35 Burst results for "One Thing"

Kelly Shackelford on His SCOTUS Victory Affirming Religious Freedom

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | 2 d ago

Kelly Shackelford on His SCOTUS Victory Affirming Religious Freedom

"Guys, what a perfect time to bring back to the podcast, our friend Kelly shackleford, he's the president and CEO of first liberty institute. He's a constitutional scholar. He's argued before the Supreme Court testified before the House and Senate. One numerous landmark First Amendment and religious liberty cases. He was named one of the 25 greatest Texas lawyers of the past quarter century by Texas lawyer Kelly welcome to the podcast. I mean, you should have a big smile on your face. This has been a pretty momentous week to massive victories for religious freedom. One, of course, the coach, the football coach spraying on the field and the other the case in Maine that involves sort of tuition subsidies and will I want to talk about both. But let's begin with the coach. Now that was a case that first liberty, that was your case. So talk about what the key issue was in that case and what the court what the court decided and what the other side was pushing for. Well, the case was pretty simple. Most people understand coach made a pledge to God that after every game, win or lose, he would go to the 50 yard line when people were milling around, checking their cell phones, talking to friends. He would the first thing he would do is go to a knee for 20 seconds, maybe 30 seconds tops, and just give thanks for the privilege of coaching those young men. And he did that for over 7 years until the school told them that if he did that again, they were going to fire him. And he did because he made a pledge and they fired him for going on his on his knee for about 20 seconds and saying a silent prayer. And, you know, the argument, of course, on our side was that he has free speech rights. He has free exercise of religion, right? So under the First Amendment. And they tried to argue that, well, no, some student, you know, might see him from 200 yards away and feel coerced to pray because he's

Kelly Shackleford First Liberty Institute Texas Supreme Court Senate Kelly Maine Football House
Dinesh Reviews the Latest Supreme Court Decision Taming the EPA

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:59 min | 2 d ago

Dinesh Reviews the Latest Supreme Court Decision Taming the EPA

"The EPA has been writing all these rules to fight climate change, and they're basically one thing they're trying to do is make it almost impossible for the coal industry. The function in this country. And the way they do this is they take the clean air act, which was passed by Congress, and they expanded in such a way that it enables them to pass all kinds of rules that set certain emissions and put caps on how much emissions can occur. The net effect is we are almost you may say deliberately killing a major industry in our own country and doing it in the name of climate change. So this goes to the Supreme Court and it goes to the Supreme Court on the part of plaintiffs who say basically listen. Yes, there is a clean air act. But the clean air act was passed long before this climate change hoopla. Moreover, the Congress delegates to the EPA, the authority to clean up the air. And the EPA does have the right to make rules consistent with that delegation of power. But no, the EPA can't just say, well, since we have a clean air act, we're not going to take all these new issues of climate change, the oceans are rising, the temperature is going up, the global temperature, and we will now declare ourselves. The enforcer of this climate change ideology, and the court goes, where's your authority to do that in the clean air act? I'm now going to read from the court's decision. When Congress seems slow to solve problems, it may seem natural that those in the executive branch might seek to take matters into their own hands. But the constitution does not authorize agencies to do this. It goes on to say they can not be quote substitutes for laws passed by the people's representatives. In other words, an agency of the executive branch can't just decide what Congress can pass a law. Well, that's okay. We'll sort of make the law ourselves

EPA Congress Supreme Court
Cheney to Secret Service: 'We Welcome Additional Testimony Under Oath'

The Officer Tatum Show

01:38 min | 3 d ago

Cheney to Secret Service: 'We Welcome Additional Testimony Under Oath'

"Listen to what Liz Cheney said, we're gonna roll clip 9. Listen to what Liz Cheney said in her response to Jenny or 6. Corroboration of Hutchinson's testimony. Did you seek testimony from Tony ornato or Robert engel to corroborate or to refute what she said? I don't want to get into too many details, the committee has spoken to both mister ornato and mister engel, and we welcome additional testimony under oath from both of them and from anybody else in the Secret Service who has information about any of these issues. Do you expect that that testimony will be live testimony under oath like her testimony and for the world to see? How is that going to happen? Look, we have been working with the Secret Service. We've interviewed, as I said, a number of individuals in the Secret Service. We will continue to do so. And I think it is important that their testimony be under oath. Okay, ladies and gentlemen, we've seen this party before we been to this event before. One thing I don't understand is that you're claiming that you spoke to these people, not under oath, you have no testimony from anybody, ingles, anybody else, which is the head of the Secret Service. You have no testimony written down. You have disclosed the testimony and I don't know if they're supposed to bring these people up to testify or not, but why would you bring a person on to produce hearsay when you supposedly have people that have firsthand information?

Liz Cheney Secret Service Tony Ornato Robert Engel Mister Ornato Mister Engel Hutchinson Jenny
Cassidy Hutchinson's Hearsay Testimony Is Full of Holes

The Officer Tatum Show

01:14 min | 3 d ago

Cassidy Hutchinson's Hearsay Testimony Is Full of Holes

"Who is right and who is wrong when it comes to miss Hutchinson. I'm going to talk about her a little bit more today, Cassidy hutchison, the young lady who gave testimony and many believe is a fraudulent testimony regarding Donald Trump being, I don't know Gumby. I don't know what super stretch Armstrong. Reaching through the beast, which is a limousine, it's like 22 feet long, and somehow slapping people and choking people and grabbing the steering wheel and all kind of amazing theories that came from Cassidy Hutchinson and many of them have not been proven to be fact. One thing that troubles me for a, you know, it troubles me dearly. Is that how in the world can you legitimize what you would consider to be witness testimony and the testimony is hearsay? Which means that this is a testimony from a person that does not have direct knowledge or didn't visibly see what she's talking about. How is this anything she say? Make any sense whatsoever when the girl didn't witness anything.

Cassidy Hutchison Cassidy Hutchinson Hutchinson Donald Trump Armstrong
What a Disappointment Rep. Peter Meijer Turned Out to Be

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | 3 d ago

What a Disappointment Rep. Peter Meijer Turned Out to Be

"Couple summers ago and turning point action was starting a series of super Saturdays, turning point action did a series of door knocking, campaigns across America, organized by the great Tyler Boyer and the whole turning point action team separate from the educational ventures of turning point USA. So I remember I was in Chicago and I drove to Grand Rapids, Michigan. That's not an easy drive for those of you that have done it throughout the night because the next morning we are starting our door knocking for a certain candidate in western Michigan. I got up very early and rally the troops and told everybody that in western Michigan, we need to put our forces together to go get a certain person elected by the name of Peter Meyer. Now mind you, I don't know why we endorsed Peter Meyer largely because I thought it was a flip district or something like that, a way to kind of gain ground. But what an incredible disappointment and let down. Peter Meyer in western Michigan has become. He has become a camera seeking attention grabbing self righteous congressman who voted for the impeachment of Donald Trump was like one of the first things he did right out of the gate. He sprints to try to go on cable television at every single corner imaginable. And he's someone I have very little respect for. And he's got to go and he's got to go right now. And there is a great candidate running

Peter Meyer Tyler Boyer Educational Ventures Of Turnin Michigan Grand Rapids Chicago America Donald Trump
Biden backs change to filibuster rules to codify abortion and privacy rights into law

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

Biden backs change to filibuster rules to codify abortion and privacy rights into law

"President Biden is blasting the Supreme Court's decision to end a constitutional right to abortion The president says the high court made a mistake in essentially challenging privacy rights The one thing that has been destabilizing is the outrageous behavior of the Supreme Court of the United States And says he backs changing Senate filibuster rules to let a bill extending abortion protection pass by a simple majority instead of 60 votes Still as he ended a NATO summit in Spain the president said the ruling does not affect the nation's global standing America is better positioned to

President Biden Supreme Court Senate America Nato Spain
The Show Trial for the Invented Insurrection With Will Chamberlain

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 4 d ago

The Show Trial for the Invented Insurrection With Will Chamberlain

"Well, I'm delighted to be back sitting in for Seb doing America first radio, and even more delighted to now have in the chair. One of my favorite lawyers, which is admittedly a short list. I think it's pretty much you and schlichter. But Wilt Chamberlain is here. And I would love will to get your opinion of just how brutally effective the show trial for the invented insurrection has been at throwing the trader Trump into the brink. He's going to jail, right? Well, I think there's so many different problems. We just start with yesterday what happened with Cassidy Hutchinson. I remember watching Fox News and hearing Brett, tell me, oh, this is devastating. Did you hear? This is devastating testimony, and it's like clearly you've never seen a trial because the first thing you notice is it's hearsay. She's almost very rarely is she testifying even to a conversation she herself heard most of the talk is about someone else told her that Trump said X and that's not just hearsay, it's actually what we call double hearsay. The hearsay statement of Trump being offered for whatever the truth of that it was asserted. And then there's the hearsay statement of the person gossiping, right? So you have these it's the legal standard for gossip. We got hearsay, double hearsay, gossip. BS, which is what it seems. And so, you know, it's not that all hearsay statements are inadmissible. There are actually a lot of exceptions to the hearsay rule. But this is the classic example of why we have a hearsay rule, right? You have this woman saying, well, I heard that Trump grabbed the Stuart, you know, this guy, this guy told me Trump grab the steering wheel, and then you realize, well, that's not even possible. And then within an hour of the testimony, it comes out that the Secret Service agents are perfectly willing to say under oath, no, that never happened.

Schlichter Cassidy Hutchinson Wilt Chamberlain SEB Donald Trump Fox News Brett America Stuart Secret Service
Grand Theft Auto: Capitol City?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 4 d ago

Grand Theft Auto: Capitol City?

"Here's Cassidy Hutchinson saying that Donald Trump tried to create a new saga in the Grand Theft Auto series, otherwise known as Grand Theft Auto capital city. Play cut 70. Tony described him as being irate, the president said something to the effect of, I'm the effing president, take me up to the capitol now to which Bobby responded, sir, we have to go back to the west wing. The president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel. Mister engel grabbed his arm, he said, sir, you need to take your hand off the steering wheel. We're going back to the west wing. We're not going to the capitol. Mister Trump then used his free hand to lunge towards Bobby angle and this one mister ornata had recounted the story to me. He had motioned towards his clavicles. So that's a really serious accusation, right? I mean, you have a president of the United States that assaults the Secret Service agents. I mean, that's serious. I mean, wow. And by the way, who uses the word clavicles. Assaulted me in the clavicles, the first thing you say, wait, is that like super anatomically specific, by the way? Unless you're trained to say that she was trained in coached, I think, to say that. So okay, fine. She says this, super serious accusation. And I knew it as soon as I heard, it's just like, there's no way that's true. No way. I've been in the beast. You can't do that. And by the way, it's just not something I believe Donald Trump would do otherwise.

Cassidy Hutchinson Mister Engel Mister Trump Bobby Angle Mister Ornata Donald Trump Bobby Tony Secret Service United States
Is the Jan. 6 Committee Inducing Witnesses to Lie?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:29 min | 4 d ago

Is the Jan. 6 Committee Inducing Witnesses to Lie?

"Now again, it's one thing if they're saying this now if there were feuding this now, but if they were a feud under oath, somebody's lying. And somebody needs to go to jail. And there's a broader question. I was talking to my good buddy, Steve gill. He's a great political analyst, and he's been doing this a very long time. He said, Todd, not only is somebody not telling the truth, it's very possible that some of the committee members may be suborning perjury. In other words, they are inducing somebody to lie under oath, and that somebody is Cassidy, Hutchinson. Now, you gotta work with me here. You saw her live testimony, but there was also pre recorded testimony of Cassidy Hutchinson. In other words, they had already interviewed her, so they knew exactly what she was going to say when the TV cameras came on, and this went boarded a border coast to coast across the fruited plain. So they knew this well in advance. These are no doubt these are explosive charges. I mean, if in fact this is true, you are dealing with a lunatic in The White House who was trying to hijack the presidential limousine and was literally attacking physically attacking Secret Service agents. I mean, that's insane. That's like a made for TV movie. If it happened. But I don't think it happened, but I think we all know it didn't happen.

Steve Gill Cassidy Hutchinson Todd Cassidy Hutchinson White House Secret Service
Grayson Murray on His PGA Status and Goals

Fore The People

01:32 min | 5 d ago

Grayson Murray on His PGA Status and Goals

"What are you playing and basically right now? Like, are you are you going full? Are you kind of like half and half corn fairy PGA Tour you back PGA Tour starts or like what's your goal to lead to this season? I'm exempt to the finals this year, so like the cornfield finals. So I don't need to play out there. I got, I'm gonna play in the next four in a row. I don't think PJ tour. I got John Deere, barbasol, barracuda, and then the 3M that I'm gonna get into. So basically just go out there and try to make as much points as I can, many points as I can to get in that side of that one 25. Yeah. Right now I'm like 200. I've only played. I think 6 events. So, you know, I mean, I'd have to have some good finishes, which can happen. But I'm not really stressed and like people were like, oh, you know, you're gonna, you know, this is one thing too. People don't know what the fuck they're talking about on Twitter, so they're always like, oh, you're losing your card, man, can't wait to see you back in Q school. I'm like, y'all have no clue. Hey, as a past champion on the PJ tour, I get into like 6 events, no matter what every year, like for the rest of my life, like why is so and so always in these events, well, he's born on the tour three or four times like past champions like you have at your own category. So I'm never gonna be like on the streets like you don't have a card, but I mean, I don't want to be this guy that's like trying to keep his car every year or bounce around and the corn flare of the PJ. Like, I mean, I'm a legit golfer. I want to be like a top player. So I mean, I have these goals. Like, I'm trying to get my card back and I know I'm good enough. Like, I know I can be top 15 in the world. I know I can win out there again. I'm on the right

PGA John Deere Twitter
Are We Winning or Losing? Rep. Mary Miller Weighs In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | Last week

Are We Winning or Losing? Rep. Mary Miller Weighs In

"Miller, welcome to America first. Thank you. Thank you for having me. So you were supposed to be in studio last minute, you got to be on the floor. There's some kind of vote coming up despite the fact that the January 6th committee is droning on as we speak. Let's talk about your tweet. Let's talk about the fact that this let's talk about rhinos, conservatives, and the American people. Because you got 14 senators who want to curtail Second Amendment rights, put in Second Amendment, anti red flag laws, and they have the letter R behind their name. And at the same time, you've got clowns Thomas and a 6 judge justice majority in the Supreme Court bring down this decision about New York, your reaction to all of this. Are we winning? Are we losing are the rhino still in control? Well, this is a big win for the Second Amendment for the people for our constitutional rights. Thanks to president Trump for, again, fulfilling his promises. And for putting in constitutional justices, I just can't thank president Trump enough for that. But the battle will never end. I heard someone say the other day that evil never retreats on its own. Only when it's confronted by a more powerful force. And I have to say that one thing the Democrats have gotten used to is Republicans that don't fight if they do fight it's on the defense. One of the reasons we loved president Trump is he fought on the offense for the good of America and that we're going to continue that fight and

President Trump Miller America Supreme Court Thomas New York
Herrera's 8th inning sac fly helps Cardinals beat Cubs 5-3

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Herrera's 8th inning sac fly helps Cardinals beat Cubs 5-3

"The cardinal scored two times in the 8th they need to step a three three tie and they down the cubs 5 to three at Busch stadium The teams have split the first two games of a three game series a Bon Herrera's first major league RBI comes on a sacrifice fly and gives St. Louis the lead That's one thing that I won't forget and my first RBI is help the team win and I think I can forget Britain Darwin contributes two runs batted in for the red birds Chicago center Fielder Raphael Ortega's two run home run had tied the game in the top of the 8th Ryan helsley pitches one and two third innings of shutout relief to pick up the win I'm Mike Reeves

Bon Herrera Busch Stadium Britain Darwin Cubs Red Birds Chicago Center Raphael Ortega St. Louis Ryan Helsley Mike Reeves
The FDA Has Lost the Trust of the American People

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:07 min | Last week

The FDA Has Lost the Trust of the American People

"So it comes my turn to talk about it and I know that FDA and jewel are on the agenda cut number 24 Jacob, please. I don't hear anything from the administration about fentanyl. And those numbers are through the roof. It's a tomb and the fentanyl that all of us agree is the number one part of the border crisis is what we have to be focused on to kill the 107,000 American last year. It is a wide open border. I know you wanted to talk about the FDA and Joel. And I have to say, why are we focusing part of the federal government? The FDA on regulating jewel when we can't regulate the border. Why do we assume the federal government can do anything when it can't do the first thing, which is to control the border. As Molly said, the cartels control the border, not that. And administration, so why would we trust the FDA, which had a very bad year anyway in the course of COVID? They blew the Johnson & Johnson pause. They blew in fact, they blew a lot of the Abbott laboratory process. They do not have a great reputation right now and they're shutting down jewel. I'm not a fan of Joel. Why in the world would we trust them when the government can't do anything on its number one job?

FDA Federal Government Jacob Joel Molly Johnson & Johnson
Doug Takes a Deep Dive Into Gun Legislation

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:17 min | Last week

Doug Takes a Deep Dive Into Gun Legislation

"Today, I want to, this is a timely issue, and I wanted to go ahead and discuss this because it's just something disturbing issues that are coming out. And it's going to happen very fast. This is what happens in Washington, D.C.. When circumstances in the world meet the emotional response of people and the fact that they need to do something. We talk about this a week or two ago on the podcast. When I talk about what makes you feel good doesn't always heal you. And it's talking about an honest discussion about guns. We're going to have another honest discussion this morning about the fact that what happened and you vote text is what happened at that school. Is a tragedy? What happened at school should have never happened in many ways when you had someone who decided to go into a school to use a gun and to kill people. I mean, that is was the choice that this Ramos made. He made the choice to go in there. He made the choice to kill people. He used a gun in the process. We've talked about how the many aspects of what is being proposed will not solve this, but again, as I said just a little bit ago in one of the other podcasts, was it always seems to be the very first thing that we do is to solve something is take something away from legal gun owners or legal possession to fix something that, frankly, is not going to fix.

Washington, D.C. Ramos
Circuit Courts Had Ignored Previous SCOTUS Decision on Gun Rights

Mark Levin

01:53 min | Last week

Circuit Courts Had Ignored Previous SCOTUS Decision on Gun Rights

"What happened ladies and gentlemen is that the circuit court basically ignored the Supreme Court's decision several years ago written by justice Scalia in the Heller case And these circuit courts started to create their own tests a two tiered test A two tier test And what Thomas says in the majority says here there's no two tiers That's one tier too many This one test The constitution basically And as a leader notes the holding decides nothing about who may lawfully possess a firearm It requirements that must be met to buy a gun nor does it decide anything about the kinds of weapons that people may possess In other words that's an issue for another day But once people are applicants for a weapon and they are proved to receive a weapon then there's no reason they can't take it outside their house To protect themselves as much as they protect themselves inside a house And you can not simply leave it to bureaucrats to make decisions on a one off basis If they say as I said from the opinion felons can have it and so forth That's one thing But to say you have not demonstrated to me why you need this You're not required to demonstrate why you need that or why you need free speech or why you need the freedom to exercise your faith or any of those things That's the point That's a secondary level of examination that the state has no power To conduct

Justice Scalia Supreme Court Thomas
Jack Posobiec Discusses the Inexcusable Inaction of the Uvalde Police

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | Last week

Jack Posobiec Discusses the Inexcusable Inaction of the Uvalde Police

"On the cutting edge of what's happening and you've all day. I think this is important for two reasons. Number one, we should always care about the truth, always. But number two, I think that it's important when it comes to our gun control debate right now. Because if we look at Yuval day as the facts actually show us, this has very little to do about gun purchasing or red flag laws, and a lot more about a police failure to intervene. What are your thoughts? Well, one of the big things that people need to understand about you validity, and it's actually something that even in the initial reporting. And this is something where I do have to ask for forgiveness on because when this all happened, I was over in Davos, Switzerland, I'm going up and down the Alps, where getting detained, we went to Ukraine. I come back. And that's what I really was able to start sinking my teeth into the details here. Then yesterday, the Texas Department of Public Safety comes out. That's the head of the Texas police and they start releasing these documents based on the timeline based on some of the 9-1-1 calls, the dispatcher calls with the local chief. And so now we've been able to dig through those documents to dig through this hearing. And one thing that I think everybody needs to understand is that this guy Pete arradondo, one of the names you need to memorize in this is Pete arradondo. Originally, the way it was being reported, I think a lot of people had the misunderstanding that he was the chief of police for all of you validated. It's not true. He's actually the chief of police for the validity ci DS, the consolidated independent or CIA SD school district. So he's the chief of police just for that school. That is his sole duty, his sole responsibility, and it's a 6 man force that is directly assigned for the security of that school. They're brought on by the school board, and then that's, of course, working in conjunction with the city council. But this really is a situation where he had one charge and that was the defense of this school. And so when

Pete Arradondo Davos Texas Department Of Public Saf Switzerland Ukraine Texas CIA City Council
Rand Paul: The Problem With Rushing Gun Reform Legislation

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | Last week

Rand Paul: The Problem With Rushing Gun Reform Legislation

"Question we got it last night at 6 30 and voted at 7 30 We were given one hour to read it It is and does have direct impact on the constitution on the Second Amendment And so it was not nearly enough time to examine it But there is one thing on the face of it that I do support and that is allowing the criminal records of 16 to 18 year olds to be seen If you've committed murder you committed rape assault if you've committed animal cruelty frankly when you're 15 or 16 years old making that part of the background checks I'm fine with The problem is this is a lot of money that's going to support states with red flag laws What I would do is add amendments to this bill and I'm offering about 5 amendments that will go in They won't let me offer them but I'll try to put them in the next day or two One says that a state to a red flag law can't do what's called ex parte that means that a judge can't take away your rights without you appearing and without you getting an attorney So it can't be a judge's ruling without sometimes these rulings are done These orders to take guns away are done without you even being notified even that there's been an accusation made The accusations also should not be anonymous Several of the states that have passed red flag laws say that you can make an anonymous accusation I know of no system of justice where that would be just And so I've introduced amendments to say you would get defense counsel You would get a hearing that it can't be anonymous And that the standard for judging whether or not you lose gun rights should not be something that's reasonable but should be the constitutional standard of beyond a reasonable doubt And I've actually told them I would consider even looking at the bill if you were to pass these amendments protecting the rights of gun owners in your red flag laws but so far we're hearing is that no amendments will be allowed and there will be no votes on amendments which is a sure way to get conservatives very very suspicious of the process

Rand Paul: We Have to Drill Down on Rising Costs

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | Last week

Rand Paul: We Have to Drill Down on Rising Costs

"Of course center I you probably see in this right now Joe Biden who is seems to be lost in The White House calling for a gas tax pause I have a theory on this I'd love to get your take I think the Republicans should double down I think they should turn around and say you know what Now that you're a big tax cutter Joe We agree It's a great idea Let's pause it for 6 months Let's double it and while you're at it let's throw an amendment in there to make the Trump tax cuts permanent Your thoughts on that We shouldn't run from this We should embrace it Well absolutely on making the tax cuts permanent but I don't think we have any Democrat votes for that And it will point out their hypocrisy But really I think we need to keep drilling down on the cause of the gas prices going up in the first place There's generalized inflation and that's from the massive $6 trillion borrowed in the last two years when the fed buys the debt that create all this new money when it enters circulation to all the different $1400 checks They passed out to everyone It increases the demand and the prices rise So that's responsible for the prices across the board going up in gas there are some specific reasons Well you have an administration who says they want to end the era of gasoline powered cars So that scares people to death and scares the marketplace to data You have an administration that doesn't want to let people drill for a while So when you have restrictions on the supply basically the price goes up And there's also the war So I think speculation in the war has added to the problems But it's one thing after another and they act as if they don't understand what causes inflation but basically deficits and the financing of deficits by the Federal Reserve is what causes inflation and the way you fix inflation is you got to quit adding to the debt

Joe Biden White House JOE Federal Reserve
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Thousands of highly paid sales reps. The could no longer go into the market sell off. Yeah yeah. I'll do you go to the market when you cannot go to the market. And that's when we got involved. We help them design a plan for how to do that. And this was initiative coming directly from the ceo. And they got clarity. This is the the activity that we're going to track that we will be. There would be success for us. Basilio of the company said globally. We want x. amount of activity in this category. We worked with this one tiny little division out of the entire globe This one division delivered a hundred and thirty three percent of the global number one tiny division when all the other divisions globally didn't even add up to a fraction. Why because we help them take a big goal and break it down into simple activities that they do every single week. Suddenly they woke up every rap in this division at two priorities for the week after make x. number of calls and after do why number of presentations and that's all. They focused on hammered at hammerton amer it and the results were truly extraordinary. I when i get off this now doing a presentation for the the heads of all business units globally to make this their go to market strategy around the world. I feel your passion here. What makes you so passionate about what you're doing. And in the one thing it changed my last how how james outta personally. Yeah i mean. One of the first things jay said to me is the fastest way you can get out of business with us as baton. Outliving the book. You don't have to be perfect but you gotta be following a path of mastery and philip. I was that guy that work long hours and told myself. I was doing it for my family but every day. I said no to the people that matter most sure has. I wasn't clear what to say yes to during the day i was that guy that went from email to meetings to email to. Yes if you asked me. If i had a minute but if you ask me what's my number one party for the week i would have looked at you at like during the headlights. If you utah based on your annual goals where do you have to be by the end of the month and based on that. What is your calendar. Have to look like this week. I'd look at you.

Basilio hammerton amer james outta baton jay philip utah
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

02:22 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Go build that while. Kevin nineteen is having an unprecedented impact on the economy companies. Like gusto are still building tools to support your business and your people through the ups and the downs gusto makes payroll taxes and hr actually easy for small businesses fast simple payroll processing benefits and expert. Hr sport all in one place gusto automatically pays and files your federal state and local taxes. So you don't have to worry about that. Plus it's easy to add on health benefits and even 401k's fear team many of the old school payment providers just weren't built for the way that modern small businesses work gusto as soon as we go into the new year asked the question. Should we let somebody else where some of those hats that..

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Media out or meeting. Yeah they get out of their first meeting have five minutes so they check email and then somebody calls them and asked. Hey you got him in it. And because their team player and a good person they say and the entire day flies by they look up at the end of the day thinking. I was busy and i got every i got was done by the way. I'm i'm dying. I was one of the first generation of kids diagnosed with. Add in one thousand nine hundred s k. And i've always looked at my eighty s superpower in entrepreneurship and whatever come to realize in the last six months is how much of a hindrance it is because i always thought i could handle seventy two things on my plate at once. So what i've tried to do and what i'm working towards the next. The rest of this year is getting it very much simplified down to one or two things and i was just reading the book this morning as i prepare for a talk. I'm doing later when you wanna look at achieving extraordinary results professionally. We're not talking ordinary and we're not talking. We're talking extraordinary. It requires that you get clarity on what matters most and give it its disproportionate share.

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"You fast forward. He and his co author j pap an wrote the one thing which today is one of the highest rate of business books of all time and when it took off a problem was created because they knew it needed to become a company. Gary's one things running keller williams jay's one thing was writing books with gerry and started hunting for somebody who's one thing was the one thing and that became my opportunity so all the models that he used to create this behemoth of a company were handed straight to me on a silver platter. Which i've now taken to the rest of the world whether you're a small business owner all the way up to the fortune five hundred so that she get clear on the things that matter most new accomplish things about our most. What is it. Like to spend a day with. Gary keller And just pick his brain. Not what you'd expect interesting you feel. It's easy to put them on a pedestal. In your mind and in the moment he walks in the room. He's wearing a black t. Shirt he's wearing grey or black jeans. He's wearing like chuck. Sneakers were allburn whereas all now and as down and you guys you just start talking and the moment you start talking. Forget who is. Because he's just another dude. The wants to talk about sports and music. And now you'll eventually get to talking about business right the things that he has an one of his greatest gifts is he expands your mind. It helps you. Think bigger and he doesn't such a simple way. He can say remarkably big statements in such a simple way. Now give you a perfect example. One of my first interactions with them. I had to cast vision for the business and my first ninety days to actually earn my job. Otherwise i was fire if i could not cast a vision for the business. I did not earn the right to run this company..

j pap Gary keller keller williams gerry jay Gary chuck
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"So that they start owning one hundred percent of their job and not getting their leader. Back pieces of it. Well you know why this is so relevant. Because you you've made listen to a few of our podcast 'cause you text may about them but Is that. it's almost the same thing. I preach on the marketing front with a lot of business owners. That they all come to me and they've all run a ton of tactics dave You know they basically can't find sick. They find Incremental success or they find success birt's Work yesterday doesn't work today. They can't wrap their arms around it all the time it it just. It goes so much inconsistency and what we try to do through the marking system we have. Is we try to put a systematic approach in place that every step of the way it's measured in the risk is eliminated and we get to a certain outcome. Sounds like this is exactly the same thing exactly the same entrepreneurs and business owners the changes instead of looking at marketing focus. It's prioritization Your people are saying yes to something during the day but our say are they saying yes to the most important thing are they doing the twenty percent activities that are going to drive eighty percent of the results. And how do you create a simple way for a leader in a direct report to have really clear conversations that bring accountability and coach them to higher levels of performance. Most people don't know how to do this by. I had a gift. It was handed to me. One of my partners gary keller. He started everybody. Gary keller is if they don't have to tell everybody. 'cause i can guarantee you ninety five percent of the people don't know but gary keller is a bad ass and suri else. Gary keller is the co founder. Of keller williams. It's the largest real estate company in the world when you look at all the residential real estate companies that you could buy a house from k. w. is by far the largest and he became a self made billionaire as a result and the reason that i was handed a gift as he realized the franchise company elite the voluntary army..

Gary keller birt dave suri keller williams army
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

04:28 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Welcome bridget thanks for me. Yes so tell me this. You work with fortune. Five hundred companies and i know what you have a good idea of what you do with dumb. Because you and i've gone to exercise with my business. Tell tell me a little bit about how you work with With companies what you provide them the services that you provide them and the expertise and then how they go from one result to another sure and and you know what are we while we do service fortune five hundred. I was actually thinking about this over the weekend. Our sweet spot is more small business owner. That person who's between ten and two hundred mil is is really the sweet spot in the biggest reason for that is fortune five hundred. I mean your your steering the titanic. Burs when you're talking a company of that tended two hundred million you're talking to the ceo and they can drive it and it and it just happens fast less bureaucracy for sure. Yeah and the thing that we really focus on his time. It's our most valuable resource and every person inside. Your company has a problem. The problem is they're spending their time. They're not investing. we all know. Time is more valuable than money. And every single one of us. Who's listening to this has invested our dollars before and when we made a financial investment. What did we expect. Philip expected to next return every business. Turn right get how many of us go through our days holding our time to the same standard. We hold our dollars to go. We don't and we simply change that in the way we do that as we help whether it's an individual team or an entire organization get clarity on what the most important things are and we teach them how to make sure that their calendar reflects their priorities and not everybody else's so they invest their time innate chief extraordinary results both personally and professionally. So i love. I think it'd be really important. Tell me give me a couple examples. You don't have to use. The name of the company can use it up to you sure. I'd love to know how a company walked into the door Needing help and this is a metaphor for people listening. I hear new marketing to sure. So i'll use a. How did they go all. Use a financial.

bridget Philip
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Every single one of us knows what it feels like to have too much to do and not enough time. It's so common these days yet when you look at your team across the entire organization because people are spending their time instead of investing it the waste. It's crazy the thing that i personally have discovered living this for almost six years now is that there is a different approach. There is a way that you can invest your time. You can wake up and see it as your most valuable resource invested holding accountable to delivering a return and get far more done in way fewer hours with way less stress and crush it professionally and personally. That's why we're sharing this episode with you today. I was interviewed on a friend of mine phillips dots. Podcast called the undefeated marketing podcast and at the end of the interview. I looked at my said man. I really feel like we have to share this on the one thing we do that. He said absolutely and the reason we're sharing this with you is because it's examples of how other organizations other teams just like yours have used the principles and models of the one thing to go from being busy to being productive so that they're clear on the things that matter most they accomplish the most important things in their professional and.

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"This episode is brought to you by athletic. Greens the most comprehensive daily nutritional beverage. I have.

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

05:26 min | 10 months ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"The black guy born race in black community black church flex schools colleges like everything comes to work for the first time in georgia institution. The first time he or she has really had to deal with diversity. Is that if you really think about it. I mean because our own time we we spend our time with people have shared experiences so there difference in their similar so fast forward i come to work and now got interact with people who are different and people who have thought had you thought away people have said hispanic people this you make all these assumptions because you never interacted with the media assure you watch. Tv show. He walked estimated at a store medina. Really don't come to work now. I've got mix i can work with. You have lunch laughter standing music. Fm stay off. This happens at work so you think about tune ity for deion is to make us little 'society better appreciate an embrace our differences. All it happens at were. It's huge what it does. Is it also distills a big challenge and simplifies the solution by honing in on where that happens most and if we start to focus on how to make our workplace a more inclusive space where people can achieve great things together and then they learn how to solve problems together and that impacts and wow. It's pretty humbling. The amount of influence that we have. I can't tell you. This is the thing that the biggest hot. I grew up as his ed southern southern religious of christian background and examples of why this reset focus. So we've got to use this gift of People cringe gifted Johnny before i let you go. What's the one thing for people who are listening right now that are in this up people and their leaders of organizations and they know they're facing a reset. What's the one thing they can do to start. Would be to an very kind of hannibal but this. You've got to get comfortable which change just your entire mindset is the days of stability are gone for and so you had better used at change muscle because Everything you know when people say well. This is what it was yesterday. Now you tell me it's different. Yep sure am bednets I can't this longer. The rules are in a handbook that you can go pull innate rules. Five years ago ten years ago and they're going to be rules tomorrow is just those days are gone. And that's probably this this idea that you've gotta be able to embrace change in our relationship would change back to my point out. People don't problem changes just like how you want to be forced upon them. It's going to be forced forever. Net requires a real insys. Shit that is. It's that's the one thing. I love that because you're right. It's the one thing that we can get comfortable being uncomfortable. It makes everything else possible there. You have it folks. Our conversation. With johnny see taylor what stands out to me is that every company has a culture but not all of them are built with intention. The cultures we developed within our organizations have the power to influence the world and if we want world that prioritizes and serves people. We have to build our cultures with care. I'm proud to say that. The one thing is a great example of this when we work with organizations to implement the principles of the one thing into their cultures it does more than increased revenue and bottom line results. It teaches individuals how to think differently about their time in all areas of their life. Criminal and professional. When you help your team prioritize their personal life the whole company wins. If you're interested to learn more about how our team can help yours me. More productive request a consultation by visiting the one thing dot com slash teams. That's the one thing with the number one in the url slash teams and if this episode has brought value who someone you know or care about that would benefit from listening to it. Would you share it with them. And if you're that percent welcome to the one thing podcast click the subscribe button so that all future episodes will be automatically downloaded to your rice. And for all of you. Please consider leaving us a rating and review. We read those and they bring us not just joy because i really do enjoy reading them ensuring how the principles of the one thing and our show or making an impact in your life but also it helps us understand what's resonating and how we can serve you more. Thanks so much for one thing podcast. We look forward to being with you in the next episode.

deion medina georgia hannibal Johnny johnny taylor
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"I would hang out over there occasionally because we have a great group of scholars thinking about behavior. Change in health. And i saw this graph. I know it's so nerdy to say that a graph changed my life but a graph changed my life and it was in this presentation. A graph of the percentage of premature deaths caused by different sources. And what was amazing and totally blew. My mind is that the largest wedge in this high chart of premature deaths in their causes was not environmental toxins or or accidents or genetic factors but actually behaviors that we could change forty percent of premature deaths in the united states due to decisions. We make about things like what we eat whether or not we exercise whether we drink and smoke and are safe. When we get into vehicles they accumulate in a way that i truly had never appreciated and seeing that graphing we realized that the work i was already doing some casually on behavior change if i really was laser focused on this topic for the rest of my career could have a much bigger impact on a much more important than about comes tonight. Appreciate it and. I don't really study this in the context of health at a major area. Also look at it when it comes to people's decisions as well as their educational outcomes and productivity at work. I've never seen a similar graph showing how those small decisions add up. But it's really easy to make the leap once you see how much these small decisions accumulate in the domain of health that they must accumulate elsewhere too so that really motivated me to focus on this and made me also appreciate that. There was a big opportunity. When i felt ready to write a book to help improve a lot of lives. I love that. So i mean at the at the end of the day. You're like your goal might be the ultimate measure of your success with this book is like it could be in lives saved sunday right. That would be amazing. And i would also love it if we could find some way to quantify that and see whether or not books like this actually can help improve outcomes angela. Duckworth and i've been talking a lot about that recently Whether or not there is some rigorous way we should run a study to evaluate whether giving people access to different kinds of books along these lines that the science and principles on on how to improve people's life could actually change outcomes for them. There's a few. I can't remember the name. There's a podcast out there. Where each week. They try to live a different kind of relativity or success book so not research but anecdotal wasn't the happiness project. I'm trying to think of the author's name and she do that as well. She tried on different pursuits edge type so like bringing a little rigor to something. That people are already curious about That would be really cool..

united states Duckworth angela
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"You can tailor fit. A solution here needs so that no goal is too big and no barrier immovable with that. Let's get into this conversation with award winning behavioral scientist and author of the new book how to change the science of getting from where you are to where you want to be. Here's jay pakistan and katie milton. I'm super excited to get to chat with katie milkman. Author of how to change. I reached out. I saw this book come out. I can't remember if i heard you on a podcast first or not. Oh i remember Angela duckworth wrote about this book in her newsletter. That i read. I went and got the book then. I reached out to her and said. Would you make an introduction. And that's how we got to meet yes. I remember that it was so wonderful. Get a chance to connect. I really appreciate you reaching out and congrats and all your success. This book has really done well. you're a first time author and your book has come out in the world. You've been in the top fifty business books. I think for the whole first month that you came out. Which is. it's a very tough market out there. Congratulations thank you. I'm really pleased with how it's been received. Feel extremely lucky ungrateful. How many podcast in shows. You think you've been on 'cause like it seems like i just turned on randomly. I think it was freakonomics radio or maybe it was like the ted talk. Our and i'm like i recognize that voice. That's a wife. And then finally. I realized that it was you talking. You really meant there have been a lot of podcasts. I think you know it's interesting releasing a book in this era that you know you can't go out and do the signings that you would normally do. And instead the big substitute is so many podcasts. And i've really enjoyed it honestly so many great conversations. It's been a tremendous amount of funds. I feel lucky in some strange ways that i had that opportunity because it's been unique. Let's go back in time. I mean you're primarily a researcher right so tell introduce everybody i could read your bio but You are a researcher europe professor. So you're a teacher. You're acting big questions. You're also trying to help your students answer them. How how did this book how to change. Come to life. Where where does this come from. Thank you for asking me that question. I'm a professor at the wharton school of university of pennsylvania and a researcher. I study the science of behavior. Change both looking at how organizations can encourage their employees to make positive change in their lives and also how individuals make positive change. And i really been studying this now for the better part of two decades and felt like i had enough accumulated knowledge that it was time to share in. Put it out there and make everything. I knew available to a broader audience and the audience of academics. I've used to writing for and in terms of the origins of the work. I should really say that the big aha moment came for me and my career that led me to this book about a decade ago and it was when i was sitting at a seminar the medical school university of pennsylvania..

jay pakistan katie milton katie milkman Angela duckworth wharton school of university o europe medical school university of p
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Crazy right all right cool so let's five to ten thousand feet in the way you do that. You simply gave us three steps step. One started collection step to spot the differences and then step three temple ties the examples that you can apply them to your life exactly right and i will say about spot. The difference is there's a lot more in the book that we've covered here. There are other techniques you can use to identify the big features identify what stands out and just to give you a taste for some of these in the book. I reverse engineer. Ken robinson's tedtalk. Ken robinson as the most popular tedtalk of all time. And what you find when you reverse engineer. It is that over the course of twenty minutes. He shares a grand total of one. Fact it's got the most popular all times gone viral. And he's got one fact. If i was writing ted talk from scratch. I would assume that. I need to throw in some really crazy persuasive. Facts to get people engaged but in fact what you find you. Reverse engineer his talk he's got grand total of one. What does he do. A lot of. He has a ton of storytelling. He's got a lot of anecdotes and you get that inside not by watching or not by listening by reading the transcript i reverse engineering and looking for the features and the talk against spotting the difference comparing his talk against talks that haven't gone viral. You see where he over representing on anecdotes and under representing on facts. That's what this allows you to do. Is find the key differences identify patterns and utilize that those insights to create something new. I love that. I love that. All right where can people learn more about you. Best place to go to find out more about this book is decoding great. Spoke dot com. The reason i share that website is because you'll get a free course and how to apply the strategies when you get the book anywhere. Just share a receipt. You'll get free course. You can find out more about me. At ron friedman. Phd dot com and up. My company's website ignite eighty. That's eight zero dot com and the reason it's called ignite. Eighty is because over eighty percent of employees or not fully engaged at work. The mission of ignite eighty is to teach leaders science-based strategies for elevating people's performance happiness and health at work a love that while thanks so much for investment time with us my pleasure. Thanks for having me. They have at our conversation with ron friedman. I really enjoyed this conversation. Just because one the the alignment with the one thing and to simplicity of it we all know it feels like to have big goals for ourselves to feel like were meant for more and to not be satisfied with where we are at and it can get frustrating. When you work hard to bridge that gap from where you are and where you think you should be it. It doesn't have to be and part of that is getting out of doing it on your natural abilities. Stop doing it based on how you would naturally approach and start relying on those that have gone before you. Examples of other people are other organizations that have achieved something extraordinary. Reverse engineering how they did it so that you can spot the difference. See what is it that they did differently. What's that difference. That made the difference. And how can i put that into a simple plan that i can then execute in my life or inside our organization based on everything you heard in this conversation. What's the one thing you can do especially by doing it. Everything else would be easier or a necessary. We'd be the type of person who actually pauses the episode and searches for that answer. Because if you do you guarantee that this was actually an investment of your time and not an expense if this episode has brought value to you please think of somebody that you know that needs to hurt shirt with them. It could make all the difference for them. If you knew the show press the subscribe button so all future episodes are automatically downloaded your podcast player of choice. If you would consider leaving us a rating and review it means the world to us. We read everyone that genuinely helps us reach more people and live our purpose. Which is to help. You better invest your time so you can achieve extraordinary results eyebrows. Jeffords we look forward to being with you in the next episode..

Ken robinson ron friedman ted Jeffords
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Be played together. Those that's a very extensive metric. I would actually urge you to narrow it down to three to five items that are easier because otherwise it feels like work is how many i want to narrow it down to okay. I don't know one there. you go. How on the point as the point is when you start this when you start identifying your metrics you do not want a hundred dollars. You wanna have a small doable number so that it feels easy and rewarding and critically. It's not enough just to have metrics you want to evolve those metrics every quarter not going to be the same metrics if there are the same metrics probably not growing as the problem Some other tips. I can offer you about. Metrics is that you also want to have some negative items. So what's the what's the what's the thing that if you're too good at at a certain metric there could be repercussions so did i neglect my work by spending too much with my kids an item for some people that's a way of procrastinating in escaping is is is going too far on that item. It's going to be different for every person but the key is to track the metrics because the more attention you give these metrics the better you'll get in fact. There's a study in the book i talk about. That shows Study at kaiser permanente where they had people come in and follow a diet and what they found was the group that was keeping a food diary on top of the diet lost more weight with the same diet as the group. That didn't have a food. Diary in is because just tracking their food. Consumption made them more mindful of having of the choices they made because they knew they have to report at the end of the day. No missiles like if you if you keep a. I don't know if you do this with your community. I know i do this with my group. Is that will do time tracking and invariably just the exercise of doing the time tracking makes you four forces you to use your time more responsibly. Because if you're not tracking your time you can go and spend a half hour on tick-tock after lunch but if you have to report that on a time she to yourself. You're embarrassed to do that. And you make better decisions. I'm literally sitting here with a cupcake below my desk as you're talking about return them like oh. I so would not eat that. If i had to write that down exactly exactly. That's the point so true become still needed by the way to talk about visualization yellows. Do okay so there is a very interesting study in In the book about visualization. And why it actually makes you worse. If you're not doing correctly. So what are we here. The internet nonstop visualize success visualized success. Right what happens when you visualize success. Is you actually less likely to be successful. So i'll give you a study that backs us up. This is a study done out of ucla where they had introductory psychology students about to take midterm rupe. One divided them into three groups group. One was told to visualize themselves getting a great score group to was s to visualize themselves studying for the test and group three was asked to just track the number of hours that they spent studying and what they found was compared to the other two groups. The group that visualize getting a high score did worse than the other two groups. Why because when you visualize success you are temporarily stated you feel the the emotions the positive emotions and satisfaction that comes from succeeding. You don't do the work in contrast visualizing yourself doing the work makes you more likely to follow through and and it's part of it is because you're now frontloading decisions. You're not thinking about. Oh what do i. What am i going to need to study. What do i need to go because you visualize yourself doing the work. You've frontloaded the decisions you're more like execute and you're more likely to be present. Which is why. I love your example. So you are visualizing yourself before you leave the office being present with your family your front wondering what you'll need to do the decisions. We need to make hydrophone maybe as those types of things that make you better equipped to follow through so that you can actually be with your family when you get home. There's another tie here that i'm realizing what the one thing when people do a four one one when people in companies adopt this model where it's no longer just. Here's your annual goals. But they've got a break those down into monthly goals which they bring down into weekly activities that weekly goals not weekly results weekly activities. Sometimes they struggle at the beginning because turning a result into the activity they will do to drive the result. They're not always clear how to bridge. The gap in their mind is not wired that way yet a once. They are in their clear. It's not just going to accomplish this thing this week. It's either the tactical things i will do. They will lead to me accomplishing that to the point that i can open up my calendar and showtime blocks where. I'm going to do those things now. They're having a relationship with their goals. Now they're becoming the person they need to become to achieve what they want to achieve. And i love that. Because what you're doing there is. You're forcing them to make the connection between the outcome and the behaviors which is what really were doing. When we're quantifying our our metrics refined our metrics were forced to think about. I didn't ask you. How would you feel if you felt more present. I'm sure that'd be great. I don't care. But i care about is. What are the behaviors that define presents for you. because then i can measure and i can quantify anything. I'm a researcher. So i believe we can quantify anything as long as we had specific enough with our questions. I love that. I love that. You've got an interesting story in the book about tender and how that relates to decoding greatness. Walk us through that. So how tender gets good at figuring out who you're going to find attractive. Is it asks you to rate a few people at the beginning. You have to swipe right if you like them swipe bluffing. You don't like them and then with tinder does is. It takes the examples of the people you have found attractive and it looks commonalities and will make it. Makes hinders so powerful is it's avail is able to through its algorithm identify. Commonalities that you consciously may not even be aware of so you may be swiping right or left depending on what you consider attractiveness but what tender could then identify is perhaps all the people you've selected our particular height or have a particular personality characteristics or have something in their profile like spicy food that you had no idea that was the thing you found attractive and with that teaches us is that how algorithms get good at identifying patterns is having examples without the example of the people that you found attractive tenders algorithm is fairly useless. Same's true for all of us. We need those examples of greatness so that we can work backward to figure out what makes them unique and obviously identify. Some of those patterns temple ties them. Execute against them involve them it. All starts with the collection and that tender story illustrates that so powerful same is true for spotify by the way spotify had scrape refused. Spotify spotify. i do every morning when i jump rope. Do you use discovery. Weekly no pam about the blow. Your mind seduce. You gotta look up discovery weekly. Every monday spotify will select for you. This is just for you. A selection of songs that is based on the songs you have listened to and light in the past it's using an algorithm to identify the features of songs that you may not even be aware of make those songs interesting to you and if you go through that for a few weeks beginning of may not be perfect. Go through a few weeks and you like the songs within discovery weekly. You're training your algorithm to select songs for you. I can tell you every monday. I get a good ten solid songs that are in my collection that i never would have found in a million years had not been for that. Algorithm is a discover weekly or discovery weekly must be discover weekly then so i just searched discover. Weekly your weekly mixed tape of fresh. Okay i'm gonna there you go. That's my day on fridays. There's new release radar if you look that up. Those are artists who whose songs you've liked in the past anything. They've put out that week. That shows up on new release radar. It's good it's good for. That's how i built my jump rope. Mix overtime is listening to certain artists and having them recommend other ones in the ones. I really like throw into the playlist and then i just go.

rupe kaiser permanente ucla pam
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Corn sausage baked penny or chicken. Pesto bowl the thing that i love is that they have options to fit any lifestyle or dietary needs. And for you as a listener of this podcast you can try freshly for just six dollars and sixteen cents a meal. The meals always are delivered. Fresh never frozen and they're ready to heat and enjoy in just three minutes right now freshly is offering you as a listener. Forty dollars off your first two orders when you go to freshly dot com slash one. Stop stressing about dinner. Go to freshly dot com slash o. N. e. for forty dollars off your first two orders that's freshly dot com slash one for forty dollars off your first two orders. You talked about a lot of people. Don't do this because they lack a simple process to follow. What is your process. When you're going to reverse engineer something okay. So the first step and this is something that anybody can incorporate into their daily life if you already do this. Congratulations most people. Don't this is something that anybody can do in any field and that is to start a collection and we think about collections we think about physical objects. We think about wide and artwork and books. That definition is far too narrow. What i'm referring to here is collecting examples in your field that stand out and so marketers collect websites. Designers collect logos. Copywriters collect headlines. I can tell you as a writer. I collect powerful stories. I collect good studies. I collect words. That are moving. That i feel it could be impactful later on it. Having that collection allows you to do two things one is. It allows you to visit that collection the next time you need to create something new for inspiration and two is it allows you to compare what's in your collection against what didn't make your collection so it's kind of like playing spot. The difference remember that game. We played his as gets where you'd have to images side by side. You'd look for the discrepancies. Which are looking to do here. By the items in your collection against those that did make it pairing the ordinary against the extraordinary. And in doing that. You can't help but figure out. What are the ingredients that make this unique and it's all about having that mindset of asking yourself what's different here what can i learn from this. How is this create it. How do i apply this to my feeble. And that's what that priceline guy was doing and it sounds like it's what you do is well jeff when you're benchmarking it's all about that mindset but it's not just like don't want to say like mindset from like an attitude change like no there are concrete things you can do. You can create a google doc right now examples that stand out for you. Maybe you're speaker find some presentation dex. Maybe you're a marketer. You write proposals all the time. Collect some proposals that have one create a best of a directory for your company's people can visit those when they want inspiration and then the final step that i wanna share is you can take those examples and you can temple ties them. You could create templates. Ask yourself what are the what are the. What are the ingredients that went into creating this and turn them into questions for yourself. Remember i mentioned before. What's the startling fact. what's the what. What is the question. I wanna raise. What is the literature reviews. That's what started me down this path in academic journal articles. But it's also again. I learned to drive all everything else. I right and this is how in the book and decoding greatness. Reverse engineer classic. Ted talks i reverse engineer world class websites. Show i show you how to do this. By even e- applying additional methodologies that we can get into which involve reverse outlining and quantifying features. There are so many techniques that you can use to apply to any field that it's just remarkable is really going to open your eyes about how hidden patterns are staring in the face. You just need to know where to look. I love the helluva to recap. You really touched on three high level. Twenty percent ideas. I started collection. This by the way was huge for me because i was sitting down to for my time blocks to benchmark something and found myself going. What should i be benchmarking. So we needed to start a collection which i didn't realize that's what we were doing. That's what we did. Second spotting the difference. What are the things that separate the good from the great and third when you spot those trends you actually can temple ties the examples now critically. It's not just about copying somebody else's formula one of things. I talk about in dakota greatness. Is that if you just copy somebody else's formula chances are you will not be successful for two reasons. One is that it's not always simple to replicate someone else's execution for example were to try to copy glide while style and writing. I probably will fail it. Many authors have gone down this path and have not been successful at this because he is so unique in his ability to find moving stories but also to us just incredibly powerful language to bring those stories to life the other element that prevents us firm. Just copy somebody else's formulated being successful. Is that audience expectations shift with time. So what what what accessible for someone else. At one point chances are will not necessarily be successful for you so in the case of glide well he was innovative in the early two thousands if you read a glide williams style today it's gonna feel derivative now. Give the example in the book of the of of the book twilight when twilight. I came out using credibly novel but then there was a flood of young adult books about teenagers. love with vampires and all of them failed spectacularly and it wasn't because they were all terrible books it was because that formula was done people were familiar with. It wasn't surprising anymore. But what was successful is when someone took that formula and evolved a little bit so teenagers in love with vampires. Didn't succeed you know what. Succeeded abraham lincoln vampire fighter all of a sudden that blew up. and so. it's all about finding a pattern. Networks and then evolving it just slightly to make it your own yeah. This was one of the hardest lessons that i learned early on. In this company we started as an online training company and when we benchmarked other online training companies they followed in internet marketing model which there are clear proven methods for that type of an approach. Will you fast forward about a year and a half. And we've looked up realizing we were following the proven model for that industry and it was undermining our brand just because it was proven for the industry did not mean. It was the right fit for our brand. Which is when i realized. Okay having clarity.

priceline jeff Ted google dakota williams abraham lincoln
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Will drive eighty percent of the results. It is so easy on a weekly basis to say no to honoring that time block to say yes to something. That seems more important and urgent in the short run. Have you found that for yourself on your journey. Yeah let me tell you i. One of the tragedies of being author and marketing a book is that. There's no time to read anymore. Take someone who enjoy. Who's good at something and enjoys doing it. And you just rip that out of their life and that's what this experience is like and this weekend in. The book came out last week. So i finally had a chance to blacks a little bit and read. And it's just like rediscovering the thing that it's like seeing high school sweetheart. I could say like going back and feel like okay. This is why i do this. And so yeah i think it is difficult but i think this is why it really is critical to figure out what you're optimizing for so many of us. I think by default to the urgent. Because we don't have systemic systematic approach to reverse engineering our own outcomes. And we could talk about that do that. That's part two of the ball park. One of the book is showing you how to reverse engineer and how to evolve formulas partout is about shrinking the gap between your ultimate vision and your current reality. And so it's all about giving you the tools to become a little bit better at execution and cure point. I think it is unless you have a system for figuring out what you're optimizing for and then keeping yourself accountable to those metrics you're gonna have a hard time executing because it's it is really easy to be seduced by the urgent. Yeah i mean it's on my four one one which for people who don't know what that is. It's a tool that gives you clarity on your priorities. So it says annual goal one of my top annual goals benchmark twenty four companies. I know that's twelve a month. I can tell you i am massively behind and we can get clarity on. This is what we have to do this week. In even when it shows up on my counter it is just. It's so easy to say no to it as the thing that it's a long term thing versus pushing off the important and urgent things today for the things that are going to do. Great for the long run. I'll tell you something that's helped me jeff and this is something that is in. The book is Something called reflective practice. And so we've heard about the liberty practice deliver practices the idea that was popularized in glide wells. Outliers it's the idea of finding something that you want to get good at and then identifying the elements. You're not currently good app and then practicing those intently. An an utilizing the feedback. You get to improve over time. That's deliberate practice reflective practice. It's it's some of the some of the book is about this particular element of practice that you can use to elevate your performance. It has to do with practicing in the past. And what i mean by that is looking at what you've learned from past experiences to improve in the present and so one of the tools used for reflective practice is something called the five-year journal. You can get these on amazon or any bookstore. What the way it works is that there are three hundred sixty five pages in this book one for each day of the year and there are five slots on each page and the idea. Is you just interest realize every day about what you learn that day or what. You did that day and you do this for a year after year. Something remarkable happens and that is you get to read what you did on that day the previous year. You do this for five years. You have five entries for each day and every time you input a new entry. You're forced to re to revisit those past experiences for new insights and one of these. I've discovered myself through. This process of using the five-year journal is that the best days for me are the days when i read and also when i exercise and also when i create something new those are the kind of the three metrics. I need to hit on to have a successful day. If i'm missing. One of those. I'm going to have a crappy day and it's just so insightful for you to use because i think that that's something that's missing for you as you're forgetting how much how much energy you get out of benchmarking those companies. How much insight and it helps to be reminded and a five year journal can help you do that. on a daily basis. It's interesting. I went through a similar exercise when i brought on our vida takeover running the company took my job. I had to define what my job was now. And as i reflect i literally did this exercise where i reflected back on. What are the things that. I'm really world class at that. Also bring me an immense amount of joy and satisfaction. And i when i look back on my counter was the days when i had time to think which is white space to sit down to journal thing to cast division making it rain a love focusing on growth activities and being ambassador the brandt getting on podcast getting on stages. Those are the three things that really light me up. And i'm super clear on that but this whole idea of benchmarking a reverse engineering is a newer activity. Now that i have the space to do it now the jeff's onboard running the company So i appreciate that connection. Because the days when i do it i do get a lot of value and i get so many areas and then i'm picking up the phone and i'm calling him on. What about this. What about this. And i'm that classic visionary with the new shiny object. Yeah that's that's very helpful. I love that idea that drama. Check that out. This episode is brought to you by masterclass. Masterclass is a fantastic online training platform. Where you can learn from some of the world's best minds anytime anywhere and at your own pace for example you can learn how to write anything from a book or screenplay to just a letter you can learn how to communicate with your boss or your family how to make dinner worthy of a michelin star or just how to make rugged scrambled eggs. Whatever you're interested in there's a masterclass for you with over one hundred plus exclusive classes top by the masters you know and love the thing that i have personally enjoyed about masterclasses getting access to minds of people that i may not have direct access to normally like bob. Iger the former. Ceo of disney. A love how they have cinema quality. Classes where bob was walking through how he thinks about leadership how he invested his time. How he gets clarity on his priorities and prioritizes his exercise and family. It was just so interesting to get a glimpse in his mind and seeing how the way he lives winds up with the one thing. We hope that is a listener of the one thing. Podcast that you'll start your journey today by exploring lessons in any order the like whether it's on your phone tablet apple. Tv or your computer. Lessons are approximately ten to fifteen minutes in length so they fit easily into your every day life. And in addition to video lessons masterclass also provides you with downloadable lesson recaps and supplemental materials. I highly recommend you check it out. Get unlimited access to every masterclass and as a one thing listener you get fifteen percent off an annual membership go to master class dot com slash. One that's master class dot com slash o. n. e. for fifteen percent off masterclass. If you're like our family right now life might be a little bit hectic. It's the summer so kids are in camp. My wife is running them from place to place. I'm working and we just got to brand new puppies but you're definitely taking up time the challenges that's made it really challenging for us to get dinner on the table every single night and this is why we're really excited. That freshly is the sponsor of the one thing podcast freshly offers chef made nutrient packed. Delicious meals delivered fresh to your door with no cooking required. This means that all the grocery shopping and the cooking takes up so much time can be leveraged to someone else. That's because your meals arrived cooked and fresh every week. So you can keep your fridge stock and skip the trip to the store ordering super easy. You visit freshly dot com and choose from over thirty delicious satisfying better for you meals like steak pepper..

jeff amazon brandt bob Iger disney apple
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Was expanded in that moment he could visualize what would it look like if there was a drive through lane around is hamburger shop and the idea of the drive through lane was born. It came from the banking industry interesting. This is something that when we talk about the twenty percent things that you should be doing in your job for me in my role as the co founder and president of this company. This is one of the things that i need to be doing. And i actually have set a goal for a specific number of times. I will sit down this year. It's twenty four times where i will just studying organization. It's usually very purposeful on the type of organization. I'm studying but i'm looking for inspiration. I'm asking a set set of questions. I'm looking for patterns. So that i can ask the question. What's that application for our business. I don't always protect time blocks by the way. But i know how important it is to tell you. That's a great story. And there are so many examples in this book that align with that of not just looking within your industry for patterns but looking at other industries to search identify different combinations of ideas that you can introduce and one of my favorite stories in dakota greatness is how barack obama became a great speaker so not a lot of people are this but when he first entered politics us a little bit of a disaster he did not do particularly well in fact he got trounced his first race for congress. He lost by margin of more than two to one. And the problem. If you can believe it was that he was a terrible speaker. He was a law school professor as a law school professor. He was used to lecturing students. Voters did not appreciate being lectured to and they let him know at the at the ballot box and so for a while. he thought about leaving politics until someone. His campaign team told him to go watch pastors. Were doing in the church. And when he came back a few years later his speaking style was transformed. You is now telling stories. He was using repetition. He was modulating his tone. He was he was he was there was so much that was changed. It was almost unrecognisable and obviously the rest is history. It what. I love about that story. Is it illustrates that braga obama didn't go find his talent eating spend ten thousand hours practicing he reverse engineer but was working in a different field and apply those insights to his field to create something january of that i love so before we dive into the the framework so that people can actually put this into practice. One of the things that you do that carrying jd. When they sit down to write any book is they look at. What are the myths that we need to bust to acknowledge the truce. What are some of the myths that you have found. People believe when it comes to great. I'll share a couple with with you right now. One is that practice is the key to becoming great now. Sure if you're practicing in a particular way that can help you improve. But there's a glaring problem with the formula of just practicing and that is you can't practice an idea you've never considered and so the last thing you want when you're trying to get great is to practice in isolation because that's not how creativity happens. Creativity happens by combining ideas from different fields. So what i say in the book. Is that practicing without looking at what others are doing is like having intellectual blinders on and is the only way to evolve your approaches to study what others are doing and have them have a methodology. You can use to really extract the best insights the other myth that i think is important for us to consider and i think this is part of the reason. Jeff why folks like us know about benchmarking we know about reverse engineering but most folks don't is because there is a stigma associated with studying what others are doing because there's an assumption that if you study someone else's work too closely you will become a hack or you will just steal their ideas. And that's why. I think it's so critical to do the research on this so there is a study that i talk about in this book conducted at the university of tokyo by creativity experts. And what they did was they had novice artists come into the lab and they divided them into two groups. The one group was told to create original artwork for three days straight. The second group was told to create original artwork for one day. Then on the second day they were asked to copy the work of established artists and then on the third day there were asked to resume their original work then they brought in actual professional artists and they had them rate which group was most creative on the third day. And it will won't shock you to know because you know about this. Jeff is that on the on the third day. The group that had paused to copy was more original than the group that had just been original the entire time and the reason for that was not because they just mimicked the arts artistic stylings of the established artists. They actually went off in completely different. Directions is because the process of considering what your instincts tell you to do and then compare them to what the actual established artists did that forces you to consider options that were hitting your work that you hadn't even considered so far for making us unoriginal. Copying others. Actually opens are. My are is up to new possibilities. It's totally true. I formed a relationship with a guy. Named jeff hoffman. Who is on the founding team of priceline dot com. And he were all saying the same thing we call benchmarking. You call it reverse engineering. He calls it info sponging and every day. He would take five minutes to look out in the world outside of his industry with genuine curiosity just to learn and he would write something down on a sticky note one day. He was walking through a farmer's market and he stopped at a stand and he was looking at fruit and notice that some of the fruit look great and some of it was starting to go bad and he wrote fruit on a sticky note and put it up on a board. Next day he was studying the airline industry breath airlines stuck it. On a board baxter. He was studying the internet road. Internet on the sticky notes stuck it on the board and he found himself one day sitting in the back of his share looking at his board with all these sticky notes. But there were three. That had been just randomly clustered next to each other internet's airlines and fruit and what he realized was fruit has a shelf life. eventually expires. Airline seats have a shelf. Life eventually expire. And then you have the internet and in that moment those three dots were connected. And that was the idea for priceline dot com. He's done all right by the way but it ensures like right. We're here by the way. Yeah i hear this just to reinforce. It's so easy. Be going down a path because that's the path you've always gone down or that's the path you've been shown and you can still be running enthusiastically in the wrong direction. Excellent point and it's all about the mindset of a.

braga obama barack obama dakota Jeff congress university of tokyo jeff hoffman baxter
"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

The ONE Thing

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"one thing" Discussed on The ONE Thing

"Through this as well as pdf guides that you can download with the exact question with that. Let's get into this conversation with the senior vice president of learning for fierce. Inc Rana Dietrich. What's one thing that's? True today at surprise you. That was not true a month or two months ago. That is a great question. you know before I started working for fear. I spent probably seven eight years working fulltime from home and what surprises me and said I'm doing that again now. When I went to fierce I have no expectation that that would be the case. We have a mazing office space in pioneer. Square Seattle and so to have spent the last two months back at my desk back in my house, figuring out how to do all of these things that I thought. I had stepped away from is very. Very surprising and I'm super grateful that I do have some familiarity with this like it's like muscle memory that is bit by bit coming back in terms of how to use my time how to keep myself focused how to get stuff done how to talk to people still surprising, though yeah, yeah, for for people who have not listened to the past episodes with with Susan. Scott, what is fierce conversations? Our definition of appears conversation is one in which you come out from behind yourself into the conversation and make it real. So? We talk about. Conversations as a way in which we can enrich relationships, in which we can tackle tough challenges, in which we can choose curiosity or our demand of being right and it's a way of looking at the conversations that we're having personally and professionally with great intention so that we can again build relationships and drive result. which I mean. This was. Content that I was so passionate about for the last few years, which is high relationship with Susan. WHO WHO CO OP? Who wrote the book for people who have not ready yet? Seems like with everything that's going on the demand in need for this just seems like it's got to be higher than ever before. I would agree with you like as hard as all of this has been That's one of the things that I have just been so grateful for to recognize. That's the content that we teach. The company. That I work for is offering what is even more critical now than it was before, and it has always been critical, so you know in this kind of an unknown in this reality that all of. Of US are facing together. It's that much more critical that we figure out how to talk to each other. Not just technically not just on zoom do I turn my camera on her. Don't I not just that, but I was having a conversation earlier this morning with one of our client company about how easy now it is for us to avoid conversations even more than we were avoiding than before. Because now, I don't have to see you every day now I can more easily make excuses for not talking about what needs to be talked about because we're not bumping into each other on a day-to-day basis in the halls, so the the requirement now to have conversations with intention has just gone up exponentially. I mean I don't know about. It is true for you, but it certainly has felt this way for me like I think I'm a pretty good conversationalist. I liked to talk I'm I'm an extrovert. I'm connected to people. And something about the way the conversations have been taking place in. Kobe have felt more intentional to me more in depth more focused. Because they have to be were on a screen were not passing each other in the house. It's not casual conversation over the lunch table is there is something more focused and more meaningful about them? I think and so to have the skill. And the capacity and the desire to step into these conversations through the lens of fears is challenge, but it's also a huge gift when you know how to do it. Yeah, I'd love to. I'd love to pull the curtain back and understand. What it's looked like what you've been going through inside the organization with everything that's going on and I'll preface by saying in engaging with the corporate clients that we work with and the people in our community. It just seems like people's goals got. Completely disrupted some people might still have some more goals, but a lot of people just the deck Scott wiped and they're looking up. What seeking clarity all over again? They're struggling to find alignment. They're wrestling with how to have positive accountability. While were distant. What does it look like for fierce? One of the things I've been saying over these last couple of months in talking with clients. Is You know we're in this with you like? We're experiencing exactly the same things that you are like we're a different company. We understand that we everybody has their own stuff that they're doing. But all of the struggles that we know that you experience as clients We're right there with you so. If I were to feel the curtain back. What I would say is that that we're experiencing very similar things disruption to our business model, understanding where the revenue comes from what are the products and forms of content that we need to be quickly. Creating or retooling in order to meet the needs of our clients right now and to continue to drive our own business by ability How do we work remotely? We have a small company. There's forty of us who have all been used to working with each other, so we've had to bury quickly. figure out how we sustain culture when we're not together for. For everything from like what's the equipment that people need at home to? How do we still have fun together? And then of course I can take this personal levels like I can think of anybody within our organization, or I can use myself as an example. What if it means to be at home with my adult daughters back home with the brand new puppy? At home in the mix of trying to figure out how to work and to hold both what's happening for me personally in the mix of social distancing and Kobe alongside everything that's going on with work, and isn't that what everybody's trying to figure out where we don't get to just focus on what's happening with us personally or just focused with what's happening at work? We're having to figure out how to hold multiple reality at the same time. That is a new muscle for a lot of..

Kobe Susan Scott senior vice president Rana Dietrich US Seattle wrestling mazing