38 Burst results for "One Year"

Fresh "One Year" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:08 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "One Year" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"One years older. Washington D C only please gamble responsibly Gambling problem. Call 805 2 to 4700 Islands views, Traffic and weather station news radio 9 21 47 FM. Wh JJ Providence and I hard radio station. Racing for a big storm. I'm Jack Callahan Fox news spinning up in the Gulf of Mexico at the moment, it's known as tropical Cyclone three. But if it reaches tropical storm strength, her name will be Claudette bearing down on the by you later today, we can expect all of South Louisiana to be impacted range of rainfall will be somewhere between one inch and eight inches. Louisiana's governor John Bel Edwards, declaring a state of emergency tropical storm warnings are posted for much of the Louise. Deanna Coastline and all of Alabama's sure the withering heat wave continues in the West and Southwest. Excessive heat warnings for several areas in the southwest in Phoenix, where hit 113 degrees midday Thursday, and excessive heat warning is in effect through Sunday. The National Weather Service recorded Las Vegas at 109 at noon on Thursday with an excessive heat warning. Also up through Sunday, Fox is Jessica Rosenthal, four people have been shot in the Phoenix area in a series of drive by shootings that have left one of the victims dead. Peoria, Arizona Police Sergeant Brandon Sheppard says they have the suspected shooter. All we can release about the suspect at this time is is an adult male and like I said he's been in custody. There were no issues with that no known motive yet nine other people were hurt either by shrapnel flying glass or buy a car accident that was caused by the shootings. Two year old in a car seat shot and killed on the Detroit Free Way. Last night. A nine year old child seriously wounded, no arrests. Yet, Detroit's interim police chief says they're looking for a monster, and he's asking for help for anyone who might have seen what happened. President Biden has signed legislation creating the holiday known as Juneteenth. I hope this is the beginning of change and the way we deal with one another. Marking the day in June of 18 65. When the last American slaves were told they'd been freed. Many federal agencies will be closed today. Wall Street Thursday, the Dow dropped 210 points. NASDAQ gained 121, the S and P. 500 down less than two. America is listening to Fox News..

Jessica Rosenthal Jack Callahan June Of 18 65 Claudette Gulf Of Mexico 210 Points Washington D C Sunday 113 Degrees President Trump Last Night Today Fox News Detroit Free Way South Louisiana Alabama Eight Inches Brandon Sheppard Phoenix Nasdaq
Media Wants to Celebrate Capitol Police but Not Those Who Protected During Antifa, BLM Violence

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 1 d ago

Media Wants to Celebrate Capitol Police but Not Those Who Protected During Antifa, BLM Violence

"A story all the headlines Congressional gold medal vote. The congressional gold medal to all the officers who defended the capital in January. 6th 21. Republicans voted no And the media very upset about this. The media very upset about this. Let's step back. The media have spent over a year trashing law enforcement in this country. Every reprobate. Imaginable. Miscreant malcontent. Whether professors or otherwise, members of black lives matter brought on T V. To tell us how bad the cops are. Except for apparently The Capitol Hill police. Because those police deserve a congressional gold medal. Not the police were trying to defend the Portland federal building. Not the police who tried to defend their own precincts in every city in this country, virtually Not the park Police and the Secret Service who defended the White House. From attacks on the White House. No, no, they don't deserve anything except To be trashed and I remember what took place in Portland. And I remember what Pelosi in Clybourne had to say the number one and number three Democrats in the House who not want to hand out gold medals. And I want to remind you Because it's only one year ago. June 2020. When Nancy Pelosi compared Federal law enforcement that was trying to protect a federal courthouse. From an insurrection, a violent armed insurrection. Stormtroopers cut 15 go.

Capitol Hill Police Portland Federal Building White House Park Police Secret Service Pelosi Portland Nancy Pelosi House
Fresh update on "one year" discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

01:18 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

"Is coming to an end. My friends and this is something that you need to know about if you have an apple tv plus trial. He's doing this louis. Why am i taking years now. I guess you just greedy. Yeah well i don't want to do it in. i'm gonna let you do it. I'm going to sit here and just be amused by the woman's bill. Sound of your voice. Wow okay well you know the the big multiple times extended one year. Free trial is about to actually go away. They extended it because of the pandemic and perhaps because he didn't have enough content to really keep people around but but in june boom. It's actually coming to an end. So if you have been using that free trial or let's say you signed up for a free trial and haven't been using it. It's a good time to go. And unsubscribe shut it off so that you don't get charged. Starting in july. The other thing that apple did recently is that they cut that one year. Retrial that you get when you buy like a new iphone or ipad or apple tv iraq. They cut that from one year down to three months. So you know baby steps toward becoming You know less of a freebie service in more of a something that may be going to pay for We have a how to on the website about how to cancel your trial. You know it's really simple. You just go in on your settings and settings app. I guess. I can't even remember you. Just go in there and the settings cloud right anyway. I didn't prepare.

Apple Ipad iPhone Three Months July One Year Apple Tv Iraq Apple Tv Plus June Years Louis
Podcaster Roger Mitchell on What He's Learned Hosting Are You Not Entertained

Unofficial Partner Podcast

02:16 min | 2 d ago

Podcaster Roger Mitchell on What He's Learned Hosting Are You Not Entertained

"Podcasts from it. Sure what have you learned over land listening to the way it started for for me and grant was purely. Let's just do this for a laugh. Nobody will listen. We had okay. In the first year we used the contacts. We'd be baked at people like yourself to come on on have to see. Giles took it to a different level with both two things. Oversee the quality of guests he could bring on secondly an acceptance in the industry that neither grant or iheart vitamin bit involved in the industry of been in the sticks for a long time. No sorts nobody really knew me then. It started kicking off and then we've got different products which is one of the things of learn a little bit coming back to give people exactly what they want has got his thing which is a little bit like desert island discs for for sports stars grant and i do go on goal which is just pop chart between two blocks. I think people connect with that and they think is quite an approachable guy of you whom we have to on a cd face and we get good gas for that. And why phoned is that people want to hang out with other people of being so we got jet cards and on and then all of a sudden we law requests for other people to come on and hang with that same crew. So it's anything it's like. A success will club at a successful restaurant. It does a little bit late and why thing a phone no richard. I don't know what you think. The quality of stuff out there mostly for free is true so good that i a little bit paranoid. Ask myself everyday. Why do i need to be around the data show well served and i guess you were going gonna ask me less was thinking about last night and i was thinking. Why do they listen to me. And and jason grant well first of all grant. I think is just a world class broadcaster in the sense of his style and his rhythm and the we can just keep also light josh when he gets on a roll is just a wonderful speaker and speaks with such eloquent. And i think they shouldn't be because the thinking you never know what that daft idiot's gonna say. What is it not going to be scared to say today on. And i i think i think in the main people can recognize that if they were on the call with us they could very easily be part of our podcast. It's very approachable. I agree richard lock. It and i learned a

Giles Jason Grant Richard Josh Richard Lock
Fresh update on "one year" discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

00:54 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one year" discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"That makes sense so yes knowing. I already knew that when you said how much your mortgage was so. I was not surprised because that is more expensive area to live in. your utilities. Are really the only thing that pops up. That might be out of the ordinary. Is that normal in the area. I know some places have way more expensive utilities others well we. We don't use a lot of anything so we Washed the clothes in cold coldwater and We keep it a worm like we. You know seasonally. We don't run the afc very much. We try to keep things low in that sense. You mean so. We were pretty gentle on the house. Because i'm a budgeters. And i have been resolved many years so i know how those things can make a difference when we're just dealing with slake having to work within a budget so we try to try to make sure but i think that washington is pretty fair thou because we're just over the bridge from oregon. I don't know about oregon but We're near right next to vancouver. And so i think it's pretty fair priced here okay. Let's walk through your balance sheet next. Your assets and liabilities investments liabilities. What what are you have their Well mainly we have our for a one k. Which is a two hundred and forty five thousand. We just have one and my husband's and that we have nine percent going toward Every paycheck his company matches up to six percent And then we have it. Invested in vanguard target date fund for twenty forty five and. I just listened to the simple paths a wealth and jail collins. Said if you wanna be more aggressive with you just you know put out the date for. There's so that's one of the questions i had. Should we make it for like twenty sixty five. I think that's as far as we can go into the future with a target But we don't have the option of picking and choosing outside of that something through the vanguard because the company uses a think fidelity or something like that so okay What about you. It sounds like you have a house. walk us through that the home the home value and the mortgage is well. Yeah oh we bought it for five thirty five one year ago. It is now worse. A bow. six eighty seven. We.

Nine Percent Vancouver One Year Ago Oregon ONE Collins Two Hundred And Forty Five Tho Six Eighty Twenty Forty Five Washington Five Thirty Five One K. Up To Six Percent Vanguard Twenty Sixty Five Seven
The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

MarTech Podcast

02:20 min | 2 d ago

The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

"Calvin welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having pleasure to have you as a guest. I appreciate you reaching out and honestly appreciate you for multiple reasons. One the subject that you've brought up his one that i feel like a lot of people wanna talk about an honestly aren't really sure how to talk about. And it's how to create space for minorities and marketing. And so most everybody that reaches out to me to be a guest on the show whilst talk about dsp's or software or branding and you actually have a real world topic in the real world. Things that are happening today happens to be the one year anniversary of the unfortunate and tragic murder of george floyd so feel like today's the best day to talk about minorities and your experience as a black man in technology. Tell me about why isn't important for marketers specifically to think about creating space for minorities in tekken and marketing. It will thanks for the question that it is unfortunate. That today has to be day right. The one year anniversary of a person's death but sometimes these opportunities present themselves the have a conversation about these things even though it's not easy from a marketer's perspective. You have to understand that i've been doing this in tech since ninety six about twenty six years and it still surprise so i go. Wow guys in tech loses some form of new building. It's happening having been around that period of time and so when it comes to marketing and what things look like marketing kinda shapes the view the way that people see products way people see industries. I would say now if you think of the tech industry because so much worse outsource now you think india you think silicon valley those types of things but there is an enormous black population. I myself have a group of. I think it's eleven or twelve hundred people. now. I haven't checked lately but called blackman coating was just kinda codifies a group of individuals just to say. Hey we're here and they have all these amazing talents and there's no space right now for that to even exist because you have all of these kinds of disparate individuals who may work for companies. But there's no groups are. There's no organizations that support that so martyrs creating space for that to even make it a reality would be similar to anything else that you see didn't exist until you saw it on. Tv sorted ads. Things like that so it helps to shape the dynamics and it helps to bring more balanced to thanks. There's just different things at different cultures. Bring any industry

George Floyd Calvin DSP Blackman India
What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

The Big Story

01:18 min | 3 d ago

What Does Bill 96 Mean for Quebec?

"Jordan rawlings. this is the big story to lead. Ramona's is a montreal based journalist also opinion columnist for cult montreal where she looked at the good the bad and the ugly of bill ninety-six tula. Hey how are you jordan. I'm doing well. Thank you for taking the time. I wanna ask you maybe just to start For those of us outside of quebec can you give us some context for the ever evolving Language legislation this is. There's a lot of historical connotations here. Right oh god where to begin will basically bill ninety. Six is is an upgraded. Its what is supposed to be an upgrade to Kickbacks language law otherwise known as bill went to one you know which just celebrated fifty one years. I think of existence Which aimed to establish french as the common long language in quebec and fifty plus years later the current government The the cue has basically decided because of issues with french because of the constant kind of fragility of the language and they feel that French is eroding vay needed to upgrade they needed to strengthen that legislation that piece of legislation. So here we are now with bill ninety six

Jordan Rawlings Bill Ninety Montreal Ramona Quebec Jordan Bill
Do We Need Deep Learning in Time Series

Data Skeptic

02:03 min | 3 d ago

Do We Need Deep Learning in Time Series

"Name is sharon assaid. I started my master's in verse. Your time germany end now. I started might be today just like this month. Oh congrats yeah thank you. That's i think. I'm from egypt to have been living here for three years yet. Basically it's the same for me. My name's danielle tyson's are currently also a phd student. Information systems and machine learning lab at the university of hildesheim in germany. So the paper. I invited you both on to talk about today. Today's title do. We really need deep learning models for time series forecasting maybe to kick off. I'd love to ask you both a little bit more details about your background. I know time series is something that not just machine. Learning people have done for a long time. So there's a multidisciplinary set of methodologies that can be looked at. How did you both become interested in this area. It started with our project during our masters. We have to go through a project for one year. So we selected the parking occupancy production and the this topic basically is also trying reconsidered it s time is costing and from here. We started working together on the problem. And from there we got to the vapor of the winnie deterring models regarding our backgrounds. Were more on the general machine learning side of which of course time series forecasting is vital. Pardon it and has recently been very much a touched also from deep learning side which was also of course our way to go before we then found out that presumably simpler baselines also work on this talk to come back to your questions on backgrounds. I do actually also have wide some background regarding time series forecasting in a different setting since i already have a master's in quantitative economics in which i of course had some finance classes. And so this project. Assuring mentioned just also came natural for me as a topic to choose

Sharon Assaid Danielle Tyson University Of Hildesheim Germany Egypt
3 Dead at Florida Supermarket Include Grandmother, Grandson

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 d ago

3 Dead at Florida Supermarket Include Grandmother, Grandson

"Authorities are trying to figure out why a gunman killed a woman and a child inside a Florida supermarket before killing himself they initially said the shooter and the victims may have known each other but now the Palm Beach county sheriff's office says there is no known relationship between the suspect and the victims a woman and her one year old grand son nor do they know why he opened fire in the public supermarket panicked shoppers started running one said some employees were crying the sheriff's office identified the gunman as fifty five year old Timothy wall of royal Palm Beach the names of the victims are not being released at the request of the family I'm Rita folate

Palm Beach County Sheriff's Of Florida Timothy Wall Royal Palm Beach Rita Folate
Mom Committed, Husband Pleads Not Guilty to Kids' Murders

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Mom Committed, Husband Pleads Not Guilty to Kids' Murders

"A man at the center of a grim saga of alleged murder doomsday believes in missing children has pleaded not guilty in Idaho courtroom appearing before judge Steven Boyce Chad day bell pleaded not guilty to murder charges handed down by a grand jury in connection with the death of his late wife and his new wife two children eight felony charges of them filed on the grand jury's indictment day they'll rent a small publishing company with his wife Tammy Dave bell who died in October twenty nineteen authorities grew suspicious when he remarried Laurie valoe just two weeks later police began searching for lorries two youngest children seven year old Josh with aloe known as JJ and seventeen year old Kylie Ryan the hearing was on the one year anniversary of when the children's bodies were found buried on day bills property in eastern Idaho the day bells espouse an apocalyptic system of religious belief on Tuesday afternoon Lori day bell was committed to a mental health facility if convicted Chad day bell could face life in prison or the death penalty I'm Jennifer king

Chad Day Bell Judge Steven Boyce Tammy Dave Bell Laurie Valoe Idaho Kylie Ryan Aloe Josh Lori Day Bell Jennifer King
Interview With Yessica M. Avila Barojas, Poet, Creator

Influx Collectiv: The Podcast

01:59 min | Last week

Interview With Yessica M. Avila Barojas, Poet, Creator

"You so much for being here with us today yesica. I like to start off with asking. How are you feeling today. I got used to saying. Okay saying okay for like the whole year because that's a loaded question. But i think over okay. I wonder. I don't know if you wanna go into that a little bit more. But i found that answer quite interesting. Can you tell us a little bit more about what you mean by. Okay yeah. I just feel like especially at work. We use mabrukeh groups in all of this during staff meetings. But we don't go into the deep. Nor would i feel comfortable sharing some of the stuff. Some of my coworkers solid at times. I have to say i'm okay. And then what people that. i am closer with. I can elaborate more on like what it is behind that. Okay but that behind. Okay we'll take more than five minute discussion. So that's why i got used to say the. Yeah and i mean okay in the sense that i am here and i feel very fortunate to be here and there are things todd like outside of my house i like happening but in here. It's safe and it's okay in that alone is it's not great but it's this holding onto the okay. I really like that. I'm like i wrote it. Down us is holding onto the okay. That sounds really cool. So can you tell us just a little bit about you. Sure my name. My full name is yes. Avi lombardo has i was born in awe decided. I could lose. My family. Mine came to this country. When i was three years old. So i've been raced in la for most of my life and then in my mid twenty s. I decided to leave home. once. I got daca. Free So then i moved to san francisco oakland in an portland. And that's where. I met my my partner who is not my wife and now we have a one year pup. So that's that's what happened during the pandemic

Avi Lombardo Todd LA Oakland San Francisco Portland
Selling Your Business Is Simpler Than You Think

The EcomCrew

02:15 min | Last week

Selling Your Business Is Simpler Than You Think

"Allegedly. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you mike. I'm happy to be europe. It's great to finally get to talk to you types. You all this hype here. And he remember we've talked quite a bit through email and also in the webinars but this is the first one. I think i've heard your voice. Oh okay actually met once and dewey. Yeah where was that are we. Sarah scott volkers. He had a couple years ago. You forgot it was like brand accelerator live. That was a great event. And i apologize. I mean i end up back in the days. When we had events i would meet to three hundred people you know at one time. It's hard to keep everybody straight and so correct. But i'm glad that we got a chance to to meet then and now i've done the know your snell if we met i would really remember you. You've been an awesome addition to the community and it's cool. I think that whenever we start a business we don't think about necessarily like. I want to sell it one day but ultimately i guess that is the goal at the end the day. If you really think about it you don't start it to just eventually folded or close it or give up on any of those things. I think the ultimate goal is to sell it. And you've reached that part of the journey. So i think that it will be cold to go back and kind of chronologically talk about and talk about the shell when we get to that point so. I'm looking forward to doing that. Yeah so i always ask this. I mean like how did you get. Starting e commerce whole thing it started is a great story. I think i started when i'm sixty one years old. I just kinda looked at what we had saved. My husband. And i and i went. You know. i think we're not gonna have enough one or die starting ecommerce business and at that time the amazing selling machine was opening. Its doors and i just jumped in and went okay. I can learn anything. I'll give it a try and reinvent myself. So that's what i did. I i had no idea I was ever going to really make any major dollars. I thought what i was gonna do and hopefully was maybe three or four thousand dollars profit every month to our bottom line and that would be great. But i reached cycle and four

Sarah Scott Volkers Dewey Snell Mike Europe
Approx 75% of Ontario Home Sales NOT Being Inspected

Toronto Real Estate Unfiltered

02:28 min | Last week

Approx 75% of Ontario Home Sales NOT Being Inspected

"Many as seventy five percent of properties in the ontario area might be might be in the process of being bought and sold without home inspections. This is based on an article in the in the cbc recently And this was a poll from land. Inkster the secretary of young terrier association of certified home inspectors. Who believes that on conversation. He's having with inspectors throughout the province less than twenty five percent of all homes. Sales are being inspected so that means seventy five percent. Properties could possibly be being sold without inspections done. Obviously these are not scientifically one hundred percent accurate numbers. But if it's anywhere close to that the you know the article says and this is the one of the quotes in the in. The article says that this is a this is a situation where antero buyers could be in in in big trouble by not doing their due diligence. So this podcast is about making sure that you guys understand not just that you know the fact that you should be doing this but why you should be doing it and the reason why you should be doing it is because you want to know as much or more any property than anyone else does including the owners of that property and the listing agent and. That's something i've done for twenty one years now in always do this. I always want to do as much homework as much background research and do as much Find out as many stories. As i can about the area about other issues in the area developments everything that has to do with the enjoyment of that property and although i might not live in every single neighborhood that my clients want to live in. I always put myself in position that if i was going to live in that property what would i do to make myself feel safe and confident about it and this is really what i wanna pass on to. You guys the importance of doing that homework and doing everything that you need to do. So as a buyer you need to understand that you are not in a position where even if you are bidding on a property which you might not wanna do even if you're bidding on a property you have the option to do a pre home inspection before putting in your

Young Terrier Association Of C Antero Inkster CBC Ontario
Winker's 3 Homers Lift Reds Over Cards 8-7 for 4-Game Sweep

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Winker's 3 Homers Lift Reds Over Cards 8-7 for 4-Game Sweep

"Jesse winters third Homer of the game gave the Reds in eight seven win over the cardinals and Cincinnati's first four game sweep of St Louis in twenty one years I just try to hit the ball hard it got up and got out you know and then when I saw it clear the fence I was so so excited weaker had six RBIs hitting a two run Homer in the first of three run shot in the second and the go ahead drive against Alex Ramos he's tied for the NL leading round trippers with seventeen following his second three Homer game of the season a U. any us were as editor two run double while the red still to seven nothing lead but Tyler o'neill had a two run Homer in the seven run sixth for the cardinals who have lost five straight for the first time since August twenty eighteen I'm the ferry

Jesse Winters Homer Alex Ramos Cardinals Reds St Louis Cincinnati Tyler O NL Neill
Pros & Cons of Inherited Tenants

Real Estate Rookie

01:56 min | Last week

Pros & Cons of Inherited Tenants

"So today's question is when you purchase a property with attendant already in the middle of their lease. Can you increase the rent or do you have to wait until their lease is up. So that's pretty straightforward. Answer is depends on the lease is a a month to month lease or one year lease or a two year lease so of their leases. Not yet you have to wait until their lease is up there. On a month to month lease you can give them notice that you're going to increase their rent or you can give them notice that one releases up you are going to increase it. If say they have six months left on the lease and look at your state laws because some states like new york state they have different requirements as of the time period. For you to give notice that. You're not going to renew a lease or that. You are going to increase the rent. So i don't know exactly but it's something like if the person has lived there for less than a year it's thirty days notice if they lived there for two years. It's sixty day notice any longer than that. You have to give maybe ninety days notice so make sure you know your state laws and regulations to when you are giving notice that you're going to increase the rent. Tony what do you have. Yeah because the only thing i'd add is that sometimes there are situations where maybe there isn't at least in place right like the owner. The landlord their current owner doesn't know where it's at or can't remember what it was and i haven't purchased a property where i've inherited attendance but in talking with some of my other investing friends one of the things that they use it's called an stoppable agreement and basically you just get the current party so the owner the landlord and the current tenant to sign the agreement saying. Hey here's what we believe the current terms of the lease to be that way when you step into it as the owner. You're not surprised by the owner. Told me that this is what was happening but attended thinks that this is what's happening and then you're kinda stuck between a rock and a hard place and a stop agreement as a way to kind of get past that

New York Tony
The Material World Remade with Dr. Beverly Lemire

Dressed: The History of Fashion

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

The Material World Remade with Dr. Beverly Lemire

"Dr lemere a warm welcome. Beverly thank you so much for joining me today on dressed. it's just a great pleasure. Thank you for asking and of course we're here today to discuss your wonderful book. Global trade and the transformation of consumer cultures the material world remade circa fifteen hundred eighteen twenty. But before we dive into this fascinating topic. I mean there's of fascinating topics related to this book. I would actually love to hear a little bit about your career path and how you came to writing about dress and fashion and also about global consumer history. That's sorta to step answers that i'll give you so. I guess i should confess. My academic trajectory was rather unorthodox I did one year of university. And then i quit. My dad was so upset and vote for a number of years. And then i went back to university by that time i had three year old daughter and i was married and i'd experienced different things and so i think i think that life experience ensured that life experience led me to have different questions. I loved history. I love seeing the connection between now. And then. But i was also from malate undergraduate days i was really interested in fashion design understood fashion as a social cultural economic force. An irish pretty sure that it might be the case that in the historical period is well ordinary people played a role. And so i had questions about varies sales. The first questions. I had were to do with the indian contract between india for about sixteen hundred or so to england and the fashion changes that took place in the political ramifications leading to the industrial revolution. So i was lucky in that every question i had inevitably when i answered it to my satisfaction led to our

Dr Lemere Beverly India England
Performance Marketing In The Influencer World with Shane Austrie

MarTech Podcast

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Performance Marketing In The Influencer World with Shane Austrie

"Talking about performance marketing when you're actually trying to drive clicks direct response results in today's disaggregated influencers and creator focused world traditionally influence market. And i've been doing it. Ever since. Two thousand fifteen but as it became more pauperize after twenty eighteen basically we have seen be integrated a lot more into experts companies instead of just guerrilla marketing by smaller companies. You'll see enterprise companies actually put this into their one year plan however they put it underneath. The brand awareness budget is not underneath the performance marketing budget. Best the issue because freeness influence the marketing. It's more possible realize and if you look back at the beginning of the internet. We did the same exact thing where we had platform. He had opportunities to advertise at us. Irs and just charge on. We'll think of as a brand where does not charge me on a cost per view and not care about our why but as we know yes. Brand awareness is important for ltv along ltv. However with his marketing we do need to see return before. Marketing is a whole budget by itself within most enterprises so now that it was marketed is now mainstream. The question is hey wiser. William brand wears why can be performance market. And that's something that's actually being worked on by my team and i and we're constantly working see. Hey what brands and what. Creators can net so the caramel synergetic leadership to me. It's an ad tracking issue. That's the problem here. We say influence marketing. It's a awareness driving campaign because they're on instagram and they post a photo of whatever product we have and we can't track whether that person comes into maybe there's a promo code or vanity. You are album. You're only capturing a small percentage of the people that are actually exposed the ad that come to your website and then redeem that code. So it's really hard to track so it must be just good for awareness. It's not driving direct response results if we can't track it

LTV William Brand IRS
Andrew Alliance Shares His Review of Dying Light 2

DLC

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Andrew Alliance Shares His Review of Dying Light 2

"Andrew you our guests she get first pick of stories. What would you consider to be your story of the week. Dying light was really good. I'm glad we're able to get an update from them. And i watched the trailer and it was absolutely amazing. So just the divide for. I am legend and higher able to go through the city. And it's it's beautiful. And i'm glad we've got an update from those guys so absolutely fantastic. Yeah we got. We got a number of pre three games being showcased trying to get a little spotlight before the big week of the summer of games is what was really gonna be and a number of games like i said getting the spotlight. Getting a game played trailers for the first time. I'm sure we'll talk about all of them. I was gonna go grab. I completely forgot before we started. I was going to go. Grab my t shirt. That i got. That says dying too. I saw at first year. Which i think is at least two years old. Maybe three years old at least two years old. Yeah still have that shirt. I saw at first. But i didn't see it before right before it came out because it's been quite a while but it sounds like it's actually coming out december seven dying light to as you said We got a a new gameplay trailer. We get the official title which is dying light to stay human. Stay human. you know like that. Try to avoid being something other than you and yeah they talk about a number of big game play systems that result from choices that consequences happen based on how you interact with the world a lot of zombies chasing ya ngo you are fan of this franchise i take it. This is why you're excited i. I'm excited. I don't really play a lot of like you know horror games but there's just something abided than i. I want to

Andrew
How Ditching the Drink Set Me Free With Loyiso Mkele

Goodbye to Alcohol

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

How Ditching the Drink Set Me Free With Loyiso Mkele

"I live in eldorado park the south of tobruk. I'm a forty one year old mother off one. I have a ten year old boy. He's fine he's a bit of a headache. But you know how boys can be. I stay with my son and my mom in our family home and moved back home after i went to the uk. I mean to the u. s. for work and then i wasn't sure what to do for a living and is subsequently started a research company. I have market research agency. Which is what. I'm doing at the moment and i have a healthcare catering business which has expanded into beijing. And i'll tell you about it at some point in this interview because that's relevant so louis so. When did you first start worrying about the wine a little bit. I seem to remember you. Facebook message megyn of the blue and said i'm worried about my. Yeah i did. I was so happy and surprised to have good you interview on the radio. One of your first ones on 702 Jen i know you from way back so when i heard your name on the radio and we're doing this world without wind thing i thought oh my goodness this is right up alley. I've always been way of that. My drinking was going to be bed. So iran when i was a teenager. I don't know if i came across some literature or something. But i suddenly realized i was really predisposed to becoming an because i had a parent who was one. My father was a heavy heavy heavy drinker. He's late now. And so i became really stocky aware of the fact that i might end up becoming a heavy drinker. I did for most of college. Avoid drinking so. I stopped taking that little bud. Lav class of champagne that we have on christmas or new year. We do that as as black families. We have that one last to celebrate once or twice a year. So when i was about sixteen i stopped having their class because i was like. I'm going to become an alcoholic. Here i know with this is going so i didn't touch. I touched booze. But i really regulated up until i was about twenty five when i was working now i i had a stable income. I had a stable life. I worked for the municipality. I slipped into this routine of going to work coming from work. Going to gym by myself a storm and this became thing it became. I started having one every single day. And that's when it started.

Eldorado Park Tobruk Headache Beijing Louis UK Facebook Iran
"one year" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

06:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"one year" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Lease thank you so much for spending time with us again. I talked to you exactly one year ago. Gosh when mr george it has been one year. And i'm so glad to have you back as we honor that date and what we all saw and learned from it and grieve that date and i'm really interested in talking with you today about where you think we are one year later. What is giving you hope what is still to be done. What is concerning to you in in terms of what we have or haven't learned so i'll just start with a really broad question as you think about it being a year from when mr floyd was murdered her that sit with you. Well well i think that one year ago before flowing was murdered we already had a string of murders of black people in their homes while jogging. You know Someone who had the cops called on him in central park for telling a white woman to to leash her dog and she accused him of attacking her was all before the uprisings. And i think that what happened in the midst of the uprisings in this severe times actually various contexts is i believe it was a time of revelation and that for people of european descent in america. I don't know why but for some reason. More people of european descent could see in a way that they couldn't see after and because of dr. george. Floyd i think that the uprising had a lot to do with it. I think that honestly. I think seeing one hundred twenty three cities burn at one time literally scared the bejesus out of white people and that's when they began to understand how serious this is. Because it's not. Even just the george floyd died because he died in at that point when he died you know there was marching in the street in minneapolis. But it was after one hundred and twenty three cities had coordinated and felt like a coordinated like we take this. No more kind of moment. So i think that there's more truth being spoken more truthfully and more people of european descent and other and others actually who have bought into he internalized oppression and bought into the european worldview. There are more who are listening really listening not just hearing but listening so i have hope because of that i have hope because the response of particularly white women after the work that we did last fall in particular last really last june all the way through the ball that more white women understand that it's not enough to feel bad that they actually have to follow the lead in action of people of color. I have hope because of that. But i am also deeply aware profoundly aware her hunting lee aware that the actual work that needs to be done hasn't been done yet. The actual work of re forming our public safety system. Which we don't have. We don't have a public safety system. We have a penal system and the penal system is really good at penalizing people for things. That probably should not be penalized. It should be cared for just yesterday. It was reported that in louisiana two years ago a man forty nine year old barber by the name of ronald green ronald green was driving and we do not know how he came into confrontation with these cops but it seems like he was trying to evade them trying to try not to be stopped by them probably because he knew what would happen and he was scared he told them i i was scared. I'm sorry i was scared in. He was completely compliant when they stopped. You can see it now if no body camera video. That was released yesterday but yet they tased him again and again and again and again so much so that bled came from his body. They punched him after that. They pulled him out of the car. Put him face down on the ground they hog tied him and then his limp body. They dragged to their car. Face down the gravel. These are police officers. These are people who are charged with protecting and serving and they loaded his limp body into the back of their car and dropped him off at the hospital and said he got into an accident. He hit a tree. But the the coroner whose name is an african name he said this doesn't add up because there were two tasers talents in the back of his prongs in the back of his back. He said this doesn't add up. It wasn't a tree crashed. Killed this man. And the video was held by the louisiana precinct for two years and not shown. This man's body was buried and the story was burying until yesterday when the ap released the video. We're seeing what happened then and we're seeing what can continue to have because it hasn't been dismantled yen. Those people are still there. The cop who is believed to have killed ronald green is dead. I think he died. Ironically in a car crash but not before it was revealed that he had done this to other black men in the same area so i i don't know if i have hope i have hope because god is but i am also in awe of how behemoth our our task is. I just think we have to end it. We have.

america two years minneapolis forty one year ago today one year later louisiana two years ago Floyd yesterday one year ronald green last fall george floyd african george floyd flowing one hundred twenty three citie
"one year" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

06:26 min | 3 weeks ago

"one year" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"So a year ago on may twenty fifth twenty twenty. George floyd died after derek. Chauvin former minneapolis. Police officer put his knee on. George floyd's neck for over nine minutes. The encounter was filmed and slowly made. Its way across social media and the internet until most americans had seen this horrific encounter and it sparked weeks of protests and a a reckoning in america about racial injustice and policing in our criminal justice system. Here we are a year later. Derek chauvin has been convicted in his sentencing will be coming up soon as well as the trial of the other officers on the scene that day and we are still in the middle of that reckoning we have lots of state and local changes when it comes to policing federal legislation that still being negotiated and debated and we wanted to go through some of that here today and talk about what's happened over this past year. Twenty cities have reduced their police budgets in some form that means across the united states. A total of about eight hundred forty million dollars has been subtracted from what we spend on policing twenty. Five cities have ended contracts with police to operate in their school systems in minneapolis. Where mr floyd was murdered. Police funding has been cut by a million dollars. The city reinvested two million dollars in community based violence prevention programs and a new mobile mental health team. All of this is happening as americans attitudes. Continue to be in a bit of flux about what the right answers are here. Axes ipsos polling. Shows that about seventy percent of people opposed the idea of defunding the police including a slight majority of black americans. But then if you ask of if americans support changes to policing diverting some police funds to community policing services a majority of respondents endorsed that goal over the past year we've also seen crime going up now it's hard to know you know what's correlation with causation. Given the pandemic. there are lots of extenuating circumstances including you know the increased tension surrounding this racial reckoning for example seattle cut. Its police budget. Almost twenty percent and finished twenty twenty with its highest homicide rate in decades increased. Response times just this weekend. We had several shootings in cities across america. I don't think there's a major. Us city that hasn't experienced some increase in crime. And so that brings a total different facet to the conversation. Because you know when crime goes up. People are afraid. I think safety is one of the most basic needs that people expect the government to meet. And when there's increased crime be it you know burglaries or homicide. It lends to atmosphere fear and when we are afraid our public policy suffers. I think it it. Shortens timeframe and increases are reactivity increases conflict between groups. Who feel like they have to compete for resources or compete for attention. And i think that that not to mention just the trauma and fallout and the ripple effect across these communities as violence increases to the people who lose loved ones to the people who lose their lives to the children affected by violence so we have this really difficult situation. And i think what's really hard about. It is what you're seeing in policing is not just some cut to funding but hit a real crisis when it comes to recruiting and retaining police officers. It seems like instead of defunding the police. We've really demoralized them. And that to me increases the crisis level reactivity. It's sort of the the worst of both worlds or instead of a careful and thoughtful approach to reform or a careful and thoughtful approach to defunding police if that is your actual goal. We're getting the worst of both worlds. We're just you know creating a crisis in recruitment so that we can't take the time and resources we need to do either reform or a complete reimagining of police the way we want to especially in the context of an increase in crime. I think it's i felt so hopeful at this time last year that things were really going to change and i still see that change and i still feel that we have made tremendous progress especially when it comes to this country wide sort of community level understanding of race relations and the impact of policing but it feels like if we're not in the the messy middle of trying to figure out what this looks like on the ground. We're getting awful close and that part is very very hard. I appreciate that in talking about the increase in crime and police. Violence people are starting to recognize all of the contradictions. That are inherent in this top. I was listening to as reclines podcast. With james foreman junior and he talked about how crime both follows and exacerbates inequality. And i think that's a really important point to hover on. There's been lots of reporting about how communities feel correctly. Both over police and underpoliced leads not get the benefit of public safety but they get disproportionately targeted by police and so there are so many seeming contradictions. That are true at once. And i don't really know how to solve this problem. I do fear that some of our best resources on what we could do especially coming out of this pandemic to make our communities safer are people who are sitting in prisons right now when you really spend time in listen to someone who has been incarcerated especially someone who's been incarcerated for a crime committed out of just a set of awful circumstances and choices. They know a lot about what happens in these communities and what people need to.

james foreman two million dollars Chauvin George floyd Twenty cities Five cities last year twenty twenty may twenty fifth twenty twenty minneapolis a year later today Derek chauvin floyd about eight hundred forty mill a year ago a million dollars both worlds america over nine minutes
A highlight from Episode 111: $50M Is Just the Beginning for AnD Ventures

From the Midwest to the Middle East

01:44 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Episode 111: $50M Is Just the Beginning for AnD Ventures

"You're managing partner of again. I hope i'm pronouncing it right. A and d ventures which is as i from your website is quote unquote redefining value investing. Can you tell my listeners. How your mission distinguishes you from other venture capital funds either a n. d. r. n. ventures. We define ourselves as a company. Builder based fund my partner. And i were in the industry for many years before establishing in and we saw These gaps for let's say early stage founders When they founding their company and a lot of help in really building the company for the first year year s and if you really look at fifty percent of the startup of the israeli start ups are failing for execution. And we wanna be there when they starting to build our company until they kind of heating gross and help them build it. We really aim to come as a partner for the company so we're not just investing or not just taking a board seat were actively helping to founders establishing companies And when we investing we architect the needs With enterpreneurs of the company manny focusing on detect that the base will be strong The products dacian which means okay have a great product to have customers for it And who are my customers so right from the beginning and then i think what's really really important Not just freeze rallies. But in general to grow is the execution of cells so detraction itself We work very hard with venture. Poor helping them bring customers for like the first year or two. That's where we think this is kind of the secret sauce helping from within it's It sounds like a a winning

Natarsha March:Utilise Video to Build a Successful Newborn Photography Business

PhotoBiz Xposed

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Natarsha March:Utilise Video to Build a Successful Newborn Photography Business

"You'll background was with tv. And it sounds like video video editing. How did you know to build the khanda website that you have and has that been a slow evolution or did you sort of hit the ground running with the web saw another that had to be a big focus. Yeah absolutely sorry. I am very computer illiterate. I'm on say really. Avoiding really hundred present also taught in terms of website so i have built my website hundred percent from scratch on wax and i built it about it on wax because wicks free and for about the first year even had like all the ads and stuff on an early days very early of the business when it was just sort of my friends that were sort of booking and that but then what happened was out of time the you do something he get at it. And so while. I wasn't shooting high numbers and high volume. I was working on the behemoth of my business sir during the kids naps and when their own the dice that they were at daycare or you know sometimes it was always something that fascinated me and i am the sort of person that loves to learn and loves to know how to do something for myself. Sorry thankfully wicks as a website is actually really drag and drop. Its really simple and it just makes sense to me. And then they did start to incorporate html cartons are dr. How courage but do i ever need to. Hired is probably not if i do. I just outsource that. So it's one of the few things that i do outside of my

Wicks
"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We only discovered that towards the end of the shuttle program so we don't have as much shuttle data as we do for other things so the short duration missions will be important for us as well so we can see that time. course. I see So let's move onto bone and joint Actually from what. I have in my notes. Jerry you are the you are the person to go through the the rest of the disciplines here so you want to kick us off with bone joint sure. Yeah i mentioned went into a little bit earlier. So i'll give you a little bit more information on that so really. The goal is to look at how bone changes is is. Their loss of a mineral ballots is awesome. Strength and micro architecture changes Look at college health. And how the those bone and joint interact And really take a broad look at. Hey how does this change. And then how is that. Readopt patient happened after those different links of mission. and does that happen That recovery happened a lot slower on this one year. Crew that the media to prepare for us we go for those longer missions. So for bone and joint. There's a lot of imaging that happened. So am are is computed tomography And then they're part of that great group that has organized The blood the blood measure. So they'll do a lot of biomarker analysis as well now what about muscle physiology. What can we expect their great. We kinda grew muscle geology and egress fitness together. Just because it's more as Movement no awake to do things for for muscle for the allergy in particular for. We're really looking at aerobics. Fitness muscle mass strengthening. Its changes over the time so really. How does that person d- condition during flight other changes the muscle. Mass are they as strong as they were on the ground And get a clue on how we can help to the longer duration crew where looking at muscle mass loss helped him exercise to have different ways for them to exercise in the future For egress fitness types of things. Really what happens to the crew during flight when they land how can they. How can we help and be able to get out of the capsule for example on bars and perform the tasks that they need at. They had such a long journey. So we're really trying to understand once once they land..

Jerry one year once
"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

06:04 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"What are your expectations for the future to get the data that you need well. We are working closely with the eye test program and the commercial crew program to figure out exactly how we are going to enable these missions. There are some technical difficulties that have to be overcome But you know we're working with them. 'cause they're very supportive of the research that we're doing because they know has said you know it's very necessary for us to get to mars to get to understand how the human body changes and how we can make the human body safe and have our crew members still perform at their peak performance on that long three year mission duration to mars and back very good so go into the The disciplines here steve. I want to start with you to kick us off There's six i guess disciplines. And then i guess maybe i'm saying it wrong so feel free to correct me and then i heard seventeen. Study something like that So so let's kick off with a cardio envisioned What are some of the things we can expect to see. Sure cardio ambition vision We're looking at how the heart changes would stay slate. We're looking at structure function shape. Its ability to contract. We're also looking at the blood vessels We have some evidence that shows that blood vessels come to get stiffer during spaceflight and we're trying to explore that especially for one year But also for the vision part. We have a an issue that is called sands Spaceflight associated neuro ocular syndromes and for some astronauts the shape of their eyeball changes and their vision. Changes a little bit. And so. that's a risk that we're really interested in figuring out and so we have a fair amount of studies while a fair amount of measurements. That will be doing to try and isolate that. And so again the time course. It's going to be very important. We only discovered that towards the end of the shuttle program so we don't have as much shuttle data as we do for other things so the short duration missions will be important for us as well so we can see that time. course. I see So let's move onto bone and joint Actually from what. I have in my notes. Jerry you are the you are the person to go through the the rest of the disciplines here so you want to kick us off with bone joint sure. Yeah i mentioned went into a little bit earlier. So i'll give you a little bit more information on that so really. The goal is to look at how bone changes is is. Their loss of a mineral ballots is awesome. Strength and micro architecture changes Look at college health. And how does the those bone and joint interact And really take a broad look at. Hey how does this change. And then how is that. Readopt patient happened after those different links of mission. and does that happen That recovery happened a lot slower on this one year. Crew that the media to prepare for us you go for those longer missions. So for bone and joint. There's a lot of imaging that happened. So am are is quantitative. Computed tomography And then they're part of that great group that has organized The blood the blood measure. So they'll do a lot of marker analysis as well now what about muscle physiology. What can we expect their great. We kinda grew muscle geology and egress fitness together. Just because it's more as Movement no awake to do things for for muscle for the allergy in particular for. We're really looking at aerobics. Fitness muscle mass strengthening. Its changes over the time so really. How does that person d- condition during flight other changes the muscle. Mass are they as strong as they were on the ground And get a clue on how we can help to the longer duration crew where looking at muscle mass loss helped him exercise to have different ways for them to exercise in the future For egress fitness types of things. Really what happens to the crew during flight when they land how can they. How can we help and be able to get out of the capsule for example on bars and perform the tasks that they need at. They had such a long journey. So we're really trying to understand once once they land. What what are they capable of doing. And where we need to provide assistance in the future. And what about the the stimulus system quite similar system. Does that organ and understanding the changes that happened and how that impacts the crew and how in their responses Nobody wants the crew to have that. Space motion sickness That's going to impede their ability to function throughout either the mission and when they return or when they land on mars so we're going to assess that system understand the changes that happen and look at ways that we may be able to mitigate those changes and help for your mission and Finally sheri to round us off cognition and behavioral health condition and behavioral health. What what you think of When we say so looking at how the crew member adapt behaviorally to the situation Looking at hey. Do they have the same sleep. Duration quality what set effects on their behavioral performance and their cognitive performance. We have them do particular tasks are they able to do those with the same fidelity early the mission mid-mission or late in the mission as they were before they flew to make short at the crew was able to actually perform the tasks that we're asking them. Reform now steve When you're taking a snapshot at all of these different studies the thing that's going through my mind right. You're talking about Engels thirty right so that's a lot of a lot of folks. I'm thinking to get good day right. You need consistent data which means you need What i'm thinking is this is all going to be happening in. Low earth orbit right. That's the plan okay. Yeah lower orbit..

Jerry one year three year six sheri seventeen mars steve disciplines thirty Engels
"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Inflight light which for cipher starts about nine months prior to when they launch for the duration of this white and goes about three years after they land. Oh wow that's Yeah that's a commitment for sure what what interested me about. That was the The three years afterwards. So steve back to you for a second When you're talking about post-flight what does that look like. What exactly is meaningful for you to get over the course of that three years. Well one of the most important things is the time course of recovery right so we expect to see things change in space. We expect to see the cardiovascular system change we expect to see the nervous system change we expect to see the shape and structure of the eyeball change. When they come back. We want to see how quickly it comes back to normal and in just regular space research that is often the most neglected part of a study and so nasa has made a very concerted effort to look at those recovery curves in three years of recovery. Let me tell you. That's kind of unheard of. You don't usually get that much recovery data because you know a crew. Mira comes back and then they get assigned other duties and and they're busy but as i said you know they're making this commitment to do the resource for so three years. It's fantastic and we'll do. Multiple data takes in early timeframe. The first three months or so. Let's say it's probably the most important because that's where we typically see the most change right so if they're eyeball shape has changed. It comes back you know relatively quickly but then it kind of plateaus out in the same thing happens with muscle and heart size. They tend to have these buffets recovery curves. And so we're we're looking at what that looks like now. This is going to help us get to mars. And that's the reason we're doing it because right now we have a lot of data from shuttle we have a fair amount of data from six month missions and we have as you said earlier and of one of american crew for one year but the.

one year six month first three months Mira one mars nine months american three years
"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:17 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I see so Sherry walk us through. Let's just say. I'm a crew member going to the international space station and let's just say ongoing for Your standard six month duration. What's that gonna look like from preflight to actual flight to post-flight what what sorts of activities can. I be expected to participate in as a space station. crew member. Actually here let me take that one. So if you're gonna do. The the fighter study remember. We have three different Durations what will happen is about a year before your mission. Neil start doing our experiments. So we'll have scans of your body won't be doing questionnaires. We'll be doing blood draws of doing ultrasound all those kind of things to all those different Organ systems will And then once you get into flight. We will replicate a lot of those studies now. Some of them. We can't do because the equipment to do them. There's only available here on her. Like the the big x ray machine. St- they way way too much. Take too much space to fly to the space station but we do have ultrasound so we'll do a lot of ultrasound studies up there we'll do blood draws saliva year and he goes samples all those kinds of things and then when you return as soon as you return hit the ground will be doing studies and we'll do various things again. Lots of blood draws for live will be doing. Scans again as soon as they get back to. Jse will be doing the scans with the big machines as well so it's a lot of work And it's a big commitment from the crew and you know we tell them long before the work is going to be and we get great cooperation from the crew. They really wanna participate in the science. They see it as part of their mission and so they're very dedicated to and so it could be years of follow up work after the one year missions. So like i say. It's a lot of work but we're very grateful to the crew for volunteering. Did you yeah looking back at one. Year mission i think One of the or even even the twin study to there was this And and i might be saying it. Wrong steve so so feel free to correct me. As the problem with the study not Just as a whole is that you have such a small sample size you got to crew members for the for the one year mission and then you got the for for the twin study. Got scott kelly and And mark kelly And and then. That's it right. So what's nice about cipher. It sounds like is now as long as you can get the a good amount of participation from the astronaut corps you can have a larger sample size and have more meaningful data. That's exactly right and that's the way we planned it out so as you said very low and one or two so the previous one year mission. But as you've heard already. This is going to be an end of thirty right so ten. Ten short duration ten what we consider regular duration. That's the six-month crew and then ten one year mission and so our staff. Even though i can just see the look on some scientists facials out there who are you doing. The clinical work and they do thousands of people but at nasa. We never have that luxury right so for us and thirty is huge and so where ore. We're very very excited to have that much data that we can go back and look at very cool now nikki when it comes to talking about this much data right. You're obviously trying to pitch to astronauts like hey we got this great integrated study coming out. We want you to participate. We want your We want your We want you to take part in the preflight in during the flight in the postwar The whole suite there so What what is the participation in planning for that look like From from your project management perspective so we have a team of a really great people is sherry said behind us and they help the principal. Investigators cypher develop an informed consent. Everything which is a short Description of what the study wants to look at what types of tests they're going to do. What the risks to some of the tests may be And then this information is presented to the crew member. The crew member can let us know. They're willing to participate or not. And if they are they signed a consent form and then we start going through all of the testing preflight inflight light which for cipher starts about nine months prior to when they launch for the duration of this white and goes about three years after they land. Oh wow that's Yeah that's a commitment for sure what what interested me about. That was the The three years afterwards. So steve back to you for a second When you're talking about post-flight what does that look like. What exactly is meaningful for you to get over the course of that three years. Well one of the most important things is the time course of recovery right so we expect to see things change in space. We expect to see the cardiovascular system change we expect to see the nervous system change we expect to see the shape and structure of the eyeball change. When they come back. We want to see how quickly it comes back to normal and in just regular space research that is often the most neglected part of study. And so nasa has made a very concerted effort to look at those recovery curves in three years of recovery. Let me tell you. That's kind of unheard of. You don't usually get that much recovery data because you know a crew. Mira comes back and then they get assigned other duties and and they're busy but as i said you know they're making this commitment to do the resource for so three years. It's fantastic and we'll do. Multiple data takes in early timeframe. The first three months or so. Let's say it's probably the most important because that's where we typically see the most change right so if they're eyeball shape has changed. It comes back you know relatively quickly but then it kind of plateaus out in the same thing happens with muscle and heart size. They tend to have these buffets recovery curves. And so we're we're looking at what that looks like now. This is going to help us get to mars. And that's the reason we're doing it because right now we have a lot of data from shuttle we have a fair amount of data from six month missions and we have as you said earlier and of one of american crew for one year but the mars mission is gonna take about three so if we can get more crew members more data for that one year when we're plotting out and constructing models for we expect to see. We will have a lot more confidence in predicting what's likely to happen Going to mars. I see so so nikki Comes to the types of missions right. We talked short. Duration standard duration extended duration What is is that gonna look like. Does that means right. We can expect to see some some somewhere. Some crew members on the international space station very soon conducting one year missions. I'm curious how those short duration missions are going to be conducted..

Neil six month six-month Sherry mark kelly scott kelly two mars Ten ten first three months One one year thirty nasa sherry steve nikki twin study one year mission
"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"What's that gonna look like from preflight to actual flight to post-flight what what sorts of activities can. I be expected to participate in as a space station. crew member. Actually here let me take that one. So if you're gonna do. The the fighter study remember. We have three different Durations what will happen is about a year before your mission. Neil start doing our experiments. So we'll have scans of your body won't be doing lots of questionnaires. We'll be doing blood draws of doing ultrasound all those kind of things. all those different Organ systems will And then once you get into flight. We will replicate a lot of those studies now. Some of them. We can't do because the equipment to do them. There's only available here on her. Like the the big x ray machine. St- they way way too much. Take too much space to fly to the space station but we do have ultrasound so we'll do a lot of ultrasound studies up there we'll do blood draws saliva year and he goes samples all those kinds of things and then when you return as soon as you return hit the ground will be doing studies and we'll do various things again. Lots of blood draws for live We'll be doing scans again as soon as they get back to. Jse will be doing the scans with the big machines as well so it's a lot of work And it's a big commitment from the crew and you know we tell them long before what the work is going to be and we get great cooperation from the crew. They really wanna participate in the science. They see it as part of their mission and so they're very dedicated to and so it could be years of follow up work after the one year missions. So like i say. It's a lot of work but we're very grateful to the crew for volunteering. Did you yeah looking back at one..

Neil one year about a year before three different Durations one Jse
"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Really look at how the bone changes so the law structure my book texture changes and even some of the challenges about changes in the cartlidge and ultimate balanced owning our balance changes. So we have about. Four p is that are looking into those of Research and understanding. How the space spaceflight cages over that horse for the bones and joints. So that's a that's a really good example When you're thinking about just that You know this is just one aspect of it right. There's a lot of different aspects to this But and it's an integrative study and there's there's kind of a wide expanse of timeframes that you're talking about here Really you're trying to collect a lot of data so for you for your team for everyone. That's involved really the p. Is why is this integrated protocol. Why is this effort. Cipher so important. Yeah that's great question so the reason we're doing cyber and we're really excited about the the biggest That we've done to really look across the whole humid in space white and understand how the changes that occur. How that happened to the whole human. We'll look at different disciplines but we're going to integrate that and look at the changes in relation to each of the disciplines himself. So right now. We have a lot of data for those particular six month missions. And this study. We're going to look at short six week missions. We're gonna look at six months and we're gonna look at year mission to look at the changes how that happens over the time. Course you give us the information. We need for For us to make it safely to mars what we need to do to help. Help help human naked. That bar necessarily important now. Now steve we've had you on before to talk about the The twin study and that was part of the Well i guess it was a different aspects of the one year mission right when you talk about when nicky and share. You're talking about integrating all these different into a single mission. It's not like this is. This is completely new right. We've done this before with the one year mission so give us a little history here on on what we did before. Sure the previous mission. We had At the time it was the largest single study that we've done Scott kelly did a ton of research more research than we've ever had done by a single crewmember station and yet we talked about having seventeen studies combined into this one cipher..

six month Scott kelly six week seventeen studies six months one year single study one aspect each one year mission single mission Four p one cipher single crewmember twin study research ton
"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"one year" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts. Scientists engineers astronauts to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight. Many may remember the popular one year mission in recent history. Where scott kelly of nasa and mikhail kornyenko of roscosmos spent just about a year on the international space station to understand what happens to the human body in space for that long astronauts today typically spend about six months on station some christina cook have spent closer to two a year and we have a good amount of data from crew members on these long duration flights and quite a lot from short duration missions during shadow where crewmember spent just a few weeks in space but to travel deeper into space. We'll need a good understanding of what happens to the human body for missions that surpass a year a human mission to mars will be just shy of two years at a minimum to better understand this question. Nasa is planning extended missions aboard the international space station a bit closer to home. It sounds like a general question right. What happens to the human body over the course of more than a year in space but the truth is that this single question is being asked from so many angles what happens to the gene expression the vascular calcium vision bones the nervous system. I want to know the answers so an integrated protocol called. Cypher is bringing together. A huge number of disciplines to investigate as many interesting aspects to an extended human mission on the international space station as possible. Of course cypher is an acronym and stands for the compliment of integrated protocols for human exploration research returning to the podcast is dr sherry. Yubari shop described her role as deputy element scientists for flight with nasa research operations and integration element at the johnson space center during episode one twenty-seven essentially as the integrator of all things human research. She is taking the helm as the chief project scientist for cipher. Also returning for the third time on. The podcast is dr steve platz platz the deputy chief scientists of the human research program and was integral in the execution of the twin study which was conducted concurrently along the one year mission and is very familiar with integrating research in a single mission. Nikki schwann beck. Is the deputy element manager for flight with nasa research operations and integration element at the johnson space center and is the project manager for cipher. It's her job to manage the overall project from development to implementation alongside dr yubari. So let's get right into it. The next one year missions with sherry. Yubari steve platt's and nikki schwann beck and joy County your have sherry steve n. Nikki thank you so much for coming on. Houston we have a podcast today. I am very excited to dive into this topic. We're talking about This approach to conducting the future of extended missions. And really. it's a. It's a whole suite. There's a lot of integration going on And i want our audience to i sort of familiarized with our voices because we have your voices because we have three Qualified experts right here. And so i wanna make sure everybody gets a chance to speak and we get to know you guys a little bit. Better nikki sean. I want to start with you. by giving us essentially an overview of what. We're gonna be talking about today cipher. So nicky what is cypher. Pfeiffer is a acronym for the compliment of integrated protocols for human exploration research. It's a compliment of seventeen research. Protocols from nasa in several international partners that look across multiple systems and the human body by collecting data biological samples in various measurements before during an after an astronaut's mission in space. And so you are. The project manager for ciphers. So what's what's your role in running this. We can call it a protocol we can call it a project Whatever you wanna call it. What's your role for my role in. This is as a project manager is to manage the overall project from development implementation alongside. Dr aubrey dr. yubari You are let's see we have you as the chief project. Scientists first hifher So you are We talked you a little bit before on one of our previous episodes about Integrating all of the human research efforts into into Altogether to make sure everyone's talking and no nothing's getting Nothing's getting dropped. And so this might be. This might be sort of the ultimate challenge for you so Kind of describe your role in this as the chief project scientists in your role in integrating everything. Yeah so my role I work with each individual. Pi's and pulled together the research that they need to answer the questions for their particular disciplined and put that into one package that we can implement on each individual crew member so seventeen. Different studies pulled together so a lot of a lot of different people on different moving parts. We have a great team behind us to help us. Put everything together and make it run smoothly and that is That's quite the job there. So when you talk about Seventeen different disciplines gives us a couple examples. What are we talking about. What's all getting pulled into Cypher what what are we what some of the disciplines were considering. So yeah we kinda group it into about six different Groupings of study so seventeen total so start We have some bone and joint studies. That really look at how the bone changes so the law structure my book texture changes and even some of the challenges about changes in the cartlidge and ultimate balanced tone or balance changes. So we have about. Four p is that are looking into those of Research and understanding how the spaceflight cages over that horse for the bones and joints. So that's a that's a really good example When you're thinking about just that You know this is just one aspect of it right. There's a lot of different aspects to this But and it's an integrative study and there's there's a kind of a wide expanse of timeframes that you're talking about here Really you're trying to collect a lot of data so for you for your team for everyone. That's involved really the p. Is why is this integrated protocol. Why is this effort. Cipher so important. Yeah that's great question so the reason we're doing cyber and we're really excited about the the biggest That we've done to really look across the whole humid in space white and understand how the changes that occur. How that happened to the whole human. We'll look at different disciplines but we're going to integrate that and look at the changes in relation to each of the disciplines himself. So right now. We have a lot of data for those particular six month missions. And this study. We're going to look at short six week missions. We're gonna look at six months and we're gonna look at year mission to look at the changes how that happens over the time course and give us the information we need for For us to make it safely to mars what we need to do to help. Help help human naked. That bar necessarily important now steve. We've had you on before to talk about the The twin study and that was part of the Well i guess it was a different aspects of the one year mission right when you talk about when nicky and share. You're talking about integrating all these different into a single mission. It's not like this is. This is completely new right. We've done this before with the one year mission so give us a little history here on on what we did before..

mikhail kornyenko Nikki schwann beck scott kelly two years Nasa six months one year six month six week nasa nikki schwann beck nikki sean aubrey Houston Seventeen different discipline today Yubari shop mars single question one aspect
"one year" Discussed on Daily Grace

Daily Grace

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Daily Grace

"Literally have tears and I'm trying really hard not to ugly cry right now. Thank you guys so much for sending in those audio clips or really just humbles us to hear how the podcast has impacted you and to everyone else who took the time to submit an itunes rating or review. We're just so grateful. We read every single one and truly it humbles us cannot inside at enough and you know we wanted to highlight a couple of those reviews To say thank you for taking the time and just to share how much of an impact it has made on us on this journey of making this podcast so a couple that I chose one is from a sixteen year old girl. And I've mentioned this in an episode before because it really didn't impact me and I wanted to bring it back and actually read a lot of what she said so she sat. I'm a sixteen year old. Who's used to listening to and reading Christian stuff that is geared towards MOMS and wives? I don't think I can explain how refreshing it was to hear them. Say that they knew high-schoolers might be tuning in. Because I think most people assume that high schoolers would rather be sending snaps on snapchat than learning about how to serve aboard. Also the idea that it's not just for MOMS and wise was thrilling. Because I think people forget that you're just as important to the Lord when you're single as married. It was especially lovely. When they said that women are not only meant to be wives and mothers. But first and foremost to be disciples of Christ. This podcast has opened my eyes to a lot of things that I need to work on my heart and his honestly made me feel like I belong in the Christian world as much as anyone else And this review has stuck with me for many reasons why that captures our heart to communicate that the Gospel and our spiritual disciplines are for all seasons of life. You know no matter what our life look like. Our ultimate purpose is the same and that is to glorify God and then to we really do hope to communicate how important every member of the body is and really show how we need each other right. We need each member in the body to be healthy as local church and as the big C church. And so thank you Lindsey Jay Hunt for leaving this review and it really just encouraged us to press on and one more review that I wanted to pull was from Kate. Rc She said. I can't say enough how much I love the daily grace podcast. I listen weekly. I've never listened to a podcast by women for women that has been so challenging. Convicting and encouraging. This is not your average. Listen and feel better about yourself. Podcast these women spend time preparing to teach truth but in such a loving way. I haven't listened to one. Podcast that has not both encouraged and convicted me. Please listen learned with me. Thank you kate for this review and for faithfully listening every week. We're just so grateful. And we appreciate your support and join. I really do prepare for each episode and we make sure that everything we say aligns with scripture and we also pray that we are communicating all of this truth in love and we do hope our listeners always feel a part of the conversation and we really are on this pursuit of holiness together. Wouldn't you say Joanna? Oh yeah absolutely. And it's been so encouraging to see reviews from people of all different life stages I'm new believers seasoned believers and a couple that I wanted to share one is from Pamela Hubbard and this is right back on the podcast I released. She said this podcast is relatable and grounded in the truths of the Gospel. The topics meet you right. Where you are encouraging you to simultaneously grow deeper in Christ will also resting in His grace and I just loved that because our heart is that that would happen that we would rest in who God is and in His grace but also that would empower ass and compel us to growth obedience. Yeah Another one from our farnd she said the focus of daily grace is spot on God his word and the Gospel of Jesus Christ are made much of you'll find solid biblical truth here to help you grow in your love for the Lord which is what transforms every area of your life such joy and hope to be found and that is our prayer that would be made much of the Gospel be made much of here and one more from Amanda Forty two she said so relatable and filling. I've been looking for a podcast. That would really dive into faith in scripture but felt like it was good conversation. This is it. I'm constantly saying Yes to every point made in the episode this'll be a shy can replay over and over and still find things. I missed the first time I especially was touched by this one because our heart for this from the beginning has been that we can offer deep truths of scripture in a way. That is meaningful approachable. Yeah and that actually impacts our daily lives so thank you so much for all of the reviews. There are so many We would've loved to spend hours reading them all but unfortunately we can't do that and but we so appreciate them and I did want to introduce to you. Another person who really helps to make these. Podcasts sound great and that is our editor Jesse. Believe me our podcast would not be what it is without Jesse and so we actually wanted to welcome her onto the podcast. Give you a little behind the scenes info here so Jesse. Thank you for joining us all. Thank you for having me you guys. It's a privilege for sure. Yeah Jesse came on with US. Pretty close to win the podcast first released and it has been such a blessing off the privileges mind. Yeah you guys have no idea how much I stumbled just reading a quote and Jesse just makes that while Jesse we would love to hear from you. We want to share looking back over the past year. What each of our favorite episodes was back in less than if you haven't had a chance. So Jesse what was your favorite episode. Yeah I think My favorite episode for a while as episode twenty five. What's God's will for your life and I think it became an instant favourite honestly because it's just a really important subject matter because I think there's a lot of confusion and the lack of clarity on the subject. I don't feel that at first. I was well taught in this subject and I feel like you ladies really just hit it home and when discerning God's will and decision making I think a lot of us have expected a sign or some sort of emotional confirmation. I know I have but it's just an encouraging reminder to as long as the decision we make doesn't go against scripture or has sinful motives tied with it we are truly free to make that decision and Shirley as we grow in the Lord and the knowledge of his word and we will grow and godly wisdom to make these decisions but we shouldn't expect like a lightning bolt from heaven whatever to affirm decision by any means. And you guys just did a really good job of widening. The scope of God's will and that is just far more than decision making and that even within scripture talks about the will of the Lord's for our sanctification that we abstained from sexual immorality and then in another area rejoice always praise these give. Thanks in all circumstances for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you and I think all of this was just nailed home so well and so clear for me in a just encouraging reminder and surely it was helpful to many people. But I'm curious about you guys though Stephanie. What was your favorite episode in the last year? Yeah I note about the episode. Just mentioned I remember when we were working through that episode thinking man. I wish someone told me this when I was eighteen. Yeah I do hope that that episode continues to serve people all ages and brings clarity on that topic and yeah we're just reminds believers of their freedom in Christ but as far as my favorite episode. I can think of three that stand out but I decided to choose the one out of the three. That's an interview We're really grateful for every single person who takes the time to record with us and speak into a topic Often hard topics that maybe we feel like we just want that extra voice of wisdom to add to the conversation so I'm grateful for everyone that has come on but one interview. That deeply impacted me was episode. Fourteen discipleship and evangelism with Tamsin Baker. And so- Tamsin reminded me how discipleship and evangelism are naturally part of the life of a believer and I actually really listened to the episode This week and gained so much someone said they repeat listening to the episodes and get more and I'm the same way honestly and you know again listening through I was just so encouraged to be consistent and the word you know. She talks about how the little mornings of faithfully reading the word adds up and so it was encouragement to me. Even this week to have this long term mindset and then she also just was such a great example of being purposeful in the mundane so to have is to see windows of opportunities to show the love of Christ and the Gospel and then lastly man I think she exemplified the so well but she was so others oriented she really cared for others and that was just so evident you know not just their spiritual needs but also their tangible you know everyday needs and so yeah just listening again to that episode. I was just you know fired up again and reminded to be consistent in the word. Be purposeful in every little thing I do because it matters for eternity answer just love to really care and love for others. And so yeah. That was my favorite episode. From this past year doing what was yours this was the hardest question scrolling through thinking. Ooh that one. Oh I know I did decide to land on one. That is a current favorite because I think back on it and draw from it often. That's episode thirty nine. What to do with bad days and and it has just been thinking back on all the things that we talked about an the truth that the Gospel actually transforms our bad days and our bad days. Difficult experiences have good purposes and good outcomes. It's just been such a source of encouragement for me when I'm having a hard moment Said that's a big one. I mean some close seconds. Where like preaching the Gospel to yourself episode seven and suffering and sovereignty with Maurizio Gutierrez? Ray Wins you gotta get your tissues ready for that lead but I really. It was really hard to pick. But it's been so sweet to learn from these episodes myself. Yeah you know I was going to choose preaching the Gospel to yourself as well. Because there's a cool backstory to that that we haven't shared that's the only episode that we lost the recording and had to you. That's right I forgot about that. Yeah and honestly it was a whole nother episode when we revisited it and I think that was all God and that was such an impact for Apple said for essay. Because you know not only did it lead to as writing the study but it really challenged us to have gospel fluency and really dig into how does the? Gospel apply these Berry real aspects of our life. And how could we communicate that so I think that was a very really pivotal time in our podcast? So yeah that was definitely good one. If you haven't listened to it but yeah as many of you know we always under interviews by asking our guests three fun questions and thought it would be fun for the three of us to answer those questions focusing on this past year. So we'll talk about our top three favorite things from this past year. What's on her nightstand? And what's a resource that has most stirred are factions for God's word in this past year so in twenty nineteen so Joanna start us off there? What are your top three favorite things from this past year? The pressure so we have kind of shared some different kinds of things and our favorite things. Maybe it's like a food item or a spiritual resource or an experience. So I thought I'd share one of each of those good place. Oh I is my new T. habit drinking tea a EB. I'm drinking some right now. Lovely Roy boasts. Tease is and so. I GOT TO HAVE MY Red Roy. T and my new electric cattle with my natural bliss French Manila creamer and I had to recommend to one of.

Jesse Joanna Kate Lindsey Jay Hunt Tamsin Baker Red Roy US Amanda Forty Pamela Hubbard editor French Manila Stephanie Maurizio Gutierrez Ray Berry Shirley Apple
"one year" Discussed on Daily Grace

Daily Grace

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Daily Grace

"I'm here as always with the lovely Stephanie. Hello everyone hey so. We are celebrating. Something really exciting. And that is the one year anniversary of the daily grace. Podcast which I just want to say is crazy. Yeah I can't believe that it's been an entire year Since the podcast launched and so we WANNA take a few minutes to celebrate. And so just a little bit about what you can expect from this episode. We are just so excited to be reflecting back over some of our favorite episodes. We are excited to hear from you all and some of the audio clips that you have sent in. We're going to share some of our favorite things from the whole year. So some good resources there for you. All and there might even be some bloopers. If you jill and I guarantee you will not want to miss. There are probably a lot more than could possibly make it into the show. Oh but you know. It's really been incredible to see what God has done this year. Through the podcast we have heard stories from people of how God has used it for encouragement and transformation and you know every good thing that has come out of this. Podcast is because of the work of God and we are just so grateful to be able to be his instruments and participate in the work that he's doing this medium and we do want to say a huge. Thank you to all of you listeners. We are so grateful to you for listening for being so gracious with us even as we share our own struggles and our own shortcomings. Y'All have been so encouraging through your reviews. They're your messages or emails or comments. And we're so grateful for all the ways that you have supported us sharing episodes with your friends. You have all been a huge blessing tests. Yeah really may God receive all the glory and honor and praise for what he has done. And through this podcast. We're just so grateful so grateful for every person who listens for every share for every review for every message that you personally sent us on facebook or instagram. Where so grateful to be invited to journey alongside you guys in the small way and I am forever will be humbled. Yeah and you know God has used this podcast in our own lives for sherm in incredible ways for growth that. I think that we couldn't have even anticipated. I'm Stephanie. Could you kind of share us. How the PODCAST has been the source of growth in your own life. Yeah Oh my goodness tremendous growth. I've grown in my knowledge of God's word of course as we prepare extensively for each episode. But I'd say not only has my knowledge grown. I think I've grown in my ability to communicate how the Gospel really does change everything like how it applies to our lies and it's been edifying to ask the questions at where we've all probably ask yourselves in private and to really put those kind of hard questions or heart thoughts against the word of God to see what it has to say and we have always found that his word is sufficient and so that has just been a tremendous blessing for my faith has grown my faith and you know one other way that I realized reflection of how I've grown this past year through this podcast is. I've seen the beauty of the gifts of others and Joanna working with you on this. Podcast has been a true gift to me. it's been so awesome to see your strengths compliment my weaknesses and honestly just celebrating your strength and embracing them because it brings glory to God and had it advances the kingdom. So it's been so wonderful to see you. Glorify the Lord in this way and I think I've just grown in my ability to see and appreciate spiritual gifts and talents. That other members of the body have is like the guests that we invite on the podcast and I'm just so grateful for everyone that's involved and yeah. I think that's how I've grown the most this past year. How `Bout you? Oh no I mean I absolutely agree with everything you said. You know on a practical level these episodes that we require a lot of research And so you know we have to wrestle through a lot of these questions that you're asking and hoping to find a biblical answer for and yeah kind of echoing. What you said Stephanie. And has caused me to dive deeper into God's word but not just for the sake of a surface knowledge but really with a heart for understanding and application how it actually changes and transforms our life. Yeah and you know. It's really challenged. My own thinking and revealed the need to respond graciously and humbly to those whose viewpoints may be different for mine because as we wrestle through these topics. There are a lot of things that we have to stop and say okay. Have I been understanding this appropriately? Yeah what what do other people who love the Lord have to say about this topic. That's been I think it's been a huge source of growth and it's also been humbling to see just how much I don't know research experience. Stephanie thank you have a grasp on a topic. And then you start diving and you're thinking. Oh my goodness. There's so much here for sure like you said to Stephanie. It's sharpened by ability to be able to have Gospel centered conversations and that's poured over into my other relationships and friendships and it's created a really sweet friendship between you and me Stephanie. Yeah Even as we do that together we to practice with each other now talking about the Gospel and why it matters and how it applies so that's been really sweet and even develop those kinds of relationships with other people like kristen who we tend to bounce really difficult topics of Jessie are editor. Who help us think there's some of these things to So yeah overall. It's just called me back to God's word. God's goodness helped me develop new habits and spiritual disciplines and it's really just over. I can just look back over the past year in hindsight and see the work of sanctification that God's been doing in my life and yeah the podcast has been an integral part of that and you know we asked to hear from you all as well about how the podcast has been impactful for you and so we wanted to share a few of the audio clips that you all sent in right.

Stephanie facebook jill Joanna kristen editor Jessie
"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"The kind of Voters that might have even been part of the trump coalition in the states or whether the Democratic Party by being true to its principles and and kind of more liberal vision can blow low through turnout models change the shape of the electorate in those six dates and other places with a kind of Warren or sanders type candidate. I have a question about the the idea of how significant this poll is a year out nate cones the Times reporter. Who did the palm talking about? It said hey a year out is is basically just as good as right before the election and then need silver. The grew fivethirtyeight said polls a year out like not not that not that that reality based not that important. What's the answer here? I first of all the answer is the pollinger is need to get different first names. It's too confusing to have both nate Cohn silber ever be named nate. Just a problem to actually. I feel like natone nate. Cohn has has. I Know Nate Cohn I've met needs over a couple of times. Cocoon is definitely riding on the coattails of nate silver. He's like oh where's the what's Hot Poli Name. It's nate. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa glommed onto that and the time hired him you don't offense would appreciate the answer to this John. One of these polls year out matter don't matter there's a general principle and then I don't know I didn't see what nate silver of fivethirtyeight sad I did read in The Times. The idea the statement that I and I have a note here go check checking out and see if that's in fact true or if there's like some important caveat but yeah the the the article that went along with the polling said that on average in the last three cycles head to head polls Aguirre ahead of the election have been as close to the final result as those taken the day before The final result I just say like tweet. You know what Posey are out there. But I'm not sure will first of all there aren't polls taken the day before I don't think right because the polls released as the deport but anyway the broader more important point is so much changes in happens. You can't I mean you can set. You can say that. That's been what they result in the the past has been but if there's an instance in which past performance does not predict future results in this current political environment. I think that would be wise to keep in mind in that in that context But I do think the idea that if the electoral college is still in play a in our presidential elections than it is important to look at the at the states that will that will matter Attar with respect to the Electoral College. So I think looking at these six states Makes Sense and then we should probably turn to this idea of what's the actual electric look like. And then WHO's best setup to make the case that electric I thought what was the most interesting thing. Innate cones piece accompanying this story about. His poll was noting. What what kind of people seem to be supporting Biden but not Warren or Warren but not Biden and yeah and that you have the categories of for example? There's sanders seems to pick up a bunch of young voters when you poll who don't want to then vote for Wariner Biden and Biden seems to pick up Like a lot of people who don't seem to WanNa vote for a woman. For example there seems to be a lot of just out and out cold stone sexist in the electorate which was horrified to read forty percent of the people there are six percent of the electorate is by not Warren and forty percent of them was answering yes to questions that made them seem like sexist Texas questions about the ability of Warren and female candidates in general. But and I've said this before but this is basically votes in the Democratic primaries and caucuses are going to be about punditry about what your neighbour thinks so you know Democrats are are by wide majorities fine with having a woman president but they don't think that their fellow Democrats Democrats are fine with having a woman president which means when they vote or the casting vote for the person they think should do the job or they doing the casting vote for the person they think. We'll have the best chance in general unroll action because of people's predispositions about women and that's what a mess that isn't trying to sort that out. Good luck with that. John What do you make of the fact that so this. The poll a swing states included the six states Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan Carolina Florida Arizona. It did not include Georgia Texas and Ohio. which are an an Iowa? So I think the presumption being that Ohio an Iowa are now basically Republican states. And it's going to be. They're not really swing states and that but also there's this at least conversation that I hear among people that Georgia and Texas are potentially in play and Arizona certainly played. Do I guess it means it's it's it's making taking some bats on two things one. Is that basically. The shape of the electric highway in Ohio is just Democrats are never gonNA do well enough to reach far enough into the white working class voters in those states or white borough voters in Iowa to beat. Also you've got you've got a Senate race in Iowa that'll with an incumbent Republican that'll tweak things for the for the Democrats and so although by the way we should note but just as a farm state. Here's we should talk about this. If you look inside the Republican coalition it seems to me. Democrats would have some opportunities. Let's talk about role voters for a moment. Bankruptcies for farms are going to be as high as they as they've ever been in two thousand nineteen the bail out to the farmers is now bigger net- net- than the bail out of the car companies under the Obama Administration because of the fight with China and the tariff battles with with with other countries if you were compelling candidate Who could make the case to a rural voters and you believed and again? We're there's some. There's there's some things implicit in what I'm saying that some people don't believe because some people leave these voters are gone at. It's all about identity not economics in there for. Why should Democrat spend a lot of time doing that but back to your basic point David? The Republican coalition has those two states and the Democrat. Coalition doesn't have enough in Georgia and Texas that this cycle. They'll be able to make inroads inroads if you believe in a warren kind of candidacy a pure base rile the base up candidacy which is essentially what trump is running on the republican side. You could try to make a case as for Georgia and taxes but the problem is if you run heavy towards turning out the liberal coalition in those states you would weaken your ability so goes the theory in six states that are are that are closest and that's another reason they picked these six that have a more mixed Electorate as the time sees it and most people only last question on this this topic so John Eight in New York magazine. Some Subsection York magazine. I can't remember which one concludes that the leftward tilt of the Democrat. Kennedy is turning out to be a disaster that they've lost touch with medium voters. They desperately need to get back to the center before they find themselves with unelectable candidate. Is it the case Warren and Sanders or essentially given themselves iron crosses. They've hung iron crosses around their neck for the general election. I find myself wishing that more mourn had not come up with a Medicare for all tax plan like really wish that she had just said. It'll be magic which is what Republicans say all the time but their plans. It's always like oh it'll be. Bajic could economic growth magic. She'll she'll be able to run away from that or is it really something that is going to drag her. I mean people move to the The ideological edge of their parties in primaries right Republicans moved to the right Democrats moved to the left the ideas and you tack to the Center and the general election. There's there's plenty of time. I do wonder about what these candidates are thinking in terms of not sticking with the most popular positions now now. Obviously Warren wants to be able to attract Bernie Sanders voters. And you know I with zero reporting. You could imagine that she is trying to make sure sure that. If and when Zander's drops out he full-throatedly endorses her and so she becomes the candidate of the left. I also think she believes in Medicare for all and yet. There is so much that these Democratic candidates could do for healthcare or for example on immigration with a path to citizenship. That is broadly popular happyhiller. That one wonders whether it would be politically wiser to stick to those positions. I mean this is a question that people like Maddock laziest at Fox have been asking for months and and when they put up the poll numbers every time it looks pretty persuasive to me. As just a matter of pragmatic politics looks for Jason Fitz sticking with broadly sadly popular positions that are more centrist. And that actually could become law would be smarter like we are not going to immediately have medicare for all so we're having They're taking Warren and Sanders. Particularly Warrant are taking a big political risk for something that doesn't seem particularly reality based and so then does it. Is it really necessary. Ray was so this is as you quite rightly pointed out. This is always the problem with primaries. It's why people have Think the primaries are part of the reason. Our politics are so messed up because everybody has to get into a very not only far left but also detached debate as a way to signal to their electorates that they are more pure than the next wchs person to your point emily about the environments can look like a year from now. Let's imagine a Democrat wins. Okay so Democrat wins. If they win it will have been on a restoration ticket which is to say. We're going to fix things post. Donald trump that gives you a huge to do is just start the the day. Okay before you get to Medicare for all you've got a lot of stuff to do to restore store and by the way most of it's going to be overseas and some large portion of it's going to be secret so there's that second of all the the intervening election over the year next year is is going to be scorched earth. So how you're GonNa get this through a medicare for all through Congress even through trying to use reconciliation after that year seems a more unlikely really than even would be today. As you quite rightly said Emily you go to you go to the left or you go to the left the right in your primaries and come back to the middle but that also depends on a you know. Politics has changed a little bit in terms of the Public Square. When you can make that case that you're not exactly the person you ran in the primaries as being it's harder to do that now secondly which should these candidates has the facility and ability to make that case or do they keep stepping on there? You know there are other shoes tied together. And so that's one question. Can they even get back back to that position. And then the question is what do you guys think that position looks like in the general election for a Democrat to to either undermine the president's coalition or to build success in areas like the suburbs Where you've seen some of these opportunities for Democrats are I cannot let the segment paths John on without noting what is surely the most important electoral result from Tuesday surprising result out of New Haven Connecticut which just elected in nineteen eighteen year old a nineteen year old one? It's all doors and this nineteen year old one a staggering ninety percent of the vote. What do you make of the overwhelming mandate mandate one by? Eli Sabin whose mother is noted political commentator Emily Babylon just how significant do you feel victory for the future of the republic. Well fortunately playing for for all those people who feel jittery about the state of the future and the state of the Republic really about whether there is verifiable truth fin these troubled times that we live in. Now I think not just the people in the In the quiet suburbs of new haven and the urban centers of that city but also really across the country in the world can find themselves Sleeping easier now as a result of that Outcome Emily Mazal Tov. Congratulations on on your son's victory. Thank you my son is now in our city council. So it's GonNa be really interesting to watch. Ally is so excited and thrilled. We get listeners. Have our annual conundrum show coming up live at the Fox theater in Oakland California December eighteenth and have been very exciting announcement which we have a great guest as you know every year we try to get a very wise philosophical minded person to help us solve conundrum for you this year no different we have an amazing guest Adam. Savage of mythbusters is going to join us at the Fox theater on December eighteenth. No one has done a keener analysis of the true questions. Americans Fret about about the real myths and blowing up the real myths. He's so funny and smart and interesting and I'm so excited he's going to join us..

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

13:49 min | 1 year ago

"one year" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Me visually but not physically. Is Emily Baz Lan of the New York Times magazine looking at over over skype. Hello Emily although although David Jail how are you. I'm good glad to be here and then joining me not visually but telephonically John dickerson of CBS. Sixty minutes from New York New York Hello John dickerson. Hello David I Is it telephonically. Come come on God interesting radio telephone telephonic. Oh my God you're dripping. You're being pedantic already on. Today's Gabfest election results in Kentucky and Virginia and bold and Democrats and then there are discouraging poll results in swing estates for Democratic presidential candidates then impeachment barrels forward. What happened this week? What is about to happen? And then president trump withdraws ause the United States from the Paris climate accord is that catastrophic or merely terrible plus. You'll have cocktail chatter one year from this this week we will have elected a new president or possibly the same president and this week we saw the last major elections before twenty twenty in a bunch of states that weirdly weirdly have off your elections which are always cute but confusing. Because you're like it's an odd year. Why is there an election? But it's still nice to have and then we also saw some very interesting gene and if you're a Democrat alarming poll results for Democratic primary challenges. So let's start with With the two thousand nine hundred John in the Commonwealth of Virginia cradle title of the Republic the cradle in fact John Dickerson. Democrats took control of the State Senate in the State House Why is that important? Why is it overdue isn't important and overdue? Well I think it's it's important. Well it's for the first time in fifty years so that's when any any time anything for the first time in fifty years you should take note of it. Basically most people would say what this does is it ends the charade that Virginia is not a blue state you know it went from being red to purple to blue and so they're saying that it's that it's Now a blue state and that. I don't know what I think about that debate. That's fine you can have that debate the most interesting thing. It seems to me about Virginia Virginia to the two most important results are first of all that the that Republicans did not win back the seats that they lost in two thousand seventeen when Democrats. It's had strong showings in Republican areas and then Democrats won in additional areas to take control over The two state houses you you now have the to stay two houses in the governorship all insane party which means there's going to be a series of series of legislation passed in Virginia on On Gun Control Troll in particular that'll be Very interesting to watch. Why is that interesting because of the second thing so the first point is Democrats are showing strength? Republicans weakness is in the exurbs the areas out suburbs outside. And that's something we'll talk a lot about because it was also strong for Democrats in Kentucky in the argument is that if it's been strong consistently gently in two thousand eighteen and twenty nineteen that's bad for Donald Trump. But the second thing that's important in Virginia's it's the home of the NRA the forces of gun control gun safety fifty. Whatever you WANNA call it basically now have beaten the NRA in their own backyard? That would mean a lot for gun legislation in Virginia and for the For for the everytown organization it. It's a model for inroads. They might be able to make in other states emily quickly. Let's also hit the. I think probably the other our big state for Democrats. This week was Kentucky where the Democrat in a very red state beat the extremely hated. Incumbent Governor Matt Bevin then in a state where president trump campaign and try to tie the Democrat Anti Bashir to impeachment trump had won the state by thirty Republicans. Want every single single other statewide office. that was up is Bevan's loss a warning trumper not really. Is it just like a particular particular set of circumstances with an extremely bad and hated incumbent. I think more of the latter you know. I wonder if people think differently friendly about the governor in some circumstances than the sort of normal party polarized politics that we have you know. I'm thinking of the fact that a Democrat is governor in Kansas or Republican governor of Massachusetts. There's a way in which that administrative job can. I think seems a little less political will than some other positions and I mostly just think that. Yeah what you said. There was an extremely unpopular incumbent. It's true the president trump couldn't save him but he had been his zone worst enemy. It's a great question but the what I think will be interesting. Is If you match the suburban and exurban results in Kentucky with with what happened with in Virginia and then what happened in the same areas with the same kind of voters in eighteen whether it's demonstrably true that that will all play out the same way in two thousand twenty it suggests enough data points that it puts high and heavy uncertainty in the air for Republican senators who are running in twenty twenty and places where they are. They're gonNA depend on thinking of people. Cory Gardner Susan Collins running in states where they need those votes and if Donald Trump and the Republican Party of Donald Donald Trump has consistently been showing weaknesses in those areas again whether it actually plays out that way in two thousand twenty. I think it's going to make some nervousness and change perhaps perhaps some calculations over the next year as Republicans worry about becoming a party that is justified by the trump coalition which is essentially non college whites Evangelical and rural voters and that nervousness. Again whether it's true or not will create some some Potential for some more more destabilizing action among Republicans Possibly actually. I had a question about that. John is John Cornyn for election. Yes twenty twenty. Yeah I mean that's when when I look at what John Cornyn is doing which is to not be as full-throated around impeachment as you nearly expect the number two Republican in the Senate. He's a Texas Republican. I that to me is a signal. He is very worried that that he you know he could face something serious again. These are these linkages we should all these are drawn in in Pencil and very lightly. But but I would also link it to what what I went on at some length about with Mitch McConnell. The a couple of weeks ago when he was asked About the conversation the president said he had with McConnell and McConnell basically through the president under the bus. I think you can. If you start to see a number of these things you see some Can whether the distancing from the president is even possible. I think that's quite hard to do for anybody. But but just the more uncertainty and destabilization. Shen there is in the world added to the existing highly destabilizing behavior of the president. And the people who are defending him it just adds more kind of frenetic possibilities in an already pretty frantic political world As everybody's trying to gauge what. The politics are going to look like a on election day a year from now now that puts so much uncertainty in in the system for Republicans to see this weakness repeated in these areas that used to be part of their coalition. And yet if you Dr Cory Gardner or Susan Collins or even John Cornyn. Aren't you kind of caught in a vice like you can try to put some distance between you and the So you know I would say most like crazy. Two defenders of trump like mark meadows. Who just seem to be saying? I mean and Lindsey Graham like I am in lockstep with the president no matter what he says says. I'm going in that direction. They're stepping back from that but in the end like there will presumably be an impeachment trial in the Senate and it's very hard to imagine agean than currently voting to remove from office president trump. Now I do think that could change. I mean we saw a public approval of President Nixon drastically graphically moved downward during the public hearings in Watergate but I just feel like from the vantage point of right now. This is like the either Angel or devil of being a trump supporter or a Republican senator. In the trump era. You may be trying to maintain some what kind of semblance of separation. But how far is that really going to get you. Whether a candidate any candidate can separate themselves in a nationalized election and we have them even even an off year so of course we're going to have on twenty twenty is I think basically most people have been in the game. Say You can't do it. You can't get out from under a president however candidates it's in fear of not being re-elected Tend to do things you know. They'd Throw Hail Mary passes. And you know Cory Gardner in Colorado which is basically. He's basically a one third one third state so Democrat Independent. Republican split the state in thirds John Hickenlooper who's running against the former governor and Mayor of Denver is a very popular popular fellow in the state. So Cory Gardner you could imagine again. If even if you stipulate that you can't get out from under a president may still try and and why does that matter. Well that's one guy in one state well for Colorado is a battleground state second of all as we know from this president when a when one person does thing something that that he doesn't like Mike he goes after them so then it becomes. You can imagine that growing into something more. Because then he's attacking a Republican. What's Mitch McConnell? Say about that and so on and so forth so so It's it's it's just as I say a possibility for destabilization. I want to touch emily on. What is potentially the most alarming alarming aspect of the vote on Tuesday which is as of Wednesday actually? Didn't look this morning. There was there was intimations hints even open statements from Republican legislators in Kentucky that they might not accept the results of that gubernatorial election. And there's a the one of the leaders in the Republican House. This is trying to conflict this into a contested election. which was you know about five thousand votes separating the the Democrat and Republican And the stunning the possibility that the how the Kentucky legislature which is dominated by Republicans might try to overturn the popular vote. I actually don't think this will succeed. Eight for a couple of even if they make real push it at which there's no sign they're going to one is Bevin has been a lousy governor even for Republicans. He's made them more unpopular. He's been unpopular blur himself. So why keep them in. Their second is actually fun to have a democratic governor of the rival party in some ways especially if you have a majority in the legislature. I just love. You can really mess with them and score points off of that person and that that's kind of good way to spend a couple of years sometimes so it's not. It's not that bad to be in the out party if you have the majority party in the legislature but also. I don't think it's effective to cheat in elections. After the fact I think it's very effective to suppress the votes in advance when it can be dressed step as some kind of principle of voter integrity but after the fact when the votes already counted the numbers are there it is not. I think it's going to look a lot like cheating. If they try to push uh-huh yeah would in fact be cheating and like deeply alarming. If this happened you know I will just note Kentucky already. Does one one thing to suppress the vote which is to close the polls at six PM. You know. I I think that you're right. This isn't GonNa go anywhere but the fact that it's even being discussed discussed it's just these signs. Were getting from states. I mean we've gotten them also from Wisconsin and of course like the Queen of this is North Carolina. Where if you don't like the way the game is being played you just like throw the board up into the air and all the pieces fall and some other place you just change the rules roles? You know I don't know enough about Kentucky Law to know how the governor's powers are distributed and who decides but you could really imagine this legislature trying to clip the wings of this new Democrat coming in in much the way that the North Carolina Republican dominated legislature has has done that for Roy. Cooper the governor there now let us turn my friends to the polls for the presidential campaign from one kind of Paul to another kind of Paul. There was a really really interesting poll in the New York. Times of Swing States John this week looking at how various Democratic presidential candidates might perform against President Trump and Wisconsin content Pennsylvania Michigan North Carolina Florida and Arizona. Interesting that Arizona is a very legit swing state in a way. That Ohio for example doesn't seem to be anymore why we're Democrats so agitated by the results of this poll and is it is this one poll significant it's Let's see how to pack. Okay so why are they agitated. Well they're agitated because Biden's only up by a couple of points over trump in these six states let's see sanders was up a little bit and and Warren was down so I think there was agitation for two reasons. One Biden up wasn't wasn't by as much as as people thought. Warren was down and three and this is the bigger point I think is a lot of people think. Stop looking at and thinking thinking about the election in that way stopped takes basically boiling the entire election down to six states full of larger shares of white working class voters because that's it's not what. The electorate is about an implicit in even doing the poll among some Democrats is the idea that that or they would argue that the Times poll kind of has its thumb on the scale in terms of this larger argument about whether the Democratic Party needs to quote unquote moderate to go for the kinds of voters in those six states or go go for.

"one year" Discussed on Thirsty Digging

Thirsty Digging

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"one year" Discussed on Thirsty Digging

"How do i get my show a tool the avs people like the listen to. How do i make my podcast. The answer to everyone. These questions is really simple. Anchor acas a one stop shop for recording hosting and distributing your podcasts. Best of all one hundred percent free and ridiculously easy to use and now anka can match you with great sponsors. Who won appetizer podcasts. That means you get paid to podcast right away. And that's what i'm doing right now by reading this ad you see thirsty. Digging was developed so that it could be various ways. Met this that we could teach you how to live your best life had to be happy and content what you have and how to strive for doing more whether it was through my own musings or whether it was through the interviews that we conduct on this channel. So if you've ever or if you've always wanted to start a pike cass. Make money doing it go to anchor that fm slash start. That's anchor that fm slash. Start to join me in a diverse community of podcasters over to use anchor. That's anchor that fm that slash start. I can't wait to hear your podcasts. Hello this is john wanamaker and welcome to thirsty digging. This is my second podcast under this title. Thirsty digging because thirsty. Digging is all about being hungry enough thirsty enough to pursue better life. I wanna thank you for visiting this downloading it. Sharing it at really. Need your help in assist spreading the word for this podcast. Because i'm new to podcasting. But i'm not new to inspiration motivation. Teaching and helping people get through tough and rough areas in their life. And if you find that say here or put here interviews or anything here is helpful. Please consider subscribing to it and please please also consider donating to it and becoming a monthly supporter of the podcast. Thirsty digging this is john. Wanna make it. I want to get started right now. Because what i have on my heart in my mind is very vital and important and i believe can change your life changing access and change. What you currently doing. The other day. I received an email Most of you know most of you probably have this. But i have a google alert on my name so when anything online is posted about me posted a newspaper. New video comes out again tag. There's something of social media I get an email and on. This particular day was september seventeenth two thousand eighteen. I received a google email in said The obituary of john wanamaker who died september seventeenth two thousand nineteen. Well today is september twenty six two thousand eighteen so one day it said that john wanamaker mining had died on september seventeenth two thousand nineteen so immediately caught me by surprise that. Is this a future item. Is this something talkin about the future. Does this mean that. I'm going to die a year from now on this day. now. I've been to a number funerals in my life and i don't mean to make this more bid but if you keep listening you're gonna hear what i have to say in. This will not be something morbid at the end. Now i've been to a funerals and most recent funeral that i've been to Was my dad's funeral and It it was. It's hard to go to a funeral. But i know reading obituaries that it talks about who is survived who has survived. Who has survived jew. Who still left on earth to walk the earth and into remember you and carry on your legacy. So i clicked on the link that was in the email token about john wanamaker dying september seventeenth two thousand nineteen in the future and i clicked on a link so i could read the obituary and i was thinking what if i read this obituary in it says john wanamaker survived by his wife britney and by his children in named all of them by name and by his mom maryland and by his sister sherry and by his aunts and uncles in what if it described me and described what was going on with me and who i was related to and it said that i died by this way in on this day and at this time would that be a glimpse into the future of what would happen to me just hypothetical because when i clicked on the link it wasn't me it was a ninety one year old man instead of a forty three year old man. But what if it had been me and what if it had been true if you received that in an had been you and it had been true and you had a glimpse to know what day you were going to die how you will gonna die. Who was still going to be alive. How would you live today. What would you do different. What would you not waste time doing those. The digging is about making your life better. And what i my my plan for you in my plant for me and my plan for this podcast is to make your life better. So if you'd know a year from now you will die. How would you spend your day. What would you cut out. What relationships would you men. Who would you say. i'm sorry to. Who would you spend a day with. What would you drink. what would you eat. How would you go about the next few weeks to the next few months. How would you lead up to that. What would you do about your bucket list. What would you do about your business. How would you leave a legacy. What legacy would you leave. So today what i want you to do is i want you to write down things. That are most important to you right down those things that are most important and write down the things that you wanna do. That are most important to you. What do you want to get accomplished before you leave this earth. What do you want to get accomplished before you take your last breath. Blinky last blink. Or have your last heartbeat. This is important because there are people who you haven't met who need to know you. There are children who you haven't touched. Who need your touch. There are men and women out there who need to know you need to know your name need to understand who you are need to know your mission. Your vision need to know exactly who you are. Whatever your name may be. There's someone who finds you to be important. There's someone who loves you. There's someone who hasn't met you yet that you're going to be married to someone who hasn't met you yet that you're going to change their life for the better. There's someone who hasn't met you yet. Who needs to know you in order for them to go on and experience and push their own purpose. This someone you haven't met yet. Who can take you to your next plateau your next destiny. Your next dollar earned your next feeling of of great sensation. There's someone you haven't met some pie cash. You haven't listened to some facebook friend you haven't friend did or you haven't accepted a friend requests some twitter that you haven't re tweeted. There's something out there that you haven't done so today. Thirsty digging what i want to ask you to do is show up and show out be who you are experienced what you need to experience. Go meet that new person. I've said this before. Anything you need in this life is wrapped up in someone else and experience knowledge is wrapped up in a book is wrapped up in person is wrapped up in a video. So today i wanna push you. I wanna push you to go experience to go meet to go do if.

john wanamaker september seventeenth britney sherry twitter today second podcast facebook earth anka john. Wan ninety one year old forty three year old one day one hundred percent anchor september twenty six two next few months thousand eighteen one
"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"one year" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"I'm has been continuing and and and they don't vote they don't want people to know what's been done we're talking about donald trump's first year as president and you're listening to potomac watch from the wall street journal if successful they're powerful and they're sharing their secrets the secrets of wealthy women podcast from the wall street journal from the opinion pages of the wall street journal this is the tomac watch welcome back on poetry go here with a dan haniger and bill mcgurn talking about donald trump's first year as president i want to address the paradox that i see in the in the trump's uh first year which is a economies join well iit's destroyed isis the light of the worst predictions about his policies so dangerous haven't come true sums some significant successes of course a one big failure with obamacare repeal but big victory with tax reform and deregulation and judges yet thirty nine percent approval rating in the uh in the real clear politics average off old dan for a first year president and uh republicans uh losing in the generic ballot test for november by nine points which means that if that holds they'd lose the house if not the sat how do you explain the paradox well i think yet it has to do with the assault inflicted wounds that we've talked about uh bill mention other forces such as democratic opposition i think one other force is worth mentioning as well in that uh which has contributed to this and that is the washington media which is in a virtual war with donald trump which started the day of his inauguration when he quipped god disputed them over the size of the inaugural audience which was i am needless fight pack but never stopped i mean of the than men than there was uh you know the white house press conferences became a running joke on saturday night live and look a lot of trump supporters will say well he's right about this it's fake news they're totally against them yes that may well be true by and large it is true but this is a source of information.

donald trump president wall street journal bill mcgurn the house assault dan haniger obamacare washington white house thirty nine percent
"one year" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"one year" Discussed on 1A

"Hey there i'm joshua johnson thanks for downloading the one a podcast from w a m u and npr for thursday april thirteenth twenty seventeen today on one a the panama papers one year later before we talk about that let me tell you about a new way to get the news each morning up first is the morning news podcast from npr it takes just ten minutes or so to give you a sense of the stories in big ideas of the day the stuff you really need to know and why it matters so start your day with up first it's available weekday mornings by six eastern on the npr one app and wherever you get your podcast last year a massive investigative report exposed a corrupt system of global tax havens for the super rich the international collaboration known as the panama papers won a pulitzer prize this week how much of a difference has that investigative report made joining me in studio to discuss it is marino walker give ara the deputy director of the international consortium of investigative journalists she coal managed the panama papers marino welcome to one a thank you so much for having also here in studio is kevin g hall the chief economics correspondent and senior investigator with mcclatchy newspapers he led mcclatchy team as the only us newspaper partner in the panama papers investigation kevin welcome great beer and also with us for the hour is clark gas coin the deputy director of the financial accountability and corporate transparency coalition or the fact coalition a nonprofit opposed to offshore corporate tax havens clark welcome to the program thanks for having marina let me start with you first of all congratulations on winning the pulitzer prize this week thank is how much really three and as we phillies price also recognizes perhaps for the first time in history that put it says.

npr pulitzer prize marino walker deputy director kevin g hall investigator partner joshua johnson panama super rich mcclatchy kevin clark corporate tax ten minutes one year