourteen kind of a funny story is I was working at nine to find nine to five job and what happened was is I was had that entrepreneurial bug I've been listening to podcasts like yours and other people. Knows you know looking at different business models and then I stumbled upon the Amazon business model at that time and I learned like the steps to source of product and all you're choosing what product to get started with and out of all the products in the world I was what would be the coolest sexiest product I could bragged my friends about and of all the products under the Sun I chose to buy a twenty foot. Container of Puppy pee pads or training dogs A. Matt and I spent almost like seventy percent of my life savings fifteen grand at the time on that container wired it to China had no idea the risks that were involved with that and luckily they did ship me a container of way too many puppy pads to sell and. Took me about a year to sell through that container. Thank goodness. It worked out and survived. So well, if they were on the market a few months ago I would have bought one Gaza we do have a a new puppy in our life is name as gas and we love him dearly and he has needed some pads as he's learned how to get to house train but I'm happy to say where we're past that stage for the most part now knock on wood but in fire. Nation as I shared in the introduction, we're talking about the Amazon formula to sell eight figures and beyond. So I mean you had that nine to five. Jeff. Back in two, thousand, fourteen, he decided to take the leap. So when exactly did you get started selling products on Amazon? I. Mean I know you said you start with a puppy pads move onto the next point from that and how did that experience actually lead you to starting turnkey product management? Yes. Of intention was not to start turnkey. Product management that came a few years later. So luckily, like I said that product ended up selling decently well, but I ended up launching additional pet products and then my sister had an idea for baby products brands. So we launched that and my friend's dad had an idea for with an awesome patented dog toy. So we launched on kickstarter and Bernard up on that and then So all of a sudden I was doing a ton of stuff and then had a few friends from college who Had Awesome products. They did you know sunglasses and wash on kickstarter and we're doing awesome on shop and sales channels like that. But they were struggling on Amazon and they saw me having success with Elaine product like bubby bads and they're like, why can't we do that? So I I ended up helping them and they just said, can you just manage it for us? Can you just do it what will pay you and I was like sure and so that was really the first consulting client. But. It was just a friend and it was fun. You know working with them and ended up growing them to over six figures in their first year and then they referred a friend and they referred a friend and now I had five clients as well in addition to all the brands. So needless to say I was. Almost envious of my previous nine to five job that I had quit because I couldn't do it all and I was like man, why did I even quit I'm like so stressed out in overwhelmed in managing way too much stuff and so I just said what what really would make me the happiest and what am I the best that and that was selling on Amazon. So what I did was decided to sell my stakes out of all may their companies in about nine month period and solely went in all in on turnkey product management gave it an official name and That was about three or four years ago and built a team hired me on my sister, my cousin, a bunch of great great people along the way, and now we're helping a lot of companies to scale their their businesses on Amazon seven and eight figures, and beyond

Amazon Jeff Lieber Matt China Official Bernard Bubby Bads Elaine
Trump paid just $750 in US income tax in election year.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:23 min | 3 d ago

Trump paid just $750 in US income tax in election year.

"Some who see it as a neo colonial foray. Donald Trump paid just seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes. The year he ran for president and in his first year in the White House according to a report yesterday in the New York. Times. Trump who has fiercely guarded he's tax filings and is the only president in modern times not to make them public pay no federal income taxes in ten of the past fifteen years. He campaigned for office as a billionaire, real estate mogul and successful businessman. Speaking at a news conference at the White House trump dismissed the report and said he has paid taxes though he gave no specifics. The disclosure which the time says comes from tax return data is obtained extending over two decades comes at a pivotal moment ahead of the first presidential debate on Tuesday and weeks before divisive election against Democrat Joe Biden. The president vowed that information about his taxes will all be revealed but he offered no timeline for disclosure and made similar promises during the two thousand sixteen campaign on which he never followed through. In fact, the president has fielded court challenges against those seeking to access his returns including the

Donald Trump President Trump White House Joe Biden New York
The Strip Search Scam

Casefile True Crime

04:31 min | 5 d ago

The Strip Search Scam

"McDonald's employees who worked double shift were given a free meal to taught the Niveau. Laura took a short break to wait before returning behind the counter. Also working that not was fifty, one year old Donna. Summer's one of the restaurants assistant manages. Like Laura some as was relatively new to the franchise. She had been working there for about eight months. Just as Laura returned to serving customers, the restaurants phone rang at full fifty six am. Some has answered it. On the other end was a man who identified himself as a police officer named officer? Scot. Officer Scott explained that, hey, had McDonald's corporate on another lawn as well as the latest students the store's manager. He was calling because a child who had banning the restaurant earlier had her coin purse stolen. The culprit was believed to be one of some employees as. Hey provided a physical description of the suspect young watt and fame ow with a petite build and dark hair. She was wearing McDonald's uniform. Officer Scot also described a tie that the suspect was wearing. Some is immediately thought of Laura. Flach. Aw. Even. Though her work record was exemplary, she'd fit the suspect's description. Perfectly. While leaving office the Scott waiting on the phone. Some is beyond Laura and asked her to accompany her to the manages office at the back of the restaurant. The small krant room had a tiled floor with a desk and account top running against opposing wools. This services were crowded with a computer and various items of stationery. Filing cabinet sat to one side and boxes were stacked behind the bench. Perched up I in the ceiling was the say, Tei? Camera. Some has led to Laura into the manager's office before locking the door behind them. She then informed the Laura that police officer had accused her of rubbing cast them a-. Shocked Laura immediately protested her innocence telling her. Dona of never done anything wrong I could never steal. Some has responded that a police officer had described Laura as the person responsible. Officer Scott was still waiting on the fine. Some is switched between speaking to him and Laura. Officer Scott informed some as that Laura had two choices. She could either submit to a search for the Stalin purse the Ben and there Oh, she could wait until an officer came to arrest her and undergo a search at the police station. Upon learning of her options, Laura started to cry and begged to be taken to the police station. So the matter could be cleared that. Some as handed the phone to Laura who spoke to office got herself. After doing. So Laura, great to be searched on the spot. Offices Scott issued instructions to summers who in turn relayed them to Laura I Laura was asked to empty her pockets. She did so without complaint. After handing IVA KS and herself Iron Laura revealed there was no stolen purse in her pockets. Office gone suspected at the autumn could be hidden underneath Laura's clothing and ordered her to undress. But this time another assistant manager named Kim Dockery arrived to stop work. Kim. was set to replace some as for the evening shift. Upon, discovering what was happening in the manages office came off to what was going on. Some has refused to say at office a Scott's command.

Iron Laura Officer Scott Officer Mcdonald Assistant Manager Kim Dockery Scot Iva Ks Kim. Stalin BEN
"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

01:52 min | 7 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"I will canvass this number of times and no more and that way sort of set yourself limit so that you have because this is not actually sprint. This is the this is going to be a marathon. You know the twenty twenty election is not the end of politics And we have to keep doing this literally for the rest of our lives. So I I really suggest remembering that. You sometimes need to leave you know. Leave yourself a little strength or as the Internet. Likes to say more spoons for for later on down the road So feel free to like you know set set some boundaries for yourself who I would just close by saying. I heartily agree with both Kelly and Sophie. I would say I guess That I do think that twenty twenty at least in my lifetime which is long one at this point More important by far than any other election I've ever seen so I kind of have tried to take for myself and obviously you have to give yourself time the respite take for myself. This notion that We do have to fight as hard as we can and work as hard as we can this year for the sake of everybody and not to be corny. But certainly we among us you particular. So I'm the note that we're all in this together we're going to take care of each other And on this first anniversary of voter in thank you all for listening in. Please do send us your thoughts about what we're doing and how we should do it and We'll just move along so thanks to everyone. Vote in segment is a collaboration of two broad talking politics and author Rebecca side. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band? Immune ARY and we're using it with permission of the band..

Kelly ARY Rebecca side Sophie
"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

15:04 min | 7 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Everybody? You know I think it closer talks a lot about things like mental health you know and is that are these things working for for you. The voter at the person on the ground. I want to be fighting. Not because I want you know that fancy house in DC. Not because I want you know. There's the fancy pen I get to sign laws with but because I want to help you and I want to make your life better and I think that that's an argument. That women can make very powerfully. Because that's what women do. In general I is is fight Four people and is is how people you know in you you think about this as as MOMS chromos. Teachers is lawyers end and so. I think that they can make that really compelling argument and I think that that really gets voters motivated I agree and I think really to put the emphasis on On the what? You said that some people say that this is working. But it's not working for you and I can see that because I think there's a big sort of energy in the mid West right now feeling left behind. I think that's been happening for like the past twenty or thirty years particularly in areas where people feel like okay. The rest of the world is doing fine. But everybody's forgotten about my little town in the midwest everybody's forgotten about us and we're not doing so well and I think speaking to those people and saying you know what all these people in Washington are saying. Oh the economy is so great but like is it. Because you're not doing. Wow because farmer suicides. An all time high in Wisconsin. So obviously like things are going well for you. Tell me more about how I can help you. I think that's a really effective message to say I see you. Even though other people might be doing fine I see you and I care about you. You know one of the things. I talk about this in my book. Voter was the importance of in lots of other people. Of course we've talked about this true about building. Alliances among women across class and race lines and in order to get what we need in order to be helped in the way that we need to be. And you know it's an ongoing challenge. There is still data about. I don't know how good it is and we'll see as the race unfolds about Y Women Not Favoring Democratic candidate necessarily. I think it's sort of too early to be dispositive about that but I do think that we're seeing you know. A lot of women vote for the male candidates in this race. There's no reason so far and that may continue to be true so one of the questions. That's come up in these last few days prominently in the press is whether it's time For either warring or kosher or both of them to quit the presidential race and needless to say I'm not speaking to the mayor's bad idea at all but as politicians of course they have to consider what what they're hearing from the media and otherwise and and how they Preserve their brands so to speak and their point of view and I sort of thought it might be fun for us to think about this because it doesn't often happen. They happen for sort of everyday people. I gotTA quit this job. No we just put our heads down you know and keep trying to work harder but say you you know. Kelly say you were in senator clover shirts shoes or Senator Warren shoes. Neither of whom has one So far in both of whom have a big challenge ahead of them in South Carolina How would you? How would you evaluate that matter repeat? Let me quit while I'm ahead and TRY TO POSITION MYSELF. For instance say to BP. I think the answers different for the two of them not so much because of their standing in the polls or anything like that but because of the the lanes that they inhabit because the moderate lean is so much more crowded right now in this race. I think that I if I were Senator Klobuchar I would think seriously about whether people rightly or wrongly think that she is standing in the way of a moderate gaining consensus. And then you people a lot of people really want somebody to beat Bernie and you know. So if because she's in that more crowded lane if she is in the way of that you know. It's it's possible that that would sort of hurt her brand at some point that maybe she stayed in the race too long. You know we can to beat all day whether that is actually true or not whether that game theory makes sense. But I think that there's a perception of that. And so if she let's say were to leave the race and endorsed Joe Biden. Who seems like you know of the the moderates may be the one who could who could pull it off? You know maybe that does give her You know whether a VP spot for him or somewhere in his cabinet. You know. I I could see that being very valuable for her. I'm not sure that there's as much of an argument For Senator Warren to drop out. Because I'm not sure what it gets her and I'm not sure that it helps this project that everyone wants to beat Bernie because they think of Warren drops out half her voters might go to Bernie and then that actually helps him so you know. I don't know that it positions her quite as well and may be staying in the race and being the fighter the person to take down. Bloomberg is is what positions her better for you know a VP slot or a position in a cabinet or just being able to stay in the Senate and she could work there. So I don't necessarily think it's the same answer for both of them but I. I do think that it's something they need to be thinking about seriously You know I don't want them to drop out of the race. You know I said the other day like my choices. Two through eight have already dropped out and you know. I don't want more of my first place choices to drop out but I think it's something that they need to consider a specially if there is widespread panic rightly or wrongly about Bernie cutting the nomination. I This is interesting. I agree with you that it's different for both of them and I agree. It's because of the lanes but my conclusion is the opposite that because the moderate lane is so crowded. I'M NOT SURE WHO. Amy Klobuchar would know to endorse or to negotiate with whereas Elizabeth Warren clearly. She's a line on the left with Bernie and so she could go to Bernie and say. Hey if I drop out. Can you guarantee me? Xyz And then that materially helps Bernie if amy drops out. It's not entirely clear to me who that helps. Does it help Bloomberg does it help. Biden doesn't help Buddha judge and so for her. It's a lot going to be a lot harder to figure out. Who are you negotiated with you? Are you going to go all three of them and say if I drop out? Will any of you give me this? I mean for her. I I think that would be a harder decision so for for me I think. Yeah that is a very. I mean. They're both really smart analyses. I I agree with pieces of both. I would add one other thing to this. I guess from the vantage point of My own involvement going back aways one of the most important things that happened For African Americans in presidential primaries was of course the fact that Jesse Jackson stayed in and he stayed in and he ran again for years. Later and my recollection. I don't have these numbers in front of me. Is that at the end of the Democratic primaries I think in the second campaign he had received twenty percent or so of people's votes that was enormous. That had never happened before it shows the strength of him personally but certainly of an African American candidate and their viability. And you know. I think that that's an instructive lesson. for both Senators as we are in this place this year and go forward a wanted to turn for a minute to this point about the vice presidency and talk quickly about that and then I think we're gonNA WANNA close today's episode with a little bit of Inspirational what's next to do discussion. But you know. Obviously there's been lots of discussion in this whole context about Some people saying that a woman vice presidential is really important other saying not so much. Certainly Stacey Abrams yourself. Right out there a couple of weeks ago. Think she'd be happy to be the candidate with anyone Kamala Harris has been Significantly more circumspect but then of course if it's the case as we've just discussed You know there are other Women who could be considered for that spot not only senator warm and Senator Klobuchar. Certainly you know other members of the Senate or governor. That spot has a history of being considered by presidential candidates for a range of people. So I just was curious about kind of what you're nearing so to speak on your respective streets about this aspect of things. Well Rachel Bitta coffer has said that she thinks that Stacey Abrams is the should be the VP. Pick for any of them who are left And you know I can definitely see that. I love soup runs. I think she is incredibly inspirational. I think her as Rachel Offers. Her charisma is just extra. Think it's hard to even measure but you know I don't know. I think that that would make a lot of sense. I think that would be a good pick. She certainly has the the the chops of of being out there doing the work. And so I think that would be good. I think that the a lot of the so-called k. high of the Communist supporters still have not settled on a candidate. There's sort of reluctantly deciding to vote for someone you know. Some of them were in some of them Biden. And I think that you could get an awful lot of them really excited and a and a lot of them. Are you know people who are happy to give a lot of money into a ton of work and so I think you know comma could be a very strategic pick a you know a across the board as well and I think it helps that? California is a pretty safe place for us to be taking a senator out of you know. We're we're not gonNA have to worry about losing that Senate seat it'll still go to a democrat. So I think in that case you know. Kamla might be a really good pick. Although she'd be an excellent attorney general to if that was the thing that she was interested in doing in the future so I could easily see either one of them. And I think I I'm I'm going to be deeply uncomfortable with the Democratic ticket is all white and so I think that you know in that case. Both of them would would help with that issue as well. I think that you know as much as I would love to see Warren As VP of she is not president. I do think that taking somebody in Massachusetts where there is a Republican governor. And you know we could at least short term end up with a Republican senator in that seat I think could be Kinda Frisky so you know. I think we need to think about those sorts of issues as well But you know I. I'm all for the Stacy Harris as VP to literally anybody. Well I'm fairly sure that in Massachusetts you actually have to have a special election. They're not gubernatorial early appointed. Yeah it would be derby a few month gap at least well. There was an appointed person so I wanted to say here that I saw a data point earlier today and in another context which I think is important to what we're doing here in to all our listeners are doing it was about The fact that In the last few years I forget the actual time period only fourteen percent of any exhibits in major museums. Were of women artists that made me think about political pundits which who of course are overwhelmingly male as well and and overwhelmingly white so I wanted to say to our listeners. That well of the three of us. Don't pretend to be totally knowledgeable on this subject. I think it's really important for us to have this conversation. Among ourselves among women who do pay attention who do care and who are thinking hard about this and so that's the context in which We had this discussion today And I just wanted to close it with The notion that You know of course. The most important thing for us all to do is to stay mobilized There's an argument for focusing on whatever candidate matters the most to you or if not playing the odds. I've started getting phone calls from friends asking me about that. Because they don't want to waste their time or their vote. But what we do want to say to you here is just. Please stay mobilized active. Do everything you can killing and Sophie. Any final on that this is something will be returning to for sure but I think it's also important for people to remember that as important as the top of the ticket is. It's not the only part of the ticket and so you know. If in the end your favorite candidate is not nominee that will certainly be the case for some percentage of the people listening here that you know. Find Down Ballot race. That is exciting to find a woman running for state legislature governor. Something that you're really excited about passionate about and knock on doors and increase turnout for that down. Ballot candidates will also increase turnout for the ballot. So you can. You can go out there and be motivated whether or not. The actual presidential nominee is the one who inspires you. I agree and I want to put in a plug as well for pacing yourself I see a lot of people that I know who got active in politics. Oppose Twenty Sixteen. Who you know a little crazy for the midterms really got into it? And burn themselves out and now are feeling horribly guilty It's okay to symptoms not be able to take on everything. I find it more helpful to sort of budget out my time and say okay. I will write this number of postcards every week and no more. I will donate this amount of money every month. And no more. I will canvass this number of times and no more and that way sort of set yourself limit so that you have because this is not actually sprint. This is the.

Bernie senator VP Senator Klobuchar Elizabeth Warren Senate Joe Biden Bloomberg Massachusetts Senator Warren DC Washington Wisconsin South Carolina Stacey Abrams Rachel Bitta Kamala Harris Stacy Harris Jesse Jackson
"one year" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

11:08 min | 11 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"This is Josh Barrow. Welcome to left right and center. You're civilized yet provocative antidote to the self-contained opinion bubbles dominate political debate. It is the first week of November our and this week. The New York Times made a lot of liberals nervous new high-quality battleground state polls from the time. Paint a picture of a close twenty twenty election sending sending a different message from the national polling. We see more often with big leads for Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders. Part of the message here is that trump's electoral college advantage appears to be widening that whatever trends are happening in the suburbs that continue to weaken Republicans with part of their traditional base. Then maybe taking away. Votes in Texas or even more votes in California -Fornia but in Pennsylvania Michigan Wisconsin. Those effects aren't as important things remain close. And you could conceivably see. Donald trump be reelected while losing the popular vote road by an even wider margin than he lost last time and that has a lot of Democrats wondering what they need to do in this primary to prevent that from happening. We're GonNa talk about that later today. And how you should think about polls so far in advance election but now let's bring in our left right and center panel as always. I'm your center. I'm joined by rich lowry editor of National Review on the right and on the leftist Sabil Rahman of Demos. We also have a special guest today Oreo Edwards Levy who is reporter and pulling editor at Huffpost. Hello everyone hey josh. Hi everybody so There were elections on Tuesday in a few states. We can talk about twenty nine thousand nine elections before we turn to twenty twenty And Republicans did hold onto the governorship in Mississippi By about six points points but in Kentucky Republican incumbent Matt Bevin lost despite a last-minute assist from president trump who rallied for him in the state. Andy Bashir won that Election Kentucky succeeding where other Democrats have failed in two ways. He held onto port of the ancestral democratic base in Appalachian Eastern Kentucky. which is otherwise swung hard toward Republicans? Any made inroads in one strongly Republican suburbs of Louisville and Cincinnati. The suburbs also delivered for Democrats in Virginia giving the Party control of both chambers of the state legislature sure and therefore full control of that state's government for the first time in decades Sabil. What lessons do you see in these results as Democrats look to next year so a couple of things jump out out I is this is a pretty important result for the Democrats right. You have a really important shift in Virginia now with the TRIFECTA that's going to change the politics and the policies command that state. And when you compare Virginia Kentucky this move in the suburbs that you're describing really is a strong pattern across the different states We'll see there also is a similar move move happening in rural counties to in the direction and I'm sure we'll talk about that in a moment The other thing is that you know there is a grain of salt rate. It's twenty one thousand nine. It's off your election It's hard to extrapolate national trends. So it's this isn't quite the same as the precursor to twenty eighteen But it is a strong result for the Democrats rich. When you look at Virginia Democrats it felt like we're having a rough year in Virginia. You know you had the the black face scandal with the governor and the other black face scandal with the attorney general and rape accusations against the Lieutenant Governor And some Democrats in the legislature and the governor staking out a position on abortion that Republicans thought was very extreme outrage. The median voter. None of that seems to to have stopped the steady forward march of Virginia becoming a blue state. Yes this marshes right word. It's a trend. That's been going on for a long time. Has To do with demographic changes ages in the state state becoming better educated more suburban more diverse so the whole divide seeing now between the suburbs and more rural working class voters. It's something that's been going on for quite a long time. And trump has just accelerated it and he's His conduct is repellent. Want to a lot of of former Republicans in the suburbs especially women or the question and we'll get stressed this in a little bit as whether he can do what he didn't. Twenty sixteen draw. Aw a A broadly are radioactive. Released E- easy to make radioactive opponent and take off enough of the edge in in the suburbs to just barely over the top again. Arielle is the national story. That simple as you know re Republicans keep doing worse in especially inner suburbs and Democrats. Democrats keep doing worse in rural areas. And if that is the story is that an even trade between the two parties I mean I think that is in large part what we are seeing across the country and you know I think that can obscure event. There will always be things happening in a particular race in particular level. I mean you saw that in Kentucky where certainly considerations that were not national politics obviously. That's it gubernatorial race where it's a little bit of a different story in terms of how much which partisanship is going to influence people's votes but you are seeing these broader demographic trends of these areas sorting themselves out more and more and you. You know we'll see whether that ends up evening out and whose favor that is rich. The governor's Arial notes. There were some specific local factors. Matt Bevin was not the best like person including institutionally in the Republican Party in Kentucky. He tried to defeat Mitch McConnell and a primary if years ago so after this close result he lost by about five one thousand votes. He's basically said he's not going to concede he thinks there were regularities. He wants a canvas. Maybe he's going to contest the election first of all. What are you like he lost? What do you make of him coming out and saying that and then also I mean what do you make of the response of the Republican Party in Kentucky which has been mostly to sort of ignore him and say well he lost the five thousand votes is not a a a lot in the scheme of things but recount are- canvas sincere? A scenario is huge and the chances overturning that are extremely minimal basically impossible muscle so i. I don't like the trend we saw stacey. Abrams Georgia as well. You lost please be gracious about it. It's a very tough thing. Personally it's hard to take but go away and don't tell us for years afterwards. How you were truly? The winner. Went clearly weren't beal. I as I I hear Democrats worrying what about you. Know what is true. IS TRUMP GONNA admit he lost if he loses the two thousand twenty election and this I. I've not been very worried about that. For reasons. That are are playing out on the Ground Kentucky. which is you know you can say? I didn't lose. I didn't lose and that can be irrelevant if other people won't go along with it and it looks to me here. You know the partly I think you know as noting five thousand votes as a lot if it was five hundred votes we might see see a different situation but also it's peril to trump and that you have an executive who the other institutional elements in the party never really wanted in charge and there's a part of them that I'm I'm sure is just you know pleased to be done with them. Yeah I mean I think I think that's a hopeful Lesson I hope you're right taking the model of of Kentucky I look. Here's the here's the challenge. In some ways that the the decision making factor here is going to be the rest of the institutional right. What the party things right? If the Party doesn't go along with it then and it just becomes sort of a slightly embarrassing stance on the part of the losing candidate and it goes away and our democracy proceeds in democracy only works if both sides recognize the legitimacy the results right and so so I think I think in that sense. You are right what I worry about is when we talk about the impeachment scenarios there there is such a strong strong incentive at the moment for the institutional powerbrokers of the Republican Party disarray fall in line with the president that that's where I would put more concern right presents going to do what he's GonNa do. We always has but at what point does the rest of the party decide. You know what the rules are the rules we have We have other people. We can put forward in an electoral contest. Then we don't need to keep following this train. Well let's talk about impeachment I think that's a that's a good time for us to talk about impeachment Rich there's there's an article in the New York Times This week about an emerging defense dance that house. Republicans are talking about I as it becomes clearer that there was some sort of quid pro quo here around Ukraine ambassador Gordon. Sunland has changed his mind. He refreshed his recollection and and said. Oh Yeah I did. I did tell the Ukrainians they would have to make this public statement about investigating the Biden's in order to get the release of the military aid and so Republicans are talking about the possibility of saying essentially that these guys were freelancing. Yes somehow a message got to the Ukrainians that there was this quid pro quo that but maybe trump never authorized them to send that message. Maybe he didn't want breath after all. Trump's specifically denied Senator Ron Johnson that he had proposed a quid pro quo and especially in. The case of Rudy Giuliani. Maybe he was even acting for for his own independent financial interests. He had all these business interests in Ukraine. Maybe he was using his position. Close to the president to push his own agenda. And that's where this quid pro quo idea came from in. The president is innocent. It and I think in that context. It's worth considering a tweet. That Rudy Giuliani sent. This week that looks outwardly. Like defensive the president but I'm not sure it is. He says the investigation I conducted concerning 2016 two thousand sixteen Ukrainian collusion and corruption was done solely as a defense attorney to defend my client against false charges unquote. So is it a viable defense into the president to basically throw rudy. Giuliani under the bus. And say you know whatever. These people did. The president did authorize them to do that. Because it certainly sounds like Giuliani is going to say no. I did this in my capacity as the president agent. Yes I say a couple of things one. There's a glimmer of an opening for this defense. Because most people we've heard from so far really almost all the people we've heard from so far Had what trump was thinking second or third hand because they weren't the insiders which is more Bolton Mo- Vini Giuliani and it's entirely plausible. That Giuliani and important respects was freelancing but I think that would have to do more with his business dealings in Ukraine. So it's just hard to believe. Leave that that these guys got this cooked up this idea on on their own. How how did the defense aid get withheld? According to and trump mentioned on the call talked to Rudy. which again is an indication that he and rudy are on the on the same board on the soap a month ago When it was still pretty early I had a theory that it might defense? I offered tentatively that maybe there was the intention of quid. Pro Quo. Never really got to the Ukrainian so it's clear at least it got the Ukrainians and I still. I know you're skeptic Josh by so think Defense Republican senators will end up falling back on. is they got the money. And they didn't make a statement about investigations. Well so the bill. This is. This is the sideshow Bob Defense. You know the you know attempted murder. There's no there's no noble prize for Attempted Chemistry Right But that in the simpsons. That's a joke like is it. Is it really good enough to say well. You know the president didn't get away with it and therefore no harm no foul. Yeah I think it any fifth-grader recognizes just how paper thin excuses is. You know won't get you very far in in the real world and we'll get you very far year. It's it's it's not an excuse. Use It all right. Of course the the the the point is in the attempt and I agree with what Richard I mean. Excuse the freelancing. Excuse this each week. There's a new sort of angle right right and they all kind of keep falling down one after another in large part because of stuff that the president and Giuliani and others keep saying on live. TV and on twitter from their own mouths. So you know. It's it is kind of absurd so I know you hate this question rich but I so this still isn't impeachable and I ask again. I wanted to because of that. Giuliani tweet..

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:40 min | 11 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

12:29 min | 11 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"The kind of Voters that might have even been part of the trump coalition in the states or whether the Democratic Party by being true to its principles and and kind of more liberal vision can blow low through turnout models change the shape of the electorate in those six dates and other places with a kind of Warren or sanders type candidate. I have a question about the the idea of how significant this poll is a year out nate cones the Times reporter. Who did the palm talking about? It said hey a year out is is basically just as good as right before the election and then need silver. The grew fivethirtyeight said polls a year out like not not that not that that reality based not that important. What's the answer here? I first of all the answer is the pollinger is need to get different first names. It's too confusing to have both nate Cohn silber ever be named nate. Just a problem to actually. I feel like natone nate. Cohn has has. I Know Nate Cohn I've met needs over a couple of times. Cocoon is definitely riding on the coattails of nate silver. He's like oh where's the what's Hot Poli Name. It's nate. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa glommed onto that and the time hired him you don't offense would appreciate the answer to this John. One of these polls year out matter don't matter there's a general principle and then I don't know I didn't see what nate silver of fivethirtyeight sad I did read in The Times. The idea the statement that I and I have a note here go check checking out and see if that's in fact true or if there's like some important caveat but yeah the the the article that went along with the polling said that on average in the last three cycles head to head polls Aguirre ahead of the election have been as close to the final result as those taken the day before The final result I just say like tweet. You know what Posey are out there. But I'm not sure will first of all there aren't polls taken the day before I don't think right because the polls released as the deport but anyway the broader more important point is so much changes in happens. You can't I mean you can set. You can say that. That's been what they result in the the past has been but if there's an instance in which past performance does not predict future results in this current political environment. I think that would be wise to keep in mind in that in that context But I do think the idea that if the electoral college is still in play a in our presidential elections than it is important to look at the at the states that will that will matter Attar with respect to the Electoral College. So I think looking at these six states Makes Sense and then we should probably turn to this idea of what's the actual electric look like. And then WHO's best setup to make the case that electric I thought what was the most interesting thing. Innate cones piece accompanying this story about. His poll was noting. What what kind of people seem to be supporting Biden but not Warren or Warren but not Biden and yeah and that you have the categories of for example? There's sanders seems to pick up a bunch of young voters when you poll who don't want to then vote for Wariner Biden and Biden seems to pick up Like a lot of people who don't seem to WanNa vote for a woman. For example there seems to be a lot of just out and out cold stone sexist in the electorate which was horrified to read forty percent of the people there are six percent of the electorate is by not Warren and forty percent of them was answering yes to questions that made them seem like sexist Texas questions about the ability of Warren and female candidates in general. But and I've said this before but this is basically votes in the Democratic primaries and caucuses are going to be about punditry about what your neighbour thinks so you know Democrats are are by wide majorities fine with having a woman president but they don't think that their fellow Democrats Democrats are fine with having a woman president which means when they vote or the casting vote for the person they think should do the job or they doing the casting vote for the person they think. We'll have the best chance in general unroll action because of people's predispositions about women and that's what a mess that isn't trying to sort that out. Good luck with that. John What do you make of the fact that so this. The poll a swing states included the six states Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan Carolina Florida Arizona. It did not include Georgia Texas and Ohio. which are an an Iowa? So I think the presumption being that Ohio an Iowa are now basically Republican states. And it's going to be. They're not really swing states and that but also there's this at least conversation that I hear among people that Georgia and Texas are potentially in play and Arizona certainly played. Do I guess it means it's it's it's making taking some bats on two things one. Is that basically. The shape of the electric highway in Ohio is just Democrats are never gonNA do well enough to reach far enough into the white working class voters in those states or white borough voters in Iowa to beat. Also you've got you've got a Senate race in Iowa that'll with an incumbent Republican that'll tweak things for the for the Democrats and so although by the way we should note but just as a farm state. Here's we should talk about this. If you look inside the Republican coalition it seems to me. Democrats would have some opportunities. Let's talk about role voters for a moment. Bankruptcies for farms are going to be as high as they as they've ever been in two thousand nineteen the bail out to the farmers is now bigger net- net- than the bail out of the car companies under the Obama Administration because of the fight with China and the tariff battles with with with other countries if you were compelling candidate Who could make the case to a rural voters and you believed and again? We're there's some. There's there's some things implicit in what I'm saying that some people don't believe because some people leave these voters are gone at. It's all about identity not economics in there for. Why should Democrat spend a lot of time doing that but back to your basic point David? The Republican coalition has those two states and the Democrat. Coalition doesn't have enough in Georgia and Texas that this cycle. They'll be able to make inroads inroads if you believe in a warren kind of candidacy a pure base rile the base up candidacy which is essentially what trump is running on the republican side. You could try to make a case as for Georgia and taxes but the problem is if you run heavy towards turning out the liberal coalition in those states you would weaken your ability so goes the theory in six states that are are that are closest and that's another reason they picked these six that have a more mixed Electorate as the time sees it and most people only last question on this this topic so John Eight in New York magazine. Some Subsection York magazine. I can't remember which one concludes that the leftward tilt of the Democrat. Kennedy is turning out to be a disaster that they've lost touch with medium voters. They desperately need to get back to the center before they find themselves with unelectable candidate. Is it the case Warren and Sanders or essentially given themselves iron crosses. They've hung iron crosses around their neck for the general election. I find myself wishing that more mourn had not come up with a Medicare for all tax plan like really wish that she had just said. It'll be magic which is what Republicans say all the time but their plans. It's always like oh it'll be. Bajic could economic growth magic. She'll she'll be able to run away from that or is it really something that is going to drag her. I mean people move to the The ideological edge of their parties in primaries right Republicans moved to the right Democrats moved to the left the ideas and you tack to the Center and the general election. There's there's plenty of time. I do wonder about what these candidates are thinking in terms of not sticking with the most popular positions now now. Obviously Warren wants to be able to attract Bernie Sanders voters. And you know I with zero reporting. You could imagine that she is trying to make sure sure that. If and when Zander's drops out he full-throatedly endorses her and so she becomes the candidate of the left. I also think she believes in Medicare for all and yet. There is so much that these Democratic candidates could do for healthcare or for example on immigration with a path to citizenship. That is broadly popular happyhiller. That one wonders whether it would be politically wiser to stick to those positions. I mean this is a question that people like Maddock laziest at Fox have been asking for months and and when they put up the poll numbers every time it looks pretty persuasive to me. As just a matter of pragmatic politics looks for Jason Fitz sticking with broadly sadly popular positions that are more centrist. And that actually could become law would be smarter like we are not going to immediately have medicare for all so we're having They're taking Warren and Sanders. Particularly Warrant are taking a big political risk for something that doesn't seem particularly reality based and so then does it. Is it really necessary. Ray was so this is as you quite rightly pointed out. This is always the problem with primaries. It's why people have Think the primaries are part of the reason. Our politics are so messed up because everybody has to get into a very not only far left but also detached debate as a way to signal to their electorates that they are more pure than the next wchs person to your point emily about the environments can look like a year from now. Let's imagine a Democrat wins. Okay so Democrat wins. If they win it will have been on a restoration ticket which is to say. We're going to fix things post. Donald trump that gives you a huge to do is just start the the day. Okay before you get to Medicare for all you've got a lot of stuff to do to restore store and by the way most of it's going to be overseas and some large portion of it's going to be secret so there's that second of all the the intervening election over the year next year is is going to be scorched earth. So how you're GonNa get this through a medicare for all through Congress even through trying to use reconciliation after that year seems a more unlikely really than even would be today. As you quite rightly said Emily you go to you go to the left or you go to the left the right in your primaries and come back to the middle but that also depends on a you know. Politics has changed a little bit in terms of the Public Square. When you can make that case that you're not exactly the person you ran in the primaries as being it's harder to do that now secondly which should these candidates has the facility and ability to make that case or do they keep stepping on there? You know there are other shoes tied together. And so that's one question. Can they even get back back to that position. And then the question is what do you guys think that position looks like in the general election for a Democrat to to either undermine the president's coalition or to build success in areas like the suburbs Where you've seen some of these opportunities for Democrats are I cannot let the segment paths John on without noting what is surely the most important electoral result from Tuesday surprising result out of New Haven Connecticut which just elected in nineteen eighteen year old a nineteen year old one? It's all doors and this nineteen year old one a staggering ninety percent of the vote. What do you make of the overwhelming mandate mandate one by? Eli Sabin whose mother is noted political commentator Emily Babylon just how significant do you feel victory for the future of the republic. Well fortunately playing for for all those people who feel jittery about the state of the future and the state of the Republic really about whether there is verifiable truth fin these troubled times that we live in. Now I think not just the people in the In the quiet suburbs of new haven and the urban centers of that city but also really across the country in the world can find themselves Sleeping easier now as a result of that Outcome Emily Mazal Tov. Congratulations on on your son's victory. Thank you my son is now in our city council. So it's GonNa be really interesting to watch. Ally is so excited and thrilled. We get listeners. Have our annual conundrum show coming up live at the Fox theater in Oakland California December eighteenth and have been very exciting announcement which we have a great guest as you know every year we try to get a very wise philosophical minded person to help us solve conundrum for you this year no different we have an amazing guest Adam. Savage of mythbusters is going to join us at the Fox theater on December eighteenth. No one has done a keener analysis of the true questions. Americans Fret about about the real myths and blowing up the real myths. He's so funny and smart and interesting and I'm so excited he's going to join us..

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

13:49 min | 11 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Me visually but not physically. Is Emily Baz Lan of the New York Times magazine looking at over over skype. Hello Emily although although David Jail how are you. I'm good glad to be here and then joining me not visually but telephonically John dickerson of CBS. Sixty minutes from New York New York Hello John dickerson. Hello David I Is it telephonically. Come come on God interesting radio telephone telephonic. Oh my God you're dripping. You're being pedantic already on. Today's Gabfest election results in Kentucky and Virginia and bold and Democrats and then there are discouraging poll results in swing estates for Democratic presidential candidates then impeachment barrels forward. What happened this week? What is about to happen? And then president trump withdraws ause the United States from the Paris climate accord is that catastrophic or merely terrible plus. You'll have cocktail chatter one year from this this week we will have elected a new president or possibly the same president and this week we saw the last major elections before twenty twenty in a bunch of states that weirdly weirdly have off your elections which are always cute but confusing. Because you're like it's an odd year. Why is there an election? But it's still nice to have and then we also saw some very interesting gene and if you're a Democrat alarming poll results for Democratic primary challenges. So let's start with With the two thousand nine hundred John in the Commonwealth of Virginia cradle title of the Republic the cradle in fact John Dickerson. Democrats took control of the State Senate in the State House Why is that important? Why is it overdue isn't important and overdue? Well I think it's it's important. Well it's for the first time in fifty years so that's when any any time anything for the first time in fifty years you should take note of it. Basically most people would say what this does is it ends the charade that Virginia is not a blue state you know it went from being red to purple to blue and so they're saying that it's that it's Now a blue state and that. I don't know what I think about that debate. That's fine you can have that debate the most interesting thing. It seems to me about Virginia Virginia to the two most important results are first of all that the that Republicans did not win back the seats that they lost in two thousand seventeen when Democrats. It's had strong showings in Republican areas and then Democrats won in additional areas to take control over The two state houses you you now have the to stay two houses in the governorship all insane party which means there's going to be a series of series of legislation passed in Virginia on On Gun Control Troll in particular that'll be Very interesting to watch. Why is that interesting because of the second thing so the first point is Democrats are showing strength? Republicans weakness is in the exurbs the areas out suburbs outside. And that's something we'll talk a lot about because it was also strong for Democrats in Kentucky in the argument is that if it's been strong consistently gently in two thousand eighteen and twenty nineteen that's bad for Donald Trump. But the second thing that's important in Virginia's it's the home of the NRA the forces of gun control gun safety fifty. Whatever you WANNA call it basically now have beaten the NRA in their own backyard? That would mean a lot for gun legislation in Virginia and for the For for the everytown organization it. It's a model for inroads. They might be able to make in other states emily quickly. Let's also hit the. I think probably the other our big state for Democrats. This week was Kentucky where the Democrat in a very red state beat the extremely hated. Incumbent Governor Matt Bevin then in a state where president trump campaign and try to tie the Democrat Anti Bashir to impeachment trump had won the state by thirty Republicans. Want every single single other statewide office. that was up is Bevan's loss a warning trumper not really. Is it just like a particular particular set of circumstances with an extremely bad and hated incumbent. I think more of the latter you know. I wonder if people think differently friendly about the governor in some circumstances than the sort of normal party polarized politics that we have you know. I'm thinking of the fact that a Democrat is governor in Kansas or Republican governor of Massachusetts. There's a way in which that administrative job can. I think seems a little less political will than some other positions and I mostly just think that. Yeah what you said. There was an extremely unpopular incumbent. It's true the president trump couldn't save him but he had been his zone worst enemy. It's a great question but the what I think will be interesting. Is If you match the suburban and exurban results in Kentucky with with what happened with in Virginia and then what happened in the same areas with the same kind of voters in eighteen whether it's demonstrably true that that will all play out the same way in two thousand twenty it suggests enough data points that it puts high and heavy uncertainty in the air for Republican senators who are running in twenty twenty and places where they are. They're gonNA depend on thinking of people. Cory Gardner Susan Collins running in states where they need those votes and if Donald Trump and the Republican Party of Donald Donald Trump has consistently been showing weaknesses in those areas again whether it actually plays out that way in two thousand twenty. I think it's going to make some nervousness and change perhaps perhaps some calculations over the next year as Republicans worry about becoming a party that is justified by the trump coalition which is essentially non college whites Evangelical and rural voters and that nervousness. Again whether it's true or not will create some some Potential for some more more destabilizing action among Republicans Possibly actually. I had a question about that. John is John Cornyn for election. Yes twenty twenty. Yeah I mean that's when when I look at what John Cornyn is doing which is to not be as full-throated around impeachment as you nearly expect the number two Republican in the Senate. He's a Texas Republican. I that to me is a signal. He is very worried that that he you know he could face something serious again. These are these linkages we should all these are drawn in in Pencil and very lightly. But but I would also link it to what what I went on at some length about with Mitch McConnell. The a couple of weeks ago when he was asked About the conversation the president said he had with McConnell and McConnell basically through the president under the bus. I think you can. If you start to see a number of these things you see some Can whether the distancing from the president is even possible. I think that's quite hard to do for anybody. But but just the more uncertainty and destabilization. Shen there is in the world added to the existing highly destabilizing behavior of the president. And the people who are defending him it just adds more kind of frenetic possibilities in an already pretty frantic political world As everybody's trying to gauge what. The politics are going to look like a on election day a year from now now that puts so much uncertainty in in the system for Republicans to see this weakness repeated in these areas that used to be part of their coalition. And yet if you Dr Cory Gardner or Susan Collins or even John Cornyn. Aren't you kind of caught in a vice like you can try to put some distance between you and the So you know I would say most like crazy. Two defenders of trump like mark meadows. Who just seem to be saying? I mean and Lindsey Graham like I am in lockstep with the president no matter what he says says. I'm going in that direction. They're stepping back from that but in the end like there will presumably be an impeachment trial in the Senate and it's very hard to imagine agean than currently voting to remove from office president trump. Now I do think that could change. I mean we saw a public approval of President Nixon drastically graphically moved downward during the public hearings in Watergate but I just feel like from the vantage point of right now. This is like the either Angel or devil of being a trump supporter or a Republican senator. In the trump era. You may be trying to maintain some what kind of semblance of separation. But how far is that really going to get you. Whether a candidate any candidate can separate themselves in a nationalized election and we have them even even an off year so of course we're going to have on twenty twenty is I think basically most people have been in the game. Say You can't do it. You can't get out from under a president however candidates it's in fear of not being re-elected Tend to do things you know. They'd Throw Hail Mary passes. And you know Cory Gardner in Colorado which is basically. He's basically a one third one third state so Democrat Independent. Republican split the state in thirds John Hickenlooper who's running against the former governor and Mayor of Denver is a very popular popular fellow in the state. So Cory Gardner you could imagine again. If even if you stipulate that you can't get out from under a president may still try and and why does that matter. Well that's one guy in one state well for Colorado is a battleground state second of all as we know from this president when a when one person does thing something that that he doesn't like Mike he goes after them so then it becomes. You can imagine that growing into something more. Because then he's attacking a Republican. What's Mitch McConnell? Say about that and so on and so forth so so It's it's it's just as I say a possibility for destabilization. I want to touch emily on. What is potentially the most alarming alarming aspect of the vote on Tuesday which is as of Wednesday actually? Didn't look this morning. There was there was intimations hints even open statements from Republican legislators in Kentucky that they might not accept the results of that gubernatorial election. And there's a the one of the leaders in the Republican House. This is trying to conflict this into a contested election. which was you know about five thousand votes separating the the Democrat and Republican And the stunning the possibility that the how the Kentucky legislature which is dominated by Republicans might try to overturn the popular vote. I actually don't think this will succeed. Eight for a couple of even if they make real push it at which there's no sign they're going to one is Bevin has been a lousy governor even for Republicans. He's made them more unpopular. He's been unpopular blur himself. So why keep them in. Their second is actually fun to have a democratic governor of the rival party in some ways especially if you have a majority in the legislature. I just love. You can really mess with them and score points off of that person and that that's kind of good way to spend a couple of years sometimes so it's not. It's not that bad to be in the out party if you have the majority party in the legislature but also. I don't think it's effective to cheat in elections. After the fact I think it's very effective to suppress the votes in advance when it can be dressed step as some kind of principle of voter integrity but after the fact when the votes already counted the numbers are there it is not. I think it's going to look a lot like cheating. If they try to push uh-huh yeah would in fact be cheating and like deeply alarming. If this happened you know I will just note Kentucky already. Does one one thing to suppress the vote which is to close the polls at six PM. You know. I I think that you're right. This isn't GonNa go anywhere but the fact that it's even being discussed discussed it's just these signs. Were getting from states. I mean we've gotten them also from Wisconsin and of course like the Queen of this is North Carolina. Where if you don't like the way the game is being played you just like throw the board up into the air and all the pieces fall and some other place you just change the rules roles? You know I don't know enough about Kentucky Law to know how the governor's powers are distributed and who decides but you could really imagine this legislature trying to clip the wings of this new Democrat coming in in much the way that the North Carolina Republican dominated legislature has has done that for Roy. Cooper the governor there now let us turn my friends to the polls for the presidential campaign from one kind of Paul to another kind of Paul. There was a really really interesting poll in the New York. Times of Swing States John this week looking at how various Democratic presidential candidates might perform against President Trump and Wisconsin content Pennsylvania Michigan North Carolina Florida and Arizona. Interesting that Arizona is a very legit swing state in a way. That Ohio for example doesn't seem to be anymore why we're Democrats so agitated by the results of this poll and is it is this one poll significant it's Let's see how to pack. Okay so why are they agitated. Well they're agitated because Biden's only up by a couple of points over trump in these six states let's see sanders was up a little bit and and Warren was down so I think there was agitation for two reasons. One Biden up wasn't wasn't by as much as as people thought. Warren was down and three and this is the bigger point I think is a lot of people think. Stop looking at and thinking thinking about the election in that way stopped takes basically boiling the entire election down to six states full of larger shares of white working class voters because that's it's not what. The electorate is about an implicit in even doing the poll among some Democrats is the idea that that or they would argue that the Times poll kind of has its thumb on the scale in terms of this larger argument about whether the Democratic Party needs to quote unquote moderate to go for the kinds of voters in those six states or go go for.

"one year" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

10:42 min | 11 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Today, Explained

"The first half of this show talking about the Democrats and and where they stand right now one year away from the election and I just wonder where does Donald Trump stand right now with the American people what are is approval ratings what's extraordinary is Donald trump stands exactly where he stood more or less for the entire time of his presidency we've never had a president in the post World War Two period who's been an as stable and as non volatile in approval ratings his lowest I think is around thirty seven is high around forty four forty five so you know he's in the upper range but he's been there for quite a while and I think the big note there's we've had a lot of stories happening recently right in Ukraine impeachment and Bughdadi and even as US filter into the ratings nothing's happening which is to say people have decided if they like Donald trump or not and nothing that they are learning earning or have learned over the past couple years seems to have changed that underlying structure of opinion in any real way I can imagine the people who support Donald Trump our unwavering because things like Moller probe and Ukraine and send her back and even you know good people on both sides don't really get in the way of love his appointing Supreme Court justices which he's done or tax cuts for the rich which is done but what about other stuff like the wall I mean he hasn't accomplished that in over two years of his presidency does that affect him in some way pulling is always hard to get to the heart of what people people really think ride we only have this number and it is an imperfect summation of people's use but I suspect that on something like the wall the way Donald Trump's supporters understand that is not the Donald Trump is built the wall but that the lame stream media the failing New York Times the do nothing Democrats have stopped Donald well trump from building the wall mayor he is out there fighting on their behalf trying to get the wall built and he's at war with deep state and the swamp and everyone else I mean donald trump typically does not get blamed for a lot of what he does it's why I think one of the few things that did appear to hurt him was the House Republican healthcare bill because that was something we're Donald Trump during the campaign at promised he would not cut medicaid he promised he would give everyone better health insurance and then he signed onto this bill he signed on he supported this bill written by Paul Ryan that would've taken health insurance away from tens of millions the people that would not have been better for people that would not have predicted preexisting conditions it would cut cut medicaid very dramatically so that was a moment where the ability to say Donald Trump is being stopped by others and that is why he is not doing what he promised evaporated and you had to say Oh Donald Trump is actually betraying his promise and that seemed to have an effect it's why when you talk to Democrats they want to run against donald trump's embrace of more traditional Republican policies on healthcare and the economy and tax cuts and other things they don't want to run against the craziness of the trump show the tweets the eccentric behavior because to them the people who don't like him for those resort you don't like him I'm the place where you can find new allies new votes are on the people who there's a dissonance between what they wanted Donald trump to do and what he has been doing and it's donald trump's embrace of the traditional traditional conservative agenda that you can begin to open up that wedge is it unusual for president have such steady approval ratings or did Obama have a thirty forty percent margin that he just could never lose no matter what he did it is unusual and there couple of reasons is unusual so one is that Obama for instance had much bigger swings round his early honeymoon period rate very high approval ratings which Donald Trump never had and there are some bigger swings around things like killing Osama bin Laden but it is also true that most of the time Obama was in a fairly narrow band so if you look at the course of his presidency you would see a larger potential variation variation but if you looked at any given month you would not see a huge difference from where Donald Trump is Obama was somewhat more popular than trump and somewhat more popular in trump amidst a much worse economy which which suggests to me that trump is underperforming potential approval ratings quite dramatically thing I'd say about Donald Trump's approval ratings in the big picture is that he is in a condition right now where he should be quite strong he has a pretty good economy unemployment is quite low historically we have had steady job job growth we've had steady GDP growth even in las year to reasonable wage growth so that plus the fact that we are not currently embroiled in a huge new war or I think one of the good things I will say about Donald Trump did not take the advice of any of his administration and try to go to war with Iran you could imagine a precedent in these conditions fifty five percent not seventy percent given the structure partisan politician but fifty five the fact that he's at forty two speaks to the effect that his own unusual behavior his tweeting his fights his eccentricities his recklessness it speaks to the fact that he's not tough law that that has imposed a cost penalty on his approval ratings and the thing I was thinking about Donald Trump is that he did not win in two thousand sixteen by much he did not win the popular vote at all and even in Pennsylvania you would have had to change about forty thousand votes for Donald Trump to lose two and so it was such a close election and the demographic trends are sufficiently in Democrats favor that trump to get reelected into twenty twenty he doesn't need to match his performance in two thousand sixteen he needs to do better than it and there's no evidence in his polling that he has expanded his base a thing I tend to think about from time to time people exist in this country who voted for Barack Obama and then several years later voted for Donald Trump which I guess often amazes people outside of this country how do the Democrats win those particular voters back so there's a huge amount of research now and attention on this quite small percentage of voters who switched from Obama to trump and particularly in mid west states my read of that research overall suggests that in general these were voters who were reasonably high and what social scientists racial resentment and you might say yeah well how could they elect Barack Obama then and the answer is that feeling away about a group of people doesn't always Dr Phil about one person Obama did a lot of work to calm white anxieties to sort of appear people as somebody who was operating outside of some traditional enmities you could kind of feel like you're getting past some of that when Hillary Clinton ran a much more explicit elicit campaign arguing in favor of black lives matter talking about systematic racism systemic racism on the campaign trail those voters who are higher earn racial resentment and have more intensely negative views about immigration whenever Donald Trump I do not know how winnable they are if you talk to Bernie any sanders or no Elizabeth Warren what they will tell you is that those voters were upset by Washington support for free trade deals they weren't helped enough by democratic policies over the past ten years and a more unvarnished for economic populism will win them back you talk to Joe Biden but he won't tell you but I think what is believed to be true there is uncle Joe so is a sort of an older white guy comforting figure these folks believe he's on their side like maybe move over to him I think that it is a mistake for Democrats to think about this all all in terms of winning the last war they'll probably get some of these people back and by running a different campaign and running more popular candidate than Hillary Clinton they can get some of them back but they also would have won on the election if African American turnout had been at the levels it was under Barack Obama that's probably very hard to reconstitute but it's not necessarily impossible parties really come back from a defeat and the way you expect them to so after two thousand and four there was this huge belief that Democrats had lost white evangelical heartland voters and you know maybe they'd become to open to gay marriage or they were too socially liberal and you know John Kerry was in a feet you know french-speaking windsurfing etcetera etcetera and there's this whole discourse party about becoming more culturally conservative and economically populist and then who actually wins it's an African American guy with with the Middle Name Hussein from Chicago right like that was not anywhere in the theory but that's what they did so I suspect that if Democrats win in twenty twenty it will not be because they managed to reverse engineer Donald Trump's victory but they nominated a candidate who in being themselves and exciting interesting interesting unique political force created their own political dynamics donald trump had to respond to and was not quite able to and what do you think that dynamics should be I don't know I I think what's really important is that Democrats do not just run anti-trump I think that the Democrats need to have a vision and a theory and an an inspirational charge of their own and if they don't have that that creates a lot of space for trump to dominate the conversation I think the biggest mistake Democrats could make would be need to be constantly reactive to whatever grenade donald trump is logged on twitter that morning I mean if you look in two thousand eight I would not say that what Barack Obama ran non was an extraordinarily ambitious policy gender imbalance in the way the presidential engines earned bishops but he himself represented something in politics at excited people he ran on a theory of how politics could be how could look how we could relate to each other how we could fix it and that generated a momentum that really reshaped shaped American Politics for eight years and I think that what Democrats are going to need to do is to not just sit around clapping back donald trump but but have something that in in its ambition in its intensity in its controversy sets the conversation on their terms the one of the only times Donald Trump is actually reactive democrats is when he is arguing against their socialism one of the Times he response and so the ways in which I think particularly Warren Sanders are able to use big ambitious policies to set the agenda such it it's at least a conversation happening on terms I think that's powerful I think some of the other candidates are able to do it in some other ways sometimes but certainly they're the two who've been able to set the terms of democratic debate debate and I think as a kind of Meta level of the campaign being able to set the terms of the debate is a genuinely important qualification for them crowd and Twenty Twenty.

"one year" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Reset

"Give you the real exchange rate for a laughably low fee which makes them Bird than a bank or paypal transfer wise also offers a debit mastercard. That always gives you the real rate when you spend overseas transfer wise is your Swiss army knife for due to the question about trust I think it's one of the most foundational things for the company I take it seriously listen to the it back tried to understand feel there's something which cost a breaking of trust and see what we can do to improve Google CEO soon dr ice says the company has been struggling with maintaining the trust of its employees this is how he described the problem in leaked audio published by The Washington Post last week genuinely struggling with some issues transparency at scale how do it especially at a time when everything we do is doesn't stay within the walls those comments come at an interest in time on November I it will have been exactly one year since the google walkout a protest against Google leadership that had a reported twenty thousand employees walking off the job in offices around the world I'm Jim Ross Today on resets we're looking at the impact the Google walkout one year later Google time's up on sexual harassment Taylor I've been at Google for seven years I've had both the sexual harassment and sexual discrimination case I've blocked out the memories of it but I don't think anybody not anymore I decided to coordinate this stuff and gathering as one of the many Google sites that are walking day it was huge a big deal I was there and you could feel this energy that I had never seen before in the tech industry looking out in support of they've been harassed anywhere in energy of sort of anger and for Russian and a real rising of worker descent Ghaffari is a reporter for recode you covered the walkout from Google's headquarters in mountain view a year ago I asked her to explain how this all started the google walkout was about really the abuse of power our sexual harassment in the tech industry particularly at Google where at the time and had recently come out that there was a pattern of sexual misconduct at the company and that high-powered managers and executives were getting protected and in some cases paid out to leave after there had been credit bowl claims launched against them for sexually harassing using their employees and worthies people people who were high up in the company yeah so the host damning claim was probably about Andy Rubin he's the so called founder of the android and it was very very important person at the company he was accused of coercing and employees into performing oral sex the company actually found that claim to be notable launch an investigation but they kept quiet about that and pushed Rubanov but thank him publicly on his way out the door and paid him nine be million dollars in an exit package so when the New York Times revealed the circumstances around Ruben's exit and the massive payout people were pissed and you have twenty thousand employees walking out of work I google offices around the world just to put this in respective twenty thousand employees walking out on the job is that a lot I mean that's huge Google's total employment is I think around one hundred thousand so twenty out of one hundred thousand I mean that is huge for any workforce but especially in tech where historically workers do not speak out against management because overall the perception is that tech workers historically are treated well engineers get all these perks especially at Google you know there's AH child care on premises or is free lunch there's amazing healthcare in time off that's that's the perception of working at a top tech company like Google so yeah workers don't usually walk to work so the group will walk out was about sexual harassment at the company that's what it was about yes at its core it was about sexual harassment but also that other issues like worker pay diversity having an employee voice on important projects all these things that have bubbled up and erupted at the time of the Walker so there were organizers who sort of made this google walkout happen what were their demands most of the demands focused on making sure something like the Ruben situation did not happen again so that means giving legal protections to employees who speak out against things like sexual harassment and that means taking out these houses that were in their contracts that for some not to take their claims to court if they had an issue but instead settle it privately and confidentially so that to me and was actually met that was probably the biggest direct kind of success of the Google walkout in terms of policy changes but there were other deeper structural demands that are very much inch still being worked out Google and those have to do with you know having an an employee representation on the board of directors those you have to do with gender and diversity and pay equity which is not just a problem at Google but the entire tech industry and remember that only thirty three son of employees at Google where women last year and that number drops to about twenty five percent for leadership and technical positions so it's been a year since the walkout do you think it was effective I think the Google walk it was successful in cracking open deeper tensions not just a google but the entire tech industry and many of the man's have not been Matt many people are still actively pushing for those kinds of demands to be met what happened to the people who initiated the walkout so Meredith Whitaker and clear stapleton the organizers they publicly came out and months after the walk outside hey we feel that management actually punishing us for our political activists so you saw Clare say that two months after the walkout she was told she would be demoted and lose half of her direct reports and clear was a marketing manager at Youtube after she reported the HR and she said Hey feel like I'm being retired against they reversed emotion but she said that her managers started to ignore her gave her work to other people and she was told to go on medical leave even though she wasn't sick meredith who was an a researcher who led Google's open research she said she was told her role would be changed dramatically and to stop her notable research on Ai Ethics at the AI now institute a research center butte are there any more examples like this of retaliation Google yeah I mean in my reporting I talked to Google employees all the time who face issues oftentimes it's less well-known employees and maybe less scandalous circumstances but these are people who say they've been subjected to things like everyday harassment on the job having a manager who frequently makes inappropriate comments based on someone's gender or sexuality or race and they're forced to kind of put up with it they say because is when they hear comments like you're not getting promoted because you're such an emotional woman and they report something like that they say they're quietly pushed down the corporate ladder all the people who made those comments are kept in place or pushed up so in your mind is the significance of the Google walkout sort of a moment where employees finally felt comfortable bull calling this behavior outright this retaliation and the higher ups that Google ignoring retaliation is that what it is absolutely and Anna comes in the wake of the me two times up movement and you're seeing people say hey I'm not GonNa let this report about my manager sexually harassing me sit in a competent the HR file for the rest of my life. I'M GONNA come out with US and take a big risk potentially to my employment to my social standing with managers and say that it's not okay.

"one year" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"If not for you guys, neither Mike or I would be employed, and that's just real talk. This show has changed my life in a more positive way than anything else aside from meeting Taylor lane. That is also real talking. I mean that from the bottom of my heart. I found my calling when I found this show. And I don't mean podcasting. I've found that with the wasters clams and cockles shout out to the clam fan. But I mean, like, my voice, my real calling and how I can use my voice to not just make people laugh, but teach people and teach myself about random, interesting shit and most importantly help people to realize they're not alone in the world. No matter what they're going through whether that'd be loss, depression, anxiety, addiction, whatever it may be there's always hope out there. And they're literally literally millions of other people going through the same things you are to varying degrees. Of course, in some cases, in some cases, much much much much fucking worse than anything that you could be going through. So. It just all this is to say in a little under a year, according to soundcloud, we've done it says like eleven months on soundcloud. But I think that might just be changing any day now to twelve months we've done over three million downloads. And that's not accounting for a lot of shit like Spotify that those numbers are not included. So from inception to the year one three fucking million. It's just it's it's crazy to me. I love what we've created here. I love this show. I love being the head of a crime syndicate that ransacked japodlay restaurants for napkins and Tabasco this holiday season. Honestly may be the most blessed I've ever felt in my fucking life. Even considering that this was not the easiest views and not the easiest of the last couple of months. It's been pretty rough actually and all in all I have all of you to think. So let's fucking go. And I just wanted to say, thank you. Hopefully this week once at some point I wanna get I got to get permission from the appropriate parties. But I'm going to be announcing a very cool giveaway in honor of our one year birthday that you'll absolutely want to be looking out for the only hint. I can give is that it sneaker related, but I'll talk more about it when I can't. Anyway, I hope you enjoy the show today because this one and literally every single ever one ever is for you. Next segment your top songs two thousand eighteen so all of you probably aware at this point as of a few days ago Spotify released their deal that they do every single year, which is where they give us all these numbers and stats on what we listened to over the course of this calendar year, and there's like individualized ones that you can get you..

Taylor lane soundcloud Mike eleven months twelve months one year
"one year" Discussed on JKNews

JKNews

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on JKNews

"Like, you can't even close our front door Howell. Yeah. We had like we had a cook around our cartons. It was crazy, man. This is dope. Your parents supported. And then I think after my dad one he came to our trade show one year. And then he saw it was like, wow, they built this from house to treat. You mean? Like at e three. Yeah. I would think it was a ether your see we see us in Vegas. So see is that electron IX show? Right. Those are huge, man. So you guys had booths there and all that we did we had our first booth there on the year after that e three show in two hundred six seven two thousand eight was our first show. And then our dad showed up. He was a whoa, you guys. Actually can make money from this. And they started to believing that is finally proud. And I think that's what dope. Yeah. And I think that's that's what I think made me go even further to like to a point where I didn't even know where it would take us. You know to see my dad actually proud of what we did. And I think that's one thing that I if I could tell entrepreneurs today is maybe you experience this Joe's like, you know, you're working so hard, and, you know, people talk about life balance, I always work on that. But it's like take a step back sometimes. And then look at what you've accomplished. Yes. And I think I've never done that even like six seven eight years into did that well because I think there's a part of us that is afraid that were gonna get too comfortable or were our egos too big. And we feel like we've accomplished. But you know, what? I mean, like, it's it's like being an entrepreneur is very scary. But you're driven by the fear because it's motivating right? So what I'm so what I mean by that is for people that don't understand so. Like once you go into business for yourself. There's so much responsibility. That falls on you like now you've got mouths to feed. And in the the bigger you grow the more mouths that depend on you. And you feel like you can't rest because if you do then other people that depend on you are going to get hurt or more just like, you know, you've you also like coming from a poor place or a bad place. Never experienced what it was like to get ten thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars. So you tell yourself I could I could you know, skip out on Steve for for today 'cause I've never made forty thousand dollars in one day. So you'll you'll plow through it. And then you you'll get through it in your comes another opportunity, and you go oh another opportunity for forty thousand dollars. Lemme lemme Folles I could sleep tha. Morrogh like in a new you before you know, it you just didn't sleep. 'cause you kept getting great offers like there's things like that that always happened in an you face something called burnout, whereas like your health or your your your relationships with people or things like that like this is the evolution of a lot of entrepreneurs..

Steve Howell Vegas Joe forty thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars six seven eight years ten thousand dollars one year one day
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Refined amended special counsel rules that we that we proposed and which were which were enacted and that those are the rules under which rod rosenstein who worked with me in the whitewater investigation has in his a terrific attorney and does not deserve the criticism in my judgment that he's been you worked with rosenstein in the whitewater investing yes yes right as part of the team for a short period as i was for short periods yourself you're saying here is that the special counsel taken various different forms over the years archibald cox was fireable by the department of justice ken starr was authorized under the independent counsel act he was not fireable by the justice department he was truly independent and muller is back to the previous model he works for rod rosenstein and serves at his pleasure serves the pleasure of the justice department or the acting attorney general in this case that's right david and it's a model which recognizes the responsibility in and the authority of the attorney general or his or her designate in this case rod rosenstein to to frame the reference which rod did and to oversee the investigation in a way in a matter that is consistent with department of justice policy and i think i think it's the appropriate format and an seems to me that the format is working very well in most importantly is chris said we hear nothing and should hear nothing from bob muller we're what if i could ask given that the you know this is essentially the serie where was the ken starr investigation one year in and what other shoes were left to drop in the years to follow question there were four major investigations underway the investor.

rod rosenstein attorney special counsel archibald cox ken starr justice department acting attorney general david chris bob muller one year
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The president is fully cooperating that the special counsel is continuing his work and that the president's lawyers have cooperated every step of the way however they have expressed concerns about the scope of this investigation chris can you tell us more sure have been back and forth negotiations between the trump team and muller's team about the scope of the investigation whether trump is going to do an interview and early on trump's legal team urged cooperation but now the giuliani has come in there is more and more resistance to cooperation and moller still has the additional work of the investigation to to complete and it's hard to see how he can wrap this up without going through all of turning over all of the stones that he needs to turn over it's important to remember that early on before muller was even appointed trump in his allies were saying that there was no contact between people on the trump campaign and russians and now we know a year later there were multiple multiple contacts and so the longer the investigation goes on the more we learn about contacts and financial relationships between trump and russians chris drama bloomberg news stay with us we're taking stock of the mother investigations one year in nineteen indictments and guilty pleas so far the president claims it's a witch hunt but he's not the first to face tough scrutiny from a special counsel i'm david wright of abc news this is on point.

president special counsel chris muller trump giuliani david wright moller abc one year
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"He's looking into that meeting as well where does his investigation stand so one year in a lot has happened needless to say what we have now is a series of indictments in charges that have come out of the molar investigation it's it's important to step back and take stock of how far we've come just in one year muller has kind of gone through a buckets in his investigation and last fall we had the indictment against paul manafort who was trump's campaign chairman and the and his deputy richard gates and then we had an indictment or guilty plea against george popadopoulos and then we had a guilty plea against michael flynn who is trump's national security advisor and then we had indictments against russians for weaponising social media in order to damage trump in so discord in the us and so it's been a year it seems like it's been a lifetime but in a way you can see these different chunks of the investigation in our muller has been building his cases some of which are going to trial and we are it's our understanding now that trump is into the meat of the investigation into what if any specific cooperation took place between russia and the trump campaign to interfere in the election and whether or not trump or anybody else obstructed justice and by seeking to shut down the investigation one of the big issues yet to be confronted is the hacking and release of dnc emails also the emails of clinton's campaign chair john podesta and other members of trump's inner circle or thought to be impossible jeopardy here roger stone his political advisor.

muller paul manafort trump chairman richard gates george popadopoulos michael flynn advisor us russia clinton john podesta political advisor one year
"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"I'm has been continuing and and and they don't vote they don't want people to know what's been done we're talking about donald trump's first year as president and you're listening to potomac watch from the wall street journal if successful they're powerful and they're sharing their secrets the secrets of wealthy women podcast from the wall street journal from the opinion pages of the wall street journal this is the tomac watch welcome back on poetry go here with a dan haniger and bill mcgurn talking about donald trump's first year as president i want to address the paradox that i see in the in the trump's uh first year which is a economies join well iit's destroyed isis the light of the worst predictions about his policies so dangerous haven't come true sums some significant successes of course a one big failure with obamacare repeal but big victory with tax reform and deregulation and judges yet thirty nine percent approval rating in the uh in the real clear politics average off old dan for a first year president and uh republicans uh losing in the generic ballot test for november by nine points which means that if that holds they'd lose the house if not the sat how do you explain the paradox well i think yet it has to do with the assault inflicted wounds that we've talked about uh bill mention other forces such as democratic opposition i think one other force is worth mentioning as well in that uh which has contributed to this and that is the washington media which is in a virtual war with donald trump which started the day of his inauguration when he quipped god disputed them over the size of the inaugural audience which was i am needless fight pack but never stopped i mean of the than men than there was uh you know the white house press conferences became a running joke on saturday night live and look a lot of trump supporters will say well he's right about this it's fake news they're totally against them yes that may well be true by and large it is true but this is a source of information.

donald trump president wall street journal bill mcgurn the house assault dan haniger obamacare washington white house thirty nine percent
"one year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Support for di andrews podcast on my mind comes from keppel inner foundation supporting public understanding of business and the economy hi it's diane so great to be back with you on my mind this week it's been one year since the inauguration of president trump earlier this week i invited ford topnotch political commentators for a panel discussion i wanted to hear about how they thought our country and change and get their perspective on many of the challenges ahead in the studio with me norm ornstein of the american enterprise institute one as summers said cnn and byron york of the washington examiner maggie haberman of the new york times joins us from a studio in new york and here's our conversation nor i'm going to his start with you looking back on donald trump's first year what do you think will all standout most in your memory and in my memory it is a how all of the conditions in government design to keep a presidency from careening out of control from moving step by step towards things that are more autocratic from preventing the kind of corruption inside the presidency a kleptocracy a keeping government functioning at a reasonable level have gone awry and as much as anything it's not just the president and even the president's administration it's the congress just reading the other day a catalogue of the ways in which the president and his family have enriched themselves and foreign governments have fallen all over them cells to try and provide money for him so that they can get in his good graces or may be use it in another way congress has held zero hearings on any of this i look at some of the nominees who have been confirmed judges and cabinet in subcabinet people who didn't get the kind of vetting that we normally anticipate and so i end up with some very profound concerns at the end of the year that go beyond simply trump himself.

di andrews keppel inner foundation norm ornstein american enterprise institute cnn maggie haberman the new york times new york donald trump president congress ford summers byron york washington subcabinet one year
"one year" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on Business Daily

"Hello i made butler and welcomed the business daily from the bbc today we mark one year since president donald trump reached the white house as he's livid on the economy the stock market is up then taxes you're going down in i don't have any problem with what president trump's doing it'd be upset people that's just too bad baden nobel laureate tells us the president can't really take credit for a small rise in the economy we're already at full employment and saw how do we get to even higher levels of output i would want to be boosting scientific research i want to make more scientists come to our country but that's not what he's done marking trump scarred business daily from the bbc donald trump did make a lot of economic promises before he made it to the white house here's some of them i'm going to bring back millions of jobs protecting our workers also means reforming our system of legal immigrations and billions and billions and billions and billions and billions and billions at three point two trillion dollars in tax cuts for american families this is again the biggest tax reform of millions and billions in stock market hit an alltime record high today over twenty two thousand we've picked up more than four trillion dollars in net worth in terms of our country our stocks are companies billions and billions and billions and billions left's cut the red tape let's set free our dreams and yes let's make america great again yep the trump agenda and some big numbers heavily montage i will.

butler bbc donald trump stock market president america four trillion dollars two trillion dollars one year
"one year" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"And and i think that there was at the beginning uh a lot of cautious optimism because if you remember you know trump campaigned outside of the traditional political sphere right he was going to be a dealmaker he was going to shake up washington and there was a sense that maybe he could be a president who could broker the partisan warfare that we'd seen in washington in the last six years of the obama administration one year into that administration i'm not sure we have seen him really be the dealmaker that he promised to be they haven't had a tunnel legislative accomplishments with back and forth is is a of the opposite as the opposite of that and i do think they're they're greatest legislative achievement so far the tax bill that they pass at the end of 2017 was really more a product of congressional republicans and unification on that and the president really didn't need to clinch the deal they just wanted to vote for that so at this stage though even though again as we seen in the immigration fight the president is unpredictable they don't know where he is they're still always on his side there if anything that's really shifted is that i think that the republican party at least as i see it in congress has almost uniformly lined up excuse me lined up behind president trump because we are very familiar with the republicans who haven't people like jeff flake of arizona bob corker of tennessee the critics in his party are way outnumbered by the people that stand behind the president and many of those critics have decided it's not even worth trying to run for reelection exactly because i think they recognize that the base of the party the the republican primary voter believes the donald trump is the head of their party and they like him a whole lot more than they like a lot of the establishment samara you medically leg talking about norms do you like norms more than memes i like norms more than maim love i'm not amine person norm yeah did you see the pictures of one of you after you thought i was pretty funny so if you didn't see this on twitter mareseille.

washington president obama administration the deal republican party congress jeff flake bob corker tennessee donald trump samara arizona twitter six years one year