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37 Burst results for "One Year"

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on The Cruz Show

The Cruz Show

00:19 min | 28 min ago

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on The Cruz Show

"On my son's like being ex, my city, and they never, ever seen Neutron. Um, a young boy agents on Fontana might give it up when it's done. I'm a Philip of Rina's like Gilbert of Rayna's Shoot My shot. I'm still with demons. I got chicks in New York. That means one in each borough. I'm in the pocket like, bro. When I'm back home not to treat me like Robert didn't go home. Give us cinnamon swirled left it in our got a one year old zeros on heroes and heroes. How about Let's say I got a check from a company not do anything. A new balance, take bought a play to get out of state government started from runaway said. I'm in town the day she says she's coming over and she's down to stay. I gotta have you been planning some people upon me. I know what she was Probably brand new widow is hard. I got options are good peasant stock, just Josh Holiday. Nagi bring good just like that. No matter what, No college call me too, baby. No time creative making and not just from a Leone Yesterday I go back and forth like a billboard number one when you're not, And I don't give a what you say Batman the bat Mobile to the cab that I believed you wanted. You'd like to take it easy. I'm not going down with me. Squeeze down a drink of my work abroad like I'ma clean, but not together, like telling somebody better. So you know it. Baby was brand new. We're just hard to get past. It. Was somebody calling me daddy on somebody for that Gotta go out when I kiss it upon my lips like somebody wanted the dominant nation caught in a while. She put up that way, But nobody told me that she wouldn't fill up my music for me is nobody on it. Put a frisky little history is so much work on my cell you had let go tell Mel It's reached me all in my dear fellow. You're okay with lost its used to my bed and a lot of your efficiency. I'm just you know, you ain't believe that she wanted to toast me ahead of any as long as a rule in case she was pulling that want to approach me, But you came back in a color and she wanted to study. So did she cover for longer Give fast up is the only funny confronting confronting the damaged a looming they in No way did I come again? I just so many pennies on the eyes. Now Never. Gaston again. Look was brand new. We're just how God could just spend this holiday logging into both one branch. No magic magnet, Say most magazine say McDonald Dragons Sam. Most jungle edges have a medic. Protect that boy number. The lad is that Booth was about but is put about messed up like she go lead over Uncle Leo. I was this that I need Keep around free Rose Noelle Lane down. Create a big problem. I got options. I could just.

Rayna Nagi New York Mel It Neutron Fontana Rina Josh Holiday Uncle Leo Leone Robert Booth Gaston
'Chance the Snapper': Chicago's Humboldt Park alligator one year later

WBBM Afternoon News Update

01:05 min | 1 d ago

'Chance the Snapper': Chicago's Humboldt Park alligator one year later

"Chance the snapper was first spotted in the Humboldt Park Lagoon and a week later rather, a week later, his life's changed forever. The alligators saga from a year ago created two celebrities Chance the snapper and alligator rob, otherwise known as Frank Rob, the Florida man who caught chance and took him to warmer climes in Florida. Rob says he visits chance every month or so at chances home. At the ST Augustine Alligator Farm. I think he kind of gives me that stink eye a little bit. Yeah, like man. Are you that guy again? Tag Navid. If you really can't, you're back here again, so that jokingly but they they don't forget. They're one of those animals that really their memory is so advanced. Their thought process is so advanced people give up, not a whole lot of credit, because again, they're brain small. Ah, alligator. His size has a brain the size of a great but unlike they're using every single bit of it. Rob says Chance grew six inches, the 1st 3 or four months. He was at the alligator Farm. Rob's life changed, too. When he came to Chicago, he says he still has a girlfriend here. Steve Miller News Radio, one of

Frank Rob St Augustine Alligator Farm Chance Humboldt Park Lagoon Florida Steve Miller Chicago
Fresh update on "one year" discussed on Wheels

Wheels

01:05 min | 56 min ago

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on Wheels

"And Alice. Thank you for holding. A long time. First time you could say longtime sufferer don't know why I'm calling today except that also one of our questions is with all of your extracurricular music gigs. When did you ever have to sell a car? You know something I love and believe me. I spent a lot of time. In the car business. In order to be really successful at it. You can't go in and just work 1/2 shift during the day. In fact, when I got Up to Dallas. Henry Butts in 1975 didn't close till 10 o'clock at night. Which means if you caught a customer, 9 30 folks back then people still going out to look at cars at 9 30 at night, you might not get home to one o'clock morning. Have to be back there at eight o'clock in the morning. But you still had Sunday off. So you know, you just kind of pay attention. Whenever he had sometime. I'd read a book whenever you had some time you play the guitar. And then you get older and you walk into a guitar center in the average 14 year old kid sitting there is better than you've ever been, and you've been working at it for 40 years. Yeah, they're amazing that it is truly stunning. The clever things at very young people. When everybody talks bad about young people, you say, you know they're picking up something is better than us. Absolutely. Here's my question. Okay. I bought a 2015 Honda Accord Brand Moon and ah, the What color? What color? It's what it's what, Okay? From from the within the first year. It already was accumulating nicks and chips and stuff. And, um, after about a year and 1/2 about I just knew that didn't sound right didn't seem right. And I went and asked the manager of the theater ship, and he said, Well, it's True that that we have experience or softer Paint. That was his terminology, a softer paint and we have had some issues. And that was his thought ofyou. Okay, Hold on, Charles. Was that someone ever ever? Anybody on this show? No. There you go. If that happened, and I'm not saying it didn't you know my 1996 R L I got right after I came to Calais F and we did a big weekend deal. Dan a reunion, right? So I had my car for a week and I have to go because you have to get there early because I'm in early show I get down to re union where K L F is playing all weekend. When I get done with the show on a walk outside somebody's completely and totally keyed the car all the way around. So, Yeah, So had a brand new r l I had to get repainted from scratch. However. Rock chips and all that, if you live and civilization on black paint, I'm not buying the story that it was soft paint, and I am going to tell you point blank. If it were a problem with Honda paint wherever you bought it. All they needed to do was kind of sit there with the Honda District manager and you Let Han to take care of it. I'm going to guess they did not make that offer. That's correct. Which is why I say where you buy the car really matters. Yeah. Drive these forever have a 98 records Gro for 17 years when it finally croaked and I went right straight down and bottle. The 2015 didn't even hassling the price. So that's what I want and signed the papers and I'm this guy. That a lot of times when people writing on stuff And again I don't want to set myself up is the world's greatest whatever. But if I like people that I did business with And they had a legitimate problem. You would get that taken care off. And I was just done some of these e mails. I get they go. Well, I bought from this play because there really nice and all that yet. They're not nice enough to actually take care of you with an issue they could get handled if they wanted to. See, that's what drives me nuts. But again If you had a paint with Honda and you have lived in the same address, and you had your previous on did this didn't happen, too. And your loyal Honda owner? That's when a dealer that you have a relationship is supposed to say, Look. Service manager District Service manager is going to be on our store on this state. I would like to set an appointment for you to meet him and show him what you're showing me. Very good. Appreciate. I love your show, by the way. Good job. Thank you Have a good weekend. You too. Yeah, again. I get that e mail all the time. And you go, folks. I don't I can't make a bad dealer, a good dealer. I can't make somebody that is in the car business. Maybe successful, added that actually may be in the business, and I know how to do this stuff. I've had one person who, by the way is actually someone on the show. Say District managers don't do that anymore, and I told him really, really. Because I just set it up with three other people this week. You mean they won't do it? Of course we'll do it. That's what they're there for. It's not just there to pop in and see if the coffee's any good, but you gotta have a dealer that believes you go all out for a good customer. If you don't have that, then you're gonna end up with her. Five year old Honda with paint chips all over. Let's go to Edward Ino Villa. Thanks for holding Edward. How are you? Fine if they fixed the roads out there yet. Okay, six. Probably or longer. Adama.

Honda Honda District Edward Ino Villa Alice District Service Manager Henry Butts Dallas Calais F Edward Charles DAN HAN
Trump administration begins formal withdrawal from World Health Organization

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

02:16 min | 3 d ago

Trump administration begins formal withdrawal from World Health Organization

"President Trump is following through on his threat should withdraw from the World Health Organization, which he's criticized along with China for the response to the initial Corona virus outbreak in Wuhan. Are you seeing any evidence that this is something the American public is paying attention to you at all? Or is You know, I worry about the virus really just swallowing everything else. Well, I think it's probably the latter. People are most interested in their date early. It's a life and whether or not their kids to be able to go back to school in the fall, whether it's safe for them, whether they've got a job, whether it's safe to go back to that job, Get on the subway. Get toe work. What's gonna be happening at work? You know if I'm you know, age am I going to be exposing myself to cope? You know, at work and the W H O way off in Geneva. It's kind of not on their radar screen Thie president's decision, too. Withdraw the United States. Is the result of his feeling that the W H O misinform the United States about the severity of the outbreak in China. He blames China. For the same not informing the United States he believes, blames the W. H O. He blames individual state governors, particularly in Democratic states for not doing enough about the Corona virus. There's a lot of blaming done by the president, but Truth of the matter is that he was getting plenty of intelligence separate from the W. H O through the National Security Council and other health authorities way back at the beginning of the year. And the president away, you know, talk virus down that it was going away that it would go away. You don't spring, you know, got warm. I mean, you've heard heard all this. So the plane the W H O I think is kind of a nonstarter. It serves a purpose. It's not perfect, but it serves a purpose, and it's in the health interests and in the self interest of the United States citizen to be a part of that inner and national organization. Essentially given them a one year notice of withdrawal. So it'll be interesting to see what happens with

United States President Trump China W H O World Health Organization Wuhan Thie National Security Council Geneva W. H O W. H O.
Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

Democracy Now! Audio

00:34 sec | 3 d ago

Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

"Mexico. There's a major development in the case of the forty three IOT. Students who were kidnapped and disappeared nearly sixty years ago in the town of Gwala Gato. A bone fragment found in the nearby town of Kula. Kula has been determined to be from one of the students twenty one year old, Christian offense, Rodriguez to lumbering, the Mexican government, has long claimed the bodies of the students were burnt in disposed of in a garbage dump in Coca Cola or a nearby river, but the bone fragments were found in a different location, casting new doubts about the government's official account of what. To the

Kula Mexican Government Gwala Gato Rodriguez Official
Ryder Cup postponed until next year at Whistling Straits

AM Tampa Bay

00:16 sec | 3 d ago

Ryder Cup postponed until next year at Whistling Straits

"Of America will make it official today when they postponed the Ryder Cup for one year because of the Corona virus pandemic. The event was scheduled for September 25th to the 27th at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin. It will be delayed until the same time next year. The

Whistling Straits Wisconsin America Official
Los Angeles County Votes To Initiate Plan To Close Men’s Central Jail Within The Year

NBC 4 News at 6

00:29 sec | 3 d ago

Los Angeles County Votes To Initiate Plan To Close Men’s Central Jail Within The Year

"It's a done deal sort of L. A County supervisors have voted unanimously to develop a plan to close the men's central jail within one year. It's part of the county's new push for and in their words. CareFirst jails last the board is asking an existing task force to map out what has to happen to close the facility. Not everyone's on the same page, though Sheriff Alex Villanueva and many residents say they're worried about the potential public safety ramifications. Sharon Reardon, ABC

Alex Villanueva Sharon Reardon ABC
Some Harvard, MIT students to return to campuses in Boston area this fall

WBZ Afternoon News

01:06 min | 3 d ago

Some Harvard, MIT students to return to campuses in Boston area this fall

"There There will will be be a a very very different different look look and and feel feel on on the the campus campus of of Harvard Harvard University University this this fall. fall. Nobody Nobody sees sees James James Roll Roll hostiles hostiles is is only only a a fraction fraction of of the the student student body body will will be be on on campus. campus. Only Only 40% 40% of of Harvard Harvard undergraduates undergraduates will be joining first year students this fall. All courses will also be taught online. University officials say the recent upturn in Coben 19 cases in certain states shows how hard it is to make predictions and given the uncertainty they found. This plan allows them to bring back as many students as possible. This September, students left On campus would be housed in single dorm rooms and must agree. It's a new health measures, including daily health assessments and viral testing every three days and the use of face masks and social distancing James RoHaas W B Z Boston's NewsRadio a similar but different approach. It M I T the school will only invite seniors to return to campus this fall, according to the tack, the Stoop school's student paper. No other undergraduates will be granted access to the school's facilities. However, students can apply for special consideration for housing, which will be handled on a case by case basis. At least some classes will be held in person. Beginning in early September.

Harvard Harvard University Uni James James Stoop School Coben Boston
Only 40% of Harvard undergrads will return to campus this fall

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

Only 40% of Harvard undergrads will return to campus this fall

"Over in Cambridge, the campus of Harvard University will be far less crowded this fall. That usually is school announcing that all fall classes will be taught online and less than half the student body will be allowed back into campus housing. The university acknowledges. There's a risk when it comes to reopening the campus, But officials say they've worked closely with medical experts defining an approach they believe will protect the health and safety of their community. So this fall, Harvard is only allowing first year students on campus and only 40% of undergraduate It's all courses will be taught online. Now students will be housed in single room dorms and will be tested every three days. Those who test positive will be isolated and cared for at student health services.

Harvard University Cambridge
Washington DC - Georgetown U. reopening plan allows 2,000 students back on campus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 4 d ago

Washington DC - Georgetown U. reopening plan allows 2,000 students back on campus

"University plans to let about 2000 undergraduates live on its main campus. For this fall and to take hybrid classes. All first year, students will be allowed to stay on campus. Some upperclassman will also be allowed to return. The university will offer some courses and hybrid format and some first year courses will be in person. However, most undergraduate courses and all school of continuing studies courses Will be fully online Students who choose to live on campus will have to move out by November 20th and finish the fall semester at home.

Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

Derek Hunter

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

"Of Harvard will be online next year. You won't go to a class even if you live on campus at Harvard, and they're going to allow some people to live on campus, mostly first year students, even if you live on campus. You can't go to class. It's all going to be streamed online. So why do those students? Presumably Americans are largely Americans? Why should they get screwed of the college experience? Where, as they'll move heaven and Earth to make sure that the People here on visas. Student visas get to stay. What will they do? They will make all kinds of special arrangements to make sure these people are protected and safe. Will they extend the same courtesy to Americans highly unlikely.

Harvard
Gwen Stefani's ex-husband Gavin Rossdale says 'most embarrassing moment' was the end of his marriage

Jared and Katie

01:02 min | 4 d ago

Gwen Stefani's ex-husband Gavin Rossdale says 'most embarrassing moment' was the end of his marriage

"Tell, you know he was married to Gwen Stefani for a very, very, very long time and Gavin Ross Dale today, saying that his most embarrassing moment in life Was the crumbling of his marriage to Gwen Stefani. Okay, he said it was one sided. He said that it made him look like a total a hole, and he said there were two people in this marriage, and he said that she in away made out better, and he had to suffer. And and took the embarrassment. It was 100% embarrassing for eyes must be still embarrassing because here she is going on show after show, and she's with another guy on national television. That's so much better than Gavin was right. Beloved Blake Shelton. Yes, the Bush singer Gavin Rasta, who's 54 by the way, and Gwen's too funny who's 50 were married for 13 years. The divorce was finalized One year later, they share three Children. They have Kingston, whose 14 Zuma, whose 11 and Apollo who six And Gavin Russell. He didn't just come out and say this, he was asked during an interview, which is part of the problem sometimes is that they these out crazy answers are then publishes. If he's just coming out to say,

Gwen Stefani Gavin Ross Dale Gavin Rasta Gavin Russell Gavin Zuma Blake Shelton Kingston Apollo
Nick Cordero, Broadway actor who battled COVID-19, has died at age 41, wife says

Erin Burnett OutFront

02:25 min | 4 d ago

Nick Cordero, Broadway actor who battled COVID-19, has died at age 41, wife says

"Tonight devastating loss Broadway. Actor Nick Cordero Battled Corona Virus for ninety five days before the disease took his life at age forty one. Cordero's wife Chronicle despite on social media, people around the world followed all of us hoping for his recovery Cheney most is out front. Broadway star Nick Cordeiro struggled for three months in the I. See you in a coma up and down, but he is awake. Data is awake. But more down than up I am asking again for. All the prayers mega prayers, his ordeal documented by his wife Amanda Clues from bullets over Broadway. To Law and order his career is going great this. Could be one of the Great Wall until it was cut short by COVID. Nineteen God has another Angel in heaven. Now posted his wife. Nick had been young and healthy as Alec Baldwin noted. Last June nick was looking at his newborn son. Elvis in the ICU, this June nick was in the ICU himself, and through it all Amanda shared the experience. He told me for times that he won't survive. He was put on a ventilator is. Gone for two minutes, and they had to resuscitate his heart, they had to amputate away. It was a situation of lifer leg. He communicated with his is by looking down. Yes, to know US since Amanda recruited an army to say prayers created the HASHTAG UP Nick inspired people to Sing Day. Wake Up. Fans in Arp work, go fund me page for medical expenses zoom past, eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and rising just a few days before his death, his wife spoke with CBS so grab his hand, and I'm waiting to the day that he called my hand back that day, apparently never came. He missed seeing his sons I. Nick Cordero was outlived by his one year old. Who will grow up hearing stories of how much he was loved.

Nick Cordero Amanda Clues Nick Nick Cordeiro Elvis United States Alec Baldwin Cheney Chronicle Coma CBS
Ennio Morricone, Prolific Italian Composer for the Movies, Dies at 91

The Big Picture

00:30 sec | 4 d ago

Ennio Morricone, Prolific Italian Composer for the Movies, Dies at 91

"Lost one of the greats, one of the one of the greatest contributors to the history of film, my favorite film composer ever annual Marconi who died over the weekend and ninety one years old I. Was bummed deeply by this news despite the fact that he was a man in his nineties, What was your reaction? I assume you were not a week like I was at one o'clock in the morning when this came across transit, no, I missed it, so I woke up to the obituaries, which were represented a full career, and

Marconi
Tributes For Nick Cordero, Dies Of COVID-19

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:46 sec | 5 d ago

Tributes For Nick Cordero, Dies Of COVID-19

"Matter what they say. Tributes are pouring in for Broadway star Nick Cordero died here in Los Angeles over the weekend after three month battle against the Corona virus. Hamilton Starr Lin Manuel Miranda, calling his passing devastating Lecter is Zach Braff, who co starred with Cordero when the hit Broadway musical Bullets over Broadway, said he never knew a kinder person, Dr David Barron tells K. And, actually, celebrity deaths can get people to be more proactive about covert 19. I think once we get over the sadness and the horror that we feel when we hear about a relatively young person, especially someone He's a person of note in society who's known to lots of people. It's very sobering. It really can affect us. Cordero is survived by his wife and his one year old son. The Cordero was just 41 years

Nick Cordero Hamilton Starr Lin Manuel Mira Zach Braff Los Angeles Dr David Barron Lecter K. And
Children are among the victims of July 4 weekend gun violence across the US

The KFBK Morning News

03:22 min | 5 d ago

Children are among the victims of July 4 weekend gun violence across the US

"Was a really violent one or in terms of shootings, gun violence in a number of cities across the country are going to break down some of the numbers just to give you an idea and, unfortunately included small Children. Across the country. A seven year old girl in Chicago shot in the head while she was playing with some friends. On Saturday. A 14 year old killed in a separate Chicago shooting Washington D. C. 11 year old boy shot and killed while running into the house to grab a phone charger. At least 24 people were shot in Atlanta on Saturday into Sunday evening for them died, including an eight year old girl. Who was driving in a car with her mom and a friend, and it has people like the mayor of Atlanta. Very, very concerned. We're fighting the enemy was in Well, we're shooting each other up on our streets in that sitting shot and killed a baby That is Atlanta Mayor Key shit. Lance bottom. She held a press conference after the shooting to talk about the tragedy. And if I'm not mistaken, Christina's she also at one point in time with in the past recent weeks. Talked about the need to defund the police department as well. Right? This is happening in other cities, this movement, obviously to defund the police department. And if you talk to police unions, they say that you know, morale is at an all time low among police department. That's awesome Video out of New York, where 11 people were shot and killed over the weekend of NYPD car rolling through a neighborhood as people just like tossed bottles at it, and the officers did not get out of the car. So apparently they disbanded this anti crime unit and a lot of the officers are retiring. There just their morale is low, and the union at least says This is part of the reason why we are seeing this crime spike that people are criminals are emboldened to come out because they know that they probably won't be arrested. Here's another audio clip from mayor Bottoms from Atlanta, talking about the passion that she sees right now towards ending community violence that she has seen towards police reform. Do you want people to take a seriously? You want. You don't want us to lose his movement that we we can't can't lose lose each each other. other. Here's Here's one one more more clip clip from from their their bottoms bottoms from from Atlanta. Atlanta. This This random random Wow! Wow! Wow, Wow, Wes, Wes, shoot shoot him him up. up. Because you can It's gotta stop. It has to stop. But the problem is when you talk about like New York City, and they pull all of those officers off the streets, and you talked about the increased they've had a 200% increase in shootings, 116 shootings took place in New York since officers were reassigned. That was in June 15th. To July 2nd, that same number that same time for him last year. 38 shootings 1 16/38 right one year and you know they've talked and in the cities where they're talking about defending the police. They've talked about putting other community safety professionals in place that hasn't happened and if it did I don't know if you want to send them out if people are shooting, no, especially if they're unarmed, So they're just Yeah, it's an issue. It's an issue that we're seeing. And there's a cause and effect here. Yeah, we wanted to bring you just some of the headlines making Ah, making news this morning in Atlanta in Chicago and in New York out to

Atlanta Chicago New York City Christina WES Nypd Lance Washington
How to Be a Vision-Driven Leader with Michael Hyatt

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:24 min | 5 d ago

How to Be a Vision-Driven Leader with Michael Hyatt

"I was in the coaching conversation with the business owner, the other day and we were walking through some of the powerful questions that every business leader should be answering questions one was. Why do you exist as a business? And they had the answer that question question to? What you stand for as a business, and they were able to answer that question as well and then the third question I asked him was wear. Is Your Business going and I'll never forget? They looked at me and they said I don't know. From the Ramsey network is the entree viewership podcast where we help business leaders themselves, their teams, and their profits I'm your host Alex Judd and the answer to that question of where are we going is found in your organization's vision and today we talked to someone who's both a practitioner and teacher on this topic of clarifying and executing on a crystal clear vision today. We're talking with Michael Hyatt and Michael. Hyatt has had a lot of success in the arena of vision and growth with the company that is currently running. It's a lesson that he actually learned from a failure when he tried to start his first publishing house at thirty one years old. We started back in nineteen, eighty six, and we had the good fortune of publishing oral hershiser's biography. Now he was the themed Pitcher of the dodgers, and they had just won the world series. He was a household name. Everybody'd heard of him. The book rocketed to the top of the New York Times bestseller list and it was there for seven months. And so it brought in a ton of cash a lot of notoriety and thinks that happens. Is you become successful as you start attracting a lot of opportunities, but if you're not careful, opportunities or distraction, show up on your doorstep, and you can't tell the difference between opportunities and distractions so distractions masquerades opportunities, so it happened us, so we decided you know we were bulletproof. In everything we touched turned to gold, so we thought we'll publish. Reference Books will publish. Gift books will publish children's books. We've been published a large Bible project. The problem was it fractured our focus it. Our resources and that business went bust. And, the reason it happened was because we didn't have a vision that we're starting with. It would be akin to deciding. You're going to add an addition onto your house. And as long as the Home Depot truck shows up and keeps unloading lumber and sheet rock, and you just keep building adding on, and that's exactly what we did. There was no blueprint. There was no plan and we failed for lack of vision, which is exactly interestingly what the book of proverbs says that without vision the people perish. That is so fascinating and I think it's one of those things that. That in leadership, courses and classes and books. We read about it all the time. You have to have a vision. If you're going to be leader, but so often, it seems like they dismissed. Thing that no one knows what it actually is, so can you? Can you set the record straight right now? When you say you need to have a vision as a leader? What are you actually talking about? Not. Talking about is a vision statement. You know we've been told that we need to have this short. Brief almo, slogan or motto that we could put on a coffee Mug or that. We had put on a bumper sticker. Can't. That's not robust enough so when I talk about vision. I'm talking about a vision script, and specifically I mean at this way. It's a written document. That's three to five pages in length. Okay, so it's going to be more robust and pithy thing but something. That's really thoughtful. The describes a future state. It outlines a clear, inspiring, practical and attractive picture of your organization's, future. Here's it's fun. It describes reality as you see it. Three to five years from now. And it's written in the present tense as though it's already happened. Now when you begin to do that, will you begin to visualize something like that? Right in the present tense? That's the first process of creating anything. And I basically learned this process the big idea from Stephen, Covey who said begin with the end in mind. And so to start a business or even a department, that's a part of a large organization without a vision. Is kind of a fool's errand. Leadership leadership presupposes that you know where you're going. You're going somewhere. You know where you're going. But if you don't know where you're going, right, how can you lead anybody there? Yeah. It's gotTa start. With vision. You jumped into this four terms already clear, inspiring, practical and attractive. I want us to jump into kind of the tactical of what those words look like. You're just a bit, but I love the fact that you say that this is robust, so it's not a pithy statement is catching that vision. Is that something that comes from? Is it a skill that can be developed, is it? A wiring is a gifting as A. A personality trait because sometimes we call people visionary, and it just makes it seem like okay well. They're visionary, which means if I'm not a visionary than I can't do right. That's a lot of people. Give up before they start because they think of somebody like Steve Jobs. That's right, you know. He could stand up and not only hold the stage, but I mean he. Had you totally into that reality distortion zone. Actually vision you know. His wife famously said at his memorial service that Steve Not only saw reality clearly, but he saw what reality lacked. And why it was imperative to bridge that gap between what he saw, and what could be so every other cell manufacturer saw that the market was saturated that every cell phone that could possibly be invented had been invented besieged, said Nope I got a different idea, and it was the iphone. As we know it today,

Michael Hyatt Business Owner Steve Jobs Alex Judd Dodgers New York Times Home Depot Stephen Covey
A Developer's Summer, with Underscore David Smith

Mac Power Users

06:30 min | 5 d ago

A Developer's Summer, with Underscore David Smith

"Hello everyone this is David sparks joined by my fellow co-hosts Mr. Stephen Hackett I Stephen Hey David. How are you good I feel like this week is kind of putting the capper on our W. WDC coverage. Finished up last week, we were able to talk about quite a bit during the during ww see, and then we talked about our Betas last week this week. We thought we bring in somebody who has a unique and interesting perspective on it. Welcome back to the show David Smith. You it's A. It's a pleasure to be here I mean I was? It's an honor to be on power users so I'm glad to be able to kind of come in gas lend a developer perspective to all the announcements that we just had. Thinking that you'd be the perfect guest for it by pay, we just had him on and then I looked twenty seventeen, so. I don't know what happened there in my head, but The you know David you were telling me before the show started. How many wwe cs have you participated in a believe? This is number twelve for me and my first one is in two thousand and nine, and I've been essentially attended in some form ever ever since so it's been like this regular fixture in my family that as far as like in which. That's longer than my children have. Our old, so like from their perspective, daddy always disappears for a week in June like that's just a part of a part of life that I'm sure they expect happens to every father in the world. They just June is when they go to California, but that's. It was a very unusual year to just actually just stay at home and be here, but sort of not here. kind of station in the basement to a just a after shift myself to California time, and then also just there's so much to do. But generally speaking, it was definitely a different year than all the others that I've had the privilege of experiencing. As, someone who's been W. DC with you? I think we one year we stay together and the relay Commun-. The but I feel like you are somebody that really always. My observation takes advantage of WBZ. You're always hustling to get to meetings and and get the content and I feel like you are in my mind for lack of a better term, a lunch pail developer just show up and you get the work done, and I've always appreciate that about you. So, let's talk, you know. You watched it from home this year I guess That was that. It was different I. Mean on the one hand. It was kind of Nice to be able to like my wife set next to me on the Sofa and we questioned on our TV, and it was. It was kind of Nice to share that with her. Because while we sometimes, we'll do that for things like phone announcements, or you know other apple events throughout the year when I'm not in California You know she's heard me talk about WDC many times and WC announcements are the ones that I like kind of lose my mind and be super excited, and like it's in a way that is unusual that it's not. As to you know with an iphone announcement because a cool new camera that's kind of clear and accessible, but like I'm losing my mind over some minor thing that they just mentioned and she has no idea and it was kind of a fun thing. I think for us to be to share that But it was definitely a bit odd to. Then just like just like. I watched the Hino, and then I go and sit at my at my regular, my regular office and I can download all the Betas, and like get started right away rather than like frantically trying to eat like an awful box lunch in between the keynote in the state of the Union and then like sometime later somehow try and get the. Betas installed over Chino potentially and not so reliable Wi fi, and so like it was definitely a very different Monday for WGC than I'm used to though I kind of liked it like it was kind of Nice I felt like I was super productive like in a very intense way which? Definitely took the weekend to recover from, but it was. It was different, but in a good way I, think is the best summary for how serve the General Rafeal if WGC was for me. The general take wagon talking to developer friends. It's like it was a more more is week easier to get information easier to manage Betas and find out what exactly what's going on. You're not kind of in the thick of it. But it was less useful of direct access to apple engineers. Maybe I'd say from my experience like they had labs this year. Which is alive that typically WGC they have these big sessions where apple engineers are available to attendees who go into, ask your questions, which is the one time of year typically where you're able to interact with an apple engineer, because typically they're locked. Locked away in Cupertino and can talk about anything related to what they're working on, but this one week they get let out in are allowed to do that. And I was very curious to see what they did for. The labs experience this year and worked well like I think I attended five or six lives, and they were just kind of like voice. Conference calls I could share I could share my screen to to the call if I had some code I needed to show them or something. I wanted them to kind of look at and by and large. That process was actually very efficient, and from the kind of likes to the way they structured. It is I mean they were available to anyone who had a pay developer account so I. Don't Know How many people that is in the world, but it is almost certainly. Probably millions if not. Like tens of millions and it was just kind of you signed up. You submitted a question, and they had of reviewed them the day before and assigned to a lab based on as like, do you? Did you actually see Mike? You had a reason a question. That's useful and. Effective to answer, and it was to the asking esque, the right lab, or the right place and feuded, both those things like I was able to get my labs, and got my questions answered, and so that was actually kind of cool. I think only part. I missed was really like. You're talking about the sexting at the the relay commune. Having that kind of that sense of community and being around other people. Like the idea. Of being on site in San Jose was something that I certainly missed this year, and that's a tricky thing to quantify 'cause i. think in most other ways. The Co like the conference was better for being virtual like the session videos were better, and they were more accessible in the sense that they are available immediately to everybody they all have full transcripts that are searchable and so are accessible, just both from an ex. A accessibility perspective of perse people for people for whom listening to video is difficult. They have the transcript immediately available, and they can do. Watch close captioning as Equally accessible to everybody irrespective, if you have the means and the resources and the ability to go to saint, say or not you just if you have an Internet connection, you have exactly the same connection, and then like all the content was super polished

Developer California Stephen Hey David Apple Engineer David Smith David Sparks Mr. Stephen Hackett Chino Cupertino Hino San Jose Esque Mike WI
No magic wand for business email compromise (BEC)

Risky Business

03:23 min | Last week

No magic wand for business email compromise (BEC)

"Sadly, it's not possible just to waive some magic technology wand and Mike. Go Away is a complicated and diabolical problem but as a company with a specialty in email security per point is expected to at least help its customers and clients get on top of it now. Obviously, a lot of east stuff comes down to training and process and things like that right, so you can't just buy a product and it magically goes away, but there are things you can do as an email security provided to help right. So yeah in this conversation you'll hear us. Talk about about the problem and also about proof points approach in trying to minimize basie or try to make a dent in it. I'll drop you in here. Where Ryan is explaining that be scam is these days aren't necessarily trying to go fix giant paydays that can be clawed back right like there was that facebook one years ago with one stall. One hundred million people tend to notice, and you know they're not trying to do a million small payments, either it's really about hitting targets for just the right amount. He is Ryan Kalemba. It's really more about. About finding a sweet spot in between when it is too large to be easily transferable and too small to be economically meaningful, and what we're seeing now is a Q.. Twenty things like payroll, the version right payroll diversion. If you, if you add up the number of payroll diversion, social engineering attempts that we stop day, and just sort of multiply that by the average pay packet at millions and millions of dollars every day. But. It's those sorts of numbers that become really repeatable and really successful for the type of cybercriminals. We're talking about here. We're not talking about apex predators about something that is broadly democratized across the cyber criminal world, and is available to a huge number of groups operating worldwide. So what is the sweet spot in terms of monetary value? Right like where is the median level that you can do this and not set off fraud. Fraud controls. I guess you know. Let's do a step by step on how to do really good BC right. It is interesting because you have certain groups operating at scale where they really WANNA steal a few thousand at a time because they know that with a big company. That's just breakage, right? They're just GONNA call them at a minor loss and then move on. But that's it. There's a fair amount of them that are a little bit closer to the big game hunting trend to be ransomware side one. I, remember in particular was an organization, basically set up a very very convincing fake version of the contractor that was building a brand new hospital, and they spent months actually going back and forth before they knew a large payment was going to get moved, and then they knew actually how much time they'd have between the payment going through and somebody noticing the payment had not actually shown up yet and they social engineer. Engineer the payment to come across three weeks before the bill is actually do, and then they had three weeks to move that money in as many places as possible and none of that got recovered. So those are the ones and those kind of represent I think the two ends of the spectrum anyone who has as spectacularly unlucky or lucky as a as as what was the the Estonian Diner Lithuanian. They will also Indian guy that went after facebook and Google is probably on the wrong end of that spectrum, but that's just not happening that often lately.

Facebook Ryan Kalemba Engineer Fraud Estonian Diner Lithuanian Mike Basie Google
Undercover Robot Interview

Storynory

05:48 min | Last week

Undercover Robot Interview

"Hello, this is Bertie I'm here with some big news. I've written a book. That's just been published. It's called undercover robot my first year as a human, and when I say I've written it what I really mean is that I co wrote it with my old friend, what he's not that old, but his name is David Edmonds, so let me introduce you to my collaborator and friend. David, Hi, story, Neue I am a key data old, but anyway we'll pass over that, David. Perhaps you can tell the audience a little bit about undercover robot. Well undercover Bogut is about. About a girl could dotty and dot. He's eleven years old and the thing you need to know about doc- is that she's not actually a girl. She's a robot and she's been designed by a professor Catnip, who is kind of like a dad? And if Dottie can survive for a year at school without being identified uncovered as a robot, she and professor catnip will win a huge amount of money. She lives with professors. CATNIP family who don't know that she's a robot and at school. Most people are taken in, but there's one boy, isn't there? Who's really onto her? Yes there's a guy called Martin strange. Who is trying to expose her and I should explain that it. You actually spot low Bot and identify the robot correctly you win ten thousand dollars, so people are on the lookout to see who might be global in their school. It turns out that there were five robots around the world who are trying to win this prize. And there were people trying to out them. Okay, so I haven't mentioned this yet but David. You're a philosopher onto you and you've published quite a few books. Some of them bestselling books on philosophy and book has. Has Quite a lot of philosophy in it, doesn't it? It's got a lot of philosophy quite well hidden, but the basic issue is quite philosophical, which is where a robot can actually be like a human. Is there something special about human beings that means loobox never copied them, or could really brilliantly designed and built low bought actually not only pretend to be like a human being, but to all intents and purposes be just like a human being, because dotty is very nearly like a human being, but she gets a few things wrong and Some of those things raise lots of questions. Questions in philosophy. What about Dadis first meal at the CATNIP family? How can just having SOPA raise philosophical questions we'll dottie gets into trouble very early on because she doesn't understand etiquette that you're supposed to put your knife in the light hand and the folk in the left hand least in British culture, the old thing about etiquette is that in other societies they do things differently, so it seems a bit different for morality, so for example pretty much every society people think it's wrong to murder somebody, but in different societies, people have different kinds of approaches to meals and food in some. Some societies you're supposed to burp loudly to show your appreciation. which little girl in the story does, doesn't she? The little cabinet goal does BURP and dotty Kapisa dotty copies. dotty assumes that that's what you're supposed to do. dotty can't quote workout which rules a supposed to be universal, which will supposed to apply to the whole world, and which rules exposed to apply just a maybe British society, or maybe just to the catnip household where she lives because at school there, lots and lots of rules aren't there and lots and lots of detentions it. It's a very strict school and dotty has. To navigate the school as well, but she doesn't want to be too good, because if she's good and doesn't get into any trouble. That would be suspicious. That will be like not a normal kid fact. She has a misbehavior quota, doesn't she? She's allowed to misbehave. I can't remember that eight percent of the time or twenty percent of the time we discussed it a lot, but of course she overshoots a quota quite a bit and gets into lots and lots of trouble. Yes, she also has to get what her designers programmers called friendship point she has. has to try and make friends with people in her class to show that she's capable of meaningful human interactions. There's a girl Kohana. WHO's quite a rebel who becomes her friend? But there others that she really annoys like Cindy Low, isn't there? I mean most people find quite lovable, but she can be a bit irritating sometimes. Yes, she can sometimes take it literally, which other people find really annoying. humor is sometimes be off, so she sometimes doesn't get palms, and at least the early stages. She's not very good at picking up the subtleties of human. Human Interaction and that's why she gets into so much trouble. We're not going to say everything, but it does build up to a very big climax, and some really crazy stuff starts to happen almost surreal stuff that you as a philosopher I believe. Call a thought experiment. You know if you imagined this crazy thing could happen. What would that mean to philosophy? Yes, store a few thought experiments, the something that happens when dottie is in a zoo and wild animal escapes, and it looks like it's GonNa head for and possibly injured possibly even kill a bunch. Bunch of kids and don't has to decide very quickly where we should try to strap the bear, and pointed as it were in another direction, but the problem with doing that is that it would put other people at danger. Fewer people sadate estimate this decision wherever to save thirty lights, but at the cost of paps, killing five people, and not just any five people as it happens to people she would endanger would be members of the family that she lives with

David Edmonds Professor Dottie Catnip Bertie Neue Bogut Dadis Cindy Low Murder Martin
"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

01:52 min | 4 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"I will canvass this number of times and no more and that way sort of set yourself limit so that you have because this is not actually sprint. This is the this is going to be a marathon. You know the twenty twenty election is not the end of politics And we have to keep doing this literally for the rest of our lives. So I I really suggest remembering that. You sometimes need to leave you know. Leave yourself a little strength or as the Internet. Likes to say more spoons for for later on down the road So feel free to like you know set set some boundaries for yourself who I would just close by saying. I heartily agree with both Kelly and Sophie. I would say I guess That I do think that twenty twenty at least in my lifetime which is long one at this point More important by far than any other election I've ever seen so I kind of have tried to take for myself and obviously you have to give yourself time the respite take for myself. This notion that We do have to fight as hard as we can and work as hard as we can this year for the sake of everybody and not to be corny. But certainly we among us you particular. So I'm the note that we're all in this together we're going to take care of each other And on this first anniversary of voter in thank you all for listening in. Please do send us your thoughts about what we're doing and how we should do it and We'll just move along so thanks to everyone. Vote in segment is a collaboration of two broad talking politics and author Rebecca side. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band? Immune ARY and we're using it with permission of the band..

Kelly ARY Rebecca side Sophie
"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

15:04 min | 4 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Everybody? You know I think it closer talks a lot about things like mental health you know and is that are these things working for for you. The voter at the person on the ground. I want to be fighting. Not because I want you know that fancy house in DC. Not because I want you know. There's the fancy pen I get to sign laws with but because I want to help you and I want to make your life better and I think that that's an argument. That women can make very powerfully. Because that's what women do. In general I is is fight Four people and is is how people you know in you you think about this as as MOMS chromos. Teachers is lawyers end and so. I think that they can make that really compelling argument and I think that that really gets voters motivated I agree and I think really to put the emphasis on On the what? You said that some people say that this is working. But it's not working for you and I can see that because I think there's a big sort of energy in the mid West right now feeling left behind. I think that's been happening for like the past twenty or thirty years particularly in areas where people feel like okay. The rest of the world is doing fine. But everybody's forgotten about my little town in the midwest everybody's forgotten about us and we're not doing so well and I think speaking to those people and saying you know what all these people in Washington are saying. Oh the economy is so great but like is it. Because you're not doing. Wow because farmer suicides. An all time high in Wisconsin. So obviously like things are going well for you. Tell me more about how I can help you. I think that's a really effective message to say I see you. Even though other people might be doing fine I see you and I care about you. You know one of the things. I talk about this in my book. Voter was the importance of in lots of other people. Of course we've talked about this true about building. Alliances among women across class and race lines and in order to get what we need in order to be helped in the way that we need to be. And you know it's an ongoing challenge. There is still data about. I don't know how good it is and we'll see as the race unfolds about Y Women Not Favoring Democratic candidate necessarily. I think it's sort of too early to be dispositive about that but I do think that we're seeing you know. A lot of women vote for the male candidates in this race. There's no reason so far and that may continue to be true so one of the questions. That's come up in these last few days prominently in the press is whether it's time For either warring or kosher or both of them to quit the presidential race and needless to say I'm not speaking to the mayor's bad idea at all but as politicians of course they have to consider what what they're hearing from the media and otherwise and and how they Preserve their brands so to speak and their point of view and I sort of thought it might be fun for us to think about this because it doesn't often happen. They happen for sort of everyday people. I gotTA quit this job. No we just put our heads down you know and keep trying to work harder but say you you know. Kelly say you were in senator clover shirts shoes or Senator Warren shoes. Neither of whom has one So far in both of whom have a big challenge ahead of them in South Carolina How would you? How would you evaluate that matter repeat? Let me quit while I'm ahead and TRY TO POSITION MYSELF. For instance say to BP. I think the answers different for the two of them not so much because of their standing in the polls or anything like that but because of the the lanes that they inhabit because the moderate lean is so much more crowded right now in this race. I think that I if I were Senator Klobuchar I would think seriously about whether people rightly or wrongly think that she is standing in the way of a moderate gaining consensus. And then you people a lot of people really want somebody to beat Bernie and you know. So if because she's in that more crowded lane if she is in the way of that you know. It's it's possible that that would sort of hurt her brand at some point that maybe she stayed in the race too long. You know we can to beat all day whether that is actually true or not whether that game theory makes sense. But I think that there's a perception of that. And so if she let's say were to leave the race and endorsed Joe Biden. Who seems like you know of the the moderates may be the one who could who could pull it off? You know maybe that does give her You know whether a VP spot for him or somewhere in his cabinet. You know. I I could see that being very valuable for her. I'm not sure that there's as much of an argument For Senator Warren to drop out. Because I'm not sure what it gets her and I'm not sure that it helps this project that everyone wants to beat Bernie because they think of Warren drops out half her voters might go to Bernie and then that actually helps him so you know. I don't know that it positions her quite as well and may be staying in the race and being the fighter the person to take down. Bloomberg is is what positions her better for you know a VP slot or a position in a cabinet or just being able to stay in the Senate and she could work there. So I don't necessarily think it's the same answer for both of them but I. I do think that it's something they need to be thinking about seriously You know I don't want them to drop out of the race. You know I said the other day like my choices. Two through eight have already dropped out and you know. I don't want more of my first place choices to drop out but I think it's something that they need to consider a specially if there is widespread panic rightly or wrongly about Bernie cutting the nomination. I This is interesting. I agree with you that it's different for both of them and I agree. It's because of the lanes but my conclusion is the opposite that because the moderate lane is so crowded. I'M NOT SURE WHO. Amy Klobuchar would know to endorse or to negotiate with whereas Elizabeth Warren clearly. She's a line on the left with Bernie and so she could go to Bernie and say. Hey if I drop out. Can you guarantee me? Xyz And then that materially helps Bernie if amy drops out. It's not entirely clear to me who that helps. Does it help Bloomberg does it help. Biden doesn't help Buddha judge and so for her. It's a lot going to be a lot harder to figure out. Who are you negotiated with you? Are you going to go all three of them and say if I drop out? Will any of you give me this? I mean for her. I I think that would be a harder decision so for for me I think. Yeah that is a very. I mean. They're both really smart analyses. I I agree with pieces of both. I would add one other thing to this. I guess from the vantage point of My own involvement going back aways one of the most important things that happened For African Americans in presidential primaries was of course the fact that Jesse Jackson stayed in and he stayed in and he ran again for years. Later and my recollection. I don't have these numbers in front of me. Is that at the end of the Democratic primaries I think in the second campaign he had received twenty percent or so of people's votes that was enormous. That had never happened before it shows the strength of him personally but certainly of an African American candidate and their viability. And you know. I think that that's an instructive lesson. for both Senators as we are in this place this year and go forward a wanted to turn for a minute to this point about the vice presidency and talk quickly about that and then I think we're gonNA WANNA close today's episode with a little bit of Inspirational what's next to do discussion. But you know. Obviously there's been lots of discussion in this whole context about Some people saying that a woman vice presidential is really important other saying not so much. Certainly Stacey Abrams yourself. Right out there a couple of weeks ago. Think she'd be happy to be the candidate with anyone Kamala Harris has been Significantly more circumspect but then of course if it's the case as we've just discussed You know there are other Women who could be considered for that spot not only senator warm and Senator Klobuchar. Certainly you know other members of the Senate or governor. That spot has a history of being considered by presidential candidates for a range of people. So I just was curious about kind of what you're nearing so to speak on your respective streets about this aspect of things. Well Rachel Bitta coffer has said that she thinks that Stacey Abrams is the should be the VP. Pick for any of them who are left And you know I can definitely see that. I love soup runs. I think she is incredibly inspirational. I think her as Rachel Offers. Her charisma is just extra. Think it's hard to even measure but you know I don't know. I think that that would make a lot of sense. I think that would be a good pick. She certainly has the the the chops of of being out there doing the work. And so I think that would be good. I think that the a lot of the so-called k. high of the Communist supporters still have not settled on a candidate. There's sort of reluctantly deciding to vote for someone you know. Some of them were in some of them Biden. And I think that you could get an awful lot of them really excited and a and a lot of them. Are you know people who are happy to give a lot of money into a ton of work and so I think you know comma could be a very strategic pick a you know a across the board as well and I think it helps that? California is a pretty safe place for us to be taking a senator out of you know. We're we're not gonNA have to worry about losing that Senate seat it'll still go to a democrat. So I think in that case you know. Kamla might be a really good pick. Although she'd be an excellent attorney general to if that was the thing that she was interested in doing in the future so I could easily see either one of them. And I think I I'm I'm going to be deeply uncomfortable with the Democratic ticket is all white and so I think that you know in that case. Both of them would would help with that issue as well. I think that you know as much as I would love to see Warren As VP of she is not president. I do think that taking somebody in Massachusetts where there is a Republican governor. And you know we could at least short term end up with a Republican senator in that seat I think could be Kinda Frisky so you know. I think we need to think about those sorts of issues as well But you know I. I'm all for the Stacy Harris as VP to literally anybody. Well I'm fairly sure that in Massachusetts you actually have to have a special election. They're not gubernatorial early appointed. Yeah it would be derby a few month gap at least well. There was an appointed person so I wanted to say here that I saw a data point earlier today and in another context which I think is important to what we're doing here in to all our listeners are doing it was about The fact that In the last few years I forget the actual time period only fourteen percent of any exhibits in major museums. Were of women artists that made me think about political pundits which who of course are overwhelmingly male as well and and overwhelmingly white so I wanted to say to our listeners. That well of the three of us. Don't pretend to be totally knowledgeable on this subject. I think it's really important for us to have this conversation. Among ourselves among women who do pay attention who do care and who are thinking hard about this and so that's the context in which We had this discussion today And I just wanted to close it with The notion that You know of course. The most important thing for us all to do is to stay mobilized There's an argument for focusing on whatever candidate matters the most to you or if not playing the odds. I've started getting phone calls from friends asking me about that. Because they don't want to waste their time or their vote. But what we do want to say to you here is just. Please stay mobilized active. Do everything you can killing and Sophie. Any final on that this is something will be returning to for sure but I think it's also important for people to remember that as important as the top of the ticket is. It's not the only part of the ticket and so you know. If in the end your favorite candidate is not nominee that will certainly be the case for some percentage of the people listening here that you know. Find Down Ballot race. That is exciting to find a woman running for state legislature governor. Something that you're really excited about passionate about and knock on doors and increase turnout for that down. Ballot candidates will also increase turnout for the ballot. So you can. You can go out there and be motivated whether or not. The actual presidential nominee is the one who inspires you. I agree and I want to put in a plug as well for pacing yourself I see a lot of people that I know who got active in politics. Oppose Twenty Sixteen. Who you know a little crazy for the midterms really got into it? And burn themselves out and now are feeling horribly guilty It's okay to symptoms not be able to take on everything. I find it more helpful to sort of budget out my time and say okay. I will write this number of postcards every week and no more. I will donate this amount of money every month. And no more. I will canvass this number of times and no more and that way sort of set yourself limit so that you have because this is not actually sprint. This is the.

Bernie senator VP Senator Klobuchar Elizabeth Warren Senate Joe Biden Bloomberg Massachusetts Senator Warren DC Washington Wisconsin South Carolina Stacey Abrams Rachel Bitta Kamala Harris Stacy Harris Jesse Jackson
"one year" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

11:08 min | 8 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"This is Josh Barrow. Welcome to left right and center. You're civilized yet provocative antidote to the self-contained opinion bubbles dominate political debate. It is the first week of November our and this week. The New York Times made a lot of liberals nervous new high-quality battleground state polls from the time. Paint a picture of a close twenty twenty election sending sending a different message from the national polling. We see more often with big leads for Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders. Part of the message here is that trump's electoral college advantage appears to be widening that whatever trends are happening in the suburbs that continue to weaken Republicans with part of their traditional base. Then maybe taking away. Votes in Texas or even more votes in California -Fornia but in Pennsylvania Michigan Wisconsin. Those effects aren't as important things remain close. And you could conceivably see. Donald trump be reelected while losing the popular vote road by an even wider margin than he lost last time and that has a lot of Democrats wondering what they need to do in this primary to prevent that from happening. We're GonNa talk about that later today. And how you should think about polls so far in advance election but now let's bring in our left right and center panel as always. I'm your center. I'm joined by rich lowry editor of National Review on the right and on the leftist Sabil Rahman of Demos. We also have a special guest today Oreo Edwards Levy who is reporter and pulling editor at Huffpost. Hello everyone hey josh. Hi everybody so There were elections on Tuesday in a few states. We can talk about twenty nine thousand nine elections before we turn to twenty twenty And Republicans did hold onto the governorship in Mississippi By about six points points but in Kentucky Republican incumbent Matt Bevin lost despite a last-minute assist from president trump who rallied for him in the state. Andy Bashir won that Election Kentucky succeeding where other Democrats have failed in two ways. He held onto port of the ancestral democratic base in Appalachian Eastern Kentucky. which is otherwise swung hard toward Republicans? Any made inroads in one strongly Republican suburbs of Louisville and Cincinnati. The suburbs also delivered for Democrats in Virginia giving the Party control of both chambers of the state legislature sure and therefore full control of that state's government for the first time in decades Sabil. What lessons do you see in these results as Democrats look to next year so a couple of things jump out out I is this is a pretty important result for the Democrats right. You have a really important shift in Virginia now with the TRIFECTA that's going to change the politics and the policies command that state. And when you compare Virginia Kentucky this move in the suburbs that you're describing really is a strong pattern across the different states We'll see there also is a similar move move happening in rural counties to in the direction and I'm sure we'll talk about that in a moment The other thing is that you know there is a grain of salt rate. It's twenty one thousand nine. It's off your election It's hard to extrapolate national trends. So it's this isn't quite the same as the precursor to twenty eighteen But it is a strong result for the Democrats rich. When you look at Virginia Democrats it felt like we're having a rough year in Virginia. You know you had the the black face scandal with the governor and the other black face scandal with the attorney general and rape accusations against the Lieutenant Governor And some Democrats in the legislature and the governor staking out a position on abortion that Republicans thought was very extreme outrage. The median voter. None of that seems to to have stopped the steady forward march of Virginia becoming a blue state. Yes this marshes right word. It's a trend. That's been going on for a long time. Has To do with demographic changes ages in the state state becoming better educated more suburban more diverse so the whole divide seeing now between the suburbs and more rural working class voters. It's something that's been going on for quite a long time. And trump has just accelerated it and he's His conduct is repellent. Want to a lot of of former Republicans in the suburbs especially women or the question and we'll get stressed this in a little bit as whether he can do what he didn't. Twenty sixteen draw. Aw a A broadly are radioactive. Released E- easy to make radioactive opponent and take off enough of the edge in in the suburbs to just barely over the top again. Arielle is the national story. That simple as you know re Republicans keep doing worse in especially inner suburbs and Democrats. Democrats keep doing worse in rural areas. And if that is the story is that an even trade between the two parties I mean I think that is in large part what we are seeing across the country and you know I think that can obscure event. There will always be things happening in a particular race in particular level. I mean you saw that in Kentucky where certainly considerations that were not national politics obviously. That's it gubernatorial race where it's a little bit of a different story in terms of how much which partisanship is going to influence people's votes but you are seeing these broader demographic trends of these areas sorting themselves out more and more and you. You know we'll see whether that ends up evening out and whose favor that is rich. The governor's Arial notes. There were some specific local factors. Matt Bevin was not the best like person including institutionally in the Republican Party in Kentucky. He tried to defeat Mitch McConnell and a primary if years ago so after this close result he lost by about five one thousand votes. He's basically said he's not going to concede he thinks there were regularities. He wants a canvas. Maybe he's going to contest the election first of all. What are you like he lost? What do you make of him coming out and saying that and then also I mean what do you make of the response of the Republican Party in Kentucky which has been mostly to sort of ignore him and say well he lost the five thousand votes is not a a a lot in the scheme of things but recount are- canvas sincere? A scenario is huge and the chances overturning that are extremely minimal basically impossible muscle so i. I don't like the trend we saw stacey. Abrams Georgia as well. You lost please be gracious about it. It's a very tough thing. Personally it's hard to take but go away and don't tell us for years afterwards. How you were truly? The winner. Went clearly weren't beal. I as I I hear Democrats worrying what about you. Know what is true. IS TRUMP GONNA admit he lost if he loses the two thousand twenty election and this I. I've not been very worried about that. For reasons. That are are playing out on the Ground Kentucky. which is you know you can say? I didn't lose. I didn't lose and that can be irrelevant if other people won't go along with it and it looks to me here. You know the partly I think you know as noting five thousand votes as a lot if it was five hundred votes we might see see a different situation but also it's peril to trump and that you have an executive who the other institutional elements in the party never really wanted in charge and there's a part of them that I'm I'm sure is just you know pleased to be done with them. Yeah I mean I think I think that's a hopeful Lesson I hope you're right taking the model of of Kentucky I look. Here's the here's the challenge. In some ways that the the decision making factor here is going to be the rest of the institutional right. What the party things right? If the Party doesn't go along with it then and it just becomes sort of a slightly embarrassing stance on the part of the losing candidate and it goes away and our democracy proceeds in democracy only works if both sides recognize the legitimacy the results right and so so I think I think in that sense. You are right what I worry about is when we talk about the impeachment scenarios there there is such a strong strong incentive at the moment for the institutional powerbrokers of the Republican Party disarray fall in line with the president that that's where I would put more concern right presents going to do what he's GonNa do. We always has but at what point does the rest of the party decide. You know what the rules are the rules we have We have other people. We can put forward in an electoral contest. Then we don't need to keep following this train. Well let's talk about impeachment I think that's a that's a good time for us to talk about impeachment Rich there's there's an article in the New York Times This week about an emerging defense dance that house. Republicans are talking about I as it becomes clearer that there was some sort of quid pro quo here around Ukraine ambassador Gordon. Sunland has changed his mind. He refreshed his recollection and and said. Oh Yeah I did. I did tell the Ukrainians they would have to make this public statement about investigating the Biden's in order to get the release of the military aid and so Republicans are talking about the possibility of saying essentially that these guys were freelancing. Yes somehow a message got to the Ukrainians that there was this quid pro quo that but maybe trump never authorized them to send that message. Maybe he didn't want breath after all. Trump's specifically denied Senator Ron Johnson that he had proposed a quid pro quo and especially in. The case of Rudy Giuliani. Maybe he was even acting for for his own independent financial interests. He had all these business interests in Ukraine. Maybe he was using his position. Close to the president to push his own agenda. And that's where this quid pro quo idea came from in. The president is innocent. It and I think in that context. It's worth considering a tweet. That Rudy Giuliani sent. This week that looks outwardly. Like defensive the president but I'm not sure it is. He says the investigation I conducted concerning 2016 two thousand sixteen Ukrainian collusion and corruption was done solely as a defense attorney to defend my client against false charges unquote. So is it a viable defense into the president to basically throw rudy. Giuliani under the bus. And say you know whatever. These people did. The president did authorize them to do that. Because it certainly sounds like Giuliani is going to say no. I did this in my capacity as the president agent. Yes I say a couple of things one. There's a glimmer of an opening for this defense. Because most people we've heard from so far really almost all the people we've heard from so far Had what trump was thinking second or third hand because they weren't the insiders which is more Bolton Mo- Vini Giuliani and it's entirely plausible. That Giuliani and important respects was freelancing but I think that would have to do more with his business dealings in Ukraine. So it's just hard to believe. Leave that that these guys got this cooked up this idea on on their own. How how did the defense aid get withheld? According to and trump mentioned on the call talked to Rudy. which again is an indication that he and rudy are on the on the same board on the soap a month ago When it was still pretty early I had a theory that it might defense? I offered tentatively that maybe there was the intention of quid. Pro Quo. Never really got to the Ukrainian so it's clear at least it got the Ukrainians and I still. I know you're skeptic Josh by so think Defense Republican senators will end up falling back on. is they got the money. And they didn't make a statement about investigations. Well so the bill. This is. This is the sideshow Bob Defense. You know the you know attempted murder. There's no there's no noble prize for Attempted Chemistry Right But that in the simpsons. That's a joke like is it. Is it really good enough to say well. You know the president didn't get away with it and therefore no harm no foul. Yeah I think it any fifth-grader recognizes just how paper thin excuses is. You know won't get you very far in in the real world and we'll get you very far year. It's it's it's not an excuse. Use It all right. Of course the the the the point is in the attempt and I agree with what Richard I mean. Excuse the freelancing. Excuse this each week. There's a new sort of angle right right and they all kind of keep falling down one after another in large part because of stuff that the president and Giuliani and others keep saying on live. TV and on twitter from their own mouths. So you know. It's it is kind of absurd so I know you hate this question rich but I so this still isn't impeachable and I ask again. I wanted to because of that. Giuliani tweet..

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:40 min | 8 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

12:29 min | 8 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"The kind of Voters that might have even been part of the trump coalition in the states or whether the Democratic Party by being true to its principles and and kind of more liberal vision can blow low through turnout models change the shape of the electorate in those six dates and other places with a kind of Warren or sanders type candidate. I have a question about the the idea of how significant this poll is a year out nate cones the Times reporter. Who did the palm talking about? It said hey a year out is is basically just as good as right before the election and then need silver. The grew fivethirtyeight said polls a year out like not not that not that that reality based not that important. What's the answer here? I first of all the answer is the pollinger is need to get different first names. It's too confusing to have both nate Cohn silber ever be named nate. Just a problem to actually. I feel like natone nate. Cohn has has. I Know Nate Cohn I've met needs over a couple of times. Cocoon is definitely riding on the coattails of nate silver. He's like oh where's the what's Hot Poli Name. It's nate. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa glommed onto that and the time hired him you don't offense would appreciate the answer to this John. One of these polls year out matter don't matter there's a general principle and then I don't know I didn't see what nate silver of fivethirtyeight sad I did read in The Times. The idea the statement that I and I have a note here go check checking out and see if that's in fact true or if there's like some important caveat but yeah the the the article that went along with the polling said that on average in the last three cycles head to head polls Aguirre ahead of the election have been as close to the final result as those taken the day before The final result I just say like tweet. You know what Posey are out there. But I'm not sure will first of all there aren't polls taken the day before I don't think right because the polls released as the deport but anyway the broader more important point is so much changes in happens. You can't I mean you can set. You can say that. That's been what they result in the the past has been but if there's an instance in which past performance does not predict future results in this current political environment. I think that would be wise to keep in mind in that in that context But I do think the idea that if the electoral college is still in play a in our presidential elections than it is important to look at the at the states that will that will matter Attar with respect to the Electoral College. So I think looking at these six states Makes Sense and then we should probably turn to this idea of what's the actual electric look like. And then WHO's best setup to make the case that electric I thought what was the most interesting thing. Innate cones piece accompanying this story about. His poll was noting. What what kind of people seem to be supporting Biden but not Warren or Warren but not Biden and yeah and that you have the categories of for example? There's sanders seems to pick up a bunch of young voters when you poll who don't want to then vote for Wariner Biden and Biden seems to pick up Like a lot of people who don't seem to WanNa vote for a woman. For example there seems to be a lot of just out and out cold stone sexist in the electorate which was horrified to read forty percent of the people there are six percent of the electorate is by not Warren and forty percent of them was answering yes to questions that made them seem like sexist Texas questions about the ability of Warren and female candidates in general. But and I've said this before but this is basically votes in the Democratic primaries and caucuses are going to be about punditry about what your neighbour thinks so you know Democrats are are by wide majorities fine with having a woman president but they don't think that their fellow Democrats Democrats are fine with having a woman president which means when they vote or the casting vote for the person they think should do the job or they doing the casting vote for the person they think. We'll have the best chance in general unroll action because of people's predispositions about women and that's what a mess that isn't trying to sort that out. Good luck with that. John What do you make of the fact that so this. The poll a swing states included the six states Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan Carolina Florida Arizona. It did not include Georgia Texas and Ohio. which are an an Iowa? So I think the presumption being that Ohio an Iowa are now basically Republican states. And it's going to be. They're not really swing states and that but also there's this at least conversation that I hear among people that Georgia and Texas are potentially in play and Arizona certainly played. Do I guess it means it's it's it's making taking some bats on two things one. Is that basically. The shape of the electric highway in Ohio is just Democrats are never gonNA do well enough to reach far enough into the white working class voters in those states or white borough voters in Iowa to beat. Also you've got you've got a Senate race in Iowa that'll with an incumbent Republican that'll tweak things for the for the Democrats and so although by the way we should note but just as a farm state. Here's we should talk about this. If you look inside the Republican coalition it seems to me. Democrats would have some opportunities. Let's talk about role voters for a moment. Bankruptcies for farms are going to be as high as they as they've ever been in two thousand nineteen the bail out to the farmers is now bigger net- net- than the bail out of the car companies under the Obama Administration because of the fight with China and the tariff battles with with with other countries if you were compelling candidate Who could make the case to a rural voters and you believed and again? We're there's some. There's there's some things implicit in what I'm saying that some people don't believe because some people leave these voters are gone at. It's all about identity not economics in there for. Why should Democrat spend a lot of time doing that but back to your basic point David? The Republican coalition has those two states and the Democrat. Coalition doesn't have enough in Georgia and Texas that this cycle. They'll be able to make inroads inroads if you believe in a warren kind of candidacy a pure base rile the base up candidacy which is essentially what trump is running on the republican side. You could try to make a case as for Georgia and taxes but the problem is if you run heavy towards turning out the liberal coalition in those states you would weaken your ability so goes the theory in six states that are are that are closest and that's another reason they picked these six that have a more mixed Electorate as the time sees it and most people only last question on this this topic so John Eight in New York magazine. Some Subsection York magazine. I can't remember which one concludes that the leftward tilt of the Democrat. Kennedy is turning out to be a disaster that they've lost touch with medium voters. They desperately need to get back to the center before they find themselves with unelectable candidate. Is it the case Warren and Sanders or essentially given themselves iron crosses. They've hung iron crosses around their neck for the general election. I find myself wishing that more mourn had not come up with a Medicare for all tax plan like really wish that she had just said. It'll be magic which is what Republicans say all the time but their plans. It's always like oh it'll be. Bajic could economic growth magic. She'll she'll be able to run away from that or is it really something that is going to drag her. I mean people move to the The ideological edge of their parties in primaries right Republicans moved to the right Democrats moved to the left the ideas and you tack to the Center and the general election. There's there's plenty of time. I do wonder about what these candidates are thinking in terms of not sticking with the most popular positions now now. Obviously Warren wants to be able to attract Bernie Sanders voters. And you know I with zero reporting. You could imagine that she is trying to make sure sure that. If and when Zander's drops out he full-throatedly endorses her and so she becomes the candidate of the left. I also think she believes in Medicare for all and yet. There is so much that these Democratic candidates could do for healthcare or for example on immigration with a path to citizenship. That is broadly popular happyhiller. That one wonders whether it would be politically wiser to stick to those positions. I mean this is a question that people like Maddock laziest at Fox have been asking for months and and when they put up the poll numbers every time it looks pretty persuasive to me. As just a matter of pragmatic politics looks for Jason Fitz sticking with broadly sadly popular positions that are more centrist. And that actually could become law would be smarter like we are not going to immediately have medicare for all so we're having They're taking Warren and Sanders. Particularly Warrant are taking a big political risk for something that doesn't seem particularly reality based and so then does it. Is it really necessary. Ray was so this is as you quite rightly pointed out. This is always the problem with primaries. It's why people have Think the primaries are part of the reason. Our politics are so messed up because everybody has to get into a very not only far left but also detached debate as a way to signal to their electorates that they are more pure than the next wchs person to your point emily about the environments can look like a year from now. Let's imagine a Democrat wins. Okay so Democrat wins. If they win it will have been on a restoration ticket which is to say. We're going to fix things post. Donald trump that gives you a huge to do is just start the the day. Okay before you get to Medicare for all you've got a lot of stuff to do to restore store and by the way most of it's going to be overseas and some large portion of it's going to be secret so there's that second of all the the intervening election over the year next year is is going to be scorched earth. So how you're GonNa get this through a medicare for all through Congress even through trying to use reconciliation after that year seems a more unlikely really than even would be today. As you quite rightly said Emily you go to you go to the left or you go to the left the right in your primaries and come back to the middle but that also depends on a you know. Politics has changed a little bit in terms of the Public Square. When you can make that case that you're not exactly the person you ran in the primaries as being it's harder to do that now secondly which should these candidates has the facility and ability to make that case or do they keep stepping on there? You know there are other shoes tied together. And so that's one question. Can they even get back back to that position. And then the question is what do you guys think that position looks like in the general election for a Democrat to to either undermine the president's coalition or to build success in areas like the suburbs Where you've seen some of these opportunities for Democrats are I cannot let the segment paths John on without noting what is surely the most important electoral result from Tuesday surprising result out of New Haven Connecticut which just elected in nineteen eighteen year old a nineteen year old one? It's all doors and this nineteen year old one a staggering ninety percent of the vote. What do you make of the overwhelming mandate mandate one by? Eli Sabin whose mother is noted political commentator Emily Babylon just how significant do you feel victory for the future of the republic. Well fortunately playing for for all those people who feel jittery about the state of the future and the state of the Republic really about whether there is verifiable truth fin these troubled times that we live in. Now I think not just the people in the In the quiet suburbs of new haven and the urban centers of that city but also really across the country in the world can find themselves Sleeping easier now as a result of that Outcome Emily Mazal Tov. Congratulations on on your son's victory. Thank you my son is now in our city council. So it's GonNa be really interesting to watch. Ally is so excited and thrilled. We get listeners. Have our annual conundrum show coming up live at the Fox theater in Oakland California December eighteenth and have been very exciting announcement which we have a great guest as you know every year we try to get a very wise philosophical minded person to help us solve conundrum for you this year no different we have an amazing guest Adam. Savage of mythbusters is going to join us at the Fox theater on December eighteenth. No one has done a keener analysis of the true questions. Americans Fret about about the real myths and blowing up the real myths. He's so funny and smart and interesting and I'm so excited he's going to join us..

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

13:49 min | 8 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Me visually but not physically. Is Emily Baz Lan of the New York Times magazine looking at over over skype. Hello Emily although although David Jail how are you. I'm good glad to be here and then joining me not visually but telephonically John dickerson of CBS. Sixty minutes from New York New York Hello John dickerson. Hello David I Is it telephonically. Come come on God interesting radio telephone telephonic. Oh my God you're dripping. You're being pedantic already on. Today's Gabfest election results in Kentucky and Virginia and bold and Democrats and then there are discouraging poll results in swing estates for Democratic presidential candidates then impeachment barrels forward. What happened this week? What is about to happen? And then president trump withdraws ause the United States from the Paris climate accord is that catastrophic or merely terrible plus. You'll have cocktail chatter one year from this this week we will have elected a new president or possibly the same president and this week we saw the last major elections before twenty twenty in a bunch of states that weirdly weirdly have off your elections which are always cute but confusing. Because you're like it's an odd year. Why is there an election? But it's still nice to have and then we also saw some very interesting gene and if you're a Democrat alarming poll results for Democratic primary challenges. So let's start with With the two thousand nine hundred John in the Commonwealth of Virginia cradle title of the Republic the cradle in fact John Dickerson. Democrats took control of the State Senate in the State House Why is that important? Why is it overdue isn't important and overdue? Well I think it's it's important. Well it's for the first time in fifty years so that's when any any time anything for the first time in fifty years you should take note of it. Basically most people would say what this does is it ends the charade that Virginia is not a blue state you know it went from being red to purple to blue and so they're saying that it's that it's Now a blue state and that. I don't know what I think about that debate. That's fine you can have that debate the most interesting thing. It seems to me about Virginia Virginia to the two most important results are first of all that the that Republicans did not win back the seats that they lost in two thousand seventeen when Democrats. It's had strong showings in Republican areas and then Democrats won in additional areas to take control over The two state houses you you now have the to stay two houses in the governorship all insane party which means there's going to be a series of series of legislation passed in Virginia on On Gun Control Troll in particular that'll be Very interesting to watch. Why is that interesting because of the second thing so the first point is Democrats are showing strength? Republicans weakness is in the exurbs the areas out suburbs outside. And that's something we'll talk a lot about because it was also strong for Democrats in Kentucky in the argument is that if it's been strong consistently gently in two thousand eighteen and twenty nineteen that's bad for Donald Trump. But the second thing that's important in Virginia's it's the home of the NRA the forces of gun control gun safety fifty. Whatever you WANNA call it basically now have beaten the NRA in their own backyard? That would mean a lot for gun legislation in Virginia and for the For for the everytown organization it. It's a model for inroads. They might be able to make in other states emily quickly. Let's also hit the. I think probably the other our big state for Democrats. This week was Kentucky where the Democrat in a very red state beat the extremely hated. Incumbent Governor Matt Bevin then in a state where president trump campaign and try to tie the Democrat Anti Bashir to impeachment trump had won the state by thirty Republicans. Want every single single other statewide office. that was up is Bevan's loss a warning trumper not really. Is it just like a particular particular set of circumstances with an extremely bad and hated incumbent. I think more of the latter you know. I wonder if people think differently friendly about the governor in some circumstances than the sort of normal party polarized politics that we have you know. I'm thinking of the fact that a Democrat is governor in Kansas or Republican governor of Massachusetts. There's a way in which that administrative job can. I think seems a little less political will than some other positions and I mostly just think that. Yeah what you said. There was an extremely unpopular incumbent. It's true the president trump couldn't save him but he had been his zone worst enemy. It's a great question but the what I think will be interesting. Is If you match the suburban and exurban results in Kentucky with with what happened with in Virginia and then what happened in the same areas with the same kind of voters in eighteen whether it's demonstrably true that that will all play out the same way in two thousand twenty it suggests enough data points that it puts high and heavy uncertainty in the air for Republican senators who are running in twenty twenty and places where they are. They're gonNA depend on thinking of people. Cory Gardner Susan Collins running in states where they need those votes and if Donald Trump and the Republican Party of Donald Donald Trump has consistently been showing weaknesses in those areas again whether it actually plays out that way in two thousand twenty. I think it's going to make some nervousness and change perhaps perhaps some calculations over the next year as Republicans worry about becoming a party that is justified by the trump coalition which is essentially non college whites Evangelical and rural voters and that nervousness. Again whether it's true or not will create some some Potential for some more more destabilizing action among Republicans Possibly actually. I had a question about that. John is John Cornyn for election. Yes twenty twenty. Yeah I mean that's when when I look at what John Cornyn is doing which is to not be as full-throated around impeachment as you nearly expect the number two Republican in the Senate. He's a Texas Republican. I that to me is a signal. He is very worried that that he you know he could face something serious again. These are these linkages we should all these are drawn in in Pencil and very lightly. But but I would also link it to what what I went on at some length about with Mitch McConnell. The a couple of weeks ago when he was asked About the conversation the president said he had with McConnell and McConnell basically through the president under the bus. I think you can. If you start to see a number of these things you see some Can whether the distancing from the president is even possible. I think that's quite hard to do for anybody. But but just the more uncertainty and destabilization. Shen there is in the world added to the existing highly destabilizing behavior of the president. And the people who are defending him it just adds more kind of frenetic possibilities in an already pretty frantic political world As everybody's trying to gauge what. The politics are going to look like a on election day a year from now now that puts so much uncertainty in in the system for Republicans to see this weakness repeated in these areas that used to be part of their coalition. And yet if you Dr Cory Gardner or Susan Collins or even John Cornyn. Aren't you kind of caught in a vice like you can try to put some distance between you and the So you know I would say most like crazy. Two defenders of trump like mark meadows. Who just seem to be saying? I mean and Lindsey Graham like I am in lockstep with the president no matter what he says says. I'm going in that direction. They're stepping back from that but in the end like there will presumably be an impeachment trial in the Senate and it's very hard to imagine agean than currently voting to remove from office president trump. Now I do think that could change. I mean we saw a public approval of President Nixon drastically graphically moved downward during the public hearings in Watergate but I just feel like from the vantage point of right now. This is like the either Angel or devil of being a trump supporter or a Republican senator. In the trump era. You may be trying to maintain some what kind of semblance of separation. But how far is that really going to get you. Whether a candidate any candidate can separate themselves in a nationalized election and we have them even even an off year so of course we're going to have on twenty twenty is I think basically most people have been in the game. Say You can't do it. You can't get out from under a president however candidates it's in fear of not being re-elected Tend to do things you know. They'd Throw Hail Mary passes. And you know Cory Gardner in Colorado which is basically. He's basically a one third one third state so Democrat Independent. Republican split the state in thirds John Hickenlooper who's running against the former governor and Mayor of Denver is a very popular popular fellow in the state. So Cory Gardner you could imagine again. If even if you stipulate that you can't get out from under a president may still try and and why does that matter. Well that's one guy in one state well for Colorado is a battleground state second of all as we know from this president when a when one person does thing something that that he doesn't like Mike he goes after them so then it becomes. You can imagine that growing into something more. Because then he's attacking a Republican. What's Mitch McConnell? Say about that and so on and so forth so so It's it's it's just as I say a possibility for destabilization. I want to touch emily on. What is potentially the most alarming alarming aspect of the vote on Tuesday which is as of Wednesday actually? Didn't look this morning. There was there was intimations hints even open statements from Republican legislators in Kentucky that they might not accept the results of that gubernatorial election. And there's a the one of the leaders in the Republican House. This is trying to conflict this into a contested election. which was you know about five thousand votes separating the the Democrat and Republican And the stunning the possibility that the how the Kentucky legislature which is dominated by Republicans might try to overturn the popular vote. I actually don't think this will succeed. Eight for a couple of even if they make real push it at which there's no sign they're going to one is Bevin has been a lousy governor even for Republicans. He's made them more unpopular. He's been unpopular blur himself. So why keep them in. Their second is actually fun to have a democratic governor of the rival party in some ways especially if you have a majority in the legislature. I just love. You can really mess with them and score points off of that person and that that's kind of good way to spend a couple of years sometimes so it's not. It's not that bad to be in the out party if you have the majority party in the legislature but also. I don't think it's effective to cheat in elections. After the fact I think it's very effective to suppress the votes in advance when it can be dressed step as some kind of principle of voter integrity but after the fact when the votes already counted the numbers are there it is not. I think it's going to look a lot like cheating. If they try to push uh-huh yeah would in fact be cheating and like deeply alarming. If this happened you know I will just note Kentucky already. Does one one thing to suppress the vote which is to close the polls at six PM. You know. I I think that you're right. This isn't GonNa go anywhere but the fact that it's even being discussed discussed it's just these signs. Were getting from states. I mean we've gotten them also from Wisconsin and of course like the Queen of this is North Carolina. Where if you don't like the way the game is being played you just like throw the board up into the air and all the pieces fall and some other place you just change the rules roles? You know I don't know enough about Kentucky Law to know how the governor's powers are distributed and who decides but you could really imagine this legislature trying to clip the wings of this new Democrat coming in in much the way that the North Carolina Republican dominated legislature has has done that for Roy. Cooper the governor there now let us turn my friends to the polls for the presidential campaign from one kind of Paul to another kind of Paul. There was a really really interesting poll in the New York. Times of Swing States John this week looking at how various Democratic presidential candidates might perform against President Trump and Wisconsin content Pennsylvania Michigan North Carolina Florida and Arizona. Interesting that Arizona is a very legit swing state in a way. That Ohio for example doesn't seem to be anymore why we're Democrats so agitated by the results of this poll and is it is this one poll significant it's Let's see how to pack. Okay so why are they agitated. Well they're agitated because Biden's only up by a couple of points over trump in these six states let's see sanders was up a little bit and and Warren was down so I think there was agitation for two reasons. One Biden up wasn't wasn't by as much as as people thought. Warren was down and three and this is the bigger point I think is a lot of people think. Stop looking at and thinking thinking about the election in that way stopped takes basically boiling the entire election down to six states full of larger shares of white working class voters because that's it's not what. The electorate is about an implicit in even doing the poll among some Democrats is the idea that that or they would argue that the Times poll kind of has its thumb on the scale in terms of this larger argument about whether the Democratic Party needs to quote unquote moderate to go for the kinds of voters in those six states or go go for.

"one year" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

10:42 min | 8 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Today, Explained

"The first half of this show talking about the Democrats and and where they stand right now one year away from the election and I just wonder where does Donald Trump stand right now with the American people what are is approval ratings what's extraordinary is Donald trump stands exactly where he stood more or less for the entire time of his presidency we've never had a president in the post World War Two period who's been an as stable and as non volatile in approval ratings his lowest I think is around thirty seven is high around forty four forty five so you know he's in the upper range but he's been there for quite a while and I think the big note there's we've had a lot of stories happening recently right in Ukraine impeachment and Bughdadi and even as US filter into the ratings nothing's happening which is to say people have decided if they like Donald trump or not and nothing that they are learning earning or have learned over the past couple years seems to have changed that underlying structure of opinion in any real way I can imagine the people who support Donald Trump our unwavering because things like Moller probe and Ukraine and send her back and even you know good people on both sides don't really get in the way of love his appointing Supreme Court justices which he's done or tax cuts for the rich which is done but what about other stuff like the wall I mean he hasn't accomplished that in over two years of his presidency does that affect him in some way pulling is always hard to get to the heart of what people people really think ride we only have this number and it is an imperfect summation of people's use but I suspect that on something like the wall the way Donald Trump's supporters understand that is not the Donald Trump is built the wall but that the lame stream media the failing New York Times the do nothing Democrats have stopped Donald well trump from building the wall mayor he is out there fighting on their behalf trying to get the wall built and he's at war with deep state and the swamp and everyone else I mean donald trump typically does not get blamed for a lot of what he does it's why I think one of the few things that did appear to hurt him was the House Republican healthcare bill because that was something we're Donald Trump during the campaign at promised he would not cut medicaid he promised he would give everyone better health insurance and then he signed onto this bill he signed on he supported this bill written by Paul Ryan that would've taken health insurance away from tens of millions the people that would not have been better for people that would not have predicted preexisting conditions it would cut cut medicaid very dramatically so that was a moment where the ability to say Donald Trump is being stopped by others and that is why he is not doing what he promised evaporated and you had to say Oh Donald Trump is actually betraying his promise and that seemed to have an effect it's why when you talk to Democrats they want to run against donald trump's embrace of more traditional Republican policies on healthcare and the economy and tax cuts and other things they don't want to run against the craziness of the trump show the tweets the eccentric behavior because to them the people who don't like him for those resort you don't like him I'm the place where you can find new allies new votes are on the people who there's a dissonance between what they wanted Donald trump to do and what he has been doing and it's donald trump's embrace of the traditional traditional conservative agenda that you can begin to open up that wedge is it unusual for president have such steady approval ratings or did Obama have a thirty forty percent margin that he just could never lose no matter what he did it is unusual and there couple of reasons is unusual so one is that Obama for instance had much bigger swings round his early honeymoon period rate very high approval ratings which Donald Trump never had and there are some bigger swings around things like killing Osama bin Laden but it is also true that most of the time Obama was in a fairly narrow band so if you look at the course of his presidency you would see a larger potential variation variation but if you looked at any given month you would not see a huge difference from where Donald Trump is Obama was somewhat more popular than trump and somewhat more popular in trump amidst a much worse economy which which suggests to me that trump is underperforming potential approval ratings quite dramatically thing I'd say about Donald Trump's approval ratings in the big picture is that he is in a condition right now where he should be quite strong he has a pretty good economy unemployment is quite low historically we have had steady job job growth we've had steady GDP growth even in las year to reasonable wage growth so that plus the fact that we are not currently embroiled in a huge new war or I think one of the good things I will say about Donald Trump did not take the advice of any of his administration and try to go to war with Iran you could imagine a precedent in these conditions fifty five percent not seventy percent given the structure partisan politician but fifty five the fact that he's at forty two speaks to the effect that his own unusual behavior his tweeting his fights his eccentricities his recklessness it speaks to the fact that he's not tough law that that has imposed a cost penalty on his approval ratings and the thing I was thinking about Donald Trump is that he did not win in two thousand sixteen by much he did not win the popular vote at all and even in Pennsylvania you would have had to change about forty thousand votes for Donald Trump to lose two and so it was such a close election and the demographic trends are sufficiently in Democrats favor that trump to get reelected into twenty twenty he doesn't need to match his performance in two thousand sixteen he needs to do better than it and there's no evidence in his polling that he has expanded his base a thing I tend to think about from time to time people exist in this country who voted for Barack Obama and then several years later voted for Donald Trump which I guess often amazes people outside of this country how do the Democrats win those particular voters back so there's a huge amount of research now and attention on this quite small percentage of voters who switched from Obama to trump and particularly in mid west states my read of that research overall suggests that in general these were voters who were reasonably high and what social scientists racial resentment and you might say yeah well how could they elect Barack Obama then and the answer is that feeling away about a group of people doesn't always Dr Phil about one person Obama did a lot of work to calm white anxieties to sort of appear people as somebody who was operating outside of some traditional enmities you could kind of feel like you're getting past some of that when Hillary Clinton ran a much more explicit elicit campaign arguing in favor of black lives matter talking about systematic racism systemic racism on the campaign trail those voters who are higher earn racial resentment and have more intensely negative views about immigration whenever Donald Trump I do not know how winnable they are if you talk to Bernie any sanders or no Elizabeth Warren what they will tell you is that those voters were upset by Washington support for free trade deals they weren't helped enough by democratic policies over the past ten years and a more unvarnished for economic populism will win them back you talk to Joe Biden but he won't tell you but I think what is believed to be true there is uncle Joe so is a sort of an older white guy comforting figure these folks believe he's on their side like maybe move over to him I think that it is a mistake for Democrats to think about this all all in terms of winning the last war they'll probably get some of these people back and by running a different campaign and running more popular candidate than Hillary Clinton they can get some of them back but they also would have won on the election if African American turnout had been at the levels it was under Barack Obama that's probably very hard to reconstitute but it's not necessarily impossible parties really come back from a defeat and the way you expect them to so after two thousand and four there was this huge belief that Democrats had lost white evangelical heartland voters and you know maybe they'd become to open to gay marriage or they were too socially liberal and you know John Kerry was in a feet you know french-speaking windsurfing etcetera etcetera and there's this whole discourse party about becoming more culturally conservative and economically populist and then who actually wins it's an African American guy with with the Middle Name Hussein from Chicago right like that was not anywhere in the theory but that's what they did so I suspect that if Democrats win in twenty twenty it will not be because they managed to reverse engineer Donald Trump's victory but they nominated a candidate who in being themselves and exciting interesting interesting unique political force created their own political dynamics donald trump had to respond to and was not quite able to and what do you think that dynamics should be I don't know I I think what's really important is that Democrats do not just run anti-trump I think that the Democrats need to have a vision and a theory and an an inspirational charge of their own and if they don't have that that creates a lot of space for trump to dominate the conversation I think the biggest mistake Democrats could make would be need to be constantly reactive to whatever grenade donald trump is logged on twitter that morning I mean if you look in two thousand eight I would not say that what Barack Obama ran non was an extraordinarily ambitious policy gender imbalance in the way the presidential engines earned bishops but he himself represented something in politics at excited people he ran on a theory of how politics could be how could look how we could relate to each other how we could fix it and that generated a momentum that really reshaped shaped American Politics for eight years and I think that what Democrats are going to need to do is to not just sit around clapping back donald trump but but have something that in in its ambition in its intensity in its controversy sets the conversation on their terms the one of the only times Donald Trump is actually reactive democrats is when he is arguing against their socialism one of the Times he response and so the ways in which I think particularly Warren Sanders are able to use big ambitious policies to set the agenda such it it's at least a conversation happening on terms I think that's powerful I think some of the other candidates are able to do it in some other ways sometimes but certainly they're the two who've been able to set the terms of democratic debate debate and I think as a kind of Meta level of the campaign being able to set the terms of the debate is a genuinely important qualification for them crowd and Twenty Twenty.

"one year" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:55 min | 9 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Reset

"Give you the real exchange rate for a laughably low fee which makes them Bird than a bank or paypal transfer wise also offers a debit mastercard. That always gives you the real rate when you spend overseas transfer wise is your Swiss army knife for due to the question about trust I think it's one of the most foundational things for the company I take it seriously listen to the it back tried to understand feel there's something which cost a breaking of trust and see what we can do to improve Google CEO soon dr ice says the company has been struggling with maintaining the trust of its employees this is how he described the problem in leaked audio published by The Washington Post last week genuinely struggling with some issues transparency at scale how do it especially at a time when everything we do is doesn't stay within the walls those comments come at an interest in time on November I it will have been exactly one year since the google walkout a protest against Google leadership that had a reported twenty thousand employees walking off the job in offices around the world I'm Jim Ross Today on resets we're looking at the impact the Google walkout one year later Google time's up on sexual harassment Taylor I've been at Google for seven years I've had both the sexual harassment and sexual discrimination case I've blocked out the memories of it but I don't think anybody not anymore I decided to coordinate this stuff and gathering as one of the many Google sites that are walking day it was huge a big deal I was there and you could feel this energy that I had never seen before in the tech industry looking out in support of they've been harassed anywhere in energy of sort of anger and for Russian and a real rising of worker descent Ghaffari is a reporter for recode you covered the walkout from Google's headquarters in mountain view a year ago I asked her to explain how this all started the google walkout was about really the abuse of power our sexual harassment in the tech industry particularly at Google where at the time and had recently come out that there was a pattern of sexual misconduct at the company and that high-powered managers and executives were getting protected and in some cases paid out to leave after there had been credit bowl claims launched against them for sexually harassing using their employees and worthies people people who were high up in the company yeah so the host damning claim was probably about Andy Rubin he's the so called founder of the android and it was very very important person at the company he was accused of coercing and employees into performing oral sex the company actually found that claim to be notable launch an investigation but they kept quiet about that and pushed Rubanov but thank him publicly on his way out the door and paid him nine be million dollars in an exit package so when the New York Times revealed the circumstances around Ruben's exit and the massive payout people were pissed and you have twenty thousand employees walking out of work I google offices around the world just to put this in respective twenty thousand employees walking out on the job is that a lot I mean that's huge Google's total employment is I think around one hundred thousand so twenty out of one hundred thousand I mean that is huge for any workforce but especially in tech where historically workers do not speak out against management because overall the perception is that tech workers historically are treated well engineers get all these perks especially at Google you know there's AH child care on premises or is free lunch there's amazing healthcare in time off that's that's the perception of working at a top tech company like Google so yeah workers don't usually walk to work so the group will walk out was about sexual harassment at the company that's what it was about yes at its core it was about sexual harassment but also that other issues like worker pay diversity having an employee voice on important projects all these things that have bubbled up and erupted at the time of the Walker so there were organizers who sort of made this google walkout happen what were their demands most of the demands focused on making sure something like the Ruben situation did not happen again so that means giving legal protections to employees who speak out against things like sexual harassment and that means taking out these houses that were in their contracts that for some not to take their claims to court if they had an issue but instead settle it privately and confidentially so that to me and was actually met that was probably the biggest direct kind of success of the Google walkout in terms of policy changes but there were other deeper structural demands that are very much inch still being worked out Google and those have to do with you know having an an employee representation on the board of directors those you have to do with gender and diversity and pay equity which is not just a problem at Google but the entire tech industry and remember that only thirty three son of employees at Google where women last year and that number drops to about twenty five percent for leadership and technical positions so it's been a year since the walkout do you think it was effective I think the Google walk it was successful in cracking open deeper tensions not just a google but the entire tech industry and many of the man's have not been Matt many people are still actively pushing for those kinds of demands to be met what happened to the people who initiated the walkout so Meredith Whitaker and clear stapleton the organizers they publicly came out and months after the walk outside hey we feel that management actually punishing us for our political activists so you saw Clare say that two months after the walkout she was told she would be demoted and lose half of her direct reports and clear was a marketing manager at Youtube after she reported the HR and she said Hey feel like I'm being retired against they reversed emotion but she said that her managers started to ignore her gave her work to other people and she was told to go on medical leave even though she wasn't sick meredith who was an a researcher who led Google's open research she said she was told her role would be changed dramatically and to stop her notable research on Ai Ethics at the AI now institute a research center butte are there any more examples like this of retaliation Google yeah I mean in my reporting I talked to Google employees all the time who face issues oftentimes it's less well-known employees and maybe less scandalous circumstances but these are people who say they've been subjected to things like everyday harassment on the job having a manager who frequently makes inappropriate comments based on someone's gender or sexuality or race and they're forced to kind of put up with it they say because is when they hear comments like you're not getting promoted because you're such an emotional woman and they report something like that they say they're quietly pushed down the corporate ladder all the people who made those comments are kept in place or pushed up so in your mind is the significance of the Google walkout sort of a moment where employees finally felt comfortable bull calling this behavior outright this retaliation and the higher ups that Google ignoring retaliation is that what it is absolutely and Anna comes in the wake of the me two times up movement and you're seeing people say hey I'm not GonNa let this report about my manager sexually harassing me sit in a competent the HR file for the rest of my life. I'M GONNA come out with US and take a big risk potentially to my employment to my social standing with managers and say that it's not okay.

"one year" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"If not for you guys, neither Mike or I would be employed, and that's just real talk. This show has changed my life in a more positive way than anything else aside from meeting Taylor lane. That is also real talking. I mean that from the bottom of my heart. I found my calling when I found this show. And I don't mean podcasting. I've found that with the wasters clams and cockles shout out to the clam fan. But I mean, like, my voice, my real calling and how I can use my voice to not just make people laugh, but teach people and teach myself about random, interesting shit and most importantly help people to realize they're not alone in the world. No matter what they're going through whether that'd be loss, depression, anxiety, addiction, whatever it may be there's always hope out there. And they're literally literally millions of other people going through the same things you are to varying degrees. Of course, in some cases, in some cases, much much much much fucking worse than anything that you could be going through. So. It just all this is to say in a little under a year, according to soundcloud, we've done it says like eleven months on soundcloud. But I think that might just be changing any day now to twelve months we've done over three million downloads. And that's not accounting for a lot of shit like Spotify that those numbers are not included. So from inception to the year one three fucking million. It's just it's it's crazy to me. I love what we've created here. I love this show. I love being the head of a crime syndicate that ransacked japodlay restaurants for napkins and Tabasco this holiday season. Honestly may be the most blessed I've ever felt in my fucking life. Even considering that this was not the easiest views and not the easiest of the last couple of months. It's been pretty rough actually and all in all I have all of you to think. So let's fucking go. And I just wanted to say, thank you. Hopefully this week once at some point I wanna get I got to get permission from the appropriate parties. But I'm going to be announcing a very cool giveaway in honor of our one year birthday that you'll absolutely want to be looking out for the only hint. I can give is that it sneaker related, but I'll talk more about it when I can't. Anyway, I hope you enjoy the show today because this one and literally every single ever one ever is for you. Next segment your top songs two thousand eighteen so all of you probably aware at this point as of a few days ago Spotify released their deal that they do every single year, which is where they give us all these numbers and stats on what we listened to over the course of this calendar year, and there's like individualized ones that you can get you..

Taylor lane soundcloud Mike eleven months twelve months one year
"one year" Discussed on JKNews

JKNews

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on JKNews

"Like, you can't even close our front door Howell. Yeah. We had like we had a cook around our cartons. It was crazy, man. This is dope. Your parents supported. And then I think after my dad one he came to our trade show one year. And then he saw it was like, wow, they built this from house to treat. You mean? Like at e three. Yeah. I would think it was a ether your see we see us in Vegas. So see is that electron IX show? Right. Those are huge, man. So you guys had booths there and all that we did we had our first booth there on the year after that e three show in two hundred six seven two thousand eight was our first show. And then our dad showed up. He was a whoa, you guys. Actually can make money from this. And they started to believing that is finally proud. And I think that's what dope. Yeah. And I think that's that's what I think made me go even further to like to a point where I didn't even know where it would take us. You know to see my dad actually proud of what we did. And I think that's one thing that I if I could tell entrepreneurs today is maybe you experience this Joe's like, you know, you're working so hard, and, you know, people talk about life balance, I always work on that. But it's like take a step back sometimes. And then look at what you've accomplished. Yes. And I think I've never done that even like six seven eight years into did that well because I think there's a part of us that is afraid that were gonna get too comfortable or were our egos too big. And we feel like we've accomplished. But you know, what? I mean, like, it's it's like being an entrepreneur is very scary. But you're driven by the fear because it's motivating right? So what I'm so what I mean by that is for people that don't understand so. Like once you go into business for yourself. There's so much responsibility. That falls on you like now you've got mouths to feed. And in the the bigger you grow the more mouths that depend on you. And you feel like you can't rest because if you do then other people that depend on you are going to get hurt or more just like, you know, you've you also like coming from a poor place or a bad place. Never experienced what it was like to get ten thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars. So you tell yourself I could I could you know, skip out on Steve for for today 'cause I've never made forty thousand dollars in one day. So you'll you'll plow through it. And then you you'll get through it in your comes another opportunity, and you go oh another opportunity for forty thousand dollars. Lemme lemme Folles I could sleep tha. Morrogh like in a new you before you know, it you just didn't sleep. 'cause you kept getting great offers like there's things like that that always happened in an you face something called burnout, whereas like your health or your your your relationships with people or things like that like this is the evolution of a lot of entrepreneurs..

Steve Howell Vegas Joe forty thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars six seven eight years ten thousand dollars one year one day
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Refined amended special counsel rules that we that we proposed and which were which were enacted and that those are the rules under which rod rosenstein who worked with me in the whitewater investigation has in his a terrific attorney and does not deserve the criticism in my judgment that he's been you worked with rosenstein in the whitewater investing yes yes right as part of the team for a short period as i was for short periods yourself you're saying here is that the special counsel taken various different forms over the years archibald cox was fireable by the department of justice ken starr was authorized under the independent counsel act he was not fireable by the justice department he was truly independent and muller is back to the previous model he works for rod rosenstein and serves at his pleasure serves the pleasure of the justice department or the acting attorney general in this case that's right david and it's a model which recognizes the responsibility in and the authority of the attorney general or his or her designate in this case rod rosenstein to to frame the reference which rod did and to oversee the investigation in a way in a matter that is consistent with department of justice policy and i think i think it's the appropriate format and an seems to me that the format is working very well in most importantly is chris said we hear nothing and should hear nothing from bob muller we're what if i could ask given that the you know this is essentially the serie where was the ken starr investigation one year in and what other shoes were left to drop in the years to follow question there were four major investigations underway the investor.

rod rosenstein attorney special counsel archibald cox ken starr justice department acting attorney general david chris bob muller one year
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The president is fully cooperating that the special counsel is continuing his work and that the president's lawyers have cooperated every step of the way however they have expressed concerns about the scope of this investigation chris can you tell us more sure have been back and forth negotiations between the trump team and muller's team about the scope of the investigation whether trump is going to do an interview and early on trump's legal team urged cooperation but now the giuliani has come in there is more and more resistance to cooperation and moller still has the additional work of the investigation to to complete and it's hard to see how he can wrap this up without going through all of turning over all of the stones that he needs to turn over it's important to remember that early on before muller was even appointed trump in his allies were saying that there was no contact between people on the trump campaign and russians and now we know a year later there were multiple multiple contacts and so the longer the investigation goes on the more we learn about contacts and financial relationships between trump and russians chris drama bloomberg news stay with us we're taking stock of the mother investigations one year in nineteen indictments and guilty pleas so far the president claims it's a witch hunt but he's not the first to face tough scrutiny from a special counsel i'm david wright of abc news this is on point.

president special counsel chris muller trump giuliani david wright moller abc one year
"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"He's looking into that meeting as well where does his investigation stand so one year in a lot has happened needless to say what we have now is a series of indictments in charges that have come out of the molar investigation it's it's important to step back and take stock of how far we've come just in one year muller has kind of gone through a buckets in his investigation and last fall we had the indictment against paul manafort who was trump's campaign chairman and the and his deputy richard gates and then we had an indictment or guilty plea against george popadopoulos and then we had a guilty plea against michael flynn who is trump's national security advisor and then we had indictments against russians for weaponising social media in order to damage trump in so discord in the us and so it's been a year it seems like it's been a lifetime but in a way you can see these different chunks of the investigation in our muller has been building his cases some of which are going to trial and we are it's our understanding now that trump is into the meat of the investigation into what if any specific cooperation took place between russia and the trump campaign to interfere in the election and whether or not trump or anybody else obstructed justice and by seeking to shut down the investigation one of the big issues yet to be confronted is the hacking and release of dnc emails also the emails of clinton's campaign chair john podesta and other members of trump's inner circle or thought to be impossible jeopardy here roger stone his political advisor.

muller paul manafort trump chairman richard gates george popadopoulos michael flynn advisor us russia clinton john podesta political advisor one year
"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"I'm has been continuing and and and they don't vote they don't want people to know what's been done we're talking about donald trump's first year as president and you're listening to potomac watch from the wall street journal if successful they're powerful and they're sharing their secrets the secrets of wealthy women podcast from the wall street journal from the opinion pages of the wall street journal this is the tomac watch welcome back on poetry go here with a dan haniger and bill mcgurn talking about donald trump's first year as president i want to address the paradox that i see in the in the trump's uh first year which is a economies join well iit's destroyed isis the light of the worst predictions about his policies so dangerous haven't come true sums some significant successes of course a one big failure with obamacare repeal but big victory with tax reform and deregulation and judges yet thirty nine percent approval rating in the uh in the real clear politics average off old dan for a first year president and uh republicans uh losing in the generic ballot test for november by nine points which means that if that holds they'd lose the house if not the sat how do you explain the paradox well i think yet it has to do with the assault inflicted wounds that we've talked about uh bill mention other forces such as democratic opposition i think one other force is worth mentioning as well in that uh which has contributed to this and that is the washington media which is in a virtual war with donald trump which started the day of his inauguration when he quipped god disputed them over the size of the inaugural audience which was i am needless fight pack but never stopped i mean of the than men than there was uh you know the white house press conferences became a running joke on saturday night live and look a lot of trump supporters will say well he's right about this it's fake news they're totally against them yes that may well be true by and large it is true but this is a source of information.

donald trump president wall street journal bill mcgurn the house assault dan haniger obamacare washington white house thirty nine percent
"one year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Support for di andrews podcast on my mind comes from keppel inner foundation supporting public understanding of business and the economy hi it's diane so great to be back with you on my mind this week it's been one year since the inauguration of president trump earlier this week i invited ford topnotch political commentators for a panel discussion i wanted to hear about how they thought our country and change and get their perspective on many of the challenges ahead in the studio with me norm ornstein of the american enterprise institute one as summers said cnn and byron york of the washington examiner maggie haberman of the new york times joins us from a studio in new york and here's our conversation nor i'm going to his start with you looking back on donald trump's first year what do you think will all standout most in your memory and in my memory it is a how all of the conditions in government design to keep a presidency from careening out of control from moving step by step towards things that are more autocratic from preventing the kind of corruption inside the presidency a kleptocracy a keeping government functioning at a reasonable level have gone awry and as much as anything it's not just the president and even the president's administration it's the congress just reading the other day a catalogue of the ways in which the president and his family have enriched themselves and foreign governments have fallen all over them cells to try and provide money for him so that they can get in his good graces or may be use it in another way congress has held zero hearings on any of this i look at some of the nominees who have been confirmed judges and cabinet in subcabinet people who didn't get the kind of vetting that we normally anticipate and so i end up with some very profound concerns at the end of the year that go beyond simply trump himself.

di andrews keppel inner foundation norm ornstein american enterprise institute cnn maggie haberman the new york times new york donald trump president congress ford summers byron york washington subcabinet one year
"one year" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on Business Daily

"Hello i made butler and welcomed the business daily from the bbc today we mark one year since president donald trump reached the white house as he's livid on the economy the stock market is up then taxes you're going down in i don't have any problem with what president trump's doing it'd be upset people that's just too bad baden nobel laureate tells us the president can't really take credit for a small rise in the economy we're already at full employment and saw how do we get to even higher levels of output i would want to be boosting scientific research i want to make more scientists come to our country but that's not what he's done marking trump scarred business daily from the bbc donald trump did make a lot of economic promises before he made it to the white house here's some of them i'm going to bring back millions of jobs protecting our workers also means reforming our system of legal immigrations and billions and billions and billions and billions and billions and billions at three point two trillion dollars in tax cuts for american families this is again the biggest tax reform of millions and billions in stock market hit an alltime record high today over twenty two thousand we've picked up more than four trillion dollars in net worth in terms of our country our stocks are companies billions and billions and billions and billions left's cut the red tape let's set free our dreams and yes let's make america great again yep the trump agenda and some big numbers heavily montage i will.

butler bbc donald trump stock market president america four trillion dollars two trillion dollars one year
"one year" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"And and i think that there was at the beginning uh a lot of cautious optimism because if you remember you know trump campaigned outside of the traditional political sphere right he was going to be a dealmaker he was going to shake up washington and there was a sense that maybe he could be a president who could broker the partisan warfare that we'd seen in washington in the last six years of the obama administration one year into that administration i'm not sure we have seen him really be the dealmaker that he promised to be they haven't had a tunnel legislative accomplishments with back and forth is is a of the opposite as the opposite of that and i do think they're they're greatest legislative achievement so far the tax bill that they pass at the end of 2017 was really more a product of congressional republicans and unification on that and the president really didn't need to clinch the deal they just wanted to vote for that so at this stage though even though again as we seen in the immigration fight the president is unpredictable they don't know where he is they're still always on his side there if anything that's really shifted is that i think that the republican party at least as i see it in congress has almost uniformly lined up excuse me lined up behind president trump because we are very familiar with the republicans who haven't people like jeff flake of arizona bob corker of tennessee the critics in his party are way outnumbered by the people that stand behind the president and many of those critics have decided it's not even worth trying to run for reelection exactly because i think they recognize that the base of the party the the republican primary voter believes the donald trump is the head of their party and they like him a whole lot more than they like a lot of the establishment samara you medically leg talking about norms do you like norms more than memes i like norms more than maim love i'm not amine person norm yeah did you see the pictures of one of you after you thought i was pretty funny so if you didn't see this on twitter mareseille.

washington president obama administration the deal republican party congress jeff flake bob corker tennessee donald trump samara arizona twitter six years one year