35 Burst results for "One Thousand Nine Hundred One"

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

03:54 min | 10 months ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"What's that expression stick pork in me. I'm damned done. Yeah just a glucose up those skills. I learned the on my own and like when i was on our ko and we knew each other in in one thousand nine hundred one. I wanted to have frank your freedom. They will drop steakhouse. i wanted. Brakes your free dawn and courts. He didn't do any interviews he was completely private and so i started just saying on the air. It's time for the news. Wr ko back minute. And by the way. Frank freda please come on my show and i would do it all sorts of crazy tons one afternoon. I'm in my apartment on newbury street. And i got a call this young woman. Whatever her name was catherine frito. She said my uncle would like to see you. And i went to. The hilltop was ushered into his office sat his desk which overlooked the butcher shot so he could seek people. Shopping was a two one two way mirror. And i was with him three or four times so anyway..

Frank freda catherine frito frank
Former Mauritanian President Aziz in Jail Over Corruption Charges

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:53 min | 11 months ago

Former Mauritanian President Aziz in Jail Over Corruption Charges

"The former president of mauritania mohamed abdelaziz was jailed yesterday. He had been indicted in march accused of graft when he led the country between two thousand eight and two thousand nineteen allegations that he denies while under house arrest. He failed to report to police. Sparking is president. Mauritania is a large but sparsely populated west african country who society is deeply divided. Partly that's down to a long history of corruption but also suffers from a legacy stretches deep into its history so martina has actually a long history of slavery representing abolished in one thousand. Nine hundred one lead. That was any backed with criminal laws in two thousand seven. Kinley salmon is an africa correspondent for the economist. Martinez made up of morrish. Elitest can people and also black people of african origin but black mauritanians. Even those who have free of slavery of have been persecuted deported back in nineteen eighty-nine in particular an all. this history is created. Really quite deacon equalities in divisions that still very evident today the countries have been beset unfortunately by a number of coups and corruption so i. It's an a challenge in place and in currently for example stands one hundred and fifty seventh on the united nations human development index. It's a send a country that has had a troubled past and what about its future. Any of that changing Well the signs of change those a presidential election in two nineteen which led to the country's first ever peaceful transfer of power and the new president. Mohamed olga swanee. Many people thought he would follow the status quo but actually acted against the former president allowing parliament to investigate corruption and that's led to arrests of officials including of the former president himself

Mauritania Mohamed Abdelaziz Kinley Salmon Morrish Martina Martinez Africa Mohamed Olga Swanee United Nations Parliament
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

Rocks Across the Pond

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

"The only spectator since all the stores were closed as there was a very nice hotel there and the shopping center and hotel guests would come out and wander round and try to figure out what it was. We were doing on the ice and would ask us questions about it because the ninety one hardly anybody particularly in the south knew about curling among this motley crew of committed curlers was may marg mo and her husband out originally from canada they had moved to houston for work in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight despite living in houston may mark mo will still actively playing in canada. Thanks to the free flights she'd received from alice. Work in fact while living in houston may mar entertained from ontario. Where senior canadian champions in one thousand nine hundred ninety but in one thousand nine hundred one. Her canadian seniors team was knocked out in a regional play. Downs and dreams of back to back seniors titles came to an end. That's when al gambles we'll start turning because a world senior curling championships did not exist in one thousand nine hundred. One may more hadn't stepped onto the ice in a team. Canada uniform and since curling was not officially part of the olympic program yet rules were too strict on who was eligible in the united states. That meant that. Us resident she was eligible to play in the us playdowns. No not the. Us senior play downs. But the play down the term in the united states national champion. So i came back to Houston and that was the end of my competitive curling for that year. I came back to houston meantime. Al had been a couple of times up to denver with a bunch of seaman on. They had curled competitively up there and he said to me. I think you should go try the nash. Try to get to nationalist denver and go play in the regions. And i said oh. Yeah sure. And so. He said well. I'll get your team and away. We go so we did. A judy lived in dallas Janet lived in austin and brandon. I lived in an Houston i had with neymar quite a bit. So she and i were strangers. Didn't know the i didn't know brandon. I didn't know that we had driven down to houston a couple of times to kroll alabama in their league. There's sunday morning league in the galleria but we did not curling dallas. This opportunity arose and we thought well. Okay we'll give it a go. It was al who contacted me. He was putting the team together and i had played. I guess brought against brenda She was a league member. So i knew her did not really know may and certainly didn't know judy. So it was. It was an interesting patchwork. I was game for more curling. And i knew of may mars experience. Thought it'd be a great opportunity to curl with her. Even if she hadn't been experienced. I would have gone anyway. I hadn't played competitively for long time. So i was. I was up for a a weekend of curling.

Houston canada houston austin Janet united states one thousand dallas may marg mo ninety one neymar nine hundred sunday morning one thousand nine hundred one one thousand nine hundred nine brenda alice brandon Canada one thousand nine hundred eigh
Naomi Osaka beats Jennifer Brady to claim her 4th Grand Slam title

NPR News Now

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Naomi Osaka beats Jennifer Brady to claim her 4th Grand Slam title

"Open. Naomi osaka has won her fourth grand slam tennis title. She beat jennifer brady. Six four six three in the women's final today. Osaka is now the first woman to win the first of four grand slam finals of her career since monica seles in one thousand nine hundred one. This

Naomi Osaka Jennifer Brady Tennis Osaka Monica
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

kevin kline Dante Robbie one thousand Hammurabi over a thousand years babylon both Ninety six today euphrates babylonian one half about six hundred years later one thousand nine hundred one one hundred ninety six states hammurabi nine hundred three dozen hamurabi
The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 1 year ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on The Face Radio

The Face Radio

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on The Face Radio

"From us. Rockin you attorney we album elektra records one thousand nine hundred one. That was leon ware with baby. Don't stop me. And i'm going to stick in that year. Nice not one in an records from their album winners. Here's the brothers. Johnson caught up off.

Johnson one thousand elektra one nine hundred one
Surstromming: The World's Smelliest Food

Everything Everywhere Daily

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Surstromming: The World's Smelliest Food

"There are many foods that are considered an acquired taste foods that might not be palatable the first time you try it or something that just doesn't sit right with most people. It could be something as simple as blue cheese or something like the filipino delicacy balut which is a boiled fertilized egg with the embryos still inside sweden has its own acquired tastes delicacy which has spawned hundreds of reaction videos and caused it to be banned by airlines. Learn more about sir strumming. The world smelly food on this episode of everything everywhere. Daily this episode is sponsored by audible dot com. My audiobook recommendation. Today is the almost nearly perfect people. Behind the myth of the scandinavian utopia by michael booth journalists. Michael booth has lived among the scandinavians for more than ten years and he has grown increasingly frustrated with the roast into view of this part of the world offered up by the western media in this timely audiobook. He leaves his adoptive home of denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are the secrets of their success and most intriguing of all what they think of each other. Why are the dane. So happy despite having the highest taxes to the finns really have the best education system. Are the icelanders as fareless. They sometimes appear how the norwegian spending their fantastic oil wealth and. Why do all of them hate the swedes. you can get a free one-month trial to audible in two free audiobooks by going to audible trial dot com slash everything everywhere or by clicking on the link in the show notes the word sir strumming in swedish literally means sour fish and that is probably an understatement. More specifically sir strumming is canned fermented herring that in and of itself doesn't sound that bad. There are many fermented foods that we eat and we have no problem with them. Yogurt sauerkraut and kimchi are all fermented foods. And no-one freaks out at the idea of eating them from inflation is an ancient form of food preparation by the breakdown. Food via microorganisms like bacteria and yeast all well and good cover. There's another process of breakdown of food via micro organisms in that is called rotting serse roaming toes the line between fermentation and rotting the history of sir strumming goes back to at least the sixteenth century when we can find the first written mention of the food however the food might be very well older than that as from. It is a pretty old process. The legend of sir strumming holds that it was accidentally created by fishermen who didn't have enough salt to preserve their catch. They use less salt than normal and sold their fish to some locals and finland salt is used to inhibit microbial growth and to stop the fish from rotting. When the fishermen returned they thought the locals would be mad at them for selling them fish. That rotted instead. They love the product and wanted more of it. The fishermen tried the fish themselves and thus stroming was born today sir. Strumming is prepared. In purchasing a can while in the can the fermentation process continues fermentation results in the release of gases which means at the can will often be bulging due to high pressure inside the can the fermentation of the fish in the can result in the single most unique quality of sir strumming the smell in two thousand and two japanese study found it to be the worst smelling food in the world. The smell is so bad that it has become legendary. it's been described as rotten eggs. A dead body a dirty diaper and raw sewage but the truth is there are so few things you can really compare it to because nothing else smells quite so bad. The smell is what's made the product famous. And if it weren't for the smell it would be about as controversial as pickled herring children in sweden have been known to open a can of sir stroming school so they could get out of class. Airlines will not allow people to carry sir strumming on flights because of the high pressure in the can in the low pressure in the cabin the higher pressure differential can result in some cans rupturing spewing the smelly liquid onto the plane and. It isn't as if you can leave a plane while it's flying or open a window most famously in one thousand nine hundred one a landlord. Germany evicted attendant because they spilled a can of sir strumming in the building stairwell german laws. Make it very hard to evict people. When the eviction came to trial the landlords defense consisted of opening up a can in the courtroom. The judge have experienced the overwhelming odor ruled in favor of the landlord. If you search for sir strumming online you'll find dozens and dozens of reaction videos of people opening up the cans and trying to eat the contents. The videos mainly consists of gigging wrenching and sometimes vomiting the problem. According to the sir strumming experts is that they're eating at wrong for starters. You never want to open a canister stroming indoors for reasons which i think of established by now. Ideally you want to open the can when submerged in water that will prevent the liquid inside from spraying all over the place when it's opened alternatively you could open it while it's enclosed in a plastic bag once the liquid has been drain. You don't eat it straight from the can the herring which is put in the can. Hasn't been gutted or deboned. You need to do that. I then the traditional way of meaning it is with a swedish flat bread called tune broad along with potatoes onions and sour cream. It's usually eaten as sort of small sandwich. I've actually had the experience of trying some sir strumming and it really doesn't taste as bad as it smells ranted given that it's the worst smelling food in the world. That's a pretty low bar but it isn't bad so long as it prepared properly if you really want the full sir strumming experience. I'd have to suggest you visit the island of von in sweden's high coast. It is a center of herring fishing and it's considered. The mecca for strumming. August is considered the best season enforcers strumming. Because it's in the middle of the summer. It's also one of the best times to visit ov- on regardless the main day for eating it is the third thursday of august also known as sir strumming day. Which is the day which by royal decree you used to be able to start selling strumming. If you're there you might be able to meet ruben. Matteson who is the self proclaimed king of sir strumming. He was the person who actually served me my first serve strumming one. Is it von back in two thousand fourteen. He was involved in opening a twenty five year old. Ken of sir strumming which was found in an abandoned cabin in norway. Having been outside for a quarter century the can was quite rusted. And due to twenty five years of fermentation it was bulging a lot. The contents of the container were mostly liquid. What solid material. That did come out. Didn't really look anything. Like fish. ruben. Madsen of course aided anyhow

Michael Booth Sir Strumming Sweden Denmark Finland High Coast Germany Matteson Ruben KEN Norway Madsen
All Your Genes Are Belong To Us

Planet Money

09:43 min | 1 year ago

All Your Genes Are Belong To Us

"The story of gene patenting kind of starts in the nineteen seventies when scientists figured out how to modify genes in a lab until nineteen eighty living. Things mostly couldn't be patented but that year the supreme court said i guess. These new modified genes are inventions. And pretty soon after that the patent office started granting patents not just on those modified genes but even on genes that scientists had just managed to isolate an extract from the body which started this huge genetic goldrush hundreds of new biotech companies popped up and suddenly the human genome started to look kind of like an uncharted surveyors map with hidden treasure. Worth millions of dollars just lurking out there in the genetic code by the early nineties. One of the biggest genetic treasures was the gene responsible for most cases of inherited breast and ovarian cancer the b. r. c. h. Gene and women with the brca gene have up to a seventy percent chance of getting breast cancer. Compared to about just ten percent for the general population. There was an enormous international race to find this gene and when myriad genetics was founded in one thousand nine hundred one winning the race to find the brca gene was a top priority geneticists. Sean teigen was one of the first people hired at myriad genetics. I had never heard of myriad. In fact i was roughly employee number. Ten sean and myriad hoped that if they could find this gene they could diagnose people at risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer and create tests and treatments for it nasa whereafter in the end is to add years to the lives of the people who buy you know unfortunate chance inherited a mutation in one of these genes. The trick to locating this gene is to identify families where breast cancer clusters. And then if you compare the dna of the people in those families who got cancer versus older people in the family who never got it. It will probably lead you to the gene and in the race to find this gene. Mary has a huge head. Start mostly because of its location in salt lake city. Utah has this comprehensive database of anyone who's developed cancer in the state. It is also home to the mormon church which famously keeps extensive genealogical records show. They're thinking when if just cross-referenced reference those two databases they'd have themselves a ready made pool of promising dna candidates and then they could get straight to mining for mutations sean and his team at myriad get to work. They are working around the clock all hands on deck. How did you guys think about what the stakes were for you. Guys you know in this race returned to arrive there. I i was merely an existential question for the company. There wasn't any doubt about that. It was like if we can find this than the company is going to be successful. And if we don't find it we're probably gonna shrivel up and go hundreds of other scientists around the world were also looking for this gene if myriad doesn't want to shrivel up and go away they have to get to it i after four long years of mining. Dna myriad finally strikes gold they find the mutated gene living on chromosome seventeen from what is now known to be base pair. Forty three million forty four thousand two hundred ninety five to base pair forty three million one hundred twenty five thousand three hundred and sixty four myriad extracts and isolates gene and almost immediately stakes its claim on it by filing a patent but profiting off of that patent turns out to be a whole other problem. There's just no good way to make a drug or treatment based on this gene so instead they focused solely on making a test that would tell people if they have the gene. Though even tasked will be hard to make money off of because brca is like say cova testing where you might get tested over and over or a drug the take every day you know the same person will use a particular patent drug again and again and again and again but they get the information that they are mutations carrier wanted to. They don't need to have that test again. It's done so. The prophet situation is different. Myriad cooks up a solution to this profit problem i. They will make the cadillac of tests the very best cancer gene test of all time and they will charge a premium for it then myriad starts using. Its patent to do what happens. Do best to create a monopoly if anyone else tries to make comprehensive diagnostic test based on their brca genes including some researchers myriad says kindly cease and desist last piece of the prophet puzzle. They get to work driving up demand. Genetic testing for breast cancer was relatively new thing. People didn't really know about it yet. So myriad launched a big marketing campaign aimed mostly at doctors and clinics. But then they test out something that hadn't really been done before with genetic testing breast cancer runs in my family. My mother my dad's sisters. I wondered if it would be inevitable. The trade marketing their test directly to consumers talk to your doctor or visit brac now dot com myriad says they invested around five hundred million dollars to develop and market the test and that they didn't even turn a profit until two thousand eight and says patenting. The gene was the key. That's the only way myriad could get the time and money needed to create what they deemed one of the most sophisticated genetic tests to date attest that gave more than a million people information about their risk for breast and ovarian cancer. But as you may remember not everyone saw myriads business model in the same positive light first of all that direct marketing to a broad swath of consumers less than ten percent of women are even good candidates for this test so there were concerns that myriad was encouraging all of these people to try to get a test that most of them don't even need that cost thousands of dollars before insurance and back at the. Aclu that lawyer. Chris hansen by the mid-2000s he'd spent a few years learning all about gene patenting and looking into the ways myriad was doing business and he had a few concerns of his own for example. Chris says people who did take myriads test might have been getting a false sense of security because his cadillac of tests. The original version of that test did not screen for several dangerous mutations in the gene which came to light after they'd gone to market so that even if you are a result back from myriad saying you're fine you weren't necessarily fine which you know. Science is a process of learning but once myriad realized its mistake and fix the test if customers wanted to take their new and improved. Test that identifies mutations that was gonna cost extra and chris says myriad police it's gene patents so aggressively that no other comprehensive. Brca test was available. So if you were worried that myriad had missed something. There was no way to get a second opinion myriad. Genetics was the only place in the country. You could go if you wanted to be tested other labs could could technically do be. Rca screening were not allowed to do so because of Myriads hat myriad told us. Look we only actually filed two lawsuits against our patent but scientists. We spoke with told us that myriad also sent out a ton of letters that threatened legal action which had basically the same effect of shutting down testing efforts and many scientists were already frustrated with myriad because the race define these genes in the first place had been largely collaborative among scientists around the world and yes myriad had found the gene i but they've done it with the help of everyone else's published work and then they used their patent rights to essentially claim testing for it all to themselves and because really only myriad could test for these genes only they could gather certain kinds of really valuable new data about inherited breast cancer they collected and years of data most of which they also didn't share with the rest of the breast cancer research community. They had this gigantic database of brca one jeans and the various variations of the brca jeans myriad refused to share that database with the scientific community. We spoke to the folks at myriad and they told us that they didn't want to share their genetic database with the broader scientific community out of a concern for patient privacy. They say the pricing of tests has always been proportionate to the costs of developing and bringing them to market and they say they're patent strategy was in line with others in the industry. But chris's concerns went. Far beyond myriads business model far beyond myriad used it's gene patents for him myriad was just a symptom of a much more fundamental issue. The real problem to chris was that genes could even be patented at all. The notion that some private company to own a part of my body and i can't look at it without paying a royalty to some private company seemed to me blindingly obviously a civilization and when chris hansen sees a civil liberties issue. He knows what to

Breast Cancer Ovarian Cancer Sean Teigen Cancer Supreme Court Salt Lake City Cova Nasa Utah Sean Mary Brac Chris Hansen Aclu Chris RCA
The Crown season 4

The Watch

08:47 min | 1 year ago

The Crown season 4

"I am now joined by. Amanda dobbins our resident expert. Amanda thanks for joining me again. My pleasure your pleasure to watch these middle. Three episodes of the crown season four absolutely crushing. It this stuff. Is this really good. We're talking today about favorites fagin and taryn knowle's ands basically. It's the episode with all the kids. The episode with the guy breaks into the palace and the episode. Where charles and diana go to australia. And i have to say that i think four. I've seen a few people dating for here and there for some reason. Maybe because it's too too well kind of put too much of a bow on it. I think it's fucking extraordinary. Like if i i thought that favorites was a really like startling achievement in dramatic writing and just in terms of the amount of stuff that they burn through in the way that they bring all these characters. What did you. What did you think of that episode. I agree with you. And i have not seen any criticisms because i don't really consume social media anymore but anyone who thinks it's too neat or they put a bow on it. I guess find another show This is peter. Marin is a playwright. There is a lot of construction and intentional cinematic and exposition all dialogue and set pieces built into this. It's not. it's not that it's obvious but all of it is very crafted. So i agree with you that i thought episode four was tremendous in terms of the amount of like and setup that they managed to convey to you in a very effective way. Because we don't really know anything about two of the four children barely met any of them and has been kind of a side character and so there are four children who get their own scenes and moments and so you have to develop those characters. You have to develop the queen's relationship to all of them. You also have the margaret thatcher thematic connection of the of the children. And you're drying out a little bit about margaret thatcher's relationship to women as well which is an important larger thematic episode. And also you've got the falklands war. I mean it's and they do it definitely and i thought about something you say a lot. Which is the crown doesn't like doesn't waste a moment. They just pick the scenes they pick the lines. And you know everything you need to know. That is so hard and they nail it. I mean they do a lot of stuff that i think other shows would probably shy away from because it would feel too like they were showing you too many of their cards so i kept thinking about the scene between elizabeth and an you know they go riding out. This is the thing that they sort of both share this love of horses even though and is obviously phillips favorite. And that's like in the way that that gets conveyed in the beginning and their conversations heartbreaking you know like their conversation is legitimately breaking and i think you could look at what an says. She's like. I used to enjoy being the difficult on and scaring people and now i don't feel like have any control over that anymore and you could be like well like you might go your entire life and never have that level of self awareness. You know you may have to go through thirty years of therapy to find that out about yourself and this young woman just like sort of pops out off when confronted by her mother on iran day. But it's beautiful writing. It's just it's just like amazing writing. And i thought the performances specifically in that scene mostly because the three sons come off as absolute troll lords in this episode mean. Yeah but the scene in particular was was quite lovely thought. Listen i think that there are levels of emotional breakthrough and clarity in this. Show that it's never happened in real life and certainly have never happened in the uk and to anyone who is absolutely senior no country just a lot of time talking about salads in england too early because they get a lot of salad industry and how to their salads or just blue cheese and bacon their emotional relationships are blue cheese and bacon. Do they are not. They're not doing the the smart greens. Now i mean it's it's a tv show and we are projecting emotions and trying to figure out how these people felt about the facts that we know are true. That's what we think is so interesting about episode for which made me reflect a little bit of on the queen character in this season and an interesting thing is happening. We talked a little bit about this on the last episode. Where libya coleman is kind of popping out a little bit and coleman is one of the great actresses of time and also i find her personally hilarious so i think that that's great but i see moments where it nothing is on the page and it's just olivia colman giving it that sense of humor giving it that timing Or maybe even the character is being a little bit written to her strengths and that is also a little bit because the queen is not. i mean. she's not a side character but the way they're telling the story is about all of the other people and events who are kind of crowding into that character's life and how she's bouncing all of it but episode four is just it's about the queen and all of their writing it's character development that is in line with the past three seasons that we've seen and it's pretty extraordinary and i think libya coleman also does like a great job with the actual written script and the character and the reacting to like the horror show of her children. I mean they all are. Do you have a favorite of the four. Who is your favorite on the shore in real life. No on the show. I don't really i. It's shifted i think blassie's and it would have been charles and yeah and this season it's probably end. Although let me get to the end of it. I mean it's obviously not editor andrew. So yeah. I wanted to just quickly before we get into edward andrew charles. A little bit ask you you start this episode up. Did you expect the wedding. No if only because number one. I read some spoilers about how they don't show the wedding but i do also think in their when charles and diana yes yes. The most watched royal wedding. I think of all time. I i don't. I should have gotten this statistics. It was close to a billion people. Watch it. I mean that was everywhere and people taped it and watched it over and over again rate including me who. Dvr it when bbc america riera it before the wedding harry and meghan and it was part of their like twelve hour block of programming. I watched all of it i. It's pretty boring. They didn't really have their production values in one thousand nine hundred one that we expect from royal wedding now anyway but no. There was sort of finality to episode three and there was something intentional about the way they showed their rehearsal and kind of the real behind the scenes emotions where i was like. Okay this is an interesting choice and like this is what we're going to get and also i've seen it before was do because like they wouldn't be a lot of opportunity for people to be talking during that so unless there would be some fagin like wrinkle history that they wanted to explore not really sure what they would do their right. I mean it happened at such a scale that even it would defy the crown's siegi budget. I will say. I was surprised that diana disappeared for new episodes. We'll get episode five. But she is very briefly shown and she is heavily pregnant when she shown episode four. And she just won't come out of the room and in one way. That's really all you need to know. About how their marriage is going and how everything is you know how everything is is shaken out but on the other hand i was like uh this is a choice. Diana pretty popular. Yeah yeah no. I thought that the dow is interesting. Also the suggestion. That charles is starting to become under the influence of these gurus and like self help nutritionist. Which i didn't. I didn't know that about him. Oh yeah the the lawrence vander past reference. I only know about this from the tina brown book. But apparently he brought those books on their honeymoon and then tried to get diana who was twenty at the time of their wedding to read the books and discuss them over for dinner on their honeymoon. So that's how that went

Amanda Dobbins Taryn Knowle Margaret Thatcher Fagin Diana Coleman Charles Olivia Colman Marin Amanda Blassie Edward Andrew Charles Australia Phillips Peter Elizabeth America Riera England
A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | 1 year ago

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

Solvable

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. There is a lack of accountability for police, violence and one part of. Solving that is to give federal prosecutors more tools, so they can actually prosecute this cases. Approximately a thousand people killed during police encounters in the United States every year. And in fact, that number is held steady for nearly twenty years. Around half of those killed or white. Black Americans are more than twice as likely to die at the hands of police. They are killed disproportionately to their overall representation in the population. I'm thinking about. Say The shooting of Philander Castille. CAPLESS Tamir Rice twelve year, old boy, who was shot and killed by an officer when playing in a park in Cleveland. How do we achieve racial justice while protecting public safety? Lawyer Cheer Baynes believes the federal. Government has a key role to play. What exactly would you like to see? Happen there for Congress to lower the intense standard from willfulness recklessness, so that it would be a federal crime recklessly deprive someone of their rights under color of law to recklessly use excessive force for all the Americans who died during police encounters in less than two percent of cases, does an officer end up being charged with a crime? When you were at Doj how many times did specific language of willful thwart possible prosecution of of an officer? You think you felt a done something wrong. Routinely, that was the biggest barrier. It was always the central concern. Kira. Who's devoted his career to ending impunity for officers who commit crimes against citizens thinks we can fix this. The problem of lack of accountability for police violence is solvable. Cheering Baines is the director of Legal Strategies de Moth a racial justice organization before that he worked at the US Department of Justice, serving a senior counsel to the head the civil. Rights Division, that's the division that investigated. Ferguson Missouri and sued the city for unconstitutional policing and court practices. Baynes Co wrote the Ferguson report. Malcolm Bradwell spoke to Baynes about what needs to be done to solve the persistent problem of police impunity at the national level. To critical components are lowering the intense standard for the federal government to prosecute active excessive force criminally and using federal consent decrees to address systemic misconduct. You've been working on this question of how to make police better for quite some time right? Yes, actually. It's been an issue that's been. An issue that I've been distressed by want to do something about since I was a young kid. Actually the Rodney King case happened in the beating of Rodney King. One thousand, nine, hundred, one I was ten years old, and there are a lot of high profile incidents in the hundred ninety s with I'm dirty, yellow Louima and many other high profile cases of police violence police killings. Finish cared about as a high schooler for sure I can remember that were you in high school Chelmsford High School? It's a small town in Massachusetts next to the city of Lowell, maybe about thirty thousand thirty five thousand people. It wasn't like you were. LIVING IN LA or living in the Bronx where Ahmadou was shot, it was you were these were instance miles away. That nonetheless caught your attention. Absolutely these are national stories and I was very interested in. Civil Rights history even civil rights law. The role of lawyers in the civil rights movement. I think maybe juxtaposed that history and the principles underlying that movement with what I was seeing. Play out in terms of police violence in the country. At that time, and actually can remember. An organization called the stolen lives project that would collect information about the people who have been killed by police, disproportionately young black man. That is something that I recall, so. It's something I've. been working on for a long time ended up working on that some more in law school, focusing on it, and then it on my first job after clerking for a federal judge was to actually prosecute police misconduct cases including police violence. How early on you decide that? You wanted to become a lawyer depressingly early? Han actually I think I thought in high school. That would become a lawyer. What did you think of that decision? Well I'm an Indian kid and the child immigrants and so. I think a lot of people in that boat might relate. My mother wanted me to be a doctor. That would million other Indian children. Yeah Yeah. It's a common refrain and. Short of being a doctor, a lawyer was pretty good, so. But you know my family wasn't focused on these issues. These weren't the issues that they confronted him and they cared about it. In the sense research, generally aware my grandmother used to describe all this work as a community service or volunteer work and I'd have to actually get paid to do this job.

Officer Chelmsford High School Cheer Baynes DOJ Rodney King Jacob Weisberg Rights Division United States Baynes Co Philander Castille Ferguson Missouri Baines Congress Tamir Rice Massachusetts Cleveland Kira LA
Academy postpones 2021 Oscars, will announce new diversity rules

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Academy postpones 2021 Oscars, will announce new diversity rules

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown Twenty Years Matt Bellamy my usual Banter Buddy on the business and Matt the Ninety Third Academy Awards ceremony has been pushed from February twenty eighth to April twenty fifth for. Obvious reasons. The eligibility period for films which normally would end on December thirty first. It's been extended to February twenty eighth twenty twenty, one. Because of you know. These films have not had opportunity to play or necessarily get the kind of attention. They would normally get. That's the argument now. The Oscars has been pushed before in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight, due to La Flooding, and then in sixty eight because of the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King and again in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one, because of the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan so I. Think it's fair to conclude that. When they pushed the Oscar ceremony something very very bad is happening as it is now, but this was necessary. However, if you're ABC, just from a business point of view, this is bad news. Also yeah I mean there's A. A couple ramifications here one is for ABC I mean this is their super bowl. They count on a ton of AD revenues about hundred forty hundred fifty million dollars in ad revenue last year that they can usually count on in February that is now pushed out of q one into cue to if the Oscars take place as planned which are that's a big question mark. Will we have big scale events with celebrities walking a red carpet even in April of next year? We don't know the second is the impact on the film released calendar because. Because assuming at some point that movies do comeback and we start to get movies released in theaters again these big year end movies that everybody sees every year and you know come out around Christmas time and get a lot of the awards attention and go on to win Oscars that window is now going to shift into the January February march window, which is going to change a lot of strategies for these film companies because you don't now have to crowd. You're movie into that year end corridor in order to make an impact with Oscar voters. Voters, you can give it a little bit more time and that February. March time period is usually a dumping ground where you don't put your best movies now. Maybe you're going to put your best movies there because you know, you can get Oscar attention as well as some box office. Yeah, and what's really still very unclear win theaters will open theaters, clinging to to July, as is as our Warner Brothers with Christopher Nolan's ten and a couple of Disney with Milan they push tenant two weeks i. don't really get how that solves anything but. It makes us so they're not I now Milan will be I will be the Guinea pig, so to speak and then Warner. Brothers we'll have tended after that, so they won't be the Guinea Pig the other thing that is. Speaking of Guinea Pigs. The academy is going to try to do require going forward diversity as a criterion for eligibility for Oscar and they haven't specified what that means I I would certainly not argue with the goal Hollywood has been very very stuck for a very long time in terms of diversity goals, but you know it's something where they have to be very careful. You can't just mandate something like that without really choosing how it works, you know and and again. I want to stress how I totally support that goal, but you're sort of a strange territory telling creative people you must do X. and we don't know what xs yet, but you know. This is something where I think. There's a swimming Zaidi that it will end up being like the most popular picture category that ultimately just sort of went away. This should work, but the question is how yeah! It's a big question because you know for years and years, the academy has always said that the diversity problem is not the academy's problem. It is Hollywood's problem, and it's just at the Oscars are reflection of what the industry is doing, so you shouldn't blame the academy for the diversity problems of Hollywood. This is a flip of that. They're saying we are taking this on. On as an organization and saying that you will not be able to be eligible for an Oscar unless you adhere to some basic diversity principles, and they have yet to articulate what those are, so they just WanNa. See what the logistics are going to

Oscar Warner Brothers Hollywood Ninety Third Academy Matt Bellamy Milan ABC Attempted Assassination Kim Masters Dr Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan La Flooding Zaidi Wanna Disney Warner Christopher Nolan
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 2 years ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

Trivia With Budds

08:47 min | 2 years ago

10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

"Leaner it be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out my show and thank you guys so much for spreading the word during this quarantine about this little show. We have eight hundred episodes to listen to. So it's great for binging. You can take a couple episodes a couple of topics and you can quiz each other. You could battle against people that you're stuck in a house with and hopefully could have a good time passing the time. There are just so many different topics we've done on the show in the past things like marine biology and shopping malls and soft drinks and cooking terms. I'm just trying to think of stuff we've done there so many different topics literally inundate. You could make probably done it at this point. And even the uber specific things like Ace Ventura when Nature Calls Trivia. I think we've done that so just give it a search any topic. You're looking for go on Google and type in Trivia with buds in that topic and you should come across a link or to of Podcast episodes that. We've done shout out to my podcast hosting service. Lipson which has never faltered in all the years. I've used it. I think I've been using it for over three years. People ask me from time to time. What is my hosting plan? How much do I pay all that? Good stuff so I thought I'd share that with you. I think I pay twenty nine ninety nine a month thirty dollars a month for six hundred megabytes of storage and I've been using Lipson for that since the very beginning and the way I found them was just searching best. Podcast host read a few articles. saw some different podcasts. That I listen to that use Lipson and I said okay. I'll go with that so I started off at a smaller megabyte storage level and I moved up when I started the show daily to a little bit of a higher level so that answer that question for anybody who's thinking about starting their podcast. I do trust and believe in Lipson. Check them out. Lipson DOT COM for all the hosting plans. I think you could do it for as little as five bucks a month or six bucks a month so give it a gander. I think they're going to be a lot of podcasts. That start over this quarantine over this downtime. Because people are just sitting around at home going What should we do? Should we start a podcast? Maybe we should. We got plenty of time to do so. And you know along with binging shows that might be great pairing. This might be the Father Brown. Podcast era people watching the show. Father Brown and talking about it on a podcast. Maybe I should do that. I wonder if there's a father Brown podcast if there is someone link it to me on social media at Ryan Buds. Maybe I'll start listening. I do like that. Show all right guys. We're going to jump into today's episode. It is a competence round ten totally random questions that I used to close at my life. Trivia nights last week and by last week live Trivia Nights. I mean just at home. Because they were all cancelled from the lockdown but I am still making these different trivia nights every week going forward so you can download all of the questions to play at home if you WanNa do like a bunch of random rounds like we do at night. Go TO TRIVIA WITH BUDS DOT COM and. Click the link the very top of the website. There's an ice banner that tells you how to download it. How To play instructions rules scoreboard answer? She could print out the whole Shebang so go check that out. We're going to jump into these ten random questions right here. We go all right. It's a confidence around. You're not on your answers. Ranking them one through ten ten is the highest ones the lowest and here we go number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game? Features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number. One Thousand Nine Hundred. Eighty Nine. Computer game features. The clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number one question number two. What cheese is typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two what cheese is most typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two number three which? Us states two letter. Abbreviation is first alphabetically number. Three which states two letter abbreviation is first alphabetically. Question number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty. Five question number five coming at you. What announcer who started his career in? Nineteen eighty-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble number five. What announcer who started his career in nineteen eighty two is famous for his catchphrase? Let's get ready to rumble. Question number six. What nine hundred ninety one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread? Good number six one thousand nine hundred one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread number seven. The band looking glass had a hit seventy song. About what girl's name number seven? The band looking glass had what seventy song about a girl's name question number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams question number nine? Those hladik Z L. O. T. Y. Is the currency of what country does. Lodhi is the currency of what country and question number ten to close out this quiz what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar number ten what wwe wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. Those are all your questions for the quiz. Remember you right now. Your answers rank them. One through ten ten is the highest the lowest each number one time in your ranking process. Right down all the answers I then. After each one of them you can write a little bubble and put ten or nine eight or seven all the way down to one. Whatever you right next your answer is how many points you would award yourself if you get it right if you want to self score this at home. It's out of fifty five possible points and we'll be back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to confidence round Trivia. Guys this was a tough one. There were some tough tough questions hidden. In this episode's hopefully you came up with all the correct answers. Here's number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives? The answer there was minesweeper minesweeper. I mean that game I never to this day. I don't know how to play. Minesweeper is just kind of click around and hope that a box wouldn't explode and I'd see the numbers and I'd be like Oh cool four three one two and I would just keep clicking. I didn't really understand what the hell those things meant. And maybe you do and maybe I'm just adult as they say but I still don't understand minesweeper. Someone explained it to me number two. What cheese is typically used on a reuben sandwich that is Swiss cheese Swiss cheese although I have gotten munster on a ruben before Swiss cheese they mostly put on their number three states? Two letter? Abbreviation is first alphabetically. This was a question of the day recently. A couple episodes ago I think and popped up again. Here this is Alaska Aka AK Alabama is next. But that's a l so that comes K. L. Yeah that comes next number. Four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five that is Iran Iran number five. What announcer who started his career? Nineteen ninety-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble. That was Michael Buffer Michael. Buffer number six nineteen ninety-one movie features characters named Evelyn couch in any thread. Good Fried Green to make this number. Six Fried Green tomatoes number six number seven demand looking glass had hit seventy song. About what girl's name it was brandy and then in parentheses. You're a fine girl. If you wanted to put the full title but Brandy worked just fine number eight in the NFL. How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams five yards number eight five yards and number nine? This Lodhi is the currency of Poland Poland number ten what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. That is edge. You think you know me know me. You think you know me number. Ten edge is going to be returning to Wrestlemainia this year for a sold out crowd of zero because they are doing wrestlemainia in the performance center. I think that's what I read. And there should be no audience which is going to be sad and weird and probably not the big return. He thought it would be but hey the world is upside down right now. An edge is still wrestling. So those are your answers guys. Those were the answers to the confidence around. I hope you had a fun time playing along with today's

Evelyn Couch Persia Ryan Buds WWE Lipson NFL Father Brown Lipson Dot Com Google Ace Ventura Brandy Wrestlemainia Michael Buffer United States Alaska Poland Lodhi L. O. T. Y.
Bloomberg’s big bet: Can money beat Biden's momentum?

The Tony Kornheiser Show

04:36 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg’s big bet: Can money beat Biden's momentum?

"Buddha JIB has dropped out Biden had a big win in South Carolina a three or four days before the big win by Biden and South Carolina and people were saying he was gonNA lose to Bernie Bernie's momentum was such coming out of Nevada that he was going to win a Tuesday tomorrow. Super Tuesday can change. Everything can be over honestly Bhai Wednesday morning at nine in the morning can be over But your thoughts about Biden now budgets dropping out. And what are we looking at our? Don't we know we don't know I mean what we know is a third of all of the delegates will be apportioned tomorrow night so thirteen hundred delegates out of the thirty nine hundred. You Need Nineteen Hundred. Save the thousand or eleven. It's very hard to do that. Because unlike Republicans who have this so indicative of how the two Parties Think. Republicans have a lot of winner-take-all states. You win the state yet. All the delegates Democrats have actually in the Electoral College. Democrats have if you get fifteen percent either statewide or any congressional district in the State. You get delegates from a practical perspective. What that means is it's just harder to get a lot a big lead sanders will have the lead. After tomorrow. I would look at California. It's hugely important because it has the most delegates but also because there's a possibility no one else gets fifteen percent statewide other than sanders including Biden. And if that happens sanders will have a very large dow in the hundreds delegate lead Before Gary left on his trip he asked me who to keep an eye on. I said footage so that tells you about where I'm at right now. I wasn't wrong to keep an eye on footage because he did drop out so smart did he. And I know but I think he will endorse Biden at some point Because they are all afraid of sanders the dynamic of the races this sanders almost certainly must be stopped will end this process. June through the end of the process with the most delegates now is it. The most by three hundred is the most by fifty. I don't know. Does he have nine hundred ninety one? In which case all this is moot. Because he'll be the nominee oh So the issue is. How do you limit his number of delegates and the theory? Is You unite behind one person. I think that is at this point somewhat remarkably given that he finished fourth fifth and second winning. Yeah it looks currently like Joe Biden because the only other alternative really is Michael Bloomberg and I just don't think that Democrats are going to rally around a guy who was a Republican. You know ran for office as a Republican. I just no matter how much money you have so I think the if you are not wanting to San for sanders to win you need Bloomberg to get out in the next couple of days. Ammos spending all that money. Sure but it's nothing I mean. Yes he spent six hundred million. He'll probably spend a billion dollars. But it's it's immaterial him. I know that that's insane to say but it is true. You need him to get out in the next couple of days. You need to get out in the next couple of days and you need Warren to stay in as long as possible to Siphon. Is Kobe charge? She's running for vice president. Now what is she doing exactly? What Ewing Use Code People? I think she is staying in through tomorrow because she thinks she can win. Minnesota her home state and then maybe if she wins Minnesota then she gets out sort of Warren's GonNa lose her home state I think very tomorrow in Massachusetts to Sanders I don't know exactly what she's doing to be candid. Okay but if she thinks it's going to be a a brokered convention and all bets are off. Yeah well that's still the Warriors Theory in Warren Theory is it's going to be brokered convention. Meaning no one. We'll have nine hundred ninety one nine elegant one thousand nine hundred one delegates and that means no one went on the first ballot the last time we've gone to multiple ballots in a Democratic presidential primaries. Do you know just as a trivia question do knock nine hundred fifty two Ashley Stevenson on the third ballot That if it's if it's contested than why not stay into Gary's point and have six seven eight hundred delegates and say who who wants my support. Or Maybe I. Should you know the Dick Cheney? I did a comprehensive search for a vice president and is bounded to be me. Yeah so I still think Bernie is By far the most likely nominee I I think if he's at eighteen hundred delegates it's GonNa be very hard to take it from him is people rightly would be. I up in arms Okay which by the way gives us six more months of Larry David. Yeah which is good. Doing Bernie

Sanders Joe Biden Bernie Bernie Michael Bloomberg Gary Vice President South Carolina Warren Dick Cheney Ashley Stevenson Kobe Larry David California Nevada Ewing Minnesota Massachusetts
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Comfort in Death and Darkness

Comfort in Death and Darkness

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Comfort in Death and Darkness

"Air I awe as you just heard he was saying he was going to kill the recipient of the call over and over again and did so westbound. Why would he have been doing it in a whisper? Was He doing in an environment? Meant he could have been called. Joseph James the Angelo in nineteen seventy three was married to a woman named Sharon. Murray little before separating with her in one thousand nine hundred one was Sharon home at the time that he made this call. Was this even him. Could this have just been a voicemail left during the height of the original night? Stalker string of crimes. Well yes this actually was him. How do we know well? The person that he called would go on to become one of his victims. This is one of the scariest recordings ever think about how you feel if this landed in. Your Voice Mailbox Mid-2000s Australian.

Sharon Murray Joseph James Angelo
Fashion and War in America

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:15 min | 2 years ago

Fashion and War in America

"Are currently in the midst of international fashion week. Yes and last week. We talked about the origins of the semi-chaotic relationship between fashion and Hollywood film. But we only got into the nineteen thirties so today. We're moving out of the thirties and into the nineteen forties. Which of course takes US straight into World War Two and on the show? We've talked a lot about fashion and war as it relates to Europe during World War One and World War Two but less so about the relationship fashion and war in America and it's actually incredibly fascinating because throughout the nineteen thirties. America's changing perception of their homegrown talent was reflected in Ariz- leading fashion magazines. Such as Vogue and Harper's bazaar at both of those magazines began to feature American fashion designers more and more throughout the decade. Elizabeth Haase reflected on this transitory period in American fashion in her book. Fashion is spinach which was published in nineteen thirty eight and in it. She writes quote in the late twenties ninety percent of the drawings and photographs. Where the work? A prison couturiers and. She's talking about Vogue and Harper's bazaar and then she says many pages and both magazines are now devoted to close created in America for American Life. The outbreak of World War Two and nineteen thirty nine mark significant shift in the fate of American designers who having continued to operate in the shadow of Paris throughout the nineteen thirties. Were suddenly left to stand all on their own and during the German occupation of Paris from June nineteen forty to August nineteen forty four. Many of the leading French couture houses were forced to close and those that did remain open did so under severely limited operations and some pretty severe restrictions as well right and for those of our listeners. Who might not have heard? April actually did a fantastic interview on stuff. You Mr History class which we featured a couple months ago so check it out if you want to learn more about fashion world war two so for the French fashion industry. This meant that communication with America during World War Two. It meant that one of their most important export markets was almost entirely broken and in one thousand nine hundred one after American designers and manufacturers presented promising fall and spring collections New York Times fashion journalist Virginia Pope well. She declared Murck City to be the fashion center of the world and AIRCON designers may have come into their own during the war but they did so under restriction and regulation beginning in nineteen forty two American fashion designers had to grapple with restrictions imposed by regulation l eighty five which were government imposed sanctions at severely limited. Just what designers could and could not produce the purpose of l. eighty-five was to conserve materials. Needed for the war effort and this included fabrics such as silk cotton wool. Leather Rubber Nylon. So you know pretty much. Every material that you need to make clothing and footwear and the regulations thus restricted just. How much material could be used in the making of new garments so we had campaign such as make-do-and-mend which encouraged people to avoid shopping altogether by mending their old clothes. Something we of course support very much today. L. eighty-five essentially challenge the very nature of the fashion industry itself. As we all know depends on the production of new seasonal clothing styles to stimulate consumerism and as we establish last episode Hollywood films while they were actively complacent and encouraging fashion consumption throughout the nineteen thirties and costume designers like their fashion designer. Counterparts were not exempt from L. Eighty five regulations during the war in an eighteen. Forty four article in the New York Times renowned Hollywood costume designer. Edith head called L. Eighty five quote. The greatest boone ever came to fashion designers in Hollywood so it would appear casts that in the nineteen forties costume designers still considered themselves as fashion designers. And she goes on to say about eighty-five quote. It vanished super luxury and brought us all down to Earth. Today we create sensible styles for women the kind that they can actually wear and she goes on to say how. Well I remember the day when we would swirl Fox skins around the hem of a secretary address or wipe satin uniform on a trained nurse. Now we hold to stark realism and by this time had been the head designer at paramount. For seven years she had taken over for her predecessor. Travis Banton in nineteen thirty seven and head like baton began her career in film working with Howard greer in the nineteen twenties as a costume illustrator before climbing the ranks and indeed head is certainly one of the most prolific and fame designers from the Hollywood golden age. Numerous books have been written about this prolific designer who April has eight Academy Awards for best costume design and wait for it. She has four hundred and forty four credits. On that's intense. She worked for almost sixty years in the film industry so she had an incredible career her first credit it dates to nineteen twenty five and her last film is dead. Men Don't wear plaid with Steve Martin. That released after her death in nineteen eighty two so she died in one thousand nine hundred. One at the age of eighty. Three head is quoted and Margaret Bailey's nineteen eighty-two book those Glorious Glamour Years as saying quote. I do not consider a motion picture costume designer necessarily a fashion creator because we do the script tells us to if we do a period piece then we recreate fashion. That was done before. And if we have a character role we do character close. It is only by the accident of a script that calls for fashion an actress that can wear fashion that some of the beautiful clothes will emerge. I don't consider myself a designer in the sense of fashion designer. I am a motion picture costume designer. So just how did head go from identifying as a fashion designer in Hollywood and the nineteen forties to firmly distinguishing herself as a costume designer by the end of her career? I love this answer. You pro because it actually lies with the advent of yours new-look which is a little unexpected as many of us know nineteen forty seven witnessed this dramatic and sudden change in fashion. Thanks to the unprecedented success of Christiane Yours Premier collection and he introduced dresses with nipped in ways. Those padded hips and full long skirts and they stood in direct contrast to the war regulated fashions of years prior which is why so many people loved them. Unfortunately for the many films released the year that this change took place. The costumes were immediately glaringly out of fashion again. Dino Dior's new look was significant reminder. That though film cost you may be perceived and interpreted as fashion it will never be able to truly contend with the whims and follies of contemporary trends. And Edith. Had designed costumes for eleven films that were released in nineteen forty seven so to say that she was affected is a bit of an understatement. Here and looking on this period for the book. Edith head's Hollywood edith reflected quote. I learned my lesson. The hard way just offered Dior brought out the new look every film I had done in the past few months. Looked like something from the bread lines with each screening. I vowed that I would never get caught by fashion trend again and became a confirmed fence sitter. Although despite her weariness of fashion trends did not keep her designs from apparently sparking them as was the case with address she designed for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun which was a nineteen fifty film in a nineteen seventy-eight article for the American Film Journal. Edith wrote my dress for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun was taken up by manufacturer of debutante Party dresses. Someone at paramount wants counted at a party thirty seven Elizabeth Taylor's dancing. All studio designers have created something that influences fashion. But a good costume designer. Shouldn't try to influence style though. Naturally he hopes to hit upon something that many people will like

Hollywood Edith Head America Elizabeth Taylor New York Times Paris Paramount Head Designer United States Vogue Europe Elizabeth Haase Dior Ariz Academy Awards American Film Journal Travis Banton Harper
Frieze Hires Media-Industry Veteran Simon Fox as First CEO

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 2 years ago

Frieze Hires Media-Industry Veteran Simon Fox as First CEO

"Finally today freeze the Global Art Fair is poised to announce a new boss. He is Simon Fox previously CEO of reach the publisher of the Daily Mirror Daily Express and Daily Star. One joined with more on this by the art critic still love. It is still also lectures at the Hempstead School of art in London. A still before we be we come to the appointment to position itself in the the Global Arts Realm. How important is running freeze? It probably probably the biggest and the best and the most coveted our job ever It's one of the most respected offers in the world wide scheme of things. It's it's huge. How much influence on the direction of global law does the person inhabiting that role to have a huge amounts? uh-huh forget they're there to to oversee everything to set the programming and especially in today's Brexit world this is going to be a magnificent for anybody like Simon folks to take over and bring some of their personal import and expand the presence of Arts in how we see all around the world. But let's look at Simon Fox then as I was saying in the intro. His previous job is C- of reach which publishes the Daily Mirror Daily Express and Daily Star. I think it's fair to say that none of those journals noted for a keen interest In the modern world how enthused relaxed otherwise his rule. The Art will be about somebody that background taking over freeze. That's a great question. Don't forget when freeze was founded back in the early ninety nine nineteen thousand nine hundred ninety one by manager shop and Matthew slots over it was with the launch of a magazine it was with the launch of the frieze magazine Gene. So you know whether or not as some people may say well you need an art background. I disagree what you need is a good business business strategy and they will be a definite understanding between all the parties of how you can call the art market which is of course ever expanding. Don't forget as old collectors. Die Out New collectors a boon. And what can you collect bull Neeman born want they want to be entertained. You know people go to offense not just to look at art but they go to OPF as shallow as it might sound Andrew. They get up as for Selfie opportunities as you correctly pointed out. Freeze has expanded enormously from those modest beginnings back in one thousand nine hundred one with the launch of a magazine. It's now seventy percent owned by Endeavour. What do we know of what ambitions they have for the first of all in the future well bearing in mind and endeavor is about entertainment and their portfolio of assets includes the likes of Miss Universe? The New York Fashion Week and the ultimate fighting championship franchise So it's all about an immersive experience that that goes beyond the art world. It's all about making us feel as though we are part of the show parts of the entertainment and I. It's it's it's a form of being present in today's world. It's an extraordinary thing really. How in the beginning when you think about the first art galleries galleries which of course with churches that the experience was to go and be enlightened by the works that you see on on the wall but nowadays it's a token reverse us and the works become artworks by the public? Look up puzzle with them. The hundred twenty thousand dollar banana a with an institution like freeze though in it is an institution by now. How careful do you have to be about what we might think of? As overselling it turning turning it into something so big so mainstream that those who have patronized it up to this point start to lose interest in it. That's that's an interesting resting points as well. Andrew don't forget Art Fez don't want to be seen as being too funnel to social they don't want to be seen as the place where you go for free alcohol off off the obligatory Salvia say but all fares are a place where where serious art collectors go instead of going to galleries now because they they know that going to be seen and they know they're going to have the ultimate unimaginable experience and they know that there's a chance That they will make everyone in the jealous. You know the work of art is almost like going to a party with with the blonde goal you can find the longest legs it. It's not enough to just go on the gallery on the High Street now. People want Changes they won't growth they want to be able to go beyond the relate bonding click. which is what happens? Even with sales of about works on instagram. They want to be seen and be seen to be seen a still love it. Thank you for joining

Simon Fox Daily Star Hempstead School Of Art Global Arts Realm London Endeavour Neeman Brexit CEO Selfie New York Andrew Publisher
Sofya Kovalevskaya: The First Major Russian Female Mathematician

This Day in History Class

03:28 min | 2 years ago

Sofya Kovalevskaya: The First Major Russian Female Mathematician

"Was the first woman to get a modern doctorate in mathematics. She was the second of three children an born into a family of wealthy Russian aristocrats. Her father was in artillery general in the Russian army so the family had to move a lot when she was young but when she was around six years old. The family settled at an estate near Russia's border with Lithuania. They're Kovalskaya learned under her English. Governess an Polish tutor. She was good at an enjoyed writing. And even though too much intellectual stimulation it was deemed unhealthy for girls. At the time she read. Ed Books that were in her family's library in fact she said that her father had a quote strong prejudice against learned women and when she was caught with books exc. He punished her still. She continued her studies in though she wasn't the best at math. Initially Sophia had a lot of scholars and mathematicians in her family lineage. By the time she was fifteen she had garnered more interest and proficiency in mathematics. She began taking lessons from a mathematician at the enable school in Saint Petersburg but even though she clearly had a talent for mathematics she could not continue her education in Russia since women were not allowed to attend in higher education institutions. Sophia was able to attend lectures by academics. But she wanted to go to school abroad something. Her father did not support but she needed to get permission to study abroad from her father or a husband so she decided to pursue her goal by getting married to a man named Vladimir Sciutto a paleontology student at the University of Moscow. The agreement was that the marriage was a platonic one. They married in eighteen sixty eight in the next year. They moved to Heidelberg Germany. There Vladimir studied geology in Sofia took math classes at the university her professors had been students of the mathematician. Carl T. Buyer Strauss. So Sophia traveled to Berlin to study with him herself. Her husband stayed behind the university. versity their forbade women from attending fire stresses former lectures but vire Strauss agreed to teach her privately and he did so for the next few years. Kovalevsky ended up writing three doctoral dissertations Envir- stress submitted her work to the University of getting the dissertation on the theory theory of partial differential equations which expanded on ideas I posed by mathematician Augustin. Louis who she is considered the most important of the dissertations so she got her doctorate degree in eighteen seventy four but she still had trouble getting a teaching position so she went back to Russia to live with her husband. They had a child in for a while. They put aside their academic work but Vladimir died by suicide. Eighteen eighty three and soon Kovalevsky began Dan working as a lecturer in mathematics in Stockholm. She taught about inverse functions elliptical integral 's billion functions and. She also wrote more papers. Some of which won her awards she earned a lifetime professorship at the University of stock home and she was the first female mathematician to hold a chair the European university and her later years Kovalevsky pursued a career in writing authoring a play novels. She died of the flu complicated. Okay bye-bye Monja in one thousand nine hundred one.

Sophia Vladimir Sciutto Kovalevsky Russia University Of Moscow Vire Strauss Ed Books Carl T. Buyer Strauss European University Lithuania FLU Heidelberg Germany Kovalskaya University Of Saint Petersburg Sofia University Of Stock Berlin Augustin
A Beginner's Guide To Visiting Moldova

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:53 min | 2 years ago

A Beginner's Guide To Visiting Moldova

"I like to welcome to the show Christina Lescot from a finding elevation dot com which is a mindfulness website but she is also also from Moldova. Originally and come to talk to us about her home country original home country country of origin. Moldova Christina welcome to the show so much for having me Chris I feel like I could possibly said that more awkwardly but the I think that was awkward enough you so you were born in Moldova. But don't live there now. Yes I was born and raised and I laughed when I was nineteen and I'm currently in Canada so I will wear Moldova. I'm not sure that everybody could even put it on a map. Yeah that's a very valid question and fraud years. I was just thinking I should just make a card in every time I introduced myself someone. Just keep them the card hard and they're like. Hey this is where it is because the second question when everybody finds out at them from all the ways where is that so quite used to it already. has anyone anyone ever accused you of making up a country not yet detail. kind of thinking might happen in future. But it's actually in Ulster era. Settle in right next to Ukraine and Romania. So it's a very small country. Okay and in fact as I went to mispronounce ear name you had to tell me the Romanian pronunciation of it so the language there at least the language you spoke was Romanian. Yes we do. I have a few letters that are not used to the American side. Have a few extra letters in our alphabet that we're using it quite often and then why should someone travel to Moldova Raw. First of all would be because nobody really goes there. Technically if you're looking for for a country that it's still very cultural and it's still not tainted by tourism because tourism tends to when people go to one country and they go so in massive numbers the culture kind of gets lost in between in Moldova. Everything is quiet of people go and they see how it is this in this point in time without having to many tourists. So you won't have to deal with very high prices and generally you'll be discovering in culture that you've never really experienced before so if you're the person for looking for going to places that people don't usually go to Moldova as a really crepe place to start and we're talking about as you said a small country about I was just looking at two hundred ninety times smaller than the US us to take a whole year to visit all of Moldova. What would you recommend? We do. Say A one week itinerary. Okay so so you'll definitely be landing in the capital which is canal sue Maybe about two hundred thousand or five hundred thousand people. Oh it's very developed. It's very beautiful so there's a lot of neighborhoods to go around now. There are a lot of popular places in kitchen now. So the the main plays up people go to would be the cathedral and the Stephan the great wanting to which is right in the center of the capital capital and where you have the National Park Swell so technically. This is the main street in the center. This is where they new year's facilities are happening so y Stephan. The Great Park is important. Because he was I would say he was like a king in our country. We call it like a ruler. So he won a lot of bottles and every bottle he won. He would build the monastery. So we have a lot of monasteries in our country that would be if you're going directly to to the center of the city so this everything closed by you just take taxi. Were Public Transit. I would definitely challenge you to it from from there. My second favorite place in the capital that you should definitely try it out and go would be the place that we celebrate at the end of the war so dot would be cold the memorial complex attorney. It's also in the center kind of maybe maybe a twenty minutes drive from the center of the city still in the capital. It's one of my favorite places in kitchen house. So this is a place where we commemorate the veterans and every year the stability's for the the end of World War Two happened there and we also have an eternity fire. So there's a fire there. That never goes away. It's always protected by the military. So you can just go around. And there's different monuments and very beautiful sculptures in parks and it's kind of like a major park. Can you can just go there during the day and see it. Now we're too had other changes on Moldova's Moldova as I understand it became part of the USSR at the end of work too. So that is significant for why Moldova exists map as a separate country now is that it was part of Romania before the war part of the USSR until it gained its independence. Much more recently. That happened in one thousand nine hundred one. And that was I would say there's a big change to Moldova's cultural identity and identity in general especially language so we speak Romanian. But because we were a part of your czar We actually had our language colds curious so technically people would when they arrive they were right or million words but with Russian alphabet and also a lot of people will speak Russian so right now Moldova bovine is bilingual. And I would say it's seats at a good fifty fifty percent like if you go there you do very well refreshing language. You'll what else do very well in any language so even with my grandparents or so. They're more verse in Russian Than Me. I speak Romanian Iranian cameleon language however my grandparents They would write in curiel a car. They would not try Romanian. So that's a significant skinned difference. I'm we should point out for people who are not linguis- which I think is probably most of us. That Romanian and Russian are not in the same family group at all Romanian. Being a romance languages closer to French for instance and Russian is a Slavic language. So that's that's quite different to know this you it's Knowing Spanish and French or something like that they are completely different languages and I would say just. The war had such a big impact on us so we grew up with Russian influence. Russian music movies so I would say right now. There is obviously attention between Westernising Housing and going to the West. So it's always kind of Moldova is just in the middle and doesn't really know which way to go. The country just tear east has just had had part of it annexed by Russia as they try and get the band back together. So yeah I would think there'd be some some tension there so where else should we go after you've seen the city which there's a lot more places you obviously there's a lot of neighborhoods. I'm going to be biased entirely. Okay my favorite neighborhood is China. And that's because that is the place I spend my childhood in just walked in the streets and going to the local market it and discovering the people and there's a big alley that goes for quite a few blocks so usually when I was small. My parents would take me out there and we just walk doc do in the evenings on that massive Allie from one side to the other. There's a lot of restaurants and stores that you can check out this well and while you are in the center of the city definitely definitely try. Our cuisine. Moldova is very popular for having their a traditional food. which for me was kind of a difference because when I came to Canada was looking for traditional food but I couldn't really find it because we are so specific jake like we do have traditional food and every time we go away? We always crave it so we have like different restaurants and places we can go and buy. And I. Don't know Moldovan traditional food so it's going to be similar more similar Romanian. I'm assuming then Slavic so I'm not talking about the noodle dumplings swings and things like that. I'm talking about more stews actually. It's our traditional. Food is Komal Ga.. which is very great? Is this made off cornflower in. Eat It with your hands along with cottage

Moldova Canada Christina Lescot Romania Fraud Stephan Chris Great Park Ussr Komal Ga.. United States Russia Westernising Housing DOT Ukraine National Park Attorney Allie China
Modern Time Slips

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Modern Time Slips

"Today. Something a little bit different on this podcast. Generally science is acknowledged as something. Let's say a discovery of something and it can be replicated and therefore it is based in scientific fact and the pseudoscience is usually explained away as a simple single phenomena that can't be captured reproduced. So I have on this. PODCAST is a series of modern day. A or modern time time slips began with a white Ford pickup that pulled up to a cattle pasture near Pona City City Oklahoma. This was early in the fall of Nineteen seventy-one if stopped at the gate. Carl Marc and Gordon worked for cattle feed distributor. Were sent to this remote area to pick up a theater but they found their has kept them silent for forty one years. Carl says we opened the gate. which had barb orb wire with no locks and we entered? We went onto the property which was covered with grass up to in some cases over the truck. They drove through grass. Ask to the tank that sat close to Red Barn and got Outta the truck. We realize the tank was almost half full and too heavy to load. Carl said we. We decided to leave and drove around a Red Barn and there. We saw a large two story White House with no lights in front of us. The trio drove back to the cattle feed company and told the boss. He said he'd drained the tank and they could pick it up tomorrow. Carl says we went back to the location to retrieve the a tank the next night he said this time we decided to go through the old white big house on the hill and we brought our flashlights and shotguns. Just in case they they drove onto the property over the past. They've made through the day before they loaded the tank then they pulled around the bar toward the house what they saw burned into their memories. It was no longer there. Carl said we walked up the hill where it stood and there were no signs of demolition no foundation. There's nothing at all what we all seem to witness the night before was no longer there. We've talked to each other over the years but none of us can explain mine division. Did these men witness a time slip. Time slips have been reported throughout history and English women. Vacationing in France Franson one thousand. Nine hundred one claimed they stepped into the French Revolution. The two couples traveling in Spain in the Nineteen Seventies stated an oddly archaic. The hotel. There was simply gone on their return journey. Physicists like Albert Einstein Michio Kaku and Stephen Hawkins have have all said time. Travel is theoretically possible. Our science just can't achieve it but what if nature can another example the light in the sky shown shown white far from the Greens and the reds at Jigsaw during the Aurora Borealis of two thousand four visible in North America as far as the Lower Midwest West Jake fifteen stood outside his parents home in the lake of the ozarks Missouri around ten PM. Twenty eighth of May leaning against a truck rock looking at the lights. He didn't know his life was about to change a bright white glow suddenly filled the northern horizon this look nothing like the the northern lights the Aurora Borealis nor did it behave like that the lights move like the light of a copy machine. The single bar brightness move from west to east over Jake's head and disappeared. I thought that I should maybe go inside at this time and found myself. Unable to move he said Novenas grew in his arms and legs and he blocked out when he woke. He knew he'd been somewhere else. I felt woozy and almost dated. Said time seem muddled in my head. Had He walked into the House to find he'd been outside an hour. It took most of the night for him to tell us parents what happened. Most of the time I kept telling them that I thought the calendar was wrong. It should at least be after two thousand eight he said to this day. My mother remembers bits of this mainly because I looked at her and asked pointblank. Is that black man. Still President. What happened to j seizures psychological phenomenon or did did jake accidentally take a brief four years step forward from two thousand four hundred to two thousand eight Jake slip is just one in a long long line of stories from people who brushed against a different time such as an RAF pilots are victor good ard who encountered airplanes in nineteen eighteen thirty five that didn't exist until nineteen thirty nine one hundred year old Swiss watch found in a Chinese Ming Dynasty Tomb? People may I slipped like this all the time Duncan cal opened the door of his nineteen ninety nine Chevrolet s ten next to a convenience store gas pump trump in Springfield Missouri. Large man accosted him as I left the gas station. Some large melon-headed man dressed in a business suit yelled what year is this. Kel- set the man stood at a spot kill would've walked by when he left the store but he hadn't seen him demand wore dark black suit suit with a rough fiber texture. Kill said along the lines of things in the Teddy Roosevelt era. What year is this? The man yelled again. The the man was white about thirty five or forty years old clean-shaven normal but he asked an odd question. Carol said two thousand three CAL cal. Tolan the man's face contorted anger. What year is it? He screamed at yet cal again. I said two thousand three. The large man screamed the question. One more time I said two thousand three so he could hear me. Cal said then he quit asking. Kelly glanced away from the man as he slid into Swiss truck but safely inside he turned to get another luck and the man was gone. He disappeared from the front of the gas station. Cal said in the Second Institute held to slip into his truck demand simply vanished cal put. The man hadn't stepped inside the store the only place he could have gone in that short amount of the time he was gone.

Carl Marc Duncan Cal Jake Red Barn Missouri CAL Ford Nineteen Seventies White House Pona City City Oklahoma Aurora Borealis Spain Albert Einstein Michio Kaku France Franson Teddy Roosevelt North America Novenas Kelly
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Chelsea hold on on a guess on this date in one thousand nine hundred one super freak super super free whereas released wow I changed the game total game changer year. Rick James was a game changer yeah. He got after yes. He he got too much after he caught it a- and then he wanted other people to get after it that didn't want to get after it the same way that he did. It got weird. It got very weird. I mean he had so many proteges. If you will Eddie Murphy didn't you produce Eddie Murphy See Yeah Teena Marie the Mary Jane Girls One of my personal favorites okay during the super for everybody knows this one. Thanks Travis Happy Birthday down crews. That's insight that we didn't know all everybody doing this. One and this is because half the time northern half the time eighty percent of the time because you're talking about things. I've never heard embrace. The point is that I've never heard this is in the twenty percent. That'd be perfect right eighty one nine hundred eighty one. I was too young to be a super free. Nobody was talking about but I caught up. Yeah yeah excited for the Z.. I am I am and she's a good time. You know in terms of seeing all the collection election of athletes from our variety different sports outside of baseball of course yeah <hes> altogether seen him interact and you realize it's just a sorority is just another fraternity. Just they're all rich right right but they're still at Brotherhood sisterhood that plays he's out. It is fun and a little bit insightful the to see these guys and these women out of their natural environment for lack of a better phrase not on the court or on the on the field or whatever it is Chris. Were you there when we did the <hes> the American Century Tournament up until the one year yeah and and it was all its N._F._l.. Guys it's N._B._A.. Guys it's it's everybody but baseball because it's in the middle of the summer and everybody's relaxed and having a good time as opposed to everybody having their guard up because they know Burger and ask them questions no. It's going to be a lot of fun Roger. We are not allowed to talk about some of the presenters and stuff. I don't see why not generally there was an embargo thing on there I I saw it and I think we're past the scots is no no no no no no no no. He said no no hold y'all Margot on thirty their embargoes until two thirty yeah. Why ask questions chill man? That's right. I'm GONNA giving but don't don't look at it until later I don't care. I'm GonNa tell you tracy mortgage. Hosting we know that and boggled is baby. Do we know who's performing at the after Party Porton questions. I think that that's embargoed. What's embargo? You know what else is embargoed. Most not embargo put his time for the classic bit of the day of the day that bit at the day the bit of the day is driven by Foreign Burg in Los Angeles on the sunset strip in Queens New York. A fight broke out his ten people that are wanted by the ball. They're broke up over crab legs at a Chinese restaurant. Okay Eh in which I thought you coming in Queens New York so our people decided to get into a scuffle because the crab legs obviously ran out of something one more day one more back pay for the buffet saying I'm GonNa Fight Your Chances. Are that was part of the Calculus. You weren't thinking I'm going to get all this SURPRI right. No you would think about it so we crab legs. Dolan ain't even know King Yeah. We got to work or can country club good money though man got with crab legs at home well. That's the problem with they're bringing in the little ones and it's all you can eat. You're going to put fifty on your plate and ten people now getting ready to go stand in front of the judge in argue about crab legs go to jail crab Liska Jameis Winston crabs that was like a setup man gave him grabs Cram Louis into his gave him the credit card a whole bunch of probably went into that same supermarket and got all right the day.

Rick James baseball Eddie Murphy Chelsea Queens New York Travis Brotherhood Dolan Cram Louis Margot Chris Teena Marie Burger Los Angeles Mary Jane eighty percent twenty percent one year
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now, this isn't a story about Brooklyn's unexpected acrobat, but it is very much a story about finding as John Wayne says a certain kind of freedom because when John Dwayne was fourteen years old his life took an unexpectedly docked ton. That was one of my most scary moments. This like I was in no man's lane. He found himself in a hostile and lonely environment wrongfully imprisoned from the and though his liberty was taken away. He discovered his own sort of liberation today. The words that saved John Dwayne. As a fourteen year old boy in one thousand nine hundred one John Dwayne I found freedom while tumbling through the but his athletic prowess, hid secret, he was pretty ashamed of you. Obviously enjoyed gymnastics what was school like the school. Was it was a see-saw and experience because I was very athletic, but struggle had difficulties in reading, and is a fit is like the kind of feel you have. So at that age were you able to read and write it was extremely Hoffa me, but it school even though John Dwayne struggled. He semi manage to get by without his teacher getting too suspicious. A lot of time to teach you asked me to own copy, some that was bored at my handwriting was so neat that she allowed me to do for John Wayne says that he could write and. He's very proud of his neat handwriting. 'cause the elected the way looked that. He liked the way, but the symbols meant very difficult for him. And one thing that helped him disguise this was his popularity. He was so popular the other kids wouldn't ridicule him when he struggled through read aloud. Let's be honest kids this age can be brutal. But when John stood up at the front of the class. They stay silent became so popular like because it is sports in a tumbling in basketball that the other kids went ridiculing. The idea that no one noticed that John could barely read surprising, but the adults in his life hadn't always been able to give him the attention. He needed his upbringing.

John Dwayne John Wayne John Brooklyn basketball Hoffa fourteen years fourteen year
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The greatest American socialist in the foremost agitated for socialism that we've ever had is back in the public. I again after a century. That's then with Deb's as it's outstanding spokesman socialism began for the first time to get a hearing in our country. Deb's talked about a new social order based on cooperation and comradeship he in the newspaper appeal to reason for which he wrote inspired a whole generation of native radicals with the great promise of socialism. Socialism is no longer a dirty word in our country. Google reports that the word socialism got more hits than any other word last year two thousand and sixteen poll show democratic primary voters in every age group every gender and every race view. Socialism favorably candidates are openly advocating for socialism and getting elected in eighteen ninety four Deb's do not yet, a socialist. But militant and beloved labor leader was jailed for six months after leading the nation's railroad workers in a failed strike. It gets the powerful railroad owners. He was defended by the magnificent attorney Clarence Darrow in one thousand nine hundred nineteen Deb's again convicted this time for violating the espionage act, which was used against World War. One antiwar activists. He was incarcerated for a second time at age sixty three. And given ten years of hard labor in federal penitentiary, Atlanta, Georgia his crime was making a speech opposing America's participation in World War One. Is the espionage act, which is still on the books which will be used against WikiLeaks publisher and truth teller, Julian Assange, it's the United States government can ever get its hands on him. Debs socialist party of America was formed in one thousand nine hundred one.

Deb Julian Assange Clarence Darrow America Google Atlanta United States WikiLeaks Georgia publisher attorney six months ten years
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:26 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"January twenty seventh nineteen sixty seven the tragedy. Struck all three astronauts aboard the Apollo one capsule Gus Grissom, Roger Chaffee and Ed white died in a horrific fire during a pre launch tests that was fifty two years ago. This very day on the day that he was shot and killed by John Wilkes booth. Abraham LINCOLN approved the formation of the United States secret service. A government agency tasked with protecting the integrity of the nation's currency in one thousand nine hundred one after the assassination of president William McKinley. Congress extended their duty is to involve the protection of the president. And as the name implies the organization is extremely guarded when it comes to discussing details of their methods, but we're not completely in the dark in part. Thanks to my guest. Gary Byrne served in federal law enforcement for nearly thirty years in the US air force security police, the uniform division of the secret service and most recently as a federal air marshal while serving as a secret service officer, Gary protected, President Bill Clinton and the first family in the White House. His first. Book crisis of character was number one on the New York Times bestseller list. His latest is secrets of the secret service the history and uncertain future of the US secret service, Gary Byrne, welcome aboard good to have you back on the program. How are you? I'm fine. Thank you so much for having me back. Let me begin with a very simple question. How does one become a member of the us secret service because for example, I just completed a very simple criminal background. Check just to get a security pass that will let me into a radio station here in Toronto where I host a coast to coast several times a month. I can't imagine the criminal background check. You'd have to undergo. I mean, do they go back in time. And interview your kindergarten teacher. I mean, walk us through that a little bit. If you could. Yeah. They actually the secret service has special rules. Go figure safer. Wreck. When I applied to be. The service division if I'd had a criminal record. They have the ability to open. Excuse me, a criminal record as a juvenile. They have the authorization to go there to juvenile criminal record to see what somebody may have done the background checked for me took two and a half years because I had been stationed overseas in the air force, the average background check at that time was probably eighteen Mark to me, they'd go looking everything they look in your finances. Test. They ask you about with ever consider any sexual behavior. There. To go back to a normal relationship with animals or. Get pretty deep into it. You know, it took a long time. But probably got there. And I would imagine for anyone contemplating a career in the secret service. If you've been active on social media, they're going to go back and check that. I mean that could come that's gonna come back and haunt you. Right. Absolutely. Wedge brought that up because that is a completely different from when I joined like. It's just amazing. When I when I started in nineteen Ninety-one system as in how have change between. Now. I mean, I wouldn't be surprised to find out. You know, we were walking. Just the way communicate. Now, everything you've done just like, you know, if you're a high school, you know, when they were doing my background check in. If they had come across somebody. I went to school with high school. They said, well, you know, Gary. The goal of car. Well, now, you know, everything they put it on social media. And and, you know, people are famous we've yeah. We've some of this stuff. You're saying you're saying being on social media that you don't particularly mean or you wouldn't actually do within their there. Forever. Exactly. Yeah. People young people need to understand that not just for the secret service. Eventually, it's probably gonna come back and haunt you. Now, you're assigned to protect the Clinton White House. Now, I didn't realize that there are there are thousands of secret service agents, I guess at any one time not just the ones that are running alongside the presidential limo. We will you considered to be part of the presidential protection division. Well, not not initially for individuals that now they now they are the uniform division is actually considered harder presidents protected. But when I was there we were just uniform division. Secret service does the metal detectors do. If they do the post outside they did emergency response teams. They have a crime scene. Investigators. In washington. They also. Bomb-sniffing dogs. Considered the year for division over the years since I left they have pulled the uniform to visit and a little bit more closer to president to protect you just for communication reasons for various reasons, but and I talk about in the book in my second book secrets of the secret service. Some of the things they've done are good. And some of the things, you know. A very old fashioned system. Yeah. Is now considered for protection? And and while you were protecting the Clinton White House. Tell me about a typical day. There was such a thing. Yeah. So. It was a day shift. I would probably my house at four o'clock in the morning. I get to the White House President, our, I them workout. I. Look. I did do that. We won. Go to roll call about six thirty and. I had. Offers the why would head over there. I had a partner with an hour on row. Standing up. Sometimes I back or I would take it after it worked out. And then basically, I think you did when you went in there as you walk through the whole suite of the officers of the president, which is the Oval Office the secretary's office the cabinet room. His study the dining room, the bathroom and you walked over there. And you make sure that nothing is out of place. There's no nothing. Leaking? There's new fires everything. And then you basically just wait for the do you have a copy of the president's schedule, and you just wait for come over. And do your job. You're you're basically on standby. If there's an attack, and and and you make sure that everybody in the hallway is supposed to be there that you recognize it and you helped the agents identify everybody to because the agents they come and go with the president moves, but the uniform division guys are always there. Twenty four seven. Burbs. You work with you. You work together. We have our issues days of the secret service agents reportedly guys always had issues downtime, but we always worked together and got the job done. So. But that would be a typical day like you'd get there. You get a lunch break. And then depending on what the president did today was just kind of went along with it. So it was it was crazy. Lately, I've been watching an old series on Netflix designated survivor. I mean, how accurate a trail of the secret services that I don't know if you've seen it. But there's a character there. Mike African American gentleman who is sort of that sort of portrayed as the main secret service agent protecting the president and his family. How accurate is that? Well. They're taking a lot of of life a little bit. You know, the the secret service Lakers there at any one time. There's only six agents around now when he's in the oval the agents approached it outside of the colonnade outside of the hallway where my post was the kind of surrounding outside that ruby. You know normally day to day. We don't go to sides of room with them from time to time. They do. I mean, there was there's always exceptions. I mean, not actually myself, you know, under somebody's exceptions have actually opened the door walked in in in the president with the president in age it because it was going on. But the way they portray movies. It's a little bit more serious. A lot of the way they portray the secret service is a PDF movies portrayed him as more serious than what we are. And I don't mean we don't take the job series. But it's like anywhere. If you had that much tension on your all the time. Portraying TV movies. You would you know would be exhausted at the end of the day the next day, right? It's a little bit more laid back may portray it, but it's a serious job. And you learn how to deal with that stress. In certain ways. And but the way they portray it's always so dramatic dramatic. It's usually, you know, your hope for a real boring and the days early that that's great and some days. Well, in terms of training to be a secret service agent. Would you be required? Let's say to to watch it a pruder film, for example. Matter of fact, we do it is one of the film's you watch. And it's really funny. I didn't really realize this until last year two years ago when I was a year ago when I was writing the second book secrets of the secretaries, they teach you about the Kennedy assassination film in a certain way. They do it. Make sure that they don't have any fingerprints on the secret service tries to teach at like bit of really have any responsibility for what happened. And that's really not what the reality is. But they do talk about this booder film. And they and there's another there's another piece of film that they show, and it's still pictures and then. They're actually they do read come. They had a small bit. I remember them reading like some of the reports home guys like. Personal notes and stuff that they made afterwards and things that happened to some of the guys they don't spend a whole lot of time on it. And you know, in hindsight like I said when we write the book, it may be a little suspicious out. And I tried to when I wrote the secret service co writer, and I spent we we tried to leave the conspiracy theories out we just wanted to work on the fact that we know this is what they did. This is what happened. This is what somebody should have did neglected. What they do teach you. And they they actually they they teach the Reagan assassination pretty pretty deeply. But when I joining some of the guys that were around with and. Jonathan. They were still on the job. So we got the guys. So that was fascinating too. Yes. And we'll get into some of the specific assassination attempts above a little bit later. Gary Byrne with us for the full two hours, and we are discussing his new book secrets of the secret service. The history in uncertain future of the secret service now in crisis of character. I mean to be brutal you I mean, you lambasted the Clintons when a when a former secret when a former secret service agent tells tales out of school so to speak are the repercussions. So for example, is there like a fraternity a fraternity of former secret service agents and do you risk being ostracized? When you write a tell all, absolutely. I do absolutely everything came through retard ages associated about and you know, I they tried to say that I was that I didn't have access to what I saw. And then when that didn't stand out because the truth is, you go on YouTube, and actually there's a YouTube video the accident working my post during the Clinton administration, George Stephanopoulos. Video President Clinton video. It's it's a documentary. That was being it just happened to be filmed the Clinton administration allowed to be film other were there. So you know, it proves that..

president Gary Byrne President Bill Clinton Clinton White House United States New York Times John Wilkes Abraham LINCOLN Congress Toronto White House Gus Grissom William McKinley President Ed white Clinton administration YouTube washington Netflix
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"We'll let's see NutraSweet the DeLorean sports car and Tom Cruise on TV. It was dynasty guy. And gimme a break gone in one thousand nine hundred one Natalie wood William Holden, Bob, Marley and Perry. In this present crisis. Government is not the solution to our problem. Government is the problem. Rang out as President Reagan was leaving the hotel and about the enter his limousine. At least one person was hit and fell to the sidewalk. Blood coming from his body. It was not the president. I don't know. Whether the president was hit. I do not believe he was his car left rapidly under police escort. The shots were fired by someone in the crowd of people has a gun shot. In the left side of the chest is in stable condition. Jim Bray has been shot. We have no information on his condition. Now. Constitutionally gentlemen, you have the president vice president and the secretary of state in that order should the president decided he wants to transfer the hill through the vice president. We will do so. Now, I am in control year the White House. Barry. Nineteen eighty two Paul aluminum make salad dressing. Jane Fonda works out on videotape. What's big Christmas? Strawberry shortcake dolls BMX bikes, and trivial pursuit and for Pete's sake. What the heck is it really bobber? what's happening? The dog eat dog world. Sammy more in milk, bone underwear?.

president President Reagan vice president Jim Bray Tom Cruise Jane Fonda William Holden Natalie Sammy Pete White House Perry Marley Barry Paul milk
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Yeah. And she has used that profile to attack him with on second headquarters project in New York. We've got the tax subsidies from from the city and from the state we'll see Bernie his critics. Well, you know, I think one of the prominent creeks right now Representative Alexander okapi Cortez in New York. She of course, is just a first year member of the house of representatives, but she has quite the profile on social media and in the more traditional media, and she has used that profile to attack him with on second headquarters project in New York has got the tax subsidies from from the city and from the state. We'll see Bernie Sanders is a big critic of their practice on wages already backed off of that after Amazon made some changes to their practices. But certainly from the big progressive stars that people know in our follow phases. Move fairly quickly to raise the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. They were going to advocate for a higher minimum wage sort of pivoting very quickly. So they could be seen as a leader in the face instead of someone who was lagging on the other hand, you know, while workers may be happy with that. We're. We're still seeing that play out. It certainly did neutralize political opposition here David McCabe of axios with this mornings. Jim cesco? It's thirty minutes after the hour on this morning. America's First News. Way back in one thousand nine hundred one where the first games are played and baseball's American League this week in one thousand nine hundred twenty four the first Olympic Winter Games are held in Chaman organs. Phenomenal popularity led to a golden age for professional wrestling this week in one thousand nine hundred five we are the world was recorded in Los Angeles hours after the American music awards ceremony. Forty five stars and celebrities collaborated to raise more than sixty million dollars for African famine relief the record sold more than the first wrestler to escape the camel clutch, the signature move of reigning world. Wrestling federation champion, the iron Sheik as he defeats sheet to win his first WWF title at Madison Square Garden in New York City, the victory began what became known as polka mania as Hogan's phenomenal popularity led to a golden age for professional wrestling this week in one thousand nine hundred five we are the world was recorded in Los Angeles hours after the American. Musical ward ceremony. Forty five stars and celebrities collaborated to raise more than sixty million dollars for.

New York City Bernie Sanders Representative Alexander okapi Los Angeles Jim cesco American music awards David McCabe WWF Madison Square Garden Chaman American League Amazon baseball America Hogan sixty million dollars fifteen dollars thirty minutes
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"To have you. It is a motel Monday. The Joe pags show. Glad to have you along for the ride. Thanks for stopping by the whole crews here preciado, should let me give you a Bill Clinton had to say in nineteen Ninety-one for because most of you have never heard nor seen this. I'll show it on the live stream as well. Because it's a it's that important. And your hearts to give me your prayers and your health. I believe that together we can make America great again. And with your help, your heart, your devotion, and your efforts we can build a community of hope that will inspire the world. Yeah. But pags he met in a different way. That's Bill Clinton. He needed to say way. They can great again to him. Okay, smiling. And he's good looking man win want to have sex with him. So become on carry that sort of thing. Right. The Democrats are good looking. They've got all this way. Your your dream about Obama about Obama one lady said on some TV show somewhere, and she was ready to go and Bill Clinton look at him. He just smooth easy looks old and sickly now, but he just smoothies, cool guys. Cool. Cool make America great again. Because he didn't say it with a New York accent. Because he didn't say you because he didn't say what fantastic you didn't. He didn't say be what what what's the difference? Here's a guy announcing he's running for president since one thousand nine hundred one and in his announcement. He wants to make America great again. At six o b then. But of course, none of that matters. Because Bill Clinton said it, he's a democrat. Somehow look the biggest achievement. Democrats have ever have ever made. Is the fact that they somehow convince the American people that they weren't the party of slavery. They weren't the party of Jim crow that they weren't the party of the KKK that they weren't the party of separate but equal they weren't the party that did all these horrible things to minorities in this country that they somehow weren't the white supremacists. I don't know how they did it. But they did it. And there are a lot of you listening right now. We're watching right now who just don't believe me. Abraham LINCOLN was a Republican. The Republicans have always been the party trying to bring civil rights trying to bring equality trying to stamp out of any sort of supremacy other than American supremacy. Look, I am a supremacist I believe in American supremacy. And that includes every American. Yup. In micro aggressed melting pot. And you know, what the way I feel about this country is exactly how MLK felt about this country. That's the truth. It doesn't matter. If you believe me, it's just the truth. So it's some point we have to we have to get around this. At some point. We have to understand that. There was actually an idiot today who he's now saying carry that he didn't need it. You saw this idiot legislator. He's from who said something about that. We have to ban. Teenagers from wearing hats. And I saw them. This is I mean, this is how stupid it's become later. He tried to pretend he was it was an obvious joke. It was not carries an obvious. Joe, right? He was kidding. He wasn't serious about that. That would have been crazy. Yeah. Representative John Yarmuth. He's from he's from let's see here. Some of you listening. Probably is your your guy Kentucky is from Kentucky leftist idiot from Kentucky. Somehow, I am calling for a total and complete shutdown of teenagers wearing mega hats until we can figure out what is going on. They seem to be poisoning young minds. Now, he obviously gives using similar wording that the president used when he talked about a Muslim ban till we figure out what's going on. Budding. Funny. It's stupid. My response was understand that this left is try to pretend he's joking later. What he actually does yours exposed himself as the other minion on the left pushing it to tell Terry in centralized government. Trust me, if he could he'd banned those hats in the idea of America being great. This is real. Guys in his position and gals people in his position. Think that they're the smart ones? They're the ones that are on top of what's going on. They should set the rules and regulations, and you should just follow suit and be lucky that they let you have your life..

Joe pags Bill Clinton America MLK president Obama New York Kentucky John Yarmuth Terry Jim crow Abraham LINCOLN Representative
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on KTOK

"This week in one thousand nine hundred one Matt bars field goal with no time left gives the New York. Giants a fifteen to thirteen victory over the defending champions. The San Francisco forty Niners for the NFC title this week in nineteen Ninety-six six baseball owners unanimously approved interleague play to begin in nineteen Ninety-seven and this week in two thousand two the tuck rule game in the AFC divisional playoff game with under two minutes to play the New England Patriots trailed the Oakland Raiders thirteen to ten in a driving snowstorm name. Tuck rule game originates from the controversial game changing play where cornerback Charles Woodson sack. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady which caused a fumble. That was recovered by the raiders officials reviewed the play and eventually determined that even though Brady had seemingly voltages passing motion and was attempting to tuck the ball back into his body. It was an incomplete pass and not a fumble. As a result. The ball was given back to the patriots who moved the ball into feel tired. And then they want it or not that's your iheartradio weekend sports time capsule as it. You warming. Nearly every day before your office went clothes. Casual I used to be the CEO of your closet now. I'm just that one intern. No one ever talks to I always thought you'd circle back with me get granular keep me in the pipeline. But not nothing. Don't you? Remember, the McKittrick presentation you still coffee on me. And I still looked amazing during the breakout talk back Q and A. So I think it's time for me to move on. I've got a great resume, and I absolutely crush it in interviews. Okay. Let's make this a clean break shift the paradigm. The only thing I ask is that you think outside the box here and do this take me to goodwill where I can really make a difference. Your donations to goodwill, create new jobs training programs and education assistance for people in your community to find your nearest donation center. Go to goodwill dot ORG, donate.

New England Patriots Tom Brady Oakland Raiders Charles Woodson raiders New York AFC San Francisco intern CEO two minutes
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on Get Up!

"It's a Wednesday staple with us on get up Dominique steps to this spot. And I asked him a series of very hard hitting probing questions. And I force him to answer them. The first one is going to leave a little blank for you to fill in. Here. We go of all the coaching hirings that were made over the last week or so the one that makes no sense at all to you is easy clip gigs. Berry is that even really a question. Like that makes no sense everyone try who wants to defend cliff Kingsbury as a higher says that it's tough to win at Texas Tech, all the coaches who left Texas Tech left with winning records since one thousand nine hundred one except for cliff Kingsbury and you go through his record develop quarterbacks. He hasn't really developed much like Manziel never really developed into a quarterback under him. You say Pat, Mahomes Mahomes is the best quarterback in the NFL right now. So I don't know how much credit you get for doing anything their case keenum back in Houston is the only guy you could go to and say, hey, cliff. Pittsburgh deserves some credit and coaching up. Somebody and comes through saying normally doesn't get to a head coaching. All right. I'll try and make the next one harder you already here we go. The legendary quarterback class of two thousand and four those guys are getting a little bit older real any of them. Ben Rothlisberger Philip rivers. He li- manning ever appear in the Super Bowl again. Now, the not another layup question. I don't think the three. No, I don't think any of those three will make it back to the Super Bowl. I think that the team with the best chance I would say is probably the chargers with Philip rivers. But I think Ben Rothlisberger this. I think this window is closed. Both of the big B's of the three big B's bell in Brown are going to be out. And Ben Rothlisberger. It's not the guy that he was before. But again, I think the charges right here. Have a lot of talent around. They can make that run next year and the giants now no one believes the giants gonna go Nick is going to be quarterback there next year. Anyway, perhaps we never know which team Eli manning might make a run to the Super Bowl medicine. There doesn't seem impossible next question. If you were team is a quarterback away. Do you want Nick foles or Joe flacco? All right. You got me. This is actually a hard question. I'm going to say false. I think I I think. Nick foles has been really good and really impressed. I think he has some value in the cash that he brings to the locker room. I think you bring Nick foles into your locker room your team automatically beliefs. I think that's part of the problem. Xactly Bill was that team didn't believe the defense is still good. But it wasn't as good as it was before. Because they didn't have any faith that the offense get them points. I think you bring in foles here believe it right away. And I mean, Joe flacco lost his job last year to a guy who doesn't even throw the football that. Well, so I don't think too many teams are that excited about having Joe flacco. Okay, now, here's the one. I'm looking forward to the second straight week. I'm betting your house. If you have to bet your house on one quarterback this weekend having a huge game. Are you betting it on Brady breeze Goff or Mahomes? Oh, my heart my heart and says I want to put it on the homes because he has not had a bad week all year. But my house I can't look my wife and is not. But my money on Brady like it has to be Tom Brady, right? He's the guy who we know. It was just one game. I believe that what he did in that Super Bowl in Atlanta. How's that that game that made me a Brady believer? I think he can do that we can and week out. But in my heart. I think Patrick Mahomes is obviously a much more talented quarterback with better weapons around him. But Brady you can't go wrong with Brady..

Joe flacco Nick foles Tom Brady Philip rivers giants Ben Rothlisberger Mahomes Mahomes cliff Kingsbury Dominique Goff Texas Tech Berry Eli manning Pittsburgh Houston NFL Nick Manziel Brown
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Explorer Christopher Columbus sailing near the Dominican Republic sees three mermaids, which in reality were actually manatees and described them as not half as beautiful as they are painted jumping way ahead this week in one thousand nine hundred one drilling Derrick. It's Bendel top hill. Your Beaumont Texas produces an enormous gusher. Crude oil coating the landscape for hundreds of feet and signaling the advent of the American oil industry in the early eighteen ninety s Texas businessman and amateur geologist Patillo Higgins became convinced. There was a large pool of oil under a salt dome. Formation south of Beaumont in several partners established the Gladys city oil gas and manufacturing company and made several unsuccessful drilling attempts before Higgins left, the company missing out on the one thousand nine hundred one discovery this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty to twenty four year olds Kareem Abdul Jabbar to the Milwaukee Bucks to a one twenty one zero four victory over Wilt Chamberlain and the Los Angeles Lakers breaking the Lakers record thirty three game winning streak, the longest of any team in American professional, sports and. This week in nineteen seventy six rocky which was written by its star Sylvester Stallone began filming shot in twenty eight days on a one million dollar budget. Rocky divided critics between raves and pants, but it became the sleeper hit of the year making Stallone who got ten percent of the gross rich man and a bona fide star. It was also the first feature length movie to employ the steady Cam, which was used primarily in the fight scenes and the scenes of rocky running in Philadelphia during his training Garrett. Brown's pioneering invention help keep the moving camera steady to create a fluid smooth shot. That's your look back at this week in history. I have been saying this is not gonna end when things start getting out of hand. Somebody's gonna get hurt. Cooler. Heads must prevail. Anybody heard Sean Hannity today at three on one zero six one FM talk. Stay connected. Stank connected begins here.

Sylvester Stallone Patillo Higgins Los Angeles Lakers Kareem Abdul Jabbar Beaumont Texas Dominican Republic Christopher Columbus Sean Hannity Beaumont Wilt Chamberlain Milwaukee Bucks Texas geologist Philadelphia Brown Garrett one million dollar twenty eight days
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on KTOK

"Sports fans at sandy west wanted to take a journey back with me to this week in sports history. Let's start way back in eighteen eleven at muscle borough golf club in Scotland the first women's golf tournament is health jumping ahead almost one hundred years this week in one thousand nine hundred three Frank Farrell and Bill every purchase the American League baseball team in Baltimore for eighteen thousand dollars and move to New York City. It would become the New York Yankees this week in nineteen forty two and his twentieth. Title defence, Joe Louis Cao's buddy bear in the first round of their rematch to retain his world heavyweight boxing title at Madison Square Garden this week in nineteen sixty two the NFL prohibits grabbing the facemask this week in nineteen Seventy-three. The American League doffs the designated hitter rule this week in one thousand nine hundred to the cat, an iconic moment and NFL. History. Dwight Clark makes a fingertip cat for a touchdown from Joe Montana with fifty eight seconds left in the game against Dallas the forty Niners to win the game and go on to win the Super Bowl. This week in one thousand nine hundred one baseball officially banned Pete Rose from being elected to the hall of fame for betting on baseball and this week in two thousand thirteen it's the mile high miracle in Denver the AFC divisional playoff game between the Broncos and ravens is a wild one. Joe flacco he's a seventy yard touchdown pass to Jacoby Jones with under forty seconds to play in the game. Getting within one. The extra point is good in the game was tied at thirty five. The ravens go on to win it in the second overtime. That's your iheartradio weekend sports time capsule. Now, a look back at this week in history starting way back in fourteen ninety three Italian explorer Christopher Columbus sailing near the Dominican Republic sees three mermaids which in reality were actually managed and described them as not half as beautiful as they are painted jumping way ahead this week in one thousand nine hundred one a drilling Derrick spindle top hill near Beaumont Texas produces an enormous gusher of crude oil coating the landscape for hundreds of feet and signaling the advent of the. American oil industry in the early eighteen ninety s Texas businessman and amateur geologist Patillo Higgins became convinced. There was a large pool of oil under a salt dome. Formations south of Beaumont he and several partners established the Gladys city oil gas and manufacturing company and made several unsuccessful drilling attempts before Higgins left,.

Patillo Higgins Joe flacco American League NFL ravens baseball Joe Louis Cao New York Yankees New York City Joe Montana Beaumont Madison Square Garden Dwight Clark Baltimore Frank Farrell Scotland Texas Pete Rose
"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What was going on. He stashed me and saved me. I got my mom. My mom began to cry. She broke off a branch of Ambu. And she started with me with it. She was ashamed that child resorted to stealing can she couldn't tolerate the hunger? In one thousand nine hundred one we went from our village of Quilici outside of in century at Phnom to a refugee camp in Thailand and then onto any housing project in Oakland, California. I was so excited on a train. Just unbelievable. Take me to Mars. The whole time. I was in charge of Iraq. Filled with this rice. Starving in the United States. We were free that there would be no rights. I had never seen this much raise my whole life. It's really heavy backpack. I grew up without a backpack idea to put it on at night. How the buckles snapped or the zippers that the I insistent on taking charge of an and I never allowed it to skip from my view. And I never thought at the rice kernels just to make sure they were real. And that's how we sustain ourselves for the first few weeks. And I use that backpack to go to school.

Iraq Ambu Oakland United States Thailand Quilici California