35 Burst results for "One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty Five"

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

04:50 min | 11 months ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"We worked with him at bell media for a long time. Bhagat mark do malkowski matthew from blackburn. Hamlet owen morgan. On a. thank all of you guys for being such great members and supporting the shell reach out to us anytime anything. You need night anything anyway. We'll get to more shouts as we go along james. How're thanks good. When i was saying you repeat yourself okay. This is what we do the show setting it up. your your. your go-to is a is singing. The word okay. So for example this morning you okay. So let's roll is what we do right. We see each other. We should raise a bit. We've traded headlines okay bye-bye over it and you'll be okay. Okay okay. let's roll roll roll. Roll set up. The mike. May mike mike mike. Mike mike mike. What day is it. Hump day. Steamy couple things. Wait before you go away from that. I can stop if irritates. You know all right a couple of things. Stevie interesting ryder cup starts tomorrow. First of all. I got up kind of early today. Hit the tv turned it on and their you know their guys commentated with the matches aren't gonna wind up and then about an hour and a half later watching all this getting frustrated saying will they go to the match doesn't start till tomorrow so anyway. What little interesting things. Tv about sports that they can take away from the ryder cup. I found this totally interesting. So tony jacklin was sort of most iconic european. Guy'd come along playing the ryder cup. European finally beat. Us in one thousand nine hundred eighty five first time since nineteen fifty seven or something okay but they finally took the us down but he says we don't apologize from what you know. One player doesn't apologize to the other player like his teammate. And you see it all the time. Right bad shots. Sorry about that story story. You know you do a bad thing in hockey. Sorry about that. Sorry i apologize to the guys. You know the pitcher not playing my own apology and let me..

bell media Bhagat mark malkowski matthew owen morgan mike mike mike Mike mike mike ryder cup blackburn tony jacklin james Stevie Guy us hockey
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Idea of credit has a very long history. the code of hammurabi one of the oldest systems of laws in the world has sections on how to deal with credit it put maximum interest rates on loans of grain and silver credit. Was something that was usually done in a very personal basis. The ability to extend credit to someone was dependent upon your relationship with them and your trust in them. In fact the word credit comes from middle french and it was originally used to mean belief or faith. If you extend credit to someone it is literally a belief in the ability of that person to pay you back. This is the way the credit worked for centuries. An individual store would extend credit to individual customers based on their relationship and trust this sort of system might still exist someplace like a pub or a bar where regular might a tab that they pay at the end of the month. The system of individual lines of credit being established for individual customers by individual businesses was very inefficient. The process of making credit more efficient was begun in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with major department stores like macy's wanamaker's their wealthiest customers didn't wanna handle money directly so they were given paper cards or brass tokens that they could present at checkout. The cashier would then make note of the purchases and a customer would then get a statement at the end of the month. This form of credit wasn't intended to be alone. Like many credit cards are today. The amount had to be paid in full at the end of every month. What this system had over previous systems is that the individual cashier didn't need to know the person who presented the token the store would issue the token and any employee could then accept it in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The charger plate system was unveiled by the charger plate. Group out of new york. It was a rectangular metallic plate. That was about the size of a dog tag and like a dog tag. It had embossed letters showing the name and address of the customer. In most cases the metal plates were kept at the store rather than enhance the customer. They were then pulled out when the customer made a purchase. This certainly made processing paperwork. Easier and again. It wasn't advance but the system still only worked at a single store.

new york american airlines
The Long History of Credit

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Long History of Credit

"Idea of credit has a very long history. the code of hammurabi one of the oldest systems of laws in the world has sections on how to deal with credit it put maximum interest rates on loans of grain and silver credit. Was something that was usually done in a very personal basis. The ability to extend credit to someone was dependent upon your relationship with them and your trust in them. In fact the word credit comes from middle french and it was originally used to mean belief or faith. If you extend credit to someone it is literally a belief in the ability of that person to pay you back. This is the way the credit worked for centuries. An individual store would extend credit to individual customers based on their relationship and trust this sort of system might still exist someplace like a pub or a bar where regular might a tab that they pay at the end of the month. The system of individual lines of credit being established for individual customers by individual businesses was very inefficient. The process of making credit more efficient was begun in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with major department stores like macy's wanamaker's their wealthiest customers didn't wanna handle money directly so they were given paper cards or brass tokens that they could present at checkout. The cashier would then make note of the purchases and a customer would then get a statement at the end of the month. This form of credit wasn't intended to be alone. Like many credit cards are today. The amount had to be paid in full at the end of every month. What this system had over previous systems is that the individual cashier didn't need to know the person who presented the token the store would issue the token and any employee could then accept it in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The charger plate system was unveiled by the charger plate. Group out of new york. It was a rectangular metallic plate. That was about the size of a dog tag and like a dog tag. It had embossed letters showing the name and address of the customer. In most cases the metal plates were kept at the store rather than enhance the customer. They were then pulled out when the customer made a purchase. This certainly made processing paperwork. Easier and again. It wasn't advance but the system still only worked at a single store.

Wanamaker Macy New York
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"I disappeared on you. Didn't i his been too long. Since i released an episode. I went on vacation in mid july Mid to late july then took more of the summer for a hiatus to recharging. Relax inn rethink the next steps for this podcast which just I hope to tease this. And i hope to promise something that I will keep the promise of and that is Being more regular on my podcast episode releases I have a target in mind. That would be twice a month. And hope i can make it but You know i'm human so Don't go nuts on me if i don't If they break that promise. So but i am ready to go again and i have a not so summer. Hiatus topic to share with you today and that topic is practice and specifically the topic is the thirty. Seven practices of body sat fas which is a practice. We in the everyday sanga are doing together so This episode is dedicated to my saga members. Thank you thank you for doing this practice with me but to help explain more about the thirty seven practices and the tradition from which it came. And how i found. It is my friend and teacher who i depend on for helping me with the wisdom of tibetan buddhism frank howard one of my first teacher said everyone is your teacher because everyone is a buddha now. That is true but there are some teachers who come into your life and have major influences on you and your practice and your perspective and the way you do life. Frank coward along with his wife gretchen. Howard were my first quote unquote in person mentors in buddhism and they enabled my initial buddhist refuge and teachings with lama droop on sonum. Jor pool ripa shake and teachings by many other wonderful teachers including his eminence. Cartoon rinpoche and campo sheer bodes or an on and on and on. If not for frank gretchen and the center they guide. I would not have had the experience of being in the presence of tibetan teachers who radiated the wisdom and compassion of buddha nature like the sun. I will offer a brief introduction to frank but i will have his full bio on my website. Frank is a local attorney in the director and teacher at the white lotus buddhist center. Rochester's tibetan buddhist temple I'll have a link to that website again on my My website In this in the episode section. He has studied in practice. Buddhism senses early twenties and began formal training at the rochester. Zen center in nineteen seventy one under the direction of roshii phillip koeppel but in january nineteen eighty one. He and his wife made a pilgrimage to buddhist holy sites in india and nepal and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five after nearly fifteen years of attending zen meditation retreats in practicing as a dedicated zen practitioner frank mediterr- betton lama coach coach yeltsin soon and has studied and practiced within the tradition since that time his letters and articles on tabet have been published in the wall street journal the atlantic monthly city.

frank howard Frank coward lama droop Cartoon rinpoche frank gretchen white lotus buddhist center ripa gretchen Howard roshii phillip koeppel Zen center Rochester frank Frank rochester frank mediterr betton lama coach yeltsin nepal india
Scotland's Long Road to Independence

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Scotland's Long Road to Independence

"My name's george. Miller and my guest this month is rory scoth on an edinburgh based writer who has an article this month. Addition of the paper entitled is scotland closer to independence. Rory is also co author of the book. Rock wins a treacherous guide to the state of scotland published. Twenty sixteen. And when. I spoke to him recently. I was kid to get his update. On the current state of scotland. The two thousand sixteen brexit referendum in which scotland voted strongly to remain in the eu. And boris johnson's twenty nine thousand nine hundred. Uk general election confirmed growing divide between how scotland and england see their respective futures. The scottish national party secured a fourth successive electoral victory in last month's scottish parliamentary elections but the path to independence is still far from straightforward. So where does the snp go from here in pursuit of that objective. We'll come onto that. But rory's piece begins with a comment margaret thatcher made in the nineteen eighties whereas she offered a vision of modernisation. She asserted her. Opponents wanted to turn the uk inter museum society. Rory rights thatcher underestimated the appeal of museum society labor overestimated last him. To tell me more was one of the key things to understand about. Thatcherism is that this was not a return to the nineteenth century. This walson the state stripping away all the gains of one thousand nine hundred eighty five. There was an element of -absolutely. But really it was something new the power of neoliberalism as i think a lot of people and left know very well. The power of neoliberalism was at a offered. Something new offered a form of progress that a lot of people on the left had thought until then the right could not offer. It offered a vision of the future. That kind of took the left by surprise. I think

Scotland Rory Scoth Rory Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Edinburgh Miller George UK EU Margaret Thatcher England Thatcher
Jon Levy - How to Build Deeper Connections with Anyone

Untangle

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Jon Levy - How to Build Deeper Connections with Anyone

"So let's dive in by understanding a little bit about why human connection is so important we all know. It's important intuitively. Can you put some words around it for us. Oh for sure. So i'll just start off by saying i grew up. Pretty lonely was super kid. And i didn't really quite fit in. This was like before you could actually have cool geeks now. Everybody likes marvel superheroes back then. It was me and like three other kids in my school. So the weird thing is. I thought that that was like a unique experience. Because i would see shows on television where like everybody was hanging out and everybody had friends. Even the geeks and as i was researching my new book. You're invited. I came across something pretty startling in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the average american had just about three close friends besides family by two thousand four must in a generation later. We were down to just about to so nineteen years. We lost a third of our close social ties besides family and that is terrifying terrifying for two reasons. One is that we'd like to blame things. Like social media and technology the real culprit is probably people moving more for work or after school and it resets their social ties but now that trend is probably progressed and with the pandemic and people being locked in their homes and avoiding physical contact. That numbers probably even lower and for me. The most concerning thing about that is that research. From brigham young looked at what are the actual greatest predictors of human long jetty especially the ones that are in our control and after genetics. Which we can't really control for and i'm meeting meaningful way. At least not yet to is close social ties of close friends or family and number one is social integration which is essentially measured by the number of social contact. You have throughout the day

Marvel Brigham Young
Biden to Meet With Putin on June 16 in Switzerland

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Biden to Meet With Putin on June 16 in Switzerland

"Now. The russian leader vladimir putin and his us counterpart biden will meet in geneva on june the sixteenth off. The back of biden's european tour nuclear arms control be high on the agenda echoing meeting held in the city in one thousand nine hundred eighty five when ronald reagan and mikhail gorbachev met talk about arms control and at which they developed a personal rapport. Joining me from burn is editorial director. Tyler relay and from our zero studio. Wanna call security correspondent. Ben is log Good morning to you. Tyler moore ingredient now. There are no huge expectations for the outcome of this meeting but the one country that comes out as a winner will be switzerland. Why is it important to geneva to host these tools jersey and this is a story which has been circulating for a while. it's no great secret of course Prog within in the running for the summit a couple of other cities along the way but it's been circulating in the swiss press geneva wanted us. They wanted it very badly into your question. Geneva has been slightly dented. The city sees that its reputation home of multi-lateralism somewhat scarred Because of course it doesn't really control the narrative from many of the organization. It hosts so if you look at of course the past year and a half an organization like the who for example which sits in geneva of course has been in the headlines almost daily. I'm often for for the right reasons so even like listening this morning to the mayor of geneva certainly other politicians from the city. They see this as a very important reset moment the city. How does the city reestablish itself as a home of multi-lateralism and of course getting to bed to go with

Geneva Biden Vladimir Putin Mikhail Gorbachev Tyler Moore Ronald Reagan Tyler BEN Switzerland United States
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"You're like smiling or you know ally alive. It seems like an i. I call this. The lobotomize drag learn. I'm agenda warrior and warriors. Never smile while the thing is when you do this smile and whatnot. You creases in your face and your makeup. You distorts your face. Maybe maybe don't have nice teeth so they just want that you know they have a canvas painted and it's and it's a still life it's a catatonic look like a parole mass and to me. It's like it. It doesn't it feels basic the makeup basic and you know and someone's then said on social media is like are you coming for god mic and i said well if high heel shoe fits why not wear it. I mean i have to say got mic. In terms of design in terms of fashion in terms of costumes is probably one of the most developed and sophisticated artists to grace rupaul's drag race ever and they would be very wise to grant got back the the prize not just because they're trans but also because they're really establish makeup and costume artists in los angeles. I mean got mixed friends with paris hilton. you know. And i'm rupaul. connection friend. this is the picked up the phone and said. Hey what did what did you think about my impersonation of you on snatch game in paris hilton was like i liked. It really cool. It was hot. You know so at least can pick up the phone and call paris holden so i would say that's friendly and so anyways i feel like got mix also somebody who's been to design school fashion school. I am sure this conversation has come up in a critique where there are saying like perot mask girl that so basic. What is this one thousand nine hundred eighty five. Who's your peer one. Did you get your makeup from year. One i so you know maybe maybe the younger generation. They don't know it because from what i was just reading. An article about fashion nowadays is like there. The lot of the younger generation is picking up some the fashion choices that like our grandfathers would have worn like in the forties or fifties. Because today down its new. They've never really experienced it. There's a reason why people made fun of mimes. There's a reason why minds were bullied And attacked when they were really popular and parks in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s sure but are now had a tv show and they're also guests on a bunch of different things. Yeah for whatever reason people were at one point in time enchanted with mimes and then like everything people just turned on them out in turn. They're gonna turn doesn't matter. It doesn't matter what looks like a payroll mask. It's just a matter of time before. America says one day. You're in a next day out so i think you know. Because as is an artist who is receptive to feedback who always thinking about transforming themselves and is able to paint with a wide variety of styles. I don't see them sticking to that parole mass style for much longer while who knows yo that they never picked a winner who is stuck in one position. You know trixie mattel. When they did she just went for all stars only when she started making money that they were like..

los angeles rupaul today one America paris holden one position one day paris day one point grace rupaul one thousand nine hundred eigh fifties One paris hilton race thousand nine hundred seventy s trixie mattel
School Shootings Drove Stephen King To Take 'Rage' Off The Shelves

Two Guys to the Dark Tower Came: A Podcast about Stephen King and His Books

03:24 min | 1 year ago

School Shootings Drove Stephen King To Take 'Rage' Off The Shelves

"In this episode. We'll cover the bachmann book rage chapters one through twenty. Let's start the show high school senior. Charlie decker facing expulsion for salting. His chemistry teacher sets the contents of his locker on fire gets a pistol and returns to his algebra class or he kills the teacher and then a history teacher who comes to investigate holding the rest of the class degeorge decker reveals information about his troubled childhood and some of the other students begin to share their own secrets and feelings. That's quite the setup. sean. Yes so jay. This story rage was originally written at least started being written by king in one thousand nine hundred sixty six when he was a senior in high school and then he finished it in one thousand nine hundred seventy one and at that point it was titled getting it on Decker says that phrase multiple times throughout the section of the book king wanted to publish it like under his name right away but his publisher doubleday did want over saturate the market so this was the first case where they said all right. Well let's do it under a pseudonym and he submitted it as getting it on by guy pillsbury which is kings grandfather's name so that was going to be the original pseudonym he was going to use and there's a twitter user who just started following a couple of weeks ago named guy pillsbury so i thought that was a nice deep cut that is really deep. Cut yeah when he submitted his guy pillsbury. A number of people at the publishing house knew about king having a book called getting it odd and so the secret was already out. They pulled it and said okay and then he resubmitted as as richard bachman and submitted his with the new title rage and richard. Bachman i was because he had a richard stark book sitting on his desk and bachman turner overdrive was playing on the radio and so he was looking around. And there. you go richard bachman. Sorta like the Deficient the light bulb coming together to form the homer simpson logo number one. Lucky joe exactly so. This is actually his fourth published book. It came after kerry salem slot in the shining and just before the stand this was nineteen seventy seven it was published and then it was obviously republished in the bachman books in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. And if you're like my father you'll notice that this is not a book that is easy to come by nowadays. He was unable to find it when he was looking forward on. Different places and that is because after number of school shootings that had some tenuous ties to rage. There's at least one where the kid had a copy of the book his locker but some of the other ones may have referenced it or not king let the book go out of print in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so all the other bachman books are now published as standalone novels. But this one is not in the forward to the bachmann book. Blaze king writes about rage. This is now out of print and a good thing. And if you go to the stephen king dot com website look up rage. No future printings will be made of this novel. At stevens request due to the sensitive nature of the content

Guy Pillsbury Charlie Decker Richard Bachman Bachmann Richard Stark Bachman Turner Lucky Joe Decker Kerry Salem Sean JAY Pillsbury Bachman Twitter King Richard Stephen King Stevens
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on The Tom Dupree Show

The Tom Dupree Show

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on The Tom Dupree Show

"Satellite ramona's and half and could arrive in days is inside the star starting add in doug bar and the head of the with zero phone house about this is what's happening. The budget resolution the vice president votes in the affirmative. This was a giant first. Step get the latest. A third vaccine. Johnson johnson eighty five percent effective often trauma. Six thirty telling you l. a. p. hi i'm tom. Depre- with depre- financial group. Are you interested in keeping your business at duprey financial group we don't share a large percentage of our revenues with the big firm in new york or elsewhere that has a corporate agenda that doesn't include kentucky and because we keep our revenues local we are able to invest in our local research and client service efforts we believe the investment business is best when it is personal and local for a free analysis of your retirement investment portfolio call us at debris financial group at five nine two three three zero four hundred. Also please be sure to listen to the tom to pre show on saturday mornings from seven to nine at news radio. Six thirty w. l. a. p. that's do pre financial group at eight five nine two three three zero four hundred and do pre-financial dot com. I grew up in a small country town moving to the big city bombing to find my crew and in a with good times came concern with several of my friends tested positive for hiv. I knew i needed experts section. I founded impressive. A daily pill that can prevent hiv. Cre- i take prep and i'm ready to prevent hiv ready set. Prep provides rep medications at no cost and those who qualify visit. Get your press dot com to get started guys waking up over and over to he is not okay but now you can reduce those nighttime bathroom trips with the ingredients in super beta prostate p. Three advanced we're talking about less urges to pee at night less bathroom trips during the day and better bladder emptying. That's why super beta. 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Six thirty telling you l. a. P. an iheartradio station research raccoon is the easy and affordable way to get smarter about your customers whether you need a new name for your business or launching a new product or. Don't even know what questions to ask. Research raccoon can pull us-based customers that day. Giving you clean data to help you decide no matter the size of your business. Research raccoon gives you the tools to learn at an affordable price so move with confidence with research raccoon visit research raccoon dot com to learn more research raccoons fast results with big data thinking about life insurance. What if you could make one free phone call and learn your best price from nearly a dozen highly rated price competitive companies or. That's exactly what happens when you call selectquote life. For example georgia's forty. He was getting sky-high quotes from other companies because he takes meds to control his blood pressure but when i shopped around i found him a ten year. Five hundred thousand dollars policy for under twenty five dollars a month. I'm selectquote agent. Dan savino and believe me. If selectquote isn't shopping for your life insurance you're probably paying too much for your free quote. Call hundred five seven three ninety five fifty two. That's eight hundred. Five seven three ninety five fifty two eight hundred five seven three ninety five fifty two or go to selectquote dot com since one thousand nine hundred eighty five we shop you save get full details on the example policy at selectquote dot com slash commercials or price could vary depending on your health issuing company and other factors not available in all states. Hi i'm tom decree with two pre-financial group. Are you interested in keeping your business. Local at pre-financial group we don't share a large percentage of our revenues with a big firm in new york or elsewhere that has a corporate agenda that doesn't include kentucky and because we keep our revenues local. We are able to invest in our local research and client service efforts. We believe the investment business is best when it is personal and local for a free analysis of your retirement. Investment portfolio call us at depre- financial group at eight five nine two three three zero four hundred also. Please be sure to listen to the tom. To pre show on saturday mornings from seven to nine at newsradio. Six thirty w. l. a. p. that's duprey financial group at eight five nine two three three zero four hundred and duprey financial dot com. Because it ain't always wonderful stay informed.

Dan savino Five hundred thousand dollars new york wal mart Johnson johnson chris hundred forty selectquote third vaccine thirty day bottle selectquote dot com selectquote life eighty five percent under twenty five dollars a mo ten year tom one thousand nine hundred eigh iheartradio later tonight
Interview With Penny Powers

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Penny Powers

"Thank you very much penny for joining me and q. Barb in the rest of the special interest group for the invitation so we will have some general questions to begin with. How long have you been a therapist. I have practiced for forty five years. Wow that's quite a quite a career. At what point in your career did you become interested in assistive technology or in specialized wheelchair provisions after. I practiced a of years I received an invitation upon returning from china and adopting my second daughter Here at vanderbilt. I was offered the invitation to help out if you will in the wheelchair clinic and It afforded me the opportunity to move from a back in the day. They called it sub acute practice. So i was doing inpatient practice primarily with geriatrics medically complex patients in our sub acute unit. Which they've sort of gone away and gave me the opportunity to move to an outpatient setting so a single mom with two young children was attractive. But i have to tell you gave me great pause. I asked myself repeatedly. Could i learn a new area of practice and for me it. It really was a new area of practice and certainly I had to Get out my motivation. And i said yes for which there has been absolutely no looking back and although it's trite. I'm so glad. I jumped off that cliff great. So what is your current practice setting. Can you describe where you work. And what the setting is like sure I work at the within the vanderbilt bill wilkerson center which is Interesting are Hub for speech language and hearing sciences. And i work in the neuro rehab hub for the vanderbilt university medical center which is called the pie beta fai rehabilitation institute. And if it sounds like a sorority. It is because the pie fis gave the seed money to start this clinic and they are tremendous supporters of this clinic. The clinic did not start out just a little historical perspective. The clinic did not start out here. The clinic here at vanderbilt was part of rehabilitation services and started again. Hold onto your hat. In nineteen eighty five and so it really was on the forefront and so started in one thousand nine hundred eighty five but in two thousand five the department of rehab services which had Come under the umbrella of orthopedics divorced us and as part of the divorce agreement i brought the adult seating and mobility clinic And i say Pi beta phi. Me and jenny. Robertson took the pediatric component or division of the clinic to one hundred hoax. And of note. I think that really was a fait accompli. In that is everybody knows. A children's hospital wants everything pediatrics. So i think that part was a fait accompli. But i moved here to define two thousand five. We've been going pretty strong since then

Vanderbilt Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Cent Barb Fai Rehabilitation Institute Vanderbilt University Medical China Department Of Rehab Services Umbrella Of Orthopedics Robertson Jenny
Show 48 "Pals for over 60 years" Willie Tyler & Lester - burst 02

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Show 48 "Pals for over 60 years" Willie Tyler & Lester - burst 02

"The thing part is it's fine makes you feel good the music's playing and you singing. That's one and it goes. It goes well with the comedy. I think you know. A lot of comedy variety shows would have comic and then a singer and they do tend to work well together but lester. You're one of the few professionals that pull off both comedy and singing so brilliantly bragging. When working with motown i still watch. Tv wondering watch little stevie wonder back in those days and all the temptations. And i learned. I learned from them as watch. You can watch the music and and everything like that. It made me feel made me feel real Willie i know. You're still in the room does we. Don't speak here. you're both there so did did the watching those guys kinda help train you as well as lester. Yes it's it was fun to do the fun things about singing music. Music is like Like let's see rachel was very charles. Ninetieth birthday anniversary is in september. Twenty third and it was like we did a a video a tribute to him on on his website celebrating his ninetieth birthday on that in that particular. Little thing that we did we talked about his songs and songs made you feel good. It makes you feel sad and it and it made you. You know it and that's the same kind of thing with music music and be You know put particular song can make you feel make you jump up and down and dance and another one can make the to sit down and think about what happened yesteryear. What happened that. you know. Years before music connects with people's emotions. And that's why So many people like to sing and enjoy singing. And what's interesting is that you were a very talented are very talented singer. But you are a tremendous stand comic I know lester you had some great jokes in those days. The punchline and he used to he was straight man. I was the guy that did remember you being funnier than willie. That's good will i. I had one more question for leicester. If you've got a minute leicester back back in one thousand nine hundred eighty five you me and willie work together on a fox forty tv special a one hour show and we had you and willie as the host of that show. We had some very big names. Like dave clear and dana carvey on that show but what was interesting. Lester is i let you drive my pink cadillac as part of the opening of this show. Have you done a lot of driving. That was that was first. I and last time. Well it you can see why it's my last time i got to tell you. We do have all that on tape and it was really exciting in a little scary for me as the owner leicester i gotta be honest. Have you driving my car. But i was the big car. Yeah that was. That was a big pink convertible. It was an amazing car bed. You did a great job driving it and even though it was a little little sketchy you're a little heavy on the break There was no damage. And i just want to say thank you but i did. I was able to stop though. Oh yeah oh yeah you did in fact if you remember you kind of fun forward and willie had to save you. Yeah got right in front of the club almost late. that's why we'll say It was a real honor having you and willie as emc of that show. It was our first of three tv shows. We did too short series. One for abc nbc. But it was the fox one hour special having you is the professional. Mc really added some validity in in style in class to that first production. So thank you. That was a fun night. You don't we really like that club because this idea you know. The club was downstate. Well it's sort of hard to explain but it's down. It was downstairs basement. Level rate shows at the shows. People would go upstairs. We had a little magic stuff going on right and people go up there after the shows when we would hang out a also and But place to be. I

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy New York Jerry Mahoney Sammy Davis Paul Mitchell Willy Willie Tyler Ventriloquism Lester Willie Motown Dave Clear Stevie Rachel Dana Carvey Charles Leicester FOX EMC NBC ABC
Chuck Yeager, first pilot to break sound barrier, has died at age 97

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Chuck Yeager, first pilot to break sound barrier, has died at age 97

"We're talking about sam sheppard because the former. Us air force officer died yesterday at the age of ninety seven talking about chuck yeager on october fourteenth nineteen forty seven yeager became the first pilot to break the speed of sound as he flew the experimental bell x one rocket plane over morocco. Dry lake in california. He said the ride was nice. Just like riding fast in a car. The pilot later commanded fighter squadrons in germany and south east asia during the vietnam war and was promoted to brigadier general in nineteen sixty nine. Yeager was awarded the silver star the distinguished flying cross the bronze star the air medal and the purple heart president harry. Truman awarded him. The collier air trophy in december of nineteen forty eight for his breaking the sound barrier he also yeager received the presidential medal of freedom in one thousand nine hundred eighty five wants reflecting on his life accomplishments. Yeager said quote. I was just lucky kid who caught the right ride. Incredible life joe. Before he broke the sound barrier he was a fighter pilot in world war. Two joined out of high school grew up in west. Virginia flew missions over western. Europe was shot down in. France escaped with help from the french resistance into spain. Truly truly an extraordinary almost cinematic life that he lived and just an extraordinary life. If you haven't seen the right stuff the movie take some time out and watch. Leave it or not. I have just an extraordinary story about an extraordinary

Sam Sheppard Yeager Chuck Yeager President Harry Us Air Force Dry Lake South East Asia Morocco Truman Vietnam Germany California JOE Virginia France Europe Spain
The Matter Of Castro Tum

Latino USA

03:20 min | 1 year ago

The Matter Of Castro Tum

"Roland Sylvain was born in Haiti, though by the time of his birth in Nineteen, seventy, eight, most of his family had one foot. My grandfather actually was the one that started it. He had issues in Haiti for political reasons things like that. His grandfather's problems started during the brutal dictatorship of President Francois Duvalier who's usually known as Papa doc hopper allowed no political dissent while he ruled the mortality rate of political prisoners reportedly was the worst in the world he and his son known as baby talk ruled over Haiti from the late. Nineteen fifties till the made one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s for the first time in nearly thirty years of Duvalier, dictatorships Haitians are talking openly about overthrowing their leader ruling doesn't know exactly what went wrong. But by the time he was born, his grandfather was building a new life for himself in New York City. He was one of tens of thousands of Haitians who came to the US around that time. have been fleeing their island claiming to be refugees from political repression within a few years rowlands grandfather got settled and was able to bring the rest of his family to New York legally. and. So in December of one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, little seven year old role in boarded a plane in shorts and a tee shirt and flew to John F. Kennedy airport in New York City. And given the time of the year New York. City was a little bit of shock. Possible world where was that freezing? But then a bunch of his relatives pulled up in a really big van and had a run at one of the stores inside the airport and get us coats may bundle them up and welcomed rolling to America. From the moment he arrived in the US. Roland was a legal permanent resident and his life became very American very quickly after a couple of years living in Brooklyn, his parents moved him and his siblings to the New Jersey suburbs Roland finished high school and got a job at a chemical plant became the manager there everybody loved me because I was the youngest guy a job. He started making good money. Then after nine eleven he got laid off for a while which someone else might have seen as a glass half empty kind of situation. But Roland he saw freedom. Just had fun I had my four one k. that was loaded sides. I took the 401k he took off on the road kept going back to Montreal Miami Atlanta well. Texas. I. Did Texas a few Tom I was teenager. Enjoying myself and it was on one of these trips that Roland got pulled over for speeding. This traffic stop and the events that followed would lead role in story to collide a few years. Later with another man's a teenager whose unusual journey through the United States immigration system has derailed tens of thousands of people's lives. We're going to tell you both of their stories because the trouble rolling got into is still haunting him now. It's threatening almost everything he assumed to be true about his life and he isn't the only one.

Roland Sylvain New York City Haiti President Francois Duvalier United States Papa Doc Hopper Political Repression Texas John F. Kennedy Roland New Jersey America Brooklyn Montreal Tom I Miami Atlanta
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:35 min | 2 years ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"Okay I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It. All right. So this makes sense I mean it's kind of like how you have to buy milk every week while if you drink milk which I don't. But flower can last a month or so yup. Yeah. Exactly. Right. So I get why platelets need a bit more backup but I'm still trying to figure out my head how they actually make more of them in a lab. You know what I mean. Now platelets don't just reproduce own you need stem cells to make them.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Dr. Cedric Producer Rubin Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Cambridge University Joel
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:04 min | 2 years ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Producer Dr. Cedric Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Rubin Cambridge University Joel
African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

This Day in History Class

03:47 min | 2 years ago

African National Congress published Mandela's message - June 10, 1980

"The Day was June tenth nineteen eighty. The African National Congress published a message that are tight leader Nelson Mandela wrote in response to so wait. Oh, uprising in nineteen, seventy six. At the time Mandela was imprisoned. In nineteen, forty, eight, the National Party came to power in South Africa and began implementing the policy of apartheid at the time, racial segregation existed in the country, and the white minority held political power. Though. Segregation had long been in practice. Apartheid extended policy. Dictated where people could live and work based on race. The Population Registration Act required people to be classified and registered as black, white, coloured or other. Pass laws reinforced the ideology of white supremacy by controlling the movement of black South Africans. Plenty of other apartheid laws were passed that enforce the country system of racial segregation and disadvantaged the majority black population. Nelson Mandela was a key figure in the anti-apartheid movement in the early Nineteen Forties Mandela joint the African National Congress or a C. A political party that became dedicated to ending apartheid once the National Party came to power. In the decades after apartheid became official government policy resistance to the system sprang up South Africa. The ANC was heavily involved in the fight against apartheid and Mandela emerged as a leader in the ANC. In June of Nineteen seventy-six black students in Soweto township led protests in response to the government, mandating the use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in schools. Afrikaans was a language of the white minority. As thousands of students marched in the demonstrations. The police responded by shooting at the children. Many children were killed and the Soweto uprising spread across the country. At the time of the so wait, oh, uprising Nelson Mandela was in prison, serving a life term after being convicted of sabotage in the Rivonia Trial in one, thousand, nine, sixty four. During his time in prison, Mandela continued to write and support the anti-apartheid movement and people help Tim Smuggle his writing out of Robben Island prison. One of the messages he wrote from Robben. Island was in response to the Soweto uprising. On June. Tenth Nineteen, eighty, the ANC published this message, stating that it took more than two years to reach them. It included an introduction by Oliver Tombo who was president of the African National Congress. The introduction acknowledged the importance of Mandela's quote. Call to unity and mass action, especially since nineteen eighty marked the twenty fifth anniversary of the Freedom Charter, a document ratified in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five, that demanded equal rights for all South Africans. In the introduction, the ANC urged readers to quote make one thousand, nine hundred a year of united mass struggle. In the message Mandela laid out how quote white domination is held in check by force of arms, and how apartheid was opposed by many people, he also called for black unity instead that quote. Victory is certain. Near the end of the message, he wrote the following. Unite mobilize fight on between the and Ville of United, mass action and the hammer of the armed struggle. We shall crush apartheid in white minority racist rule. Mandela was released from prison a decade later in one, thousand, nine hundred. Negotiations to end apartheid soon began and Mandela became president of South Africa in one, thousand, nine, hundred four.

Nelson Mandela Nineteen Forties Mandela African National Congress Mandela South Africa Soweto President Trump Robben Island Tim Smuggle Oliver Tombo Official Freedom Charter Robben
Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Explorers & Contenders: Annie Oakley

"Annie. Oakley was born phoebe and Moses on August thirteenth eighteen sixty in Dark County Ohio when Anne was sits. Her Father Jacob died from pneumonia and his mother. Susan wise soon remarried but her second husband died suddenly two with eight children and very little income. Anne's family was sent to the county's poor farm. These institutions predated federal safety nets like Medicare and social security residents often dealt with miserable living conditions while battling the cultural stigma of needing help and he was placed with local families where she would work in exchange for room and board. She started hunting at eight years old from the start and he was a gifted shot selling her game to local restaurants to help support her family. At fifteen annie's hunting skills paid off the mortgage on her mother's farm that same year she traveled to Cincinnati to compete in a shooting competition with Frank e. Butler Butler was a traveling marksman who made bets with local communities that he could beat anyone in a sharp shooting match. Anne made all twenty five shots. Butler missed the final one. The two started courting and married soon after eighteen seventy six and he was sixteen years. Old Butler continued butlers tour of the country with Anne acting as his assistant despite her skills and he was responsible mostly for holding up items for Butler to shoot. All of that changed our. May I eighteen? Eighty two when Butler's partner fell ill anne filled in on stage and from then on and he was officially part of the act after touring for a year with the sells brothers circus. Anne and Butler joined Buffalo. Bill's wild west show. It was Anne who had been given the name little. Shir shot by LAKOTA. Sioux leader sitting bull really rose to fame. Butler eventually chose to serve as her stage assistant and manager even by today's standards any stunt were jaw-dropping. She would shoot glass balls and coins out of the air and cigarettes out of her husband's mouth her show often opened with her skipping onstage lifting her rifle and in one shot snuffing out the flame of let candle. Anne and Butler remained with Buffalo. Bill's show for sixteen years. The tour took them all around the world. They performed for Queen. Victoria's golden jubilee in England and travelled through Spain Italy and France. Every time she stepped on stage and he proved that women were more than capable of using firearms challenging the disciplines. Masculine reputation. She publicly encouraged women to learn how to use a pistol and to carry it in their purses arguing. Self defense was empowering in nineteen one after returning to the United States and Butler were in a train crash. Any injured her back and stopped touring two years later in nineteen. Oh three it was reported in Chicago that Anne had been arrested for stealing a man's trousers and selling them for cocaine. Despite the story being entirely false the woman arrested had used the fake name any Oakley News outlets ran with it. Anne sued every paper that ran the false accusations over seven years. She won fifty four or fifty five cases in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. The United States entered World War. One and he wrote to the secretary of war. Henry L Stimson offering to fund raiser regiment of female volunteers to fight. She also offered to help. Teach soldiers how to accurately shoot. Neither offer was accepted in nineteen twenty two any began preparing to tour again but a car accident delayed her plans after a year of recovery anti finally returned to the stage soon though any fell sick and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. She moved back to Ohio to be closer to her family. Annie Oakley died on November Third Nineteen Twenty Six. She was sixty six years old. Her husband Frank. E Butler died three weeks later the two had been married for fifty years in nineteen forty six a fictionalized version of Annie and Butler's love story debuted on Broadway as the Irving Berlin musical. Annie get your Gun Ami thing you can do. I can do better. I could do anything better than you. Yes I can yes I can to this day. The show is still regularly performed by theaters around the

Butler Butler Anne Annie Bill Annie. Oakley Frank E United States Jacob Susan Wise Buffalo Medicare Pneumonia Oakley News Dark County Ohio Moses Cincinnati Shir Sioux Henry L Stimson
Panic in the Streets

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

09:08 min | 2 years ago

Panic in the Streets

"We're discussing panic in the streets starring. Richard Would Mark Paul. Douglas Barbara Bel Getty's Jack Talents. Zero mastel directed by Eliah Kazan. This is the now playing. Co-host who's fond of Shishkabob Arnie Stewart? And this the CO host. Who Likes High Foreheads Jacob? Well we hope everybody at home is healthy and safe and likely quarantined. No matter where you're listening to us from the world. Yeah at the moment of recording. We are all separated apart. Watching the news is one of the shows that we've taped since this pandemic has hit America. We are hearing reports. There are over sixty thousand cases in America by the time this airs. Who knows but we are thinking about this pandemic and checking in with you. You guys told us you were interested in watching movies about viruses. I don't know about that you know I can understand why some people might be like. I want to turn that off. I don't WanNa think about that. It's scary to contemplate when you turn on the news these days. Yeah but people are I think indulging in it in some ways entertainment as of this recording contagion is the number four movie on Itunes and it has been for weeks and outbreak is in the top twenty five and let's face it. We had to kind of fill out our schedule. The new mutants is punted for the sixth time or something but James Bond got moved black widow. The new saw film fast and furious nine and just a couple days ago when we're recording. This wonder woman. Eighty four half of our schedule for the spring has no release date anymore. Yeah I thought it was going to be a super busy month person July and lots of new releases and now we don't know yes and we didn't really necessarily know how to approach virus movies. Either there are a lot of them and we've covered some of them and you can go find those in the archives. Twenty eight days later and I am legend. All the stand. I did a list. I wanted to see how many we've really done if people wanted to do. A full now. Playing virus retrospective. There's the I am legend trilogy. Starting with the last man on earth in nineteen sixty four. Yeah then Omega Man in seventy one. There's the stand from ninety. Four twelve monkeys. That counts right. Nine Hundred Ninety five definitely twenty eight days later two thousand and two resident evil also two thousand two twenty eight weeks later as well. Yep Yep rise of the planet of the apes and then its two sequels but rise. Came Out in twenty eleven. Dare I add it in the name of the King Two worlds. It might make you sick watching it. And there was someone plotting to release a virus. Yes and they did. That's the thing it's not if they were blinded they released it in the Kingdom of EB World War Z. And Day of the dead bloodline. Yeah I think what's different here because we do want to be sensitive. We're not doing the sensational Zombie outbreak. Type films I mean. We talked about all kinds of viral outbreaks. And we really wanted something that that would speak to. What's going on right now. Though yeah I agree I mean I want a very clear eyed view if you WANNA laugh and enjoy camping ones no judgment but it might seem inappropriate to make light of something that seemed so severe the way I thought about it is. It's more interesting even though we're told. Time and again. These are unprecedented times. Mankind has always dealt with viruses. It has always been a part of our story and it was interesting to think that we could go back through the decades and look at the ways that it was presented on film and how the general public thought about contagion and viral outbreaks. And it makes sense that we would start with panic in the streets in one thousand nine hundred fifty film when we were discussing the Tom Cruise film losing it Stewart. You pointed out that in the eighties. A lot of movies were being set in the fifties because baby boomers who were in their formative years in the fifties grew up and now they were writing films in the eighties so setting them thirty years earlier while thirty years or specifically thirty two years before nineteen fifty. The Spanish flu was out there so a lot of people. My Ninety nine year old grandmother is regaling me endlessly with this coronas. Nothing you should have been there for the Spanish flu. Nine hundred eighteen. Not many of us can say that we were there for that but it does sound awful. It killed a whole lot of people. And Yeah that comes up a lot. But even in the nineteen fifties which is the start. I think of the movie. Sub-genre virus movies kickoff with panic in the streets. Nine hundred fifty s were a scary time. That looked a lot like. Are you know right. Now we're thinking very much about protecting our seniors because they're what's at risk for covert nineteen but back in the nineteen fifties. Hide your kids to let them go to the pool. Don't let him play with other kids because if you do they're gonNA get infantile paralysis. Polio I mean the scare was real people close pools. They didn't let their kids out. He was considered a summer plague. School's out and then all of a sudden just populations of people all throughout the United States would suddenly be hit hard and kids would suddenly lose motor function and only able to breathe when they were put into an iron lung interesting statistic by the way it sounds a lot like corona only two percent of the population actually develop the disease and most of those cases were mild. Most of the people were not left with long term disabilities but it did impact a whole generation. I know my mom believes. She was diagnosed with polio. My Dad's second wife had it. You know the thirty second president. Fdr The reason why he was in a wheelchair he got it when he was thirty. Nine years old. You didn't even have to be a kit. People were living like we were back in. One thousand nine hundred eighty. When this movie came out there was a real field. If you send your kid to the movie theater. He touched another kid. This could happen wasn't until one thousand nine hundred eighty five. When Jonas Salk released his cure which was very controversial he was doing things that scientists disapproved of in order to get that vaccine and it worked one monkey equaled six thousand doses of immunization. And before you know it all the kids got to lead the iron lung and come home and famously. He didn't even keep the patent. It's something that warms my heart. When I think about it he thought it was unethical for anyone to profit from this cure and so he gave it away for free so there was panic in the streets in nineteen fifty and I think the other thing that might have inspired. The onset of movies talking about viruses was the smallpox outbreak of nineteen forty. Seven guy got on a bus in Mexico. City drove all the way to New York City. Didn't feel so well with feverish. The whole time went to Bellevue hospital a week later he died. That was when the doctors realized. Oh my God is smallpox. They had had a vaccine for smallpox for over century but because smallpox was so rare like nobody was immune from it so suddenly everyone. That man had come in contact when the bus was infected and it was being you know across the country so everyone literally was being impacted. Kind of like we are now. Everyone potentially could have smallpox what the government did was they started a big PR blitz. They put out commercials on the radio. Tv magazines go to our free health clinics. They opened them up all over the country. Get your vaccines and so everyone could sing the songs everyone knew about shots and the necessity of getting immune to smallpox. Hollywood jumps on trends. If something is big in the news. They're going to come up with a movie about it and I think that's the movie we're here to talk about today. I'd never heard of panic in the streets until we decided we were going to cherry pick. What is what the best the most iconic virus movie from each decade the fifties through the teens. And you said this is the top one on the list I I. I never heard of this. Yeah nor have I. This is totally new to me. I knew by reputation but I've never seen it either. I do think most people know Elia Kazan. He was a director more famous. Maybe for Broadway the stage but he helped pioneer the method acting. So if you know Brando if you know James Dean if you know all of those leading light actors for the nineteen fifties Elliott. Kazan probably worked with them and got them to be the actors that they were. Yeah I did look up this director and and unfortunately Brando. Unless he's in Superman or the godfather I I got a blind spot for his films as well as James Dean so I recognize. Yeah Kazan oh he's he's actually done some big movies but this one isn't one of his that I've heard of

Eliah Kazan Smallpox Shishkabob Arnie Stewart America Kazan Polio James Dean Brando Director Douglas Barbara Bel Getty FDR Richard Jonas Salk James Bond Bellevue Hospital New York City United States Jack Talents Mark Paul
The Nrburgring

CarStuff

09:11 min | 2 years ago

The Nrburgring

"I'm your host Scott Benjamin and I am Kirk Garin. I'm super excited about this show this week because we've got a topic that's got a lot of meat to it and something that. I think that Is going to be just right for conversation between the two of us because we both have an interest in the sort of thing anyway in a little bit of track driving a little bit of Little Thrill seeking. I guess. Maybe we're both kind of Not Adrenalin Junkies. But we both like to Kinda chest limits of our vehicles kind of you know. Just get out there and have a little bit of fun on them. And I think this is something that a lot of people can relate to. Maybe not a lot of people have done this in the past. Of course. I think we're GONNA find very few of our listeners. Have actually done this but there are a couple of examples that that I'll tell you about in just a moment so let's just jump right into it and I'll tell our listeners. What we're GONNA be talking about today in. It was kind of a question that I had. And it's something that I I know. I voiced on my other show on car stuff in the past and and I think maybe answered it a little bit and we've even discussed this track and Ha- I'll get to all of this. You understand in just a moment but my question is about the nurburgring and the nurburgring has in the past. I don't know decade or maybe even twelve fifteen years seemed to be the place that manufacturers have taken their automobiles to test limits to see how fast they can lap the nurburgring and it was a specific part of the nurburgring. That they do. This in. There's it's it's a It's a certain loop that they tested on. We'll talk about it. What it is is. It's kind of like a a level playing field for all manufacturers to be able to go and say we can run this track at this speed in this amount of time in this car and it. That's where cars the best and if you think you can top it go do it. Yeah and it offers a bunch of different types of conditions as well through the surface of the course and the terrain and weather and all sorts of other obstacles that make it interesting and kind of like a something to brag about though absolutely. We're we'll talk about all of this because there's some really believe it or not. Even the weather is a fascinating topic on this track. So as the surface material because it changes over over time Over distance rather and maybe one of the coolest things about this is that you can go and drive on this track if you just have a few dollars in your pocket. It doesn't really cost that much money. It's officially a toll road and I know I'm probably not giving anything away by saying that right now and then there's some fascinating things that go along with this whole thing. Now here's a little bit of background and I. I want temper this with this thought. It was a car stuff episode on the Nurburgring and we went through a lot of history. We went through the details of how they modify the track. And you know like the different curves and all that stuff and and the The barriers and I. It's just a lot of information about the track itself. So there's a ton of history. There's a ton of material there about Grand Prix or about Grand Prix racing in about You know the switch over Formula One and all of that. It's all there So I don't Wanna I don't WANNA double up on too much of that and I know that's tough not to step on that so we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA have a little bit of overlap but not a whole lot now. There's a few things that I do. I do feel like we need to repeat. This is just because there's some really interesting things about this. Track that thinker important and one number one. Probably the most important thing that we need to know about this track is that it's insanely dangerous. Insanely dangerous. I mean it really is and it was designed a long time ago. I think the track was built in one thousand nine hundred eighty five and I. It's like it's a huge huge track. It's it's what Woke in its current Form I think that the overall lap if you the norge left's norge sleep that we're GonNa talk about which is the north loop Is about fourteen I. It's over fourteen. Miles right yeah okay. So one hundred fifty turns. Yeah Oh yeah. That's right that's right. Yeah that's another important point. This is this. Of course it goes through the mountains. I'd like to see with allocation changes. Of course that I think that I think that I read somewhere that the elevation changes over a thousand feet Between the start and finish of the of the tracks so really an interesting track. It's fascinating what did you say? One hundred and fifty some turns you Y. They had more. They tried to make it safer and And that's partly due to Jackie Stewart in fact. It's it's mostly due to Jackie Stewart and a lot of other f one drivers that got together and said we are actually where they're actually going to boycott this race if they didn't make some changes in this. This wasn't always the case because early on you know Formula One. It was a little bit different. Who is it was? It was faster but it wasn't quite as fast and it wasn't quite as dangerous as it was in the late nineteen sixties and they started adding some wings to the cars and add a little. More downforce You know where the car stuck to the track exactly so when they when they would over some of the more pronounced elevation quick elevation changes. Maybe the car would get lighter than it should have been or trying to figure out why the drivers were so afraid of this particular track. And that's all I could come up with Scott wasn't that the course changed course exactly. Yeah the car's got faster in. The cars changed more dependent on air flowing flowing around it in a certain way. Absolutely not cars aren't supposed to get too far off the caress service. Yeah exactly right. Cars DESIGNED TO BE ON THE TRACK SURFACE. And we've talked about this with you know the thrust S. S. C. And you know all the other cars that are going fast and essentially every card. We talked about so far on the fast track But cars are designed to stay low to stay kind of stuck to the ground. The faster you go the more downforce. They have to have in order to stay on the ground. And what happens is that there's some dramatic elevation changes and whether it's just a little rise or You know it's like you're coming over a crest and you can't see what's going on and on the other side of it In a drops right off at this point. The cars were going so fast that they were becoming airborne and part of the problem. Was that with the way that the downforce was Designed these cars I. It was meant to act like a reverse wing to push the car down so when you get air underneath the car it acts in the opposite way. It acts like it's GonNa WanNa lift off and we've seen that in recent years of course with lemond other tracks as well. It's not just it's not just the neubergring But but tracks were cars become airborne these road courses are really really dangerous for drivers that are going super super fast and Back then you know back in the delete sick making sixties Jackie Stewart was saying at the time and I think I've mentioned this and other podcasts. Even though the F. One podcast is that you know a lot of his friends. Were dying on this on this. Unease circuits on these Research in the nurburgring was especially dangerous. In fact One of the facts that came out of the last Cardiff episode. And I think it was. Something that Ben mentioned is that this is hard to believe in. I don't know where he dug this up but I but I do remember him saying that. F One drivers had a two thirds chance over five years of competition that they would be killed in competition in five years. Two thirds chance that sixty six percent chance that you would die in a race if you raise for five years or longer. Nfl competition at the time. And this is like during the late nineteen sixties early nineteen seventies. So Jackie Stewart had a very valid point. You know he said. You know I'm losing. I'm losing friends every weekend on these tracks. Safeties got improve in some way. Let's start with cars of course but let's move onto you know safety equipment and tracks and everything. So he wanted improvements everywhere the Nurburgring. They responded they changed a lot of the a lot of the track. You know they slowed down some of the corners and you know it made it a little bit safer in a lot of ways and there's a lot of ways they can design corners to make them a little bit better but overall still. The Nurburgring is just an inherently dangerous. Course for a lot of reasons and I I think you you already know a couple of reasons. Why Yeah Yeah. I think I know what you're trying to get. At the fact that the track is kind of laid right on top of these extremely rolling hills and in the middle of a forest It's a lot narrower than a lot of modern day race tracks are designed to be The surface is different. The weather conditions are different. And then just the general speed at which you're going Of course was designed at a time when cars didn't see speeds like they see now sure they were fast but they weren't quite as fast as now we're in the sixties and seventies and then even now. I mean they're they're incredibly fast and you know. I think I want to mention this right now. If that's all right I I wanted to take just a second to say that I think the last German Grand Prix that was run at the nurburgring. And that's very specific. We'll we'll talk about that in a second but the last one was run at the nurburgring was in two thousand thirteen and You know of course there were other journ Grand Prix is I mean. The latest one was in twenty eighteen. I believe right or was there one in twenty nineteen there might have been the German Green. Just had it okay. All right But but they kind of like skip around so it's not always run at Hockenheim ring or at the nurburgring. It's kind of a mix the two or sometimes it's just not even either one of those you know depending on whether they're gonna run something else

Jackie Stewart Grand Prix Scott Benjamin HA Wanna Kirk Garin Miles Cardiff NFL BEN Lemond
Stocks surge on new virus measures; Dow up 1,985 points

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Stocks surge on new virus measures; Dow up 1,985 points

"I might cross your reporting stocks surge as president trump announces new virus measures stocks rebounded on Wall Street Friday to close a tumultuous trading week US president Donald Trump announced new measures to fight the corona virus outbreak stocks doubled gains in the last half hour as trump made his announcement the Dow Jones industrial average recorded its biggest gain since October two thousand eight rocketing one thousand nine hundred eighty five points or nine point four percent to close at twenty three thousand one eighty six the broader S. and P. five hundred clawed back two hundred thirty points a gain of nine point two nine percent to close at two thousand seven eleven the nasdaq composite shot up six hundred seventy two points or nine point three four percent to close at seventy nine hundred seventy four Friday's gains followed by one day what was the worst drop for the markets since the black Monday crash of nineteen eighty seven

Donald Trump United States President Trump
The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

Casefile True Crime

04:39 min | 2 years ago

The Murder of Leslie Marie Perlov

"The Californian city of Stanford laws in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County just under an hour drive from San Francisco covering any land area of two point. Eight Square Miles Stanford is adjacent to Palo Alto one of the principal cities of the affluent and progressive Silicon Valley which is served as an incubator for many prominent and influential technological enterprises. Over the years including Apple Google facebook and Tesla Stanford is home to the prestigious eight thousand Dak- Stanford University a private co educational and Non Denominational College and Research Institution. Many of the city's residents students faculty members who live on or Iran campus in a range of accommodations including Goma. Trees Co ops. Row Houses Fraternities sororities single family homes and condominiums established in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The university was founded by railroad magnate and California Senator Leland Stanford and his wife Jane. In memory of their only child Leyland junior he died of typhoid fever. At Age Fifteen. The land began as the stock farm with OAK dotted fields and soon developed into one of the largest university campuses in the United States despite sustaining heavy damage from two separate earthquakes in nineteen. I seek since and nine hundred ninety nine. The university has managed to maintain its original California mission architecture from the light. Eighteen hundreds characterized by embellished yellow sandstone long low and wide colonnades open arches and two red terra cotta tiled roofs at the heart of the campus is the main quadrangle the university's oldest structure stretching. Iva seventeen acres. The main quad is raised Vira Mile Long Palm Tree lined road and has an inherent data section. Both of which feature sprawling lawns courtyards and interconnected buildings housing. Various departments classrooms and administration offices regarded as a national center for Research Stanford Phages More Than One hundred and twenty research. Institutes exploring a range of topics from particle physics to International Studies Given it's proximity to silicon valley and it's impressive academic and athletic performance records. It is renowned as one of the top universities of the world. Many students go on to have a lustrous careers in their field of expertise with past alumni including noble laureates Pulitzer Prize winners and Presidential Medal of freedom recipients. One hundred and fifty thousand visit as drawn to the faint grants annually to explore it too many features including apiaries shops and gardens as well as a stadium. Golf course satellite dish and church liking trials around the campus outskirts off of use of the rolling countryside and attract by more than fifty thousand visitors a year in the early nineteen seventies. Just over eleven thousand students were enrolled at Stanford University and the Kanta coach in these men that had started in the mid nineteen sixties was still a major aspect of college lawf- students fighting for social and political change would often stage protests scenes and formed community action groups for issues such as racism. Women's liberation and gay rods. Leslie Marie Po love graduated from Stanford in nineteen seventy two with a bachelors degree in history by the beginning of the following year. The twenty one year old was working as a clerk at the north. Santa Clara Canny Low Library in Palo Alto. Leslie hoped to become a lawyer and recently been accepted into law school at the University of Pennsylvania though classes had yet to begin at three. Pm on Tuesday. February. Thirteen Leslie left work. For the day driving off in her seventy-two Orange Chevrolet Nova the coworkers presumed. She was heading directly to her time in the Los. Altos hills where she lived with her widowed mother Florence. But Leslie never arrived

Dak- Stanford University Leslie Marie Po Stanford Palo Alto Senator Leland Stanford Tesla Stanford Santa Clara County California Santa Clara Canny Low Library Goma Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Row Houses Fraternities Principal Typhoid Iran Apple United States Non Denominational College Leyland
Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

Past Gas

07:38 min | 2 years ago

Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

"It all started in in nineteen twenty five. Henry Ford was having lunch and his Dearborn Michigan Mansion with his good friend business partner entire magnate Harvey firestone Harvey. RV and Ford had been friends and partners since Ford started building cars decades earlier. So yeah just remember like he invented the model t which I like cheap car and basically he brought the car to the mass. Exactly Mr Firestone had begun ranting this time primarily focused on the impending rubber cartel that had been proposing England by one Winston Churchill. I am not a crooked. You know that payments de Yeah with a cigar and he's like on this day I I am not a crook and it will live in infamy. Yep that's him. The purpose of also the was Churchill. The king no the purpose of the rubber cartel was to limit the export of rubber in order to not overextend national resources. In case there was another World World War One thousand nine hundred eighty five probably a good idea but harvey firestone didn't like that idea. He believed that rubber prices were going to spike in the US as a result and therefore negatively affect firestone tires. Not some things never change Harvey firestone was not alone in this fear even even presidential candidate. FDR feared the effects of a rubber tariff. Remember was viewed. As the automotive industry's chokepoint seen as even more crucial than oil it's crazy. The the automotive industry relied on vulcanized rubber for literally everything from tires to hoses gaskets. A price increase of any kind could sink the young business so there there was a legitimate fear of turtles. Pain passing seems somewhat reasonable. Also it's it's it's kind of like okay here newsflash guys. If you're listening to this this might lose some you know in. I believe in climate change. And it's SORTA like yeah making some changes like you know not dumping tons of poisons into rivers and stuff might be more expensive for some people but in the at the end of the day. It's good not to have poisoned rivers and it's also probably good to have like rubber to defeat the Nazis. Yeah Germany was totally destroyed and they were afraid of something all of Europe. Yeah they're afraid of something like that happening again because those wounds had not been healed all and Churchill was just saying like hey fellers hello. Hello how does he talk. Talk like this is how are we talk again elegant. Listen listen fellows. That women's of all are still fresh insulting. I say that maybe we just save some of US supplies in case of fruit bikes out to again rubber. Blow Hurrah. Yes that's always saying always saying. Hey guys the whole world was just at war four. I think it might happen again. Maybe we should just like chill and be ready and these guys are like a money so harvey firestone was fed up with living in constant fear of their so he decided the best course of action would be to grow his own rubber smart. This wasn't the first time he had some some crazy idea. In fact Harvey tried to declare economic independence from the UK and fly rubber under the American flag. A few years earlier but that was truly the ramblings of a madman who doesn't seem to understand that you can't just not claim another country's resources by saying this cheaper so I'm just going to say it's it's American now although now that I think back on it that's kind of how we did a lot of stuff so yeah but harvey actually had a plan. He decided that he was going to start his own plantation in Liberia where the conditions were almost perfect for growing rubber trees by keeping the production in house he could avoid all the access fees associated with importation from other countries. Henry Ford had also tried growing his own rubber a year earlier. In one thousand nine hundred eighty four he had purchased this large quantities of land in the Florida everglades only to eventually do nothing with them. It was cheaper for four to import. The rubber. The idea of dramatic price is increase was still only speculation. But Still Harvey's plans had peaked and reports interests and after the lunch meeting was over. He requested that it's personal aide aide Leopold would find out where the best place to grow rubber Leopold come over here boy. Where's the best place to go? Rob A AH go find out how Liberia was the obvious choice. Harvey firestone discovered. It had the perfect climate when he put his plantation there but unfortunately Henry Ford word was very very very racist and he would not dare step foot in such an uncivilised and African society so they came to the conclusion. I mean that the rubber should be grown where it originated in the Amazon. So rubber comes from both vines and trees and you let it grow and then when you chop it you squeeze the vines and Latex Literal Latex comes out trees yeah so it's a liquid and then they they put out onto like big flat drying areas than when it dries. You can pull it up like a sheet of Latex and then you take a bunch of latex yeah stack stack into bales. And then that's what gets shipped out to like Volkan Ization plants and stuff like that. So these plantations are really only concerned with drawing the vines and extracting latex from okay okay and Liberia had the per client. But what about the Amazon Amazon also. Very clearly great. Climate only problem. It's a lot harder harder to get into the rainforest than it is in Africa. Got You throughout the nineteenth century. The Amazon River Basin supplied all of the world's rubber and made up forty percent of Brazil's exports sports at the height of the rubber boom in the second half of the nineteenth century but the Amazon's rubber room quickly turned to bus as plantations in Asia and England. Were able to go. Rubber and much denser populations and much more efficiently in Amazon many natural species that are not present in other countries limit the growth of trees so but organizing united plantations and other countries the efficiency was greatly increased. Henry had another incentive to go to South America besides his racism in End Theodore Roosevelt's book through the Brazilian wilderness. He accounts his experiences traveling through the Amazonian rainforests. One of his most significant observations is that many fast-flowing rivers could provide an almost perfect power source for any industry bold enough to be born there. He claimed that the right kind of senators such his enterprising businessmen of foresight coolness and suggest city who would be willing to put migrants to work for an advantage that would be mutually beneficial will give rise to a a great industrial civilization money. If anyone thought they could fill that description it was Henry Ford art now. Henry Ford did not really make cars. Henry Ford thought that he made men the maker. Men's like me. This builder of meant the cars they produced produced were simply a byproduct of his training. He was praised as a sociologist manufacturer. If anyone could reshape the native Brazilians into prosperous factory workers it was Henry Ford. They don't want to be or so he thought they don't want that.

Harvey Firestone Harvey Firestone Harvey Henry Ford Amazon Winston Churchill Liberia Ford Firestone United States England FDR Amazon River Basin Dearborn Michigan Mansion Partner Florida Everglades Germany Europe Africa
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:40 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And talking about some of the specific challenges that women and mothers will face during the course of their financial lives and progressions one of the things that we touched on in that first segment of the program. And I think we need to dive in deeper depth is the potential for losing streams of income between a married couple later on into retirement. And specifically when one of us is widowed the survivor benefits for social security are not sometimes what people believe them to be. Sure, that's true. And you got to do an assessment, and you've got to do it advance and all these things, and if you've got a long illness with one of the spouses, usually spouses hill is going to be very concerned about these kinds of things and proudly inquiries necessary to get the whole picture and write it down just like the list of accounts, and all that sort of thing. But yes, I suggest we will all the time in San situation get to social security benefits are usually you're not going to be concerned about just the death benefit. You're looking for the income. So yes, absolutely. Very very important thing is to have your money in lifetime income products. Like the ones that we resent the people where the income continues intact. So whatever you're getting on a monthly basis, you're going to continue getting weather. This is incredibly important the lady who was coming in today that I told you passing number years ago. All that income is going to her. She doesn't like dealing with money matters. But I will tell you. She has enough money to live. They have enough money in these products that operate automatically so to speak to her account and every month and mother live a satisfactory and safe retirement mica recent article from Bloomberg says, America's elderly are now twice as likely to work than in one thousand nine hundred eighty five twenty percent of those ages sixty five and up have not retired many can't afford to we need to plan more carefully. I'm not sure all twenty percent of those that are working really envisioned working. Well, I don't think so either I've got cases where people lost so much money in the market that they had been working very sad cases where I've observed this. And I told you get into these safe annuities for lifetime income, they were half believers, they have what they should have done in and out back working the time. There's other cases. Obviously there's cases where spouses in long term care, and it's just bleeding the and what happens if the continued work way pass time when they should have probably not physically really able to you know, there's people that just want to work, and that's fine. There's nothing wrong with that and probably live longer than others. We're tired too early. But let's not be in a position where we have to work and don't want to work, we're tired while retired. We want to spend our time doing constructive things being with our family, and our grandkids and all that sort of thing. Well, my shifting here to maybe a little bit lighter topic. Another recent article on finding love after he actually puts us in a pretty good area. Maryland, Virginia and DC all ranked in the top ten areas in the country to find love after fifty Maryland's number one. How about that? How about that? So if you're listening to me in Maryland. It's a good thing. But again finding love I think at any age is challenging certainly there are even more complications. When we're finding love later in life with the mixed families that may occur the previous marriages that we may have to understand about history of our potential mate. But all in all, Mike. This is a good thing. We have the opportunity in this area will absolutely out there, folks. You know that Mary people live longer and people that have a love in their life that have a love interest in their life enough. Got married will live longer those kinds of close relationships. Make a difference the support that you get from each other. I hear this all the time. I see all this unhappy that are in that condition. I also know people that don't have that. And it's a different Scituate. Not as folks that want to be single Ben signal all their life. Stay single and so forth. But that doesn't mean they don't have a love interest in their life. Also, well, Mike, this survey went even further in ranking the percentage of the singles in that age group with an income of over fifty thousand dollars that was a very healthy sixty eight percent. I saw that. I thought well. That can be encouraging Janet absolutely absolutely well, Mike. We again have been talking about the planning issues, specifically focusing on the mothers out there because it is mother's day weekend, some mothers, of course, are facing that challenge of finding love after fifty again so conscious of that here. But again, Mike when we look at the survivorship income question over retirement our accounts have the potential to be depleted or spent down and at the same time. There is even more likely of a chance between married couples that one income will disappear when one of them passes away. This is kind of the convergence of perfect storms there. You know, it's so sad to see on the one hand if you had enough savings, and it would take a lot of money that you could actually take X number of dollars g needs an increase with inflation and never have to worry about running the money. Well, isn't that nice? That's something that's very very very rare unless you're a multimillionaire, and so forth, and so on energy cost of living, isn't that high? And your exposure is now on the other hand seat people that are relying taking four percent of your out of the market. And this doesn't work anymore has worked for many years, but people that are doing that. And every day, they get older. So every day there is more chance that something's going to happen to their money in the market. So every day they run the risk of actually running out of money because the plan just doesn't work those kinds of things I see it on the other hand using the kinds of products that we use we can never run out of money. You don't just gonna. Pass. That's a fundamentally very strong component along with other things, pension, social security and other income expenses is the nature of the financial life in retirement. And these are the kinds of things I talk to people every day about and always a maze. I'll say, well what else are you gonna use a retirement? Well, I've got this old plan. There will be some hesitation there thinking about it. Now, I got this old plan this employer left it alone. Now for ten years. Why I have that case at least three or four times a month. We got to get the money working for us. We secure the money. We got to know we're not gonna lose money. We have to know income it's going to produce and so forth, and so on so these the kinds of things we cover in a consultation. We get the whole picture if we can in his heart as we try to do that there still will be surprised later on this one more thing that they hadn't talked about had so many situations. This is the way the spouse, assets survivor didn't even know. Yeah. Waiting around with the mail to show up to let us know where those assets are absolutely. And some sometimes they go on found Mike they end up in the situation will ultimately the state takes the money. I had a situation where a lady came to me. And her mother was in long term care that we're running out of money and she really wanted to avoid Medicaid. And so I've kept asking questions kept asking questions, and then after the second meeting, she said, you know, I was just thinking my father was a firefighter, and I don't think he ever touches retirement plan and he had passed away several years ago. She said what my mother be the beneficiaries. Of course, you would do you know that we contacted the secretary of state in Illinois? It took us about six weeks, and we got one hundred and eighty thousand dollars. Wow. So you never know. And that's the thing that I tell people it, isn't that. I'm that smart. But another set of is looking at the situation trained set of eyes looking at the situation together, we may be able to find answers that. We're going to wear to start out with well, again, if you have questions if you have concerns if you want to make sure that you are uncovering all aspects of the plan pick up the phone give Mike new my or call.

Mike Maryland San situation Bloomberg America Scituate Ben Janet Illinois DC Virginia one thousand nine hundred eigh eighty thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars sixty eight percent twenty percent four percent
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

Mile Hi Radio

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

"Longtime Chicago bass player and songwriter. Peter. So Tara Cole road hard to say, I'm sorry with producer David foster who also scored a number five hit of his own in one thousand nine hundred eighty five with a love theme from Saint elmo's fire. The. Hits. Thanks to the contributions David foster with the chargers, a performer with a love theme from Saint elmo's fire and was the co rider with Peterson Tara of hard to say, I'm sorry. A number one song for Chicago in September of.

Saint elmo David foster Tara Cole Chicago Peterson Tara chargers Peter producer
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And it's it's not me. But he does remember the dance contest. Now. This is this is a doozy. Get ready for this Lulu. Here's cut number three where he explains I wasn't in black face in the yearbook picture, but I was in black face for the Michael Jackson dance. Contest is after all I liked Michael Jackson, cut three. In a. His name Michael Jackson's I had Pam with me. Had the shoes I had a glove, and I used us a little bit of shoe polish to put under my cheeks, and the reason I used a little bit is because I don't know if anybody's ever tried that, but you cannot get shoe polish off. But but it was a it was a a dance contest. I had always like Michael Jackson. I actually won the contest because I had learned how to do the moonwalk. I words fail me. He put a little bit of shoe polish. I didn't put a lot on. Because if you put a lot on you can't get it out. It gets under your eyes and sugar black face in one thousand nine hundred eighty five now should somebody lose their career because they made a mistake in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the guy loses his job because he advocates fantasized. That's why governor north of should be ex-governor Northam because he defended the practice of killing a baby that has been born. What more do you need to say? Sorry. You're not qualified to be governor of one of our fifty states. You're such a moron. You think that a mother and her physician, and and can get together and kill a baby who has been born. That's the disqualifier. And as it turns out, according to news reports the reason the black face clan yearbook picture came out was because there were colleagues of his. That were tipped off by an individual who was angry over governor. Northbound's comments about the Bill that would eliminate restrictions on abortion in Virginia. The source told the Washington Examiner the revelations about Ralph north racist past we're absolutely driven by his medical school classmates. Anger over his recent very public support for infanticide. So they are connected. You know, what it doesn't matter to me what the reason is when I know that somebody advocates infanticide..

Michael Jackson Washington Examiner Northam Virginia Ralph north Pam
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three it's time for a listener commentary. That comes our way from Lauren boom who says she and her family were among the so-called boat, people rescued at sea after the end of the Vietnam war, but to some her gratitude for her family's rescue is misplaced my family escaped Vietnam in one thousand nine hundred eighty five years after the US withdrew we left by boat and were lost at sea does seem certain until the tense day. When a US flagship spotted us and stopped. I was seven years old. I dedicated most of my adult life searching for the. Captain and crew just to say thank you in my search. I discovered a line of studies examining the problematic nature of rescue and gratitude, especially in the US Vietnam relationship, the argument goes like this the US was a player in the Vietnam war its withdrawal left a population of Vietnamese loyal to the US ostracized in their own country. Instead of owning its role in the conflict America can feel good about rescuing Vietnamese refugees on the flipside, colonial occupation by China, France, and the US is deeply woven into Vietnam history. Some academics question whether integral to this notion of gratitude is a colonial mindset that prevents critical examination of the self-serving motive behind rescues. Gratitude the argument goes obscures, America's responsibility for the very havoc. It created. In reality. Neither the refugees nor the Mariners that I've encountered struggle with such thoughts. Instead, I've learned that at the base of every rescue Licey empathetic human spirit that connects a captain and crew who can choose to stop their ship or not for the desperate starving. Inhabitants of a crowded sinking boat. My rescue offers a paradigm of super without ulterior motive, and I am grateful even if some dismissed me as intellectually evolved, I refuse to abide by the notion that compassionate gratitude is anathema to liberated mindset, I believe it is indispensable char humanity, the alternative that is a world in which compassion is extended. But question and gratitude is intended, but restraint is too cynical to bear. With a perspective. I'm Lauren, boom. Lauren Boone is an attorney here in San Francisco, and we invite you to share your thoughts on her commentary by going online to kqeDorg slash perspectives. Support for perspectives comes from leaf debris serpine men and Bernstein seeking Justice for the injured victims of fraud, whistle blowers,.

US Vietnam Lauren boom America Lauren Boone Mariners Bernstein fraud Licey attorney San Francisco China France one thousand nine hundred eigh seven years
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to let you know USA, I might anal Horsa. And before the break we were talking about the history of Dodger Stadium and the land that it's located on Chavez ravine now at the time many residents of Chavez ravine had sold their homes after being promised public housing. But those plans were cancelled by a new mayor and the ravine itself where their old homes were sat in limbo. Here's Janice with the rest of the story. Over on the east coast. Walter O'Malley, the owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers was unhappy with his location in Brooklyn. The stadium was old. The neighborhood was changing and New York. City officials weren't helping him O'Malley wanted out. So very quietly one thousand nine hundred eighty three nine hundred fifty four nine hundred fifty five city officials began working behind the scenes with Walter O'Malley to negotiate the possibility of a relocation from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. And guess what? LA city officials suggested the bait in their negotiations with Molly was the Travis ravine. And that's when many officials began to see the traffic's ravine as the perfect site for a modern major league baseball stadium. The kind that Molly was asking for a New York City officials would not give him. So eventually the city dodger contract was created in nineteen fifty eight and it essentially handed Chavez ravine over. To Molly as a kind of gift it wasn't offer O'Malley couldn't refuse. And that's when he became a full blown political battle Mexican American city councilman Edward ROY ball, led the resistance and his criticism was on behalf of the displaced residents of the CIA deserving saying, how can you argue against public subsidies for decent housing for poor people and then turn around and provide corporate subsidies for Walter O'Malley and the Los Angeles Dodgers by essentially handing, the charges are Wien over to a very wealthy. Very shrewd, very successful negotiator private businessmen like Walter, Molly. Oh at the end. I'll whisper not the contract was approved in one thousand nine hundred eighty five years after the public housing plans were cancelled it was the final green light for building Dodger Stadium. There was just one thing. Standing in the way families that refused to leave including that at. She goes later became the face of resistance to this affection. On may eighth nineteen Fifty-nine. The city of Los Angeles took matters into their own hands. The LA county sheriff's deputies.

Walter O'Malley Chavez ravine Dodger Stadium Molly Los Angeles Los Angeles Dodgers Brooklyn New York Chavez LA county baseball Janice CIA Wien one thousand nine hundred eigh
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

05:55 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Fifty seven percent of millennials have never been married. In one thousand nine hundred eighty five. That's when boomers were around the same age. In nineteen eighty-five is not when you know before television or movies were in black and white or whatever carriage made its first appearance on American roadways right in one thousand nine hundred eighty five only a third had never been married. So it's gone from. A third never married to fifty seven percent never married from eighty five till now, that's that's quite a change and trend. It means been going steadily the same way no reason to think it's going to stop either. In terms of structuring society, and we talked yesterday a lot about the. You know, practically nobody living with their parents to the majority of people living with their parents. Well in the number of people who were living with her parents at age, thirty blew my mind. I oh my God. That was the the the idea of living with my parents at age twenty two was abhorrent to me. Yeah. So, but that's me, you know, kind of a lone wolf. So listen, we made mention of the fact that these numbers the birth rate in particular spells utter complete irrevocable collapse of our welfare state Trump pre Tuesday, by the way, if you'd like. TEFA? It's a Trump free Tuesday. So everybody do it with me hashtag. Nobody's doing it with us. Yeah. Dowry? So anyway, I'm the the numbers are inescapable about the welfare state it will collapse. If we don't have a growing population for the you know, what I almost said very few of you. But that's probably not true for for those of you who don't understand that you have not been quote, unquote, putting away social security money. You have had it taken from your paycheck. It has been instantly redistributed to current old stairs. There is no slush fund. Well, there's a little bit. But it's about to go broke a trust fund. I guess is the term they use. But at any rate, so we're not having nearly enough babies to continue to support the pyramid scheme that his social security, Medicaid Medicare cetera. And and so we made mention of the fact that that's why both parties are interested in importing millions of immigrants illegal, and otherwise, but the legal kinda great because then you don't have to have any laws about you know, how many you'll let in you just kind of sort of turn a blind eye at the borders. And that's absolutely undeniable. And and I don't want to well, what the hell I will go off on illegal immigration. I if it's at all mysterious to you why the Democrats and Republicans have failed to do anything about this, even as they trumpet their interest in solving the problem year after year after year after year, it's not only that the Democrats are trying to import and register and get devote millions and millions of Hispanic people as many as possible, and it's not only that Republicans in their industrial and farm supporters. Want is many Labor's they can possibly get. It's that all of the people in congress. Now, there are some stupid congress people, no doubt. But most of them are pretty smart, and they can do math. They understand that they have to prop up the welfare state. So that's why they haven't done anything about immigration witnessed this move house. GOP leaders. This is from politico are reneging on a vote on a vowel rather to hold an immigration vote before the August recess this after Kevin McCarthy, and I and others had swore. Born too key congress people backed up by Paul Ryan, by the way, that they would have a vote on a guest worker program before the August recess because the people in their district were screaming for it. And it was critical because it persuaded reps. Dennis Ross, a Florida, Dan Newhouse, a Washington, others not to sign onto an effort to force a vote on legislation creating a pathway to citizenship for dreamers, etc. Dreamers. Listen to me, Dr recipients, the emigrants brought to the country illegally as children at cetera, etc. It fell to signatures short to have that vote to force the vote based on we'll have a vote on a guest worker program. But now, they're not going to have it. They're thinking this is going to ruin Kevin McCarthy halfwits credibility. And cause a real shakeup in the house. Now, they're trying to promise those same people. Yeah. Yeah. I know we said we won't before August. But I promise we'll do it in the fall. I promise not only will we have a vote. We'll get the two hundred and eighteen votes needed to actually pass the measure and do something about this stuff. But they won't. Can we promise something fun will according to science the most danceable number one hits? We'll play a little bit of the most danceable songs according to science coming up at nine ten twelve minutes. So you grind your way through the college or university, your choice, you probably do some grad school as well. You got the white lab coat. You got the degree. And you think let's see what should I turn my scientific acumen, two months of calculus dreams of biological papers at Sarah physics. I got physics out the Oiseaux how about what songs are the most dancing. I'll bet it's you certainly could be funded by a record company you figure out what makes songs the most danceable pop music's formulaic. Anyway. So yeah, you figure out the, you know, the the magic sauce or whatever that makes the song super-popular dance was you just print money. Yeah. That might be what's behind it. By the way, speaking of popular, you know, what the number one book on the New York Times was last week. I don't know about this week. Haven't checked Charles Krauthammer book things that Matt things that matter since he died that book has gotten enough attention s- number one, which I'm next to my bed at home, and I've been jumping into various chapters whether you're eating about Russia or chest. It's all very interesting..

Kevin McCarthy congress New York Times Charles Krauthammer Dennis Ross Sarah physics GOP Florida Russia Paul Ryan Dan Newhouse Washington Matt nine ten twelve minutes Fifty seven percent
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Take a trip back with this week's rock almanac. What's going on? Rock and roll lovers. Sandy west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the king Elvis Aaron Presley. Born into Mississippi Elvis would get his first time at age eleven for his birthday this week in nineteen forty-nine the vinyl record format war heats up as our introduces the forty five rpm seven and director eventually replaces the seventy eight rpm record for singles one song on each side. The format takes off in the early years of the rock era this week in nineteen seventy four kiss signed their first record deal with Casablanca records this week in nineteen Seventy-six Queen were at number one on the UK singles chart with Baheen rhapsody single enjoyed a nine week run on the chart selling more than a million copies by the end of the month. It reached number one again in the UK for five weeks following, Freddie. Mercury's death eventually becoming the UK's third best selling single of all time this week in one thousand nine hundred four Cindy Lauper became the first female recording artists since Bobbie gentry in nineteen sixty seven to be nominated for five Grammy awards album of the year. Best new artist. Best pop vocal performance record of the year and song of the year this week in two thousand three British and Dutch police recovered five hundred. Beatles. Master tapes missing since they were stolen from Abbey Road studios about thirty years earlier and this week in two thousand ten the number one song the billboard hot rocks chart one three days grace break. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. Imagine imagine being denied an apartment because of housing discrimination. It's so wrong. But who has the power to stop this? You do the law is on your side if you've been discriminated against because of race color, religion, sex, national, origin, disability or familial status. Finally complaint with HUD, fair housing as your right use it, visit HUD dot gov slash housing. A public service message from HUD and the national fair housing alliance. And now the iheartradio weekend sports time capsule fellow sports fans at sandy west. Why don't you take a journey back with me to this week in sports history? Let's start way back in eighteen eleven at muscle borough golf club in Scotland the first women's golf tournament is held jumping ahead almost one hundred years this week in one thousand nine hundred three Frank Farrell and Bill devry purchase. The American League baseball team in Baltimore for eighteen thousand dollars and move it to New York City. It would become the New York Yankees this week in one thousand nine forty two and his twentieth. Title defence, Joe Louis Cao's buddy bear in the first round of the rematch to retain his world heavyweight boxing title at Madison Square Garden this week in nineteen sixty two the NFL prohibits grabbing the facemask this week in nineteen Seventy-three. The American League adopts the designated hitter rule this week in one thousand nine hundred to the cat. I comic moment in NFL history to white Clark makes a fingertip catch for a touchdown from Joe Montana with fifty eight seconds left in the game against Dallas the forty Niners would win the game and go on to win the Super Bowl. This week in nineteen Ninety-one baseball officially bands Pete Rose from being elected to the hall of fame for betting on baseball and this week in two thousand thirteen it's the mile high miracle in Denver the AFC divisional playoff game between the Broncos and ravens is a wild one. Joe flacco heaves a seventy yard touchdown pass to Jacoby Jones with under forty seconds to play in the game. Getting within one. The extra point is good. And the game was tied at thirty five. The ravens go on to win it in the second overtime. That's your iheartradio weekend sports time capsule that are victims.

UK American League HUD NFL Sandy west Elvis Aaron Presley baseball Joe flacco ravens Mississippi New York Yankees Abbey Road Cindy Lauper Bobbie gentry Joe Louis Cao Grammy Mercury
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Sandy west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the king Elvis Aaron Presley Tupelo, Mississippi Elvis would get his first tar at age eleven for his birthday this week in nineteen forty-nine the vinyl record format war heats up as RCA introduces the forty five rpm seven intrepid eventually replaces the seventy eight RPM records two singles one song on each side. The format takes off in the early years of the rock era this week in nineteen seventy four kiss signed their first record deal with Casablanca records this week in one thousand nine hundred seventy six Queen were at number one on the UK singles chart with bohemian rhapsody. The single enjoyed a nine week run on the chart selling more than a million copies by the end of the month. It reached number one again in the UK for five weeks following, Freddie. Mercury's death eventually becoming the UK's third bestseller. Being single of all time this week in one thousand nine hundred four Cindy Lauper became the first female recording artists since Bobbie gentry in nineteen sixty seven to be nominated for five Grammy awards album of the year. Best new artist. Best pop vocal performance record of the year and song of the year this week in two thousand three British and Dutch police for cover five hundred Beatles. Master tapes missing since they were stolen from Abbey Road studios about thirty years earlier this week in two thousand ten the number one song on the billboard hot rocks chart one three days grace break. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. Now a year in rock spotlight. Nineteen Seventy-three Led Zeppelin released their fifth album houses of the holy it goes to number one in the US and the UK and yields the top twenty hit Dyer maker. Brothers released their top ten album, the captain the as long train runnin and China grove and in June. Joe Lawson barnstorm have a top ten album buoyed by the single Rocky Mountain way also in June of seventy three George Harrison scores in one single give me love from the number one album living in the material world Chicago's sixth album goes to number one with two top ten hits. Just you and me and feeling stronger every day. July six hundred thousand jam Watkins Glen for summer jam the largest rock festival ever held in the US futures. The fan the Grateful Dead and the Allman brothers and in August those same Allman brothers released their first album after the death of Dwayne Allman and had their only hit single with ramblin man, which goes to number two. Keep listening to iheartradio for more from nineteen Seventy-three coming up. How comfortable are.

UK Dwayne Allman Elvis Aaron Presley Tupelo Joe Lawson barnstorm Sandy west Cindy Lauper US RCA Mississippi Abbey Road Bobbie gentry Mercury Grammy Brothers Casablanca Rocky Mountain Freddie China grove recording artists
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on KTOK

"Take a trip back with this week's rock almanac. What's going on fellow rock and roll lovers? Sandy west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the king Elvis Aaron Presley born into flow, Mississippi Elvis would get his first guitar at age eleven for his birthday this week in nineteen forty nine the vinyl record format war heats up as RCA introduced the forty five rpm seven inch record eventually replaces the seventy eight rpm record for singles one song on each side. The format takes off in the early years of the rock era this week in nineteen seventy four kiss signed their first record deal with Casablanca records this week in one thousand nine hundred seventy six Queen were at number one on the UK singles chart with Bowen rhapsody. The single enjoyed a nine week run on the chart selling more than a million copies by the end of the month. It reached number one again in the UK for five weeks following, Freddie. Mercury's death eventually becoming the UK's third best selling single of all time this week in nineteen Eighty-four Cindy Lauper became the first female recording artists since Bobbie gentry in nineteen sixty seven to be. Nominated for five Grammy awards album of the year. Best new artist. Best pop vocal performance record of the year and song of the year this week in two thousand three British and Dutch police recover five hundred Beatles. Master tapes missing since they were stolen from Abbey Road studios about thirty years earlier and this week in two thousand ten the number one song on the billboard hot rocks. Chart was three days grace break. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. This is.

UK Elvis Aaron Presley Sandy west Cindy Lauper Bobbie gentry Grammy Abbey Road RCA Casablanca Mississippi Mercury Freddie recording artists thirty years five weeks seven inch three days nine week
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A trip back with this week's rock almanac. What's going on fellow rock and roll lovers? Sandy west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the king Elvis Aaron Presley Tupelo, Mississippi Elvis would get his first Qatar at age eleven for his birthday this week in nineteen forty-nine the vinyl record format war heats up as RCA introduces the forty five rpm seven and record eventually replaces the seventy eight rpm record for singles one song on each side. The format takes off in the early years of the rock era this week in nineteen seventy four kiss signed their first record deal with Casablanca records this week in one thousand nine hundred ninety six Queen were at number one on the UK singles chart with the human rhapsody single enjoyed a nine week run on the chart selling more than a million copies by the end of the month. Every number one again in the UK for five weeks following, Freddie. Mercury's death eventually becoming the UK's third best selling single of all time. This week in nineteen Eighty-four Cindy Lauper became the first female recording artists since Bobbie gentry in nineteen sixty seven to be nominated for five Grammy awards album of the year. Best new artist. Best pop vocal performance record of the year and song of the year this week in two thousand three British and Dutch police cover five hundred Beatles. Master tapes missing since they were stolen from Abbey Road studios about thirty years earlier and this week in twenty ten the number one song on the billboard hot rocks chart three days grace break. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. Now, it's the weekend box office review. Spent a third straight weekend on top of the box office taking in an additional thirty million two hundred fifty nine million domestic total puts it a number seven for films released in two thousand eighteen number five in the DC extended universe series of films also the fifth highest worldwide grossing film released in two thousand eighteen kicking off above expectations escape room opened with a good eighteen million. That's already doublets estimated nine million dollar budget and with a decent cinema score from audiences. It should end up with forty million or so overall by the end of the Toronto dropping off about forty five percent. Mary Poppins returns fell to third place. Earning fifteen million. Here's three weeks, and total is just shy of one hundred thirty nine million. Just barely topping. It's estimated one hundred thirty million dollar budget Spiderman into the spider verse repeated in fourth place, adding thirteen million for a total of one hundred thirty three million. So far can Bumblebee rounded out the top five with twelve. Million and ninety seven million overall after its third weekend. And that's your weekend box office review on iheartradio. Here's son you love on your favorite. Iheart radio station. Give it a thumbs up. And our live programmers will use your feedback to make our station sent even better. Thanks for listening to iheartradio. Good afternoon to you. In Illinois, Richard on the Eisenhower on the Kennedy on the Dan Ryan. Thirty fifth straight close enough..

UK Elvis Aaron Presley Tupelo Sandy west Cindy Lauper Abbey Road Qatar RCA Bobbie gentry Mississippi Mercury Grammy Mary Poppins Casablanca Toronto Freddie recording artists Illinois Dan Ryan
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Take a trip back with this week's rock almanac. What's going on rock and roll lovers? Sandy west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the king Elvis Aaron Presley, Mississippi Elvis would get his first Qatar at age eleven for his birthday this week in nineteen forty-nine the vinyl record format war heats up as RCA introduced the forty five rpm seven intrepid eventually replaces the seventy eight RPM records for singles one song on each side. The format takes off in the early years of the rock era this week in nineteen seventy four kiss signed their first record deal with Casablanca records this week in one thousand nine seventy six Queen were at number one on the UK singles chart with bohemian rhapsody single enjoyed a nine week run on the chart selling more than a million copies. By the end of the month reached number one again in the UK for five weeks following, Freddie. Mercury's death eventually becoming the UK's third best selling single of all time this week in one thousand nine hundred four Cindy Lauper became the first. Female recording artists since Bobbie gentry in nineteen sixty seven to be nominated for five Grammy awards album of the year. Bessie artist's best pop vocal performance record of the year and song of the year this week in two thousand three British and Dutch police recover five hundred Beatles. Master tapes missing since they were stolen from Abbey Road studios about thirty years earlier and this week in two thousand ten the number one song the billboard hot rocks chart was three days grace break. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. Enough to sit through their favorite boy band with them. NHTSA dot gov slash therightseat to make sure they're correctly backseat. Brought to you by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration council if you wanna put the smart in your smart speaker. They Siri Alexa. Google the smartest station. You know, only one I can think of is ninety K ex traffic and weather together just minutes from now at the top of the hour. News Radio eleven ninety K X. Her you have my brand behind my back in an ongoing effort at fairness. Hang on. I'm still watching.

UK Elvis Aaron Presley Cindy Lauper Sandy west Bobbie gentry Abbey Road Siri Alexa Grammy Casablanca Qatar RCA Mercury Mississippi recording artists NHTSA Google Freddie eleven ninety K thirty years
"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"one thousand nine hundred eighty five" Discussed on WLAC

"This device is that in one thousand nine hundred eighty five FDR ordered the great seal stamped on the back of the one dollar Bill that great seal is the logo of the God being. Oh cyrus. It is. Yes. It takes the return of the Christ or messiah to the top of the pyramid. The capstone on the pyramid. I believe that that device which probably recovered now you Erica, by the way. Are you aware that in Egypt coming up on two thousand out as two thousand comes upon us? They're going to replace the gold capstone on the great pyramid. Did you know that I didn't know that? And I'm not quite sure what to make of it. I'm not sure what purpose that's going to serve because you know, what else is happening that you may or may not know about I am friends with the director of antiquities in Egypt doctors Zahi Hawass. I know, you know, who he is certainly Dr Hawass has said he is getting ready to close the great pyramid. Forever. Had you heard that I heard that too. So I'm beginning to put something together here. The gold capstone goes back on the pyramid. The pyramid closes forever. And the sphinx is intimately involved in all of this. So. There are many people who of course, believe that. The great pyramid itself was. Communication device or a channel for souls. If you will. Just as you were describing this object that we see right on my website. All connected. I well connected. I knew it. In fact, this.

Zahi Hawass Egypt FDR Erica director one dollar