35 Burst results for "One Space"

"one space" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

06:27 min | 5 d ago

"one space" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"This week In 1976. NASA publicly unveils its first space shuttle The enterprise during a ceremony in Palmdale, California Development of the shuttle cost almost 10 billion and took nearly a decade in 1977. The enterprise became the first space shuttle to fly freely when it was lifted to a height of 25,000 ft by a Boeing 7 47 and then released gliding back to Edwards Air Force Base on its own accord this week in 1978 at the White House, Egyptian President Anwar el said. Dot and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin signed the Camp David accords. Laying the groundwork for permanent peace agreement between Egypt and Israel after three decades of hostilities. The accords were negotiated during 12 days of intense talks with President Jimmy Carter at Camp David. And this week in 1995, a manifesto by the Unabomber and anti technology terrorists, is published by The New York Times and The Washington Post in the hope that someone will recognize the person who for 17 years have been sending homemade bombs through the mail after reading the manifesto, David Kaczynski link The writing style to that of his older brother, Ted, who was later convicted of the attacks. And sentenced to life in prison without parole. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on I Heart radio. Hi, Tom Martino here. 33713 talks 7138255 welcome. To the only show of its kind anywhere in the universe and water pros. I want to tell you they're giving away home show tickets. Water pros dot net Now, if you want home show tickets, you got to call 33 Martino and put in your request. We want to hear from you and talk about your project. Okay, That's all you have to do, and we'll get you home show tickets this weekend. The fall home show a wonderful group of people will be there many people from our referral list and including K and H, but water pros. Dot net Okay. Now, here's what you do. You call us and we'll give you we We text your name to him and you pick them up. Okay, That's what you do. So call us If you want home show tickets, water pros dot net by the way. They have full house water conditioning system softeners or filtration under two grand They also have a point of use filtration for under $1000 now. Do we have? We don't have our SSD. Tom. He's traveling right now. I can try to find something up. I will say I do have an SSD angel expert. I've not talked to her in a few years, so I'm gonna call her and see what we can do. We also have this. I'm going to give you I'm going to give you this off the air here, okay? All right, 3371. Thank you, Mark. 8255. Thank you, Mark. Okay. So, Larry, let's talk about SSD. We're trying to help Robert out his wife. His his daughter is on her deathbed and can't get SSD. I can You have, uh, what happened with you? Hello, Tom. Hi. Yeah. My daughter had John John Bray. This wasn't about 2000 and two. Yeah, we I got the forms and made an appointment. We went straight to the Social Security Disability office. Submitted the applications, and it was approved in two or three weeks, and they paid retroactive back to the original. Oh, my. Oh my gosh. Uh, from the original time, I wonder why it had it's gotten so difficult. I don't know. But you know, she was in a wheelchair almost totally paralyzed. And it took another seven or eight months for her to recover. And right now, today, she's Pretty much fully recovered. She got some symptoms of nerve damage and our feet now, how did she get that? Was it after a shot or something? Yes. She got that from a flu shot. First time She got a flu shot. Yeah, that happens once in a while, and that's uh yeah. And it's not unique to the, uh covid. I mean, it was happening years and years ago as you said, of course. Oh, yeah. Hey, you know the paperwork she signed, said that you know it was known. Hazard or no known risk. That's right, a known risk. So you know, there's nothing we can go back on anybody. Except you know she did get the disability for about 13 14 months. Where's your It really helped a lot saved her house. And, uh so okay. Well, thank you. I appreciate your feedback. We're trying to get that now. Rita, what's going on with you, Rita? Welcome to the show of Tom Martino. What's going on, Rita? Hi. How are you doing? Good, Rita, How can we help you, dear? Okay. I don't mean to cry, but, um, what's going on? Okay. We have a new corporate that bought out our complex. Yes. Um they came in from California bought us out. There's like 126 apartments where we live. Yes, they came in. And did they put out a new science and million dollar renovation? Okay, fine. They made everybody still wrote good and everything. Yes. Million dollar renovation was all outside every night to everybody and everything. Well, now why are you laughing so hard? Because that's just like a corporation to do that, And we're putting a million dollars into this place that is funny, funny or on the outside, well. It turns out there was real nice to everybody. Did they do a new roof? No. Well, they did. The outside. They painted the outside the outside. Looks like um Everything county. The top. Looks like Jefferson County doors downstairs. Looks like Denver County doors, You know? What the hell are you talking about? What does she mean Jefferson County doors in Denver. You know, uh, Yale Class.

Tom Martino David Kaczynski Robert Rita Larry Denver 12 days NASA Mark Ted Tom California 1976 John John Bray Camp David Jefferson County Denver County 33713 25,000 ft 17 years
Fashion Brand Founder-Influencer Amanda Steele on Being One of the First 'YouTubers'

The Glossy Podcast

02:29 min | Last month

Fashion Brand Founder-Influencer Amanda Steele on Being One of the First 'YouTubers'

"Hey amanda welcome hi. How are you the so talk to me. Oh my gosh you are. You're not old. Let's say to say that you've been creating content for ten years. How old were you when you started that youtube channel. I started my youtube channel. When i was ten so out twelve years. I feel like that's so interesting. Because i mean that was of course a longtime ago influencer marketing or even just youtube was not what it was. Today tell me about the value of. I guess getting in early. We're hearing that all the time especially on tick-tock were those players that got in so early really have an advantage. And how how do you see that. Yeah i definitely think that most of my success came from me doing it so early. So i can definitely say but that's real and i credit that for sure i think just when it gets overly saturated whatever platform you're using just really hard to get your content seen so getting an early for sure helps helps out but i think it really just comes down to the quality of your content. Like what you're really offering. You don't have to think. Like oh. I should start now because it's too late like there's too many people are they gonna notice me just as long as you have purpose and you have a great content. You should be successful. Did you know to be so focused and to really hone in on beauty and makeup and one space. I just know i have a ten year old niece. She's all over the place and would love to be like heather on youtube channel. It wouldn't be professional. That's for sure. Did you know to kind of really like keep it focused. Your focus was makeup from the get. Go out at your channel of all. Well i guess it it was just me as a fan so all my content has come from what i like at the time while i'm interested in so when i started my channel i always wanted to be fashion designers so i was watching a fashion halls look books so that's like what got me into youtube but then once i got to you to a fashion hall leads to a makeup tutorial and now i'm obsessed with make up this whole new world so i kind of like paused a bit on the fashioned content and like really dove into make up because it was new and exciting to me and i was learning and there's so many like products to try and like discuss rather than you. This is what i would say. I got this top. This is the same jeans. I wear three times a week or something. You know

Youtube Amanda Heather
Where Space Begins: Bezos' Blue Origin vs. Branson's Virgin Galactic

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Where Space Begins: Bezos' Blue Origin vs. Branson's Virgin Galactic

"This morning in a remote part of the west texas desert the world richest man amazon founder. Jeff bezos plans to take off for a trip to space. It's the first space flight with passengers on board for his company. blue origin. Now if you were paying attention nine days ago another billionaire. Richard branson took a flight to space with his company virgin. Galactic bezos is flight will be a little different in how it launches and where the passengers will go. But the difference is don't stop there. They extend to the goals and ambitions of both companies and to discuss that. We have a reporter mike. Berg who covers the business of space for the wall street journal back on the show. I'm mike thanks for joining us again so nine days ago you were in new mexico watching the virgin galactic flight with richard branson launch. Now you're in texas for the blue origin launch. What are some of the differences you expect to see when this flight takes off. Yeah i mean the biggest difference just sort of visually blue origin uses a rocket to get the space. We're going to see literally the new scheffer rocket flare up into at very high speeds into space. And then you know we won't see this but a capsule detach and float into space and then the rocket will return to the launch pad. Virgin galactic of course uses a different method. They've got a kind high-flying airplane that flies up. You know the way you would see at an airport and the space craft the virgin galactic spacecraft attached to the rocket detaches at about forty five thousand feet and then it sort of rockets up into space from there. So you'll literally see the

West Texas Desert Galactic Bezos Richard Branson Jeff Bezos Mike Amazon Berg The Wall Street Journal New Mexico Texas
Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

Tom and Curley

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

"That Branson really pulled a fast one by trying to usurp that first space flight nine days before basins. So I'm kind of team Branson Canteens Team basis. Sorry. We already had you down for Branson. You can't change your vote. You cannot There. Is there one Richard Branson, I'll be evaluating the customer spaceflight experience is this Branson speaking. Sounds even weirder than he normally does gives Sir Richard Branson this much the swashbuckling billionaire has a knack for making his dreams seem like hours in this case space. He believes it's for everyone do you like the term space tourism? Space Tourism works. On Sunday morning, Branson will become the space tourist since 2000 and four. His company Virgin Galactic has persevered through test flights and setbacks like an accident in 2014 that killed a test pilot space. Stephanie is hard. We've had our tears. We've had a choice, but I'll tell you what the joys have been fantastic. Branson's space voyaging will begin on a runway this runway at Spaceport America in New Max. To go. 12,000 FT. Straightaway for Virgin Galactic's mothership. VMS Eve is a plane, twin fuselage aircraft two pilots in the middle. It carries the space plane. The S S unity. 21 release release release at about 45,000. Ft Eve will release unity Fire fired! Cool. The spaceship will shoot straight up more than 50, Miles where space begins. Ship unity. Welcome to space. We've got massive windows. All the way around. The bill to unbuckle will be able to float around and they will become an astronaut Branson and three other passengers. All employees should experience a few minutes of weightlessness. Then unities. Two pilots will glide everyone back to Earth. By the way,

Branson Richard Branson Virgin Galactic New Max Stephanie America
Blue Origin Space Flight Auction: Bidding Hits $2.8 Million

First Light

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Blue Origin Space Flight Auction: Bidding Hits $2.8 Million

"Vaccinated by the fourth of July. Blue origin. The space company owned by Amazon founder Jeff Brazos, has announced that Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his brother Mark will be joining the winner of the first space tourism flight on July. 20th. Bidding is already up to $2.8 million for the half hour long

Jeff Brazos Amazon Jeff Bezos Mark
"one space" Discussed on The Empowered Ladies Podcast

The Empowered Ladies Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Empowered Ladies Podcast

"Those women really did miss such a great opportunity to change their perspective open their minds and hearts a little bit more so near to learn and to learn a whole new level of femininity that they will never probably reach. Yeah you know you have such a unique perspective of femininity. In general in fact what would you say now your age now where you are in life now what your idea of them iniquity is now. Oh that's interesting. I i i answer. Thank you for that and i really appreciate your perspective on how easy it could be to include me into a woman space and i really. I really appreciate that. Because when i've asked i often find myself in a defensive position defending against the invasion and so now it's like i'm on the end of privileged conversation being told i need to be the one to check my privilege and that we're not even gonna talk to you about this anymore because you're you're just you're just not. You're you're coming from privilege right now. So it's really not even you just walk in. You know you ask. Frustrating was there was one space there was there was a woman a woman's only workshop that i like really really really wanted to do 'cause i did the men's equivalent of the same training and i thought that it would be one of the most amazing experiences of my life to be able to do that. One 'cause i learned so much about my masculinity and the man training that i feel like if i would be allowed to in the women's space it'll be one of the greatest things in my life and would give me a lot of clarity on my gender and if i want to physically transition or not. I think but i was told that trans people are allowed in that workshops after they physically transitioned only. So i would need to have surgery.

one space one One
Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin to Launch First Space Tourism Flight

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin to Launch First Space Tourism Flight

"60 years Since Alan Shepard became the first American in space it comes to some people are about to learn how they can ride. A rocket, named for the pioneering astronaut Jeff Bezos plan is to launch space tourists inside his new shepherd from a pad here in Texas, hoist them into the weightlessness of space and then bring them back to Earth beneath three giant parachutes. In a video on blue origins. YouTube channel basis exclaims. How exciting is this? Come on today would be passengers on New Shepherd's maiden flight will learn how much a ticket aboard the six seed capsule will cost. Generally in ABC News, speaking

Alan Shepard Jeff Bezos New Shepherd Texas Youtube Abc News
"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:19 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Not opinion but they did. It was a fantastic machine but it was also a fragile one. Took lots of the people at kennedy space center. Very good at that when atlanta's landed after the last night that vehicle was as good a condition as it could possibly be certainly capable of flying some more the politics they accidents bell the end of that. And it'll be a long time before we have a vehicle. That's nearly as magnificent as the space shuttle. Certainly one of a kind and now as we see spacecraft manufacturer going back to the capsule design for all the advantages. It just certainly cements. Its place in history for many reasons as you mentioned if not along just how unique it was. You had a career at nasa management. So i'd i'd be remiss if i didn't ask you about your time working out here at the rocket. Ranch kennedy space center. What was that like. It was fantastic as director of the kennedy space center. That was a dream job but the only better one was sitting in the cockpit of the space shuttle. I visited the kennedy space center in the it was nineteen sixty seven before was with nasa and fell in love with the place. I always felt that was where the rubber hits. The road as the space program is concerned. The people that work there From the janitors to the center director love. It love what they're doing and do a fantastic job. You've got the new program artists which we've got rocket parts inside the va right now and you talked about what it was like to ride those solid rocket boosters. That's their plans to make that happen again. The of course you know has two solid rocket boosters. So that rides coming back. What are your thoughts about artists going back to the moon and then establishing a presence there so we can learn how to get to mars. We do need to get out of earth orbit We need to go back to. That's the right thing to do. We need to learn to live and work off this planet. Still some great things we can do on the mon. a love. people say we've been there done that but really those were like six camping trips. That didn't last very long. We need to go back and learn to to live on the moon. And then eventually flounder. Bars don't happen someday. I don't think i'll be around to sit baba mona. Leave you with this. I found this picture here. I'm gonna put it up the screen so you can see it. This is is you. And john. Young forty years ago handsome devil there signing autographs. We've done that a few tabs. What was that. Like to be a an astronaut. Celebrity will to comes with the job. John i refund of but You know part of what we need to do to to make people appreciate what the spatial Had done in what he could do a so john and i spent a while after that. I fight doing what. I call the rubber chicken circa tend signing autographs and talking to people and told them about the program bob crippen pilot for the space shuttle columbia the very first launch of the space shuttle. Thank you so much for being on and stuff and by the rocky ranch thank you forever and that's going to do it for this. Episode of the rocket range especial. Thanks to our guests astronaut. Bob crippen if you like this podcast. Please subscribed a special shout out to our producer. Jon sackman and editor chris chamberlain. I'm your host daryl nail. Reminding you that here on the rocket ranch. You gotta keep looking up..

Jon sackman Bob crippen chris chamberlain John mars six camping trips forty years ago bob crippen daryl nail earth nasa columbia last night john first launch nineteen sixty seven two solid rocket boosters atlanta one kennedy space center
"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Was that site like will is that said gonna digital for soham them but that we were paying attention to it. However after after we got out of the vehicle the dachshund checks over a they had a little ceremony out on the lake bed with the governor california and some other dignitaries and the crowd was out there as well. I remember when i was a kid growing up in the houston area. We used to go to the rodeo. Every year one year that have gene autry another year. That have roy rogers. And i'd always go down to the edge of the rain to hold up my hand and they'd ride around and shake hands with everybody and setting their own the podium after landing a look down the crowd and there was roy. Rogers got walked over and shook into. What a special moment. that must've been. It was so you there on the ground and there was celebrities everyday. You mentioned roy. Rogers but what was your. What was your sense of of the moment what you had accomplished after a getting out in and being welcome back home to such grand disintegrated fair wail guitar. Don't capture motions like that. But the both john were on high. We were really excited. The vehicle performed as well as the did. I was excited. I answer it up but we were just enjoying the moment after one crippen was selected for three more space shuttle missions and the program was flying high the first five years until the challenger accident in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and then the columbia accident in two thousand in three together. Those accidents claimed the lives of fourteen astronauts. So bob you flew four space shuttle missions on two orbiters columbia and challenger and you know both were destroyed in mission accidents. We know in one thousand nine hundred eighty six in two thousand and three and of course fourteen astronauts lost and and you knew many of them. You're a close to too many of them. In fact he flew with dick scope. I believe who was lost in in challenger would you share. What kind of impact. Those accents had on you personally and professionally. Being the you flew on both of those will there were terrible. Tragedies of probably the worst experiences i ever had the life of i was actually training for a fifth flight that we were going to do out of california to launch vanderberg air force base on the space shuttle And i was in los alamos new mexico Working with crew training one of our payloads a when we watch the launch of sds fifty one hell and we dated tv coverage because they showed the lift often they cut to a soap opera or something and saying foul words logging out of the room when the pictures came back to the terrible side of the solid rocket dealing out for radio space shuttle and cloud anew as soon as i saw the accident was lost and had bergen friends onboard. Just as you said eight flew with dick scully. Own my third point. He was a pilot on that and It was a sad moment on. I'll never forget Every everest re it tears me up a little bit. This year was thirty fifth anniversary of that That terrible tragedy but Nasa did buddy easily. Does that kind of thing in together tried to correct the mistakes and got back flying again. I was part of the The investigation and i ended up. Make a recommendation that we ought to put more operational people in the management of the shuttle in my boss. Don't leave. I believe that government. It's the program. So that was when i hung up flying boot center and try to get the shuttle back flying again which we did. Eventually i am was completely retired when we lost columbia I have a governor who works there at the johnson space center suzy griffin and susie you call me up on the days vehicles reitering and said they lost contact with it and she and i both knew that meant that it they lost to be on the crew as well. I knew some of the crew. I didn't know him the nearly as well as the fifty one l. crew another sad day. Thank you for sharing that with us. It's interesting to me that you took it as motivation to get into management to be involved to have you were an astronaut. And so now you put yourself in the operations that that carry with you throughout your management crew well You know my initial thought was. Let's get the vehicle back flying in and do it safely with alleged are personally believe that was what the crew would that we lost. Were the wanted us to do. And i did learn some lessons throughout the actually that returned to making that happen which i worked with a lot of people like aldridge who was director of the space shuttle program. That point in decors of who's looking over the engineering. The three of us worked hard for a couple of years to make that happen and we were all bird proud. Linda recount who had blown with them second flight to successfully lifted off again mob. The collective history of the space shuttle program is impressive was used to repair damage satellites while in orbit the most striking being the hubble telescope and it was also flew thirty seven shuttle flights which were necessary to to build the international space station which twenty years after Humans i got aboard is still up there. Doing great science hundred thirty five missions. Five hundred and forty two million miles. It was a long program. What is what do you think the legacy of of the space shuttle program is that all began with your first flight. I think it was one of the undoubtedly the most fantastic flying machines we've ever built as you said it allowed us to do some some great things one Early on We were flying flights for the department of defense. And i believe that the some of those valence helped us win the cold or and you said we Also were able to do the great observatories including hubble and That's enlightened us considerably above the danger of our universe and owned the bill the the international space station which is still flying today We have the two terrible tragedies. should've happen.

suzy griffin Nasa Linda fourteen astronauts roy two thousand aldridge first five years houston one thousand three Rogers roy rogers first flight both fifth flight fifty one third point second flight los alamos
"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

03:35 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"The worst experiences i ever had the life of i was actually training for a fifth flight that we were going to do out of california to launch vanderberg air force base on the space shuttle And i was in los alamos new mexico Working with a crew training one of our payloads who when we watch the launch of sds fifty one hell and we dated tv coverage because they showed the lift often they cut to a soap opera or something and saying foul words logging out of the room when the pictures came back to the terrible side of the solid rocket dealing out for radio. Space shuttle and cloud anew. Soon as i saw the accident crew was lost and had bergen friends onboard. Just as you said eight flew with dick scully. Own my third point. He was a pilot on that and it was a sad moment on. I'll never forget it. e- every everest re it. Tears me up a little bit. This year was thirty. Fifth anniversary of that Let terrible tragedy but nasa did buddy easily. Does that kind of thing in self together tried to correct the mistakes and got back flying again. I was part of the The investigation and i ended up. Make a recommendation that we ought to put more operational people in the management of the shuttle in my boss. Don't leave. I believe that government. It's the program. So that was when i hung up flying boot center and try to get the shuttle back flying again which we did. Eventually i am was completely retired when will will also columbia I have a daughter who works there. At the johnson space center suzy griffin and susie you call me up on the vehicles reitering and said they lost contact with it and she and i both knew that mitt that it they lost to be on the crew as well. I knew some of the crew. I didn't know him the nearly as well as the fifty one l. crew another sad day. Thank you for sharing that with us. It's interesting to me that you took it as motivation to get into management to be involved to have you were an astronaut. And so now you put yourself in the operations that that carry with you throughout your management crew well You know my initial thought was. Let's get the vehicle back flying in and do it safely with alleged are personally believe that was what the crew would that we lost. Were the wanted us to do. And i did learn some lessons throughout the actually that returned to making that happen which i worked with a lot of people like aldridge who was director of the space shuttle program. That point in decors of who's looking over the engineering..

california suzy griffin columbia aldridge los alamos thirty fifth flight susie johnson space center third point Fifth anniversary both This year new mexico one eight nasa vanderberg bergen fifty one
"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

05:06 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"Live on a all that was Remarkable abraxas thing that got most people's attention was when i opened up the payload bay doors rediscovered Thermal protection system tiles. Were missing off. The rear ended vehicle. John and are really weren't that concerned about that. Because those were there for reusability only But they're a lot of people only ground worried. There were some missing. They are maybe some visiting on the barber. Which would be critical but Was anything we could see or observed that would allow us to To check that out so there wasn't a sense worrying about his florida. Done our considered. You didn't worry at all No i was just enjoying the experience. Wow so the flight. The flight is completed. You're getting ready to land and as you're coming down i can imagine the reentry of this vehicle for the first time how did perform when when it was coming back into earth's atmosphere. It was fantastic. There were a lot of air. Damn things that We had to worry about but the vehicle flew beautifully on the did reach some limits that we have to be a little bit concerned about the with the way. Our buddy flap was moving into a few other things But in essence it was a beautiful landing all the way from when we did the deorbit burn to two touchdown. The ah john took over few times During entrance doing the roller burssels just to get the fatal and came out of blackout to the ground. Got excited because you didn't the tiles must've been okay. 'cause we does so by that and a remarked. This will the california coast. That was a great way to come to california and it was a beautiful day in california to work. We could see a edwards air force base are landing site from a well over one hundred miles away. I believe we could just flown visually but we had good guidance and john toco were finally a just as we came over here about forty thousand feet and started a big role reversal and roll left. I looked out his window. And i looked out lake dead end. There's thousands of people out there. S said the jar down the runway. But they weren't thank goodness the jonah brock be around in immortals lending like i knew he would and john was about as excited at that. Point is course in two hundred twenty five thousand people. It was reported. Bob were there on that on that dry lake bed watching what was that site like will is that said gonna digital for soham him but that we were paying attention to it. However after after we got out of the vehicle the dachshund checks over a they had a little ceremony out on the lake bed with the governor. Californians some other dignitaries and the crowd was out there as well. I remember when i was a kid growing up in the houston area. We used to go to every year one year that have gene autry another year. That have roy rogers. And i'd always go down to the edge of the rain to hold up my hand and they'd ride around and shake hands with everybody and setting their own the podium after landing a look down the crowd and there was roy. Rogers got walked over and shook into. What a special moment. that must've been. It was so you there on the ground and there was celebrities everyday. You mentioned roy. Rogers but what was your. What was your sense of of the moment what you had accomplished after a getting out in and being welcome back home to such grand disintegrated fair wail guitar. Don't capture motions like that. But the both john were on high. We were really excited. The vehicle performed as well as the did. I was excited. I answer it up but we were just enjoying the moment after..

california John two hundred roy john toco roy rogers Rogers houston Bob one year both jonah about forty thousand feet john first time earth two touchdown twenty five thousand people florida thousands of people
"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

06:09 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Left the record. Show when i tell you as les- it lifted off tell me about what kind of ride that was like well. It was exciting ride part of that time. Especially with the saturns very slow lift off but when the space shuttle was about lit the solid rockets. It lifted off the with the nice fast acceleration. The only thing. I've been able to like it too was a market capital. Chuck coming off an aircraft carrier But it got up and moved out to. i guess because it was waned. Most people had never realized that the all the other expendable vehicles tend to rotate right after they lift off to get themselves oriented in the direction. They want to go when we rotated i understand. It made a lot of spectators nervous. 'cause i thought something was wrong but all of us do on was what it was supposed to do It does rather noisy of shaking going on with a solid rockets. Likened it to buy pickup down an old country boss board road changes kind shake it along but last about two minutes in this quite a ride you get up but the acceleration stopped at mudgee. Only three jesus amac's up. We throttle the engines actually to maintain that not for the crew. But for the payloads that we'd be carrying a book the after the solid rocket were in doubt. Actually that really got my attention because we went from Three gs down about a half g and got very quiet very stale Shaking out for maybe the main engines. Quick to but checking the instruments that said they were still running and then fell right on out to three gs again. Eight and a half minutes. You're going seventeen thousand five hundred miles an hour ride like it anywhere else. I can only imagine. Wow listening to your description of it is is thrilling in and of itself. So you circle the earth thirty six times. You were up in space about two a half days. What were the most memorable moments from that flight. I like to use john's phrase. Let the park between landing. It was all you know. I the right of was exciting. And then all of a sudden you're floating around and getting weightless experience for the first time And you look out the window and see this beautiful spaceship earth that we live on a all. That was Remarkable abraxas thing that got most people's attention was when i opened up the payload bay doors rediscovered Thermal protection system tiles. Were missing off. The rear ended vehicle. John and are really weren't that concerned about that. Because those were there for reusability only But they're a lot of people only ground worried. There were some missing. They are maybe some visiting on the barber. Which would be critical but There was anything we could see or observed that would allow us to To check that out so there wasn't a sense worrying about his florida. Done our considered. You didn't worry at all No i was just enjoying the experience. Wow so the flight. The flight is completed. You're getting ready to land and as you're coming down i can imagine the reentry of this vehicle for the first time how did perform when when it was coming back into earth's atmosphere. It was fantastic. There were a lot of air damn things that we had to worry about but the vehicle flew beautifully on the did reach some limits that we had to be a little bit concerned about the with the way. Our buddy flap was moving into a few other things But in essence it was a beautiful landing all the way from when we did. The deorbit burn to touchdown. The ah john tucker few times During entrance doing the roller burssels just to get the fatal and came out of blackout to the ground. Got excited because you didn't the tiles must've been okay. 'cause we does so by that and a remarked. This will the california coast. That was a great way to come to california and it was a beautiful day in california to work. We could see a edwards air force base are landing site from a well over one hundred miles away. I believe we could just flown visually but we had good guidance and john toco were finally a just as we came over here about forty thousand feet and started a big role reversal and roll left. I looked out his window. And i looked out lake dead end. There's thousands of people out there. S said the jar down the runway but they weren't thank goodness the john brock be around in immortals lending like i knew he would and john was about as excited at that. Point is overseeing a two hundred twenty five thousand people. it was reported. Bob were there on that on that dry lake bed watching what.

california Eight and a half minutes John two hundred thirty six times john toco Bob first time earth john about two a half days Chuck seventeen thousand five hundre about two minutes about forty thousand feet thousands of people about a half g over one hundred miles florida twenty five thousand people
"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

05:16 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"Without a group and there was some discussion of maybe about a year product. Lightest whether we should do that or not but it would delay us. Even more have been very costly and john and i both thought the best chance of the mission success for us to be on board and thank goodness baggage Ended up agreeing with us. Was there any hesitation. Any worry or any concern in the lead up to launch the jonah. None both we knew the be very well. And we knew the people at double working on it We spend a lot of time going up to the various companies that were assembly yet and we thought that We could handle any problems were given to us. Maybe a- because we were test pilots. We thought that the a we could deal with anything. You guys were certainly the right stuff. let's go back to that jay april twelfth nineteen eighty-one here at the kennedy space center you're strapped in and the seconds are ticking. Down lift off kind of just explain to me and take me through what you remember. What you recall about about those moments will the. I still remember him very well. I think we actually tried. On april the tenth for launch and we ended up with a computer problem that caused us to scrub Actually the vehicle was as i said before very complex and it didn't surprise me that we scrubbed people smart people that the computer problem than we tried again on the twelfth Today's later and i fully expected there was a good chance that we were going to scrub again. And it was only one account got inside or about a minute. That turned john. I said i think we might really do it. And i think it was that point. My heart rate went up to about one hundred thirty. It was probably born in the most exciting moments in my life and the The flight Certainly lived up to it. That's funny that you mentioned that. Because i i have the today newspaper from after that flight with the headline colombia's a gem and there is the launch of the space shuttle in that. And it's funny. You mentioned your heart rate at one hundred thirty. And that's exactly what it was reported being and i'll just read from this part right here. It said that a cool collected fifty year. old young. Who's heartbeat was a steady eighty five during liftoff commented. I've got a super spaceship is he in crippen whizzed around the earth. One of you said forty three year old crippen who's heartbeat jumped to one. Thirty at liftoff so yours is one thirty in his eighty five. That's a cool cat. He is so although it wasn't reported but john's heart rate landing was closer to my one thirty left the record. Show when i tell you as les- it lifted off tell me about what kind of ride that was like well. It was exciting ride part of that time. Especially with the saturns very slow lift off but when the space shuttle was about lit the solid rockets. It lifted off the with the nice fast acceleration. The only thing. I've been able to like it too was a market capital. Chuck coming off aircraft carrier but It got up and moved out to. I guess because it was waned most people had never realized that the all the other expendable vehicles tend to rotate right after they lift off to get themselves oriented in the direction. They want to go when we rotated i understand. It made a lot of spectators nervous. 'cause i thought something was wrong but all of us do was what it was supposed to do It does rather noisy law shaking going on with a solid rockets likened it to buy pickup old country boss. Board road changes kind of shake it along but last about two minutes in this quite a ride you get up but the acceleration stopped at mudgee. Only three jesus amac's up. We throttle the engines actually to maintain that not for the crew. But for the payload that we'd be carrying Book the after the solid rocket. Were in doubt. Actually that really got my attention because we went from Three gs down about a half g and got very quiet very stale No shaking out for maybe the main engines equipped to but checking the instruments. That said they were still running and then fell right on out to three gs again. Eight and a half minutes. You're going seventeen.

Eight and a half minutes april seventeen one thirty Thirty one hundred thirty forty three year old eighty five both john today One fifty year. old one account about two minutes Chuck about a half g jay earth about one hundred thirty
"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

07:53 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Moon of so expected him to be the commander. I liked but i expected the bill. The seat would be occupied by. Somebody else said flown before. So i was very pleasantly surprised when george any big boss that asked me. If i'd like to fly the i was ready to turn handsprings at that moment. But i've been working a long time towards the guests leaped powers being decided they wanted to expand our experience basis as fast as possible so they were on the initial flight. A pair of the guy who had flown before with a rookie. Like myself and i ended up being looking to build a while. I can imagine that moment when he told you that that you were the guy must have been credible like you said you were doing handsprings. While i was joined the office in a nineteen sixty nine in the been a while working towards the flight in fact dick slayton win. The hardest told us would probably be able to fly around nineteen eighty an astronaut. John young what an interesting hair you. You kind of mentioned it there. He had all this experience here. He was a veteran of nasaspaceflight gemini. Apollo he walked on the moon and this was going to be your first flight so very unlikely. Pairing someone say what was what was the relationship like you know john lewis big boss at that time. Uh so i had worked really worked that close within But we developed a very close working relationship and friendship during the time training for the flight because we had more time to train them with initially planned on But john was a great guy. You know when you're a rookie going up for the first time. It's great to go with the guy that kind of experience and i'm just sorry that john kmby with us here to celebrate this order there versus myself certainly understand that john young pass away in two thousand and eighteen at the age of eighty seven and he is missed so the space shuttle ten years in the design process launched like a rocket went into space for several weeks and then came back down like an airplane This was highly complex machine. Your job i believe was working with computers and the electrical systems. How complex machine was this. Well it was very complex machine breath simplest complex we'd ever built and we did have some initial problems technically because of the hat and it took us a while to get ready for that first flight. We had problems with our main engines also with our thermal protection system tiles and we have other problems as well. Those ended up being the big ones that caused the delay But it was a complex machine and that was a fabulous machine. In retrospect what impressed you the most about it as as a spacecraft and then also as a glider well what impressed me most was that we would actually fly back in in land on a runway as opposed to parachute in the ocean. Someplace to get picked up as a pilot. That data is a much more satisfying way to come back a. It was a overall the fact that it carry a very large payloads And the loves deducing. Fantastic things with it was a great machine. I'm really proud. So the only way of proving this space shuttle that it would work was to fly with crew in it on the very first mission which is just. It's really incredible to think about you. John young flying the space shuttle. No previous test flight in unscrewed position. And so many of your contemporaries have said that this was for that reason. This was a one of the boldest test flights in history. You have a sense of that at that time. Not as much as some people have talked about in some of my aviator friends might argue this mothers of rivaled it as well but it was It wasn't interesting thing. I don't know that we'll ever do that again. But the design of the shuttle was such that the we never designed to be able to fly without a group and there was some discussion of maybe about a year product. Lightest whether we should do that or not. But it would delay as even more have been very costly. And john. And i both thought the best chance of the mission success for us to be on board and thank goodness baggage Ended up agreeing with us. Was there any hesitation. Any worry or any concern in the lead up to launch the jonah. None both we knew the be very well. And we knew the people at double working on it We spend a lot of time going up to the various companies that were assembly yet and we thought that We could handle any problems were given to us. Maybe a- because we were test pilots. We thought that the a we could deal with anything. And you guys were certainly the right stuff Let's go back to that. Jay april twelfth nineteen eighty-one here at the kennedy space center you're strapped in and the seconds are ticking down liftoff kind of just explain to me and take me through what you remember what you recall about about those moments will the. I still remember him very well. I think we actually tried. On april the tenth for launch and we ended up with a computer problem that caused us to scrub Actually the vehicle was as i said before very complex and it didn't surprise me that we scrubbed people. Smart people saw that the computer problem than we tried again on the twelfth Today's later and i fully expected there was a good chance that we were going to scrub again. And it was only one account got inside or about a minute. That turned john. I said i think we might really do it. And i think it was that point. My heart rate went up to about one hundred thirty. It was probably born in the most exciting moments in my life and the The flight Certainly lived up to it. That's funny that you mentioned that. Because i i have the today newspaper from after that flight with the headline colombia's a gem and there is the launch of the space shuttle in that. And it's funny. You mentioned your heart rate at one hundred and thirty. And that's exactly what it was reported being and i'll just read from this part right here. It said that a cool collected fifty year. old young. Who's heartbeat was a steady eighty five during liftoff commented. I've got a super spaceship is he in crippen whizzed around the earth. One of feeling what have you said forty three year old crippen who's heartbeat jumped to one. Thirty at liftoff so yours is one thirty in his eighty five. That's a cool cat. He is so although it wasn't reported but john's heart rate landing was closer to my one thirty.

ten years john lewis two thousand Jay john dick slayton john kmby forty three year old first mission one thirty george Thirty eighty seven first flight fifty year. old one account one hundred and thirty both eighteen first time
"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

05:12 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"Payloads helped us win. The cold war here now four times space shuttle astronaut bob crippen welcome to the rocket ranch. Very much pleased to hear. What was it like to be selected for this mission of the spatial. What was a very exciting moment for me on the very first flight. John young who ended up being the commander was most likely guy in the office. Does he was our most experienced. Astronaut dud flown four times including apollo sixteen and walked on the moon of so expected him to be the commander. I liked but i expected the bill. The seat would be occupied by. Somebody else said and flown before so. I was very pleasantly surprised when george any big boss that asked me. If i'd like to fly. The i ready to turn handsprings at that moment. But i've been working a long time to Guest powers being decided they wanted to expand our experience basis as fast as possible so they were on the initial flight. A pair of the guy who had flown before with a rookie. Like myself and i ended up being looking to build a well. I can imagine that moment when he told you that that you were the guy must have been credible like you said you were doing handsprings. While i was joined the office in a nineteen sixty nine in the been a while working towards the flight in fact dick slayton win. The hardest told us would probably be able to fly around nineteen eighty an astronaut. John young what an interesting hair you. You kind of mentioned it there. He had all this experience here. He was a veteran of nasaspaceflight gemini. Apollo he walked on the moon and this was going to be your first flight so very unlikely. Pairing someone say what was what was the relationship like you know john. Lewis big boss at that time So i had worked really worked that close within but we developed a very close working relationship and friendship during the time training for the flight because we had more time to train than we initially planned on But john was a great guy. You know when you're rookie going up for the first time it's great to go with the guy that kind of experience and i'm just sorry that john kmby with us here to celebrate this order there versus myself certainly understand that john young pass away in in two thousand and eighteen at the age of eighty seven and he is missed so the space shuttle ten years in the design process launched like a rocket went into space for several weeks and then came back down like an airplane. This was highly complex machine. Your job i believe was working with computers and the electrical systems. How complex machine was this. Well it was very complex machine breath simplest complex we'd ever built and we did have some initial problems. Technically because of that in the it took us a while to get ready for that first flight. We had problems with our main engines also with our thermal protection system tiles and we have other problems as well. Those ended up being the big ones that caused the delay But it was a complex machine and that was a fabulous machine. In retrospect what impressed you the most about it as as a spacecraft and then also as a glider well what impressed me most was that we would actually fly back in in land on runway as opposed to parachute in the ocean. Someplace to get picked up as a pilot is a much more satisfying way to come back a. It was a overall the fact that it carry a very large payloads and the loves deducing. Fantastic things with it was a great machine. I'm really proud. So the only way of proving this space shuttle that it would work was to fly with crew in it on the very first mission which is just. It's really incredible to think about you. John young flying the space shuttle. No previous test flight in unscrewed position. And so many of your contemporaries have said that this was for that reason. This was a one of the boldest test flights in history. You have a sense of that at that time. Not as much as some people have talked about in some of my aviator friends might argue this mothers of rivaled it as well but it was It wasn't interesting thing. I don't know that we'll ever do that again. But the design of the shuttle was such that the we never designed to be able to fly.

ten years john bob crippen two thousand first mission first flight george first time john kmby john. Lewis John dick slayton eighteen John young eighty seven one john young four times moon nineteen sixty nine
"one space" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:37 min | 6 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"That typically wasn't flowing now there's more cross communication about things that people didn't know now reporting isn't just reporting into one space now. Did you get that. There's just more communication. I think that adds more value and to the point about metrics and accountability right. It's.

one space
Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

"The space shuttle Discovery and the Hubble Space Telescope. The set will be released in April and was created in partnership with NASA to mark the 40th anniversary since the first space shuttle flight on April 12th 1981. The shuttle model costs $199 and has more than 2300 pieces. Looks like a doubt will give back some of

Nasa
"one space" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:48 min | 6 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"It's just it's have you given your stool sample yet. Oh i haven't yet home. We go do that. I think we even broke a record for the most blood taken atta or blood draws at a conference because it's very rare to go to a medical conference and actually be taking blood and stool and urine samples and all this kind of stuff like that is not really a normal thing and actually like i feel like. That's another thing that our network is kind of a pioneer in doing which is really cool. It's like yeah if we have all of us together in one space why not use that to quickly get all this done. Get it all done because it really really helps and also we also have some like genetic what what would you call genetic counselors. Yeah yeah we like everywhere you turn someone saying. Do you want to take the survey. And it's like yeah. It's a lot of research studying going on. you can feel it. It's like a buzzing you can feel like the research happening. It's not just a social gathering it's real like we are really make progress. It's more than just a support group because it is that and it is fun but is actual really important work going on at the time and it's cool to be part of all of that at one. It's really cool. It's really cool to be a part of it. Feels like we're doing something you know what i mean like. Yeah we're a part of something bigger than ourselves and it's just such a special time and i talking about it makes we really want to go and i'm so sad but it will be fine as well. I know i miss it so much. But that's sort of the breakdown of confidence in. I think we we hit it on you guys. We.

one space
Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | 7 months ago

Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

Curatorial Research Center Gosper Twitter Sophie Balancer Meena Costco Sophie Cornwall Archipelago England Iowa Large International Museum Docker Newseum Association UK
The Aftermath: Texans File Insurance Claims Following Winter Storm

Houston's Morning News

02:15 min | 7 months ago

The Aftermath: Texans File Insurance Claims Following Winter Storm

"Story this hour the fall out. Us bigger than fallout. After our deep freeze. It's just beginning now Power back on for the most part, boiled water notices being lifted, including the one in Houston. The death toll, though across the state and clear we do know it's going to go up the family of an 11 year old boy in Conroe suing ERCOT. And the utility companies for $100 million What's interesting about this whole ordeal is what these power providers and Ercot knew long before. Many of us knew it That is that they did not have the capacity. They knew they didn't have the capacity. They knew that their that they had not winterized their sources of power. That is their attorney, Tony Busby, on our TV partner Channel to Governor Greg Abbott says the PUC has issued a moratorium now on customer disconnections, and they're stopping energy companies from issuing So suddenly zoomed to the top of the crop. Top of the heap high power bills that you've been hearing about Attorney General Ken Paxton issuing see ideas as investigative demands to work hot while the Texas Legislature starts its investigation this week, grocery stores slowly getting back to normal, but there are a lot of items that they just haven't been able to restock yet. Many of the local school district still close. Some, like H I s d won't be open tomorrow, either. The complete list to ktrh dot com. Meantime, we could have some of the largest number of insurance claims in Texas history because of all this Insurance companies are already slammed with thousands of claims by Texans with water damage. But unlike a hurricane or a tornado, the winter storms were statewide disaster, So the total number of claims may end up in the hundreds of thousands pipes are still falling. Right now they're frozen and one space all out, then that water damage will start surfacing first. Secondly, you still have a lot of people that don't have Internet cell service and power. Camille Garcia with the Insurance Council of Texas says it's too soon to estimate a total dollar amount. But As a comparison, Hurricane Harvey resulted in a $19 billion loss for insurance companies. Why gold speed this radio 7 40 ktrh

Ercot Tony Busby Attorney General Ken Paxton Conroe Greg Abbott PUC Houston Texas Legislature United States Hurricane Camille Garcia Texas Insurance Council Of Texas Hurricane Harvey
Jeff Bezos Passes  Elon Musk  as Richest Person in the World

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

Jeff Bezos Passes Elon Musk as Richest Person in the World

"Chef Bezos once again the richest person on earth, Test one space ex CEO Elon Musk recently surpassed him. But Tesla's shares dropped 2.4% Tuesday, setting Musk's fortune back more than $4.5 billion, And that's where Miami Palmetto senior High valedictorian steps back into the number one spot he previously held for over three years. With a net worth of $191.2 billion. Bezos, now best musk by nearly a billion bucks.

Chef Bezos Elon Musk Miami Palmetto Tesla Musk Bezos
Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:23 min | 8 months ago

Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

"On our live stream of first. I want to lead with this paper here. Of I think Andrew Neil is his name. Very serious journalist from England. I wish our country had someone is serious is him in a high position. He's very tough on both sides talking to the head of Twitter advertising former head of political advertising a Twitter play tape, I think what does concern people Pizza, though, is the sense of unaccountable power. Whether you agree with what Twitter is done, whether you think it's bias that attends school for those on the right rather than the left. The bigger issue is unaccountable power, particularly when they seem to act in concert. I mean, these air is a company's far bigger Then the oil, the railways, the steal the robber barons of the end of the 19th century in America, they've got much more money and much more influence. And yet Twitter bans trump for life. And you've given the reason why, and then Incitement to violence is something that has there's not a right to that in free speech, but Trump's people then C. All right, we're gonna move to parlor. We could do stuff there and then immediately. The rest of big tech causes that down as well. The APS are you cannot get either from Google or from Apple, and Abbas says we hosting you anymore. That's a cartel. In America cartels are legal. Amen. I love Wen. Non Americans tell us about our laws. No, I actually mean that non sarcastically because I feel as if we get so wrapped up in our own. Political circus at times that we lose kind of a connection to Exactly what It's happening in our own country, and whether the Department of Justice will investigate cartel like behavior remains to be seen. Probably unlikely. With the new administration that is coming in, however, a Zenger Neil, I believe that's his name, pointed out. The behavior of these companies is that one hand washes the other. That is literal cartel type behavior that they don't put profits and even their own fiduciary interest First. Instead, they put the incumbent economic protection of the combined interest of their company's first That is not legal. That is that is that that's beyond monopolist. Just so we're clear that is a different threshold than monopolistic behavior. So monopolies are illegal because you dominate in one space. Cartels are illegal. Even more so than monopolies because then you have different types of companies that are leaning on each other, too, then go after competitors wherever they might arise. And so we've seen this now with Amazon that dominates the server space 49% of all rented out server space goes through Amazon Web services we've seen that threw Apple, which provides a majority. Of the smartphones in this country, so that through Google that has 92% of all search results in the country's Elvis. So you Google plus Apple plus Amazon. That's a cartel. To say the least. What you think is about? Yeah, we've reached a new level of antitrust violations here, and obviously we created antitrust laws in response to monopolistic behavior from corporations in the past. But honestly, that's not even touching what's

Twitter Andrew Neil Zenger Neil America Donald Trump England Abbas WEN Apple Google Department Of Justice Amazon
Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

The Art Newspaper Weekly

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"A mysterious object resembling the free standing plank sculptures of the late minimalist artist. Joan mccracken or the alien monoliths in stanley kubrick's sci-fi classic. Two thousand one space odyssey has been discovered in a remote area of the utah desert prompting theories ranging from extraterrestrial visitation to avocado installation biologists from the utah. Division of wildlife spotted. The monolith from a helicopter welcomed up during a routine count of bighorn sheep in the area. The location of melissa has not been disclosed but the footage shiny object in store within a red rock canyon suggested that live somewhere in southern utah which has distinct ecological landscape

Joan Mccracken Utah Desert Stanley Kubrick Division Of Wildlife Utah Melissa
Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

Going Deep with Chad and JT

01:11 min | 10 months ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"Monolithic structure that was discovered in utah in a cave. But like it's not natural looking. It's like a black kind of like ten foot obelisk or something like that. I don't know if that's big enough to be novelist. But monolith a monolith right so sorry. Yeah i don't know. What did you think it's aliens. You think it's aliens. I mean that's the question right. Who put it there. Yeah because there's no no one's claimed it it dropped. They said like there's no signs of it was dropped. It just appeared You know. I'm going go aliens on this one. It sounds gnarly. I mean the article Heavily references two thousand one space odyssey. Which is where i get the word monolith from because that's like what's all about and so they're like. Oh maybe it's a fans. I think they filmed that in the utah desert. And they're kind of saying like oh. Some artists did an installation like it looks artistic more than like anything else They thought like oh nassar put it. They're like bounce satellite signals author. But it's kind of like lowered into some rocks and stuff which would be interfere so it's not quite ideal for that. So i think the leading theory in the article was like like an artistic installation or something. Yeah

Utah Utah Desert Nassar
To Take on Slack, Google is Rebranding -- Again

Business Wars Daily

02:57 min | 11 months ago

To Take on Slack, Google is Rebranding -- Again

"The pandemic has taught us many things how to coordinate business attire with sweatpants, for example, also how you can stay inside all day and still feel exhausted. For companies one of the biggest lessons is how much more productive many employees can be when they work remotely. In fact, a recent study published in the Harvard Business Review, found that knowledge workers are more productive and generally feel better about their work when doing it from home, it's the attention of these workers that Google is trying to get by rebranding it suite of productivity and remote collaboration tools. Google workspace formerly called G. SUITE INCORPORATES G, mail calendar, drive Docs, and other Google apps into a single interface. It's got a new look and a handful of new features that are supposed to. Save Time. That's the upside on the downside. Unlimited storage will cost you about eight bucks a month more than with G. Suite. The pandemic shifted such collaboration platforms from some what irritating office requirements to essential communication tools. So it makes sense for Google to coordinate all of these tools in one space to compete with productivity platforms like slack and Microsoft, teams but there's nothing truly earth shattering about the new offering and unfortunately everyone including Google keeps messing up the new name Fast Company reported that in two separate workspace related blog posts published earlier this month Google called its own new brand work place. Meanwhile Google is playing catch up with slack, which has more than twelve million active daily users and enterprise customers include the majority of fortune one hundred companies including starbucks, Oracle and target at the company's annual conference slack announced it was adding more security features like the ability to send secure slack messages to people outside your company. The verge reports that slack will also introduce instagram likes stories and push to talk audio by the end of the year. The goal is to cut down on constant video calls and inefficient text conversations by giving users communication tools they already use a quick story post can update the team and replace that annoying fifteen minute morning huddle. Plus slack already has so many integrations that make it more than a messaging platform including integration with Google workspace. But all of those bells and whistles might not matter as protocol reported. This month platforms like slack have been pouring resources into chat functionality, which is the heart of collaboration platforms but workspaces tools are already integrated into companies in other ways. G Mail is the world's biggest email mail provider and most companies already use Google docs, sheets and slides. In fact, Google now has more than two billion users who rely on at least one of those apps. So it has some home field advantage to slack may have an advantage in cool features for now. But Google has one thing that's hard to innovate sheer mass and when a player that big comes to play on your feel you better be ready with your.

Google Harvard Business Review G. Suite Instagram Fast Company Starbucks Microsoft Oracle
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan and this is intelligence squared US part of our discourse disruptor series and what we're going to be focusing on. Our the coming presidential debates they are coming sort of starting September twenty-ninth, the first of three. And of course, because everything's different this year, the debates are going to feel different almost certainly going to be. In some fashion remote, maybe the debaters, the candidates won't even be in the same place. There's only going to be one moderator. We're not gonNA live audience because you can't have that many people in one space in this dangerous time. Also what we have going on as a conversation simultaneously with which is focused on, maybe we shouldn't have debates maybe it's time to wrap up that whole institution and go back to a time of no debates. And when I say go back did you know that for most of American history this institution that we know is the debates did not exist that for most of our history, there were no debates and did you know that once we started having debates that in the first series, there was a remote debate the candidates were not in the same place and there was no live audience. And there was only one moderator. So maybe things are circling back. There's a lot of history here and we are interested in that because. At intelligence squared, we are very interested in history and we are also very very interested in debates. So that's what we want to focus on and we want to focus. In this case of discourse disrupters with an excellent source of information about the past and the present and potentially the future, and that is a gentleman named Newton Minot and Newton Minnow is an old friend of intelligence squared us and he's also known as the father of American presidential debates and we'll talk a little bit about why that is. But first, let's bring Newt Minnow into the conversation newt. Thank you so much for for joining us. It's really a pleasure to be back in communication with you. John I. LOOK FORWARD TO I. Admire your work or the intelligence squared very very much. Well, thank you. Can I ask before we start everything else I find it interesting that for folks who don't know you have lived through some very, very disruptive times and this one in your nineties a comes at the after a long series of other adventures. I mean, you have lived through I, think twenty three presidential elections. At this point, you have seen twelve cycles of the debates that we're GONNA be talking about. You lived through the major disruption called World War to. Use served overseas you went into politics You're an aide to ally Stevenson who ran for president does the Democratic nominee twice in the nineteen fifties. So you saw two elections then you joined John Kennedy's administration and you saw the trauma of his assassination and then you were very close friends with Robert Kennedy and you saw his assassination and lived through that and and now this. Just just to take a moment is, is this disruption different in dramatically in kind from all of the others you've seen so far? Well, I lived through all that, but then I had another. Exposure to politics with Obama, the because Michelle worked for our firm and and Barack came to be a summer associate and they fell in love and so we got. So we had another round politics with with with the OBAMAS. About that but all throughout, I would say the last fifty years of this you have been intersecting with this institution that we call the presidential debates take us back to nineteen, fifty, nine, nineteen, sixty, where as an aide to at least Stevenson. You actually were involved in the idea of pushing forward the idea that there there. He did not get to take part in that kind of debate but was interested in enemies interested because you are suggesting it. You have a very strong faith in the idea of technology. To be a force for good and for communication and you saw television as this, you're right as this big thing happening in the sixties. Well, it actually was in the fifties in when. In in the fifty six. Presidential, election. The incumbent President President Eisenhower. Having a heart attack. And there was a big question whether he would be able to run again. And I suggested to adly that instead of the candidates. Rushing. All over the country and speaking crowds that that. Now, we have television which reached every home. And that instead of traditional debate that. There'd be a series of joint appearances or debates between the presidential candidates. As they considered that his advisors thought it was a gimmick and it was he never suggested it. The Federal Communications Act when it was originally passed during the new deal. Required equal time for political candidates. The law said section three fifteen FA broadcaster gives or sells time to one candidate. At must give ourselves time to the opponent on the same basis. As a result that was interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission to mean any use of the air by a candidate including being in a news program. So the broadcasters were pressing to get news programs exempt. From the equal time requirement and they finally succeeded in the late fifties. But debates were not regarded as a news program.

Stevenson President President Eisenhower John Donvan Barack Obama Newton Minnow Federal Communications Commiss John Kennedy United States Newton Minot Robert Kennedy John President Trump FA Summer Associate Michelle
Getting Into America with Trymaine Lee

Black Girl Nerds

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Getting Into America with Trymaine Lee

"Welcome to the bloggers podcast I'm your host Ryan Africa's episode. We're going to be keeping the conversation going because we WANNA. Keep the names of George. Floyd, Brianna, Taylor Ahmad Aubrey Tamir, Rice Rees Gordon, Sandra Blan- and unfortunately the list can keep going and going and going, but we want to keep those names out. There want to keep this conversation going so people stay informed. And we don't want this to be got to be forgotten, so we're back in the situation again so Yes, like I said blogger owners committed to doing that and I am not just here by myself. I have a contassot. Guests with me here today to keep this conversation going. I am talking about. Pull a surprise and Emmy Award winning journalist. Tremaine, Lee. He is also MB. Correspondent in host of the into America podcast, so I am so glad to have him here with me today. They Ryan thank you so much revenue neutral appreciative. I WANNA. Start off this. This question was kinda going throughout. My might assume I knew I was GONNA. I was excited about this because I wanna Kinda. Give the listeners a different perspective that we don't get all the time with all this coverage of the protests and everything that's going on and not to say that you speak for all of news broadcasting. and I'm in production that worlds often find myself in this conversation as well. This is why this question is so important to me. But how do you deal with the idea of people asking why the media is covering the protests way their covenant, or you know certain situations. You find yourself in a maybe you don't have a choice of what the story is recovering that day. What's it? It depends I think the one thing that we do have choice over one one space did I control is how I centered the narrative. That I'm speaking to reporting on recovering so sometimes. The critique of the media is absolutely correct, because the media is not like any other institution. America, that's been a touched in racism, touched in bias touching all those things, so it's incumbent upon us working inside media. To make sure flicking the truest narrative possible, and sometimes that begins with our own experience in our own. To understand the language that's being spoken these communities right so so we're not relying on trucks and stereotypes ideally. We're we're connecting to the people in a different way and so I don't pay much mind to the critiques necessarily except for some of correct That's when we have to make sure that we are redoubling our efforts but I know from from. You know I don't I. Don't get many of those critiques because you know. I try to keep it as as true as possible I. Mean That's what I've done my entire career. So you know sometimes they're correct. Sometimes, they're not sometimes people. Are just shouting into the ether, your social media just right the shouting right, but I think the good thing is that the proof is always in the so that people can consume the information. The best dress with their concerns are. Right and speaking of getting out there and speaking the truth into America a fairly new podcast. She started up. Can you tell me about how that started and wise that important to you? Into America at this point I think we're on episode Twenty Six maybe twenty seven in the the whole idea behind into Americans really get outside of our bubbles in really go out into America. In an approach politics policy in a different conway. Along and I worked for MSNBC PROUDLY SO but you know the twenty four hour news cycle. It's kind of like a horse. Race Times. If you're not careful the way we. The Lens from which review politics? It's also who's up now. WHO's fallen behind? You know it's daily drama as opposed to the way politics policy actually impact the lives of everyday people, and so the goal of into America was to do just that. Go out into America. And speak directly to people about their concerns, their needs but also how the backdrop of policy is really impacting them. You know and I really do believe that is the kind of thing. I worked my entire life trying to trying to do right always out there with the people and trying to tell the people's story. Our care deeply about the most vulnerable among US marginalized community, most certainly a black folks in this country, but also the poor any race the marginalized anyways so into America. We've been trying to. Obviously it's shifted a bit through. I Kobe nineteen right so now we're. Quest heard in with the engaged with how people are You know the fallout from Kobe nineteen whether it's the the emotional stuff with his health, related impact was the economic impact and now in. This Arab uprising rebellion in protests. We've shifted again to to address in all of the concerns around systemic racism the the the initial ideals of white supremacy that in so many ways to guide this country. The protests respect all of those things, so that's a long answer, but that is into America.

America Ryan Africa LEE United States Emmy Award Kobe Sandra Blan George Msnbc Taylor Ahmad Aubrey Tamir Floyd Tremaine Conway Rice Rees Gordon Brianna
SpaceX Crew Dragon Is the Most Anticipated Launch of the Year

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

SpaceX Crew Dragon Is the Most Anticipated Launch of the Year

"Astronauts are expected to launch into space from U. S. soil for the first time in nearly a decade this afternoon a SpaceX crew dragon capsule will carry Bob bacon and Doug Hurley from NASA's Kennedy Space Center to the international space station it'll be the first space crew to launch from the US since twenty eleven liftoff is scheduled for one thirty three this

Bob Bacon Doug Hurley Nasa Kennedy Space Center United States U. S. Spacex
"one space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"one space" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"If you're listening to this you obviously like podcast and you probably like music to on spotify. You can listen to all of that and what place for free. You don't need a premium account. Spotify has a huge. You've catalogue of podcasts on every topic including the one. You're listening to right now. Uh spotify you can follow your favorite podcast. You never miss an episode download episodes to listen to off-line flying wherever you are easily share what you're listening to with your friends via spotify integrations was social media platforms like instagram so just search for space news pot on on the spotify app or browse podcasts in your library tab and follow me so you never miss an episode of the space news pod spotify is the world's leading music streaming dreaming service and now it can be your go to for podcasts to hello and welcome back to the space news pod daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will walden on this episode. We're going to be talking about out a recent activity that happened on the space station allegedly so this is the first time that this has ever happened in the history of humanity <hes>. There's a possible like i said before alleged crime that took place while a nasa astronaut astronaut was on board the space station now that would mean that this is the only and first case of space crime crime and nessa is reported to be investigating a claim that an astronaut accessed the bank account of her estranged spouse spouse from the i._s._s. In what may be the first allegation with crime committed in space in this nasa astronaut is ann mclean. She acknowledges that she accessed the account from the i._s._s. but she also said she didn't do anything wrong. Her estranged spouse. Summer awarded filed a complaint with the federal trade commission. The f._t._c. and ms mclean has returned back to earth. She's not in space anymore and the astronaut told the new york times through her lawyer that she was just making sure that the family's finances were in order and there was enough money to pay bills and care for miss warden son who they had both been raising before they split up aw now rusty hardin who's an mcleans lawyer said she strenuously denies that she did anything improper and she's totally cooperating so as of right now it looks like allegedly she logged into the bank account checked act to see how much money was in the bank account and that was it. That's all we know right. Now and miss maclean miss warden who is an air force intelligence officer they married in twenty fourteen then they filed for force in two thousand eighteen and nasa office of inspector general has been investigating nissim contacted both over the allegation so ms mccane is cooperating creating anna mccain the astronaut that actually did this from the international space station the first possible all space crime ever in human history but we'll see how this kind of goes along and see what happens with this if there's going to be a trial or if it's just gonna going to be kind of one of those things where <hes> they just say. Look don't log in again like you. Don't have any reason to log in. There's this isn't your bank account anymore. Just stay out of it now. The federal trade commission is pretty strict about these things so if she's axing as accessing an account that isn't hers. There's there could be criminal penalties. It could be a big fine and this could possibly go down as the first crime that's ever been committed in space now of all the crimes that be that could be committed. This seems like a sort of innocent type of crime. If what mccain is saying is true now she's checking in <hes> <hes> a loved one checking to see how much money they have in the bank account to see if everything's okay but were gonna see what happens in the future because once they start investigating a little bit more in dig into it. I'll have all the news for you here on the space news. It was pod so thank you so much to my sponsor all right. I'm gonna take a quick break and when i get back we're going to have some more space news. I they host my podcast on anchor f._m. Anchors the easiest way to make podcast an anchor gives you all the tools that you need in one place for free which you can use from your phone phone or from your computer now these creation tools allow you to record edit your podcast so it sounds amazing in they'll distribute the podcast for you so it can it'd be heard anywhere. Spotify apple podcasts google podcasts in many more in you can easily make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership so download the ankara up or go to anchor dot f._m. To get started search and i want to say thank you to everyone who has been involved since day. One one without you couldn't do this so thank you to everyone. Who's following the channel. If you don't follow the channel yet please hit this button. It only takes a second. You'll get space. It's news every single day. You're weak and sometimes on the weekends to seven days a week. Usually sometimes twice depends on how much news there is out there so again. Thank you so much for taking the time but if you are a day to spend it here with me on the space news pod my name is will walden and i'll see you soon.

spotify federal trade commission nasa walden anna mccain ms mclean ann mclean new york times rusty hardin instagram nessa maclean officer nissim ms mccane seven days
"one space" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"one space" Discussed on E&C's Pod of Awesomeness

"So those those rare instances like that one space man, I was all in for just going for it and like enjoying the moment. Like people talk about it afterwards. And it was it was really really special. It was have some fun fun times fun. For sure L A now one of ten thousand matches. Now fast forward a bunch of years to this last year. And I shot you attack says like looks like you found a new shoe because I was watching the series with age, and I was like, whoa. All right here. He's really good, man. Yeah. He's really good. That's bring bring that. Same thing. Up to saying the the chemistry that that. You guys had was was very similar to to the what I from what I remember the matches you had with with edge. And you know, it's funny to win for. I we've talked about on this podcast. Lot's times where you know, people think that you can't wrestle or that. You're not all he you know, he has a couple Muzy can't rest and to me. That's absurd. I said maybe he's not the conventionally like this mood guy in the ring. But he's really good. See that's the thing that people don't get. And when you can adapt to any did you find when you were when you have this chance with AJ that you had something to prove in that respect too. Or was it just hey, you're gonna go out and do what you do. And no matter who's across from you. I just think it's a matter of. AJ was kind of the culmination for for years we began recruiting. Very gifted performers in a in a physical aspect. I think you could probably get the calendar all the way back to like see 'em public with with punk and Daniel, Bryan. And then signing a lot of guys from ringer von or the Indies, right? I think it's just generally assessing. You're you're playing field like a match with me against Brock Leser or Braun strowman isn't going to be the same as with Kevin Owens or AJ style. Right. And I just try to do my best to to give you know. I'm in a point where I do need to showcase my abilities. But essentially the the goal is for a guy like AJ to show he can hang with John CENA, and to do that he really has to show what he's made of. So you know, we we gotta do the best that it showcase in. What those guys have that. I think you know, in in terms of like like Brock or or even Roman or. Braun that's a that's a bit of a different tale. Because I think the interest is always or is already there. But when you you have guys that especially, you know, I really love the chance to be able to showcase guys essentially the first time like I know Chris worked with AJ before. But I didn't think he really got a proper chance he debuted in the rumble. He really didn't do much. And that's kind of what I based my argument on we'll be kind of butted heads a little bit. But I really wanted him to be able to showcase what he could do because man is just super super good. And in a guy like seven was the same thing when he came in. And there's there's a bunch of those names where where not only do you let these guys talk and let them make a statement. And I thought you know, any of those guys whether it be poked Ryan, and the list goes on and on sat in, you know, Kevin AJ, and I think it pretty much any of those guys who come from traditional roots of pro wrestling who. Made it to the dance and got a chance to to brush up against me. I thought they did a great job explaining themselves on the microphone..

Kevin AJ Brock Leser Muzy Bryan Braun wrestling Indies John CENA Kevin Owens Ryan Daniel Chris
"one space" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"one space" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Thousand one space. Yeah. The representation of the monolith. And like Buzz Aldrin said what's that don't understand guys a device that? Is a communication devices a transmitter it's been around since ancient Egypt and the idea of ancient Egyptian civilization living in Antarctica is not beyond the pale. When there have been many speculations about. In fact, I learned something today about Germany, and how they were one of the centers of Egyptology, and that could be one of the reasons why Hitler ordered a group to go down there and investigate. Well, they were also kind of crazy about they still had the Dresden scrolls from the ancient. Determines were just not before Hitler. They were fascinated with that type of archaeology is right, right. It's amazing stuff where do you get into that more with the brattle coming up on ground zero? So you may want to tune in a great show. I appreciate it. Sam. Thank you. Thank you. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred has triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred coming up you get to hear from author and an he shows up and speaks he's he's a very well. Well, known speaker at UFO conferences Brad Olsen. Good friend of mine. Coming up on ground zero. We just got back from Antarctica. And we're glad to have him here. He's gonna talk about what's going on down there. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three three seven hundred. I'm quite Lewis. You're listening to ground zero. And we'll be back..

Hitler Brad Olsen Antarctica Buzz Aldrin Egypt Lewis Sam Germany
"one space" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:07 min | 3 years ago

"one space" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Facebook's role and spreading. Misinformation has come under intense scrutiny in the last two years. Facebook has partnered with documentary filmmaker Morgan Neville to create facing facts, a short film that gives an inside look at how they are dealing with this complex issue. Go see it at inside, feed dot com. This is tech news briefing from the Wall Street Journal. Hello, welcome. I'm Tanya boost. Does reporting from the newsroom in New York. So that trip you were planning around the moon next year. It will have to wait Yulon Musk's SpaceX delays plans for the very first space tourists the details, but I, the tech headlines. Apple is holding its annual worldwide developers conference check with the podcast this week for recaps of the key points. If current rumblings are any indication this year, apple focuses attention on the quality of its iphone and ipad software execs at the annual developers conference talked up, many new features, a sampling of two new apple watch features walkie talkie, and web browsing. Also, the animosity Wall Street Journal's personal tag guru. Extraordinary Joanna stern says the biggest cheers came from the reveal of the memo g think bit Moji, but actually mapped to your face. Other new animal features include a ghost and a koala, and you can also face time with them for more on the latest updates and live coverage of the conference had to WSJ dot com. Amazon's latest milestone and eight hundred billion dollar market value. It joins apple as the only US companies valued above eight hundred billion dollars with shares of the ecommerce giant now up forty one percent on the year. Amazon took just eighty five trading days to reach the eight hundred billion dollar milestone after passing. Seven hundred billion dollars in January over at Microsoft, a big by the company purchased his Git hub for seven point, five billion dollars to be precise. The journal says, acquiring the software code repository is a move that could help it convinced more developers to create apps for its cloud computing business, and it turns out robocaller win. Even if you don't answer the phone outfits that flood American landlines with marketing calls us a decades old identification system to profit even when no one picks up. Here's how it works. Each time, a caller's name is displayed. Phone companies pay small fees, typically fractions of pennies to databases that. For such record with millions of automated calls a day. The amounts can add up coming up SpaceX likely won't launch a pair of space tourists to loop around the moon this year, which CEO Elon Musk thinks about next year. This is the Wall Street Journal's tech news briefing Facebook's role in spreading. Misinformation has come under intense grooten in the last two years. Facebook has partnered with documentary filmmaker Morgan Neville to create facing facts, a short film that gives an inside look at how they are dealing with this complex issue. Go see it at inside, feed dot com. So it turns out SpaceX will not launch a pair of space tourists to loop around the moon this year as previously announced here to talk about the challenges plaguing CEO Elon Musk's plans for human space exploration is Wall Street Journal reporter, Andy pasture, calling in from Los Angeles. Andy, thanks for having me. So a weakened, you know, a company spokesperson confirmed that the private moon launch has been postponed. What did we learn about what's what's causing the current delays? So as in most things with EON musk, it's it's a good news, bad news story or or you can look at it two different ways. They were going to launch these SpaceX. We won't launch to private astronauts. Essentially, passengers really into circumnavigate the moon backdoor. And this was going to happen by sometime late twenty eighteen and the reasons that it's not happening are varied and sort of complex the the raw. Rocket that was going to do this for SpaceX too much longer to develop than expected. The capsule that they were going to use is still under development is also delayed and SpaceX is working on an even bigger rocket and trying to put some resources into that. And so that also has created some roadblocks. So it's really a question of probably over promising in the beginning sending a timetable that was unrealistic, but the company says it still intends to do this. It's still important to do this, and I think they want to do from a number of reasons. First of all, to show that the reliability of their new rockets, the falcon heavy, which is the one that was going to take mission and as many times as they can to launch that before they start using it for government missions or in tandem with government issues. That's one certainly. One incentive in the second centered is so much talk about public private partnerships. Now with the Trump administration, that space exploration is going to be a government industry joint effort. So I think SpaceX wants to make sure that. They have their place and that they show that they're doing stuff on their own and want to participate with the government where it's appropriate or where it's possible. So clearly a lot to iron out. Did we learn anything else in terms of a timeline though it seems like a lot iron out before the next year, but I understand that that might be in play. Well, I think it's not clearly it certainly, I would say at least the labor year perhaps much longer they have set. The company is said in the past that they wanted to do this private moon mission after they started some regular NASA missions to take astronauts to the space station in operational flights, not just intest life, and that could take really could take until twenty twenty now looks like. So we're, we're still was still some way way from this. What would be a really amazing thing? Because if you look at the projected path of this dragon capsule that they're talking about, it would actually go for the further into the solar system than anybody from earth has gone further than the Apollo moon landings. Actually went beyond the mood, of course, and then came back and landed. So I, it would be quite a a landmark event on top of these various production delays. Andy sending people to the moon. Sounds risky how our industry experts and analysts coming down on the risk factor and is that impacting SpaceX? Is progress? Absolutely. Has impacted quite risky. I mean, of course, the the issue of getting up. There is one thing with the comeback. It's very complicated reentry because the capsule will be going much faster than coming back from the space station, and it actually has to make some New Jersey. They call it a skip maneuver, which means that they come into the atmosphere toward the atmosphere, and they have to actually raise their out the tooth trying to lose some speed and then start back again to come back toward the aura. So very risky. And I think the the feeling of most of the industry folks that I've talked to is that you don't wanna do this risky thing before you show NASA that you're able to do. Will somewhat less risky thing. And that is to take out NAS to the space station which is risky on its own. But I think you know not quite not quite to this level. Setback, but perhaps it's worth thinking about regardless of when tourist trips to the moon start. It could happen say what you will about Elon Musk and his team. They've really revolutionized the launch industry. Well, that's right. And I think that's when I say, if you can look at it in two different ways, what they've accomplished in a matter of sixteen years since he founded the company, but really in a matter of ten years since south of nine, their basic mainstay rocket started flying. That's only been since two thousand two thousand eight, the what, the the -ccomplish this unbelievable. Really nobody industry thought that anybody would be able to do this in terms of the cost of the launches reusability of the rocket, and but he's working on a whole bunch of other things he's working on satellites. He's working on the much bigger rocket for deep space exploration. So you have to say that the company is stretched. People are working on a tremendous clip in marathon sessions, almost all of them if they stay, it's going to require a huge amount of digital cash. Capital for him to be able to do all the things that he wants to do. And at the same time, people should remember that his basic business launching big commercial satellites is not in good shape. It's going downhill, fewer satellites being ordered fewer satellites being launched. So at the same time that he's trying to do all these ambitious things which require a lot of money, his basic revenue from launching commercial satellites is going to be eroding. So that's another complication in all of his Mackin Asians. And you know, balancing acts complicated story. That will all definitely have our. Thanks so much. My pleasure for more on the story head to wsj.com. Thanks again to the Wall Street Journal's Andy pastor. This has been the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal in New York. I'm Tanya boost does. Thanks for listening.

SpaceX Wall Street Journal Facebook CEO Elon Musk Apple New York Morgan Neville NASA Yulon Musk Andy Amazon EON musk Elon Musk Microsoft US New Jersey Joanna stern WSJ Tanya boost
"one space" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"one space" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Make statements like the sacramento kings did i mean think about what the kings did they had a psa that played on the jumbotron of their stadium they had the owner of the team a man named vic round ebay who spoke in solidarity with the protests the night that they shut the fans out of the arena there is no way that happens in the national football league and because of the national football league is so top down so a thawra tarian in terms of its approach to players that the players have felt like they've had to actually rebel in the one space where their helmets are off which is during the national anthem and what about the president and his approach to these protests i mean everyone remembers the way it went down in the nfl and the president capitalizing on that situation to rally his supporters against take any protests in the nfl he hasn't done so with the nba but it doesn't mean he hasn't had something to say about players well the one thing that donald trump has said has done is withdraw any invitation to the golden state warriors from visiting the white house after they wanna championship last year but this was done after it became very public that the golden state warriors almost certainly would not accept an invitation from the white house and donald trump has largely steered clear from the nba he hasn't responded on twitter as he does to so many people to coaches like gregg popovich and steve kerr who've spoken out against him he did not respond to lebron james for calling donald trump a bum very famously that made the cover of the new york times and the reasons why i think donald trump takes such a wide berth from the nba is that there's no way to reframe those kinds of protests like with the nfl donald trump is able to say look at them they're not patriotic look at them they hate america and what when the players are what.

ebay president nfl nba white house donald trump twitter gregg popovich steve kerr new york times america sacramento vic football lebron james