35 Burst results for "One Space"

"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | Last month

"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is defining the future. Extremely important as a hub of disciplines all in one space with all of these brilliant minds. NGOs roll is huge when it comes to defining the future and power from an interdisciplinary point of view. They have it all there, whether it's the innovation hub, the maker space, and GIT is already creating fast collaboration between the disciplines and you have civil engineers speaking to programmers speaking to electrical engineers. And together, they're creating advancements that we wouldn't have been able to do without those three minds coming together and solving a problem as one rather than solving it in isolation. And JIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at nj IT dot EDU. This is a Bloomberg money minute when gas prices hit record highs in June, Americans cut back on their driving, making fewer trips to the store, taking a bus or train instead of the car even carpooling, which added to a big reduction in gas consumption, but veteran oil analyst Paul sankey told Bloomberg, there's another reason for the drop in gas use. It's just more efficient cars that turn off in traffic jams and everything else. I think that's what we're seeing combined with marginal behavior change where people in this place will gasoline when it's expensive. And thanks to new technology, cars are better, says Carl brower executive analyst at the online auto marketplace, IC cars dot com. Cars are just far more fuel efficient than they have ever been. And you're getting more and more popularity and demand for hybrid and electric vehicles. And now federal energy officials say even though prices at the pump are down, their forecasting a drop in gas use for the current quarter. Tom busby Bloomberg radio

Bloomberg Paul sankey New Jersey institute of techno GIT Carl brower Tom busby Bloomberg radio
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"I've been told that by multiple people at the company repeatedly that this is an ambition of theirs is to create this one stop shop, and they've rolled something out where you can sign in to all of your different streaming accounts and have it tracked. I think the experience is pretty shitty right now. And don't personally recommend it. But it's available in plexus working on it and hopefully they'll be working on that instead of their music player that I've used twice in my life. What you just described as the grand ambition of plex, the good news for our friend Adam here, is that that is everybody's grand ambition. That's what Apple is trying to do. That's what plex is trying to do. That's what Google is trying to do with Google TV, like this thing where you just open up a thing and it tells you all the shows. You haven't watched yet, is like the dream. And it is everybody's dream. It's borderline impossible to pull off for all the reasons you just described. But I think eventually we're going to get there just because everybody is working on basically the same problem. Yeah, and I would say Google and Apple are both pretty close. I would also throw out there. Here's my dark horse candidate. It's this wonderful app I've been using it for like two or three years now. I love it. It's called channels. And what it does is it a digital DVR, but a legal one, ha ha. Win one. And the idea is you're supposed to be able to just use it instead of a regular DVR, so you connect it to your antenna and just get all of your stuff that way, or you connect it to your cable and get it all that way. But it also aggregates from all the other cable channels through this thing called TV everywhere, where it'll just pull from HBO, it'll pull from AMC, all of these different places and record it and put it on the DVR. And I've found that using that Apple and then religiously checking Netflix and being mad because Netflix is really bad about presenting me when a new season of something is out. Those three are my best current solution. Legal solution. Totally legal solution you can do it right now. You will not go to jail. You will not have to pay tremendous fines to companies who sue you. And I love channels. It's great success. It's not as strong for the streaming as all the other TV as like cable and linear stuff, but it's good. And it's pretty. All right, I like it. I would say go all in with one of the Google or apple or something else platforms. And just bet on whichever one of those you think is going to get better faster. And then if you want to do the crazy Alex kranz streaming bonanza go for it. I kind of watch my programs. All right, Alex, I think we have solved Adam's problem. So thank you. Yes. Sorry, Adam, the world sucks. That's it for the questions for now, but like I said, we are going to be doing this call in segment again. So call us any time the number is 8 6 6 version one one that's 866-837-4311, but it's much

Google Apple Adam Netflix AMC HBO Alex kranz Alex
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:02 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Welcome to this live streaming presentation of the National Football League on Prime Video. Amazon is going to start having Thursday Night Football, local networks, mostly kept the Sunday games, but they're also going to start streaming some stuff on their own apps. It also sounds like a streaming network is going to get the NFL Sunday ticket, and the NFL is also working on its own streaming service. It's insane. A bundle for that sounds great, right? You just have one place to watch football. But getting all of those players on board is going to be damn near impossible. Christian told me that he doesn't think it's as impossible as I do. He just sees it as a new kind of super complicated contract to sign. But even in a world where everybody goes direct to consumer, you still have this issue as a sports fan that ESPN has one set of games, another network has another set of games, and you just have to think about the pricing strategy that would have to be implemented there to make that all work. You end up in a place where a bundle actually makes a lot of sense. In general, Christian told me that the networks and studios basically want two things. They want money, which YouTube handily has lots of. And they want reach. Which YouTube also has lots of. We've got 2 billion users worldwide, so I think whether content is distributed in a bundle or where over time we explore other ways of distributing it, I think YouTube can be a great partner there. The larger purview I have a YouTube is that I manage our connected TV business. We think about sports globally. We think about it, not just in terms of how we work with the broadcasters, but also how we work directly with the leagues. In the game, we're just trying to make sure that wherever possible we're getting this content in front of YouTube users and we're doing it in a model that makes sense for the end customer and also for the network partners leagues and broadcast partners we work with. The thing he's really saying there. And the thing I find so fascinating about YouTube TV is that YouTube is the Internet's best video distributor. And in the long run, YouTube doesn't really care what form that video takes. If nothing else, I think YouTube TV exists as the same kind of backstop as cable. It's kind of a bridge between the cable box and whatever the future looks like. And YouTube, by the way, is desperately trying to

NFL YouTube Amazon Football ESPN football Christian
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:47 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Best known, but there are a few others. And YouTube TV announced this week that it has 5 million people either paying for or trying out the service, which obviously still pales next to the cable giants, but is growing really fast and means this whole bundle thing might not be dead yet. Christian ossian has been one of the lead product folks on the YouTube TV team since the product launched in 2017 and actually even a couple of years before that. And he's told me that when he first started investigating the cable world, he discovered that a lot of people were like me, they liked the bundle. They liked the TV. They just hated the way it all worked. The idea that you had to sign up for a two year contract, that there was all this obscurity around pricing, that there was very little choice and you had to rent these really dated boxes with limited amounts of storage, limited ability to record multiple shows. So we really started to think, okay, there's something there, and YouTube probably really helped. We could probably make the television experience much better. And that was really the kernel of what ultimately became YouTube TV. With unlimited DVR and personalized recommendations, YouTube TV is live TV reinvented for the 21st century. I should say, by the way, that there's one kind of content that continues to drive the regular TV ecosystem more than anything else. And that is sports. Welcome to Friday night baseball on Apple TV plus presented by Q big money super complicated deals that regulate where games can be shown, how to whom on what device it's insane. And it's because the leagues want to slice up the pie as many ways as possible to make as much money from their content as possible. That's how you end up with the NFL making an exclusive mobile rights deal with Verizon so you can't watch games on cell networks with other carriers. It's stupid. And it's just how it works. When we started, we originally had this crazy idea of like, could we just do the four main broadcast channels and do a ten to $15 bundle and see how that would work? And of course, we had yet to sort of really work in earnest with all of our broadcast partners and the bundle set of channels that they offer is still very core to how they approach distribution of their programming. So those are just kind of the hard choices you have to make. But the good news is, a lot of these companies have spent the last 5 years starting to figure out the Internet, and this should all work better now, right? Christian told me it's, well, it's not getting better exactly, but it's definitely changing. Oh, it's a completely different world. Most of the network and broadcast partners that we work with have launched direct to consumer services have placed a lot of emphasis on focus on that. We've gone through a pandemic, which was a really interesting experience from the perspective of selling TV, especially when there was no sports on live TV. And I think there's a really big market for TV. I think football, news, all these things are really important for the average household. And it's great to be able to build a service that gives them choice. On YouTube TV, if you just want to subscribe to showtime or stars, you can actually do that. We offer the ability to subscribe to stand-alone subscriptions. And if you want the full thing and with a bunch of add ons, you can do that too. There's a really interesting idea in there, right? He's saying that YouTube TV's main thing isn't we give you live cable channels over the Internet. It's the bundling itself that's the main thing. Just giving you one place to see all your stuff. Live, on demand, ad supported subscription, whatever. All in one app. That would be, by the way, a huge change from the way that streaming services work right now, which is to try and keep you inside their apps as much as possible. It's going to be hard work to get that to change. And YouTube is going to have some serious competition as that new channel bundler, given that Apple TV and Amazon are both also investing in ways to let you subscribe to HBO and stars and stuff like that. Most streaming services, by the way, haven't gone for that channel strategy, but it seems like it's starting to catch on. The NFL is actually a good example of just how weird this is going to get. A lot of its media contracts have just come up in the last couple of years. And it's gotten insane.

YouTube Christian ossian giants Verizon NFL Apple baseball football HBO Amazon
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Go do science. There's got to be some ceremony that happens here with that's like they knight each other with a sword. I don't know. There's got to be something. There will be some celebrations, I'm sure. I'd love to see them. But no, that's a great point that you made the optical or leaf feinberg who's the head of the optical instruments. I asked him, you know, how does it feel to be kind of transitioning control of the telescope? And of course, he's still going to have work to do, but things are moving into this new phase where, yeah, the scientists are kind of taking charge. And he was just expressing how happy he is to finally kind of sit back and discover the universe along with the scientists now. So all of this work up until this point has just been to get this thing into space and make sure that it works. And so now we actually get to see the fruits of that labor. And so it's a whole new era for this telescope that many people have been working on for decades. That's awesome. What do we know about the first year? Obviously, the science doers are starting to do science. And the first stuff is starting to come out. How much do we know about what's coming in the next, say, 12 months? Sure. So like I said, the first year is jam packed. There was a lot of proposals that were competitively bid. I did a story on it when JWT launched in December. There's a lot. I think if you go to the space telescope science Institutes page, they have a full list of what they're looking at. And it's everything you could possibly imagine. One that has the most time is this one called cosmos web, and it's just going to take like a full deep image of tons of galaxies and the deepest recesses of the universe, kind of like the Hubble deep field, but even bigger and more detail. And then one really exciting aspect of the science that JWST will do, which wasn't even envisioned when it was built, is looking at the atmospheres of exoplanets. So exoplanets are planets outside of our solar system. And it's really in relative terms. It's a very new field of study. You know, we didn't even know exoplanets existed until a few decades ago. And now we've discovered thousands of these worlds outside of our solar system. One thing that JWC will be able to do is peer into the atmospheres of these exoplanets and discover what the constituents are. So what kind of molecules are present and those certain types of molecules and their recipes and what kinds of mixes there are in those atmospheres could give us a better understanding if okay, maybe this planet might be able to host life as we know it. Not saying that we will get those answers, but there's plenty of exoplanet targets that are in the first year of science. Another exciting portion is a few years ago, they discovered a full planetary system with I believe 7 planets around one star. And so it's called the trappist system, and we'll be taking a look at that. It's a very exciting system. So there's a ton of stuff. I mean, and I'm only scratching the surface. The real big stuff is looking into, you know, the early cosmos, the first stars and galaxies that formed just a few 100 million years after the Big Bang. That's really what JWST was designed to do. It's also going to be looking at the planets and moons in our own solar system. It'll be tracking asteroids and comets, you know, I believe dark matter is involved in certain ways. You know, there's tons of applications for this telescope. That's what makes it so popular is because it's going to touch almost every aspect of astrophysics and astronomy. I think in like year 8, when the hype has died down and people are like, oh, James Webb, I don't even remember. We here at the verge cast. We're going to buy some time, and we're going to do some science on the telescope. I don't know what we're going to do, but it's going to be amazing. Yes. Lauren, thank you so much. This is really fun. Yeah, no problem. Okay, we're going to take a break and then I want to get back to my cable canceling adventure because I actually need some help with some things.

leaf feinberg JWT James Webb Lauren
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And a big flat mirror is not the most aerodynamic of things generally. No, no, it probably for the best that it was folded up during launch anyway. But they built the mirror in these 18 hexagonal segments that are supposed to basically perform as if they were a single mirror. But they couldn't launch that way, obviously. And even though they deployed after they did launch, they still had to be aligned so precisely that they did perform in this kind of functional way. And so that took about four months of work where they first had to take the mirrors off these things called snubbers, which made them extra snug and kept them safe during the launch. But even then, once that part was done, then they had to just tweak their movements just so slightly so that they got them all in sync together. And that was just a very tedious process of taking images with the mirrors at how they were aligned sending those images back to earth using a series of algorithms to figure out what needed to be done to fix them. They would then move the actuators on the back of the mirror segments ever so slightly. And they had to do them sequentially too. And they couldn't go too crazy with the movements because the mirrors might actually run into each other too. So it was a very precise method and very delicate and everything with JWST has to be so meticulous because it's our one shot, essentially unlike Hubble, which is in orbit around earth right now. Over time, we've been able to upgrade Hubble and service it and tweak it. With JWT, it had everything had to go right the first time. We can not service it. It's living a million miles from earth, roughly. So there's really no way that we can go out there and fix things if it breaks. A good example of this is in May, the JWT was hit by a larger than expected micrometeoroid, which left a dimple in one of those 18 mirror segments I was talking about. And they just kind of have to live with it. They've adjusted the mirror to take out as much distortion and damage that it caused, but ultimately that dimple is there to stay for the lifetime of JWST. So going back to the mirror alignment, it's just these things had to be ever so precise because any kind of error could jeopardize the mission. So these people basically just spent months doing you move it on 8th of a millimeter, take a test picture, another 8th of a millimeter test picture, 8th of a millimeter. And then you get to the one and you're like, okay, we did it. And then you go on to the second. This just sounds like the most, it sounds like a certain kind of torture. I'm sure it's like cool and interesting and rewarding, but what intense tedious work to have to do sometimes. Yeah, but you also have to understand that it's been about two and a half decades to get to the launch pad for JWST. I mean, this entire mission has been besought by delays because they've had to be tedious in their work. And they've been doing this testing on the ground to prepare for this moment in space. So I'm sure the tedium of being in space probably doesn't even compare to the amount of testing and deployment and simulations that they've run on the ground for the last 20 something years. A lot of that is dedicated to the camera piece of it. But you were writing about a bunch of the other stuff going on. There's spectrographs and there's other sensors going on that they're trying to work like is that same process repeated for every single one of those. I mean, yeah, so while the mirror alignment was happening, they booted up the four main instruments on JWST and started the calibration phase where essentially you have to make sure that these instruments are performing and taking the measurements the way that they're designed before you actually start doing science and yes, they have cameras. They have spectrographs. They have these things called coronagraphs where you can block the light of a star so you can see objects fainter objects nearby. The four instruments each have different operating modes. So they had to verify that those operating modes were working correctly too. So it involved a lot of taking measurements doing demonstrations, looking at target objects, target stars, and taking data from that, and then cross checking from what we know about the stars and the galaxies in our universe. And so that also was another painstaking process that was a massive to do list that they had to get through in order for the observatory to be ready to do the science that it's about to do. So not only do you have to make sure that the camera works, you have to make sure it's actually capturing the imagery it's supposed to be capturing in the correct way. Exactly. That's just where you get the crazy things where it's like, it's going to take pictures of things we've never seen before. How do you know if it's like this stuff gets so mind-blowing sci-fi so quickly? It's insane. Well, and the one thing that one of the machine scientists was talking to me about is that every camera has distortions in it. And so part of this was also just taking those basic images and finding the distortions to correct for them so that when they start taking those pictures, we know how to take out those errors in the data and get the best data that we can. Is this so much work upfront because like you were saying it's kind of a one shot deal and it's not like an annual reset process. It's like they're trying to prepare this thing to sort of have a long life on its own, right? Yeah, absolutely. One nice thing about it is that it was really only designed to last 5 years. That was kind of the baseline, but because of the efficiency of its launch and the precision of its launch, apparently it didn't need as much fuel to get to its final destination. And so now it should have enough fuel to operate for at least 20 years. So hopefully we'll have this extraordinary piece of machinery still going strong for the next couple of decades, which thank God because it cost us nearly $10 billion to make and like I said, two and a half decades to get to the launch pad. So having it for at least 20 years is a tremendous, but yes, I mean, like you said, it has to go right. We don't have a way to service it as of this moment. It's not designed to be serviced, and also just so many people want time with it. You know, this is an extraordinary observatory that astronomers have been dreaming of for years and years and years. And scientists around the world are kind of clamoring to get time with it. I mean, when they first put out the call for the first year of science, they got over a thousand different proposals. And those are just going to keep coming each year. They're going to do a new round of proposals and more and more people are going to throw their hat in the ring to get time with the telescope. Basically, they have to show that the telescope can do what it advertises before they kind of give it off to the science community and say, okay, here you go. Here's your time. Let's run. I just love imagining the meeting at NASA where there's like an engineering team and then like a science team and somebody just like hands a key to the scientists and they're like, it's zero time now.

JWT NASA
"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on The Vergecast

"A grain of sand on the tip of your finger at arm's length, that is the part of the universe that you're seeing, just one little speck of the universe. Galaxies on galaxies, you can see light bending in space. You can see stuff from billions of years ago, it's incredible. I'm serious. Go look. And this is only the beginning of what we're going to get from the JWST. It's been a huge amount of work and billions of dollars to get this telescope into space and operational, and now it's time to just do science super hard. The verge's Lauren grush spent a bunch of time with the team at NASA ahead of this reveal. And she wrote a great story, which I'll put in the show notes about what it took to get the JWST truly up and running in space. To start getting images like these. So she's here in between all the huge announcements coming from NASA to give us a sense of what these images mean and what's to come. Hi Lauren. Hello. I really like the story that you wrote and I want to talk about it because you did a very fun thing which is make me realize that the way that I have thought about these space telescopes is totally wrong. We talk all about the launch. It's like a whole big thing and then it's like they go to space and then they are just sort of in space and then stuff happens. And you were basically like no, actually they have to do things before it can do the space cool stuff. Right. I want to get into all that, but I think maybe the quit, let's just do sort of a quick recap of kind of where we are for the people who are not following the JWST quite the way that we are. So if you back way up, what is the point of this thing? Why did they spend all this money and all this time making this telescope? Sure. So the entire point of JWST is to unlock the secrets of the universe, if you will. I mean, every astronomers dream is to peer deeper into the universe and see with better clarity than we have before. And to do that, we send bigger and bigger pieces of mirrors into space so that we can gather more light and see deeper into the universe than we have ever before. And JW sees mirror is the largest mirror that we've ever sent into space. And so it will hopefully be able to gather light from some of the earliest galaxies and stars that formed right after the Big Bang. So when the universe began, the universe, as we know it began in earnest. Okay. And this is the first new version of this in a long time, right? It's not like we're not like launching one of these every 6 months. No, I mean, we have various observatories in space, but this one was particularly ambitious because it see in the infrared, so it has to operate it very cold temperature because infrared light is a type of light that we can't see, but we feel it as heat. And so in order to pick that up, it has to be extra cold. So there were certain design elements that had to be put in in order to make that happen. And also, like I said, the mirror is just very big. And so back to your original point about the fact that it didn't just go up, it had to do a lot of things when it went into space. The mirror was so large that the observatory had to be folded in on itself when it launched. And so that complicated the design because it had to both do these amazing sciences, but also it had to be engineered in such a way that it could deploy and move in these very intricate ways once it got into space and also didn't break. Didn't it launch on Christmas last year? It did launch on Christmas and I am forever going to be plagued by covering important launches and important space missions on holidays that is just the way of the world it seems to be. That sounds about right. Just to be clear, for me personally, this is coming out the day after the release, but July 12th, the day of the release is my birthday. So JWST two for two on hitting an important Lauren grush milestones. NASA, if you're listening, if you could just like be cool the next time that would be very helpful. We'd really appreciate that. Okay, so it launches on Christmas and my memory of it is that the big thing you were talking about was whether it would sort of unfurl correctly. And that happened pretty fast, right? That was like the big undoing the Swiss Army knife thing happened pretty quickly after launch and went pretty well. Everybody was happy. And then that is like the last I heard about the JWST. But that is like things kept happening. So what happens right after that happens? So the unfurling was probably the more dynamic time of this commissioning phase. And yeah, it was very dramatic. It had to kind of blossom like a flower, if you will. But that took about two weeks. And then it shifted into this much more quiet phase of commissioning. But no less important phase where they had to essentially align the mirrors ever so slightly and then also commission and calibrate the instruments on JWST. So one of the aspects of this mirror, this massive mirror that I've been talking about is we couldn't launch it as is. There's no rocket currently operational that could have launched the mirror completely unsegmented because there are just no rockets that wide. Or at least they're fairings, the nose cone where that shrouds the payload just aren't wide enough to launch something of that size.

JWST Lauren grush Hi Lauren NASA Swiss Army
"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is defining the future. Extremely important as a hub of disciplines all in one space with all of these brilliant minds. And GH's role is huge when it comes to defining the future and power from an interdisciplinary point of view. They have it all there, whether it's the innovation hub, the makerspace, and GIT is already creating fast collaboration between the disciplines and you have civil engineers speaking to programmers speaking to electrical engineers. And together, they're creating advancements that we wouldn't have been able to do without those three minds coming together and solving a problem as one rather than solving it in isolation. And JIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at NJ IT dot EDU. This is the Bloomberg green report sponsored by CDW. The electric car market is still relatively new and it can be confusing. That's typical for the early days of just about any new technology. Bloomberg green released new electric car ratings to clear up some of the confusion, electric vehicles are much cleaner than conventional gas vehicles and they'll become even cleaner over time, but there is no such thing as a zero emission vehicle because components such as steel body parts and batteries still have to be manufactured. The EV ratings are based on a formula that takes into account the economy of the vehicle, how far it travels relative to how many pounds it waves and the size of its battery. The Tesla Model three long range tops the list of green machines that travels up to 358 miles on a charge using a medium sized battery. GMC's Hummer EVs at the bottom of the rankings in part because of its massive battery and the chassis not really geared to economy on the road. Jeff Bellinger, Bloomberg radio

New Jersey institute of techno Tesla Model GMC Jeff Bellinger Bloomberg radio
"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 5 months ago

"one space" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And JIT is defining the future I tease extremely important as a hub of disciplines all in one space with all of these brilliant minds And GH's wrong is huge when it comes to defining the future and how from an interdisciplinary point of view they had it all there whether it's the innovation hub the maker space and JIT is already creating bash collaboration between the disciplines and you have civil engineers speaking to programmers speaking to electrical engineers And together they're creating advancements that we wouldn't have been able to do without those three minds coming together and solving a problem as one rather than solving it in isolation And JIT New Jersey institute of technology Learn more at nj IT dot EDU This is a Bloomberg money minute since the birth of the modern mobile phone business wireless carriers have played a key role in the phone buying process Now Bloomberg reporter Mark gurman says apple is taking a step toward breaking that bond If you go to buy a new iPhone SE in Apple retail stores you do not have to put in your carrier details at the point of purchase Instead if you're an AT&T or T mobile customer you'll enter your account data the first time you power on your new phone It's a subtle shift but it's a hint at Apple's continued push to sort of downgrade the carrier For Apple the goal is to gain a bigger role in the customer relationship They could push customers to use the Apple installment plans the Apple subscription plans overall it's good business for Apple to own more of the customer life cycle For now gurman says Apple is using the iPhone SE as a test for this new purchasing process He thinks it will likely be rolled out to Verizon and across apple's product line when the iPhone 14 arrives this fall Larry kofsky Bloomberg radio.

JIT New Jersey institute of te Apple Mark gurman Bloomberg gurman AT Verizon Larry kofsky Bloomberg radio
"one space" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"This week In 1976. NASA publicly unveils its first space shuttle The enterprise during a ceremony in Palmdale, California Development of the shuttle cost almost 10 billion and took nearly a decade in 1977. The enterprise became the first space shuttle to fly freely when it was lifted to a height of 25,000 ft by a Boeing 7 47 and then released gliding back to Edwards Air Force Base on its own accord this week in 1978 at the White House, Egyptian President Anwar el said. Dot and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin signed the Camp David accords. Laying the groundwork for permanent peace agreement between Egypt and Israel after three decades of hostilities. The accords were negotiated during 12 days of intense talks with President Jimmy Carter at Camp David. And this week in 1995, a manifesto by the Unabomber and anti technology terrorists, is published by The New York Times and The Washington Post in the hope that someone will recognize the person who for 17 years have been sending homemade bombs through the mail after reading the manifesto, David Kaczynski link The writing style to that of his older brother, Ted, who was later convicted of the attacks. And sentenced to life in prison without parole. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on I Heart radio. Hi, Tom Martino here. 33713 talks 7138255 welcome. To the only show of its kind anywhere in the universe and water pros. I want to tell you they're giving away home show tickets. Water pros dot net Now, if you want home show tickets, you got to call 33 Martino and put in your request. We want to hear from you and talk about your project. Okay, That's all you have to do, and we'll get you home show tickets this weekend. The fall home show a wonderful group of people will be there many people from our referral list and including K and H, but water pros. Dot net Okay. Now, here's what you do. You call us and we'll give you we We text your name to him and you pick them up. Okay, That's what you do. So call us If you want home show tickets, water pros dot net by the way. They have full house water conditioning system softeners or filtration under two grand They also have a point of use filtration for under $1000 now. Do we have? We don't have our SSD. Tom. He's traveling right now. I can try to find something up. I will say I do have an SSD angel expert. I've not talked to her in a few years, so I'm gonna call her and see what we can do. We also have this. I'm going to give you I'm going to give you this off the air here, okay? All right, 3371. Thank you, Mark. 8255. Thank you, Mark. Okay. So, Larry, let's talk about SSD. We're trying to help Robert out his wife. His his daughter is on her deathbed and can't get SSD. I can You have, uh, what happened with you? Hello, Tom. Hi. Yeah. My daughter had John John Bray. This wasn't about 2000 and two. Yeah, we I got the forms and made an appointment. We went straight to the Social Security Disability office. Submitted the applications, and it was approved in two or three weeks, and they paid retroactive back to the original. Oh, my. Oh my gosh. Uh, from the original time, I wonder why it had it's gotten so difficult. I don't know. But you know, she was in a wheelchair almost totally paralyzed. And it took another seven or eight months for her to recover. And right now, today, she's Pretty much fully recovered. She got some symptoms of nerve damage and our feet now, how did she get that? Was it after a shot or something? Yes. She got that from a flu shot. First time She got a flu shot. Yeah, that happens once in a while, and that's uh yeah. And it's not unique to the, uh covid. I mean, it was happening years and years ago as you said, of course. Oh, yeah. Hey, you know the paperwork she signed, said that you know it was known. Hazard or no known risk. That's right, a known risk. So you know, there's nothing we can go back on anybody. Except you know she did get the disability for about 13 14 months. Where's your It really helped a lot saved her house. And, uh so okay. Well, thank you. I appreciate your feedback. We're trying to get that now. Rita, what's going on with you, Rita? Welcome to the show of Tom Martino. What's going on, Rita? Hi. How are you doing? Good, Rita, How can we help you, dear? Okay. I don't mean to cry, but, um, what's going on? Okay. We have a new corporate that bought out our complex. Yes. Um they came in from California bought us out. There's like 126 apartments where we live. Yes, they came in. And did they put out a new science and million dollar renovation? Okay, fine. They made everybody still wrote good and everything. Yes. Million dollar renovation was all outside every night to everybody and everything. Well, now why are you laughing so hard? Because that's just like a corporation to do that, And we're putting a million dollars into this place that is funny, funny or on the outside, well. It turns out there was real nice to everybody. Did they do a new roof? No. Well, they did. The outside. They painted the outside the outside. Looks like um Everything county. The top. Looks like Jefferson County doors downstairs. Looks like Denver County doors, You know? What the hell are you talking about? What does she mean Jefferson County doors in Denver. You know, uh, Yale Class.

Tom Martino David Kaczynski Robert Rita Larry Denver 12 days NASA Mark Ted Tom California 1976 John John Bray Camp David Jefferson County Denver County 33713 25,000 ft 17 years
Fashion Brand Founder-Influencer Amanda Steele on Being One of the First 'YouTubers'

The Glossy Podcast

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Fashion Brand Founder-Influencer Amanda Steele on Being One of the First 'YouTubers'

"Hey amanda welcome hi. How are you the so talk to me. Oh my gosh you are. You're not old. Let's say to say that you've been creating content for ten years. How old were you when you started that youtube channel. I started my youtube channel. When i was ten so out twelve years. I feel like that's so interesting. Because i mean that was of course a longtime ago influencer marketing or even just youtube was not what it was. Today tell me about the value of. I guess getting in early. We're hearing that all the time especially on tick-tock were those players that got in so early really have an advantage. And how how do you see that. Yeah i definitely think that most of my success came from me doing it so early. So i can definitely say but that's real and i credit that for sure i think just when it gets overly saturated whatever platform you're using just really hard to get your content seen so getting an early for sure helps helps out but i think it really just comes down to the quality of your content. Like what you're really offering. You don't have to think. Like oh. I should start now because it's too late like there's too many people are they gonna notice me just as long as you have purpose and you have a great content. You should be successful. Did you know to be so focused and to really hone in on beauty and makeup and one space. I just know i have a ten year old niece. She's all over the place and would love to be like heather on youtube channel. It wouldn't be professional. That's for sure. Did you know to kind of really like keep it focused. Your focus was makeup from the get. Go out at your channel of all. Well i guess it it was just me as a fan so all my content has come from what i like at the time while i'm interested in so when i started my channel i always wanted to be fashion designers so i was watching a fashion halls look books so that's like what got me into youtube but then once i got to you to a fashion hall leads to a makeup tutorial and now i'm obsessed with make up this whole new world so i kind of like paused a bit on the fashioned content and like really dove into make up because it was new and exciting to me and i was learning and there's so many like products to try and like discuss rather than you. This is what i would say. I got this top. This is the same jeans. I wear three times a week or something. You know

Youtube Amanda Heather
Where Space Begins: Bezos' Blue Origin vs. Branson's Virgin Galactic

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Where Space Begins: Bezos' Blue Origin vs. Branson's Virgin Galactic

"This morning in a remote part of the west texas desert the world richest man amazon founder. Jeff bezos plans to take off for a trip to space. It's the first space flight with passengers on board for his company. blue origin. Now if you were paying attention nine days ago another billionaire. Richard branson took a flight to space with his company virgin. Galactic bezos is flight will be a little different in how it launches and where the passengers will go. But the difference is don't stop there. They extend to the goals and ambitions of both companies and to discuss that. We have a reporter mike. Berg who covers the business of space for the wall street journal back on the show. I'm mike thanks for joining us again so nine days ago you were in new mexico watching the virgin galactic flight with richard branson launch. Now you're in texas for the blue origin launch. What are some of the differences you expect to see when this flight takes off. Yeah i mean the biggest difference just sort of visually blue origin uses a rocket to get the space. We're going to see literally the new scheffer rocket flare up into at very high speeds into space. And then you know we won't see this but a capsule detach and float into space and then the rocket will return to the launch pad. Virgin galactic of course uses a different method. They've got a kind high-flying airplane that flies up. You know the way you would see at an airport and the space craft the virgin galactic spacecraft attached to the rocket detaches at about forty five thousand feet and then it sort of rockets up into space from there. So you'll literally see the

West Texas Desert Galactic Bezos Richard Branson Jeff Bezos Mike Amazon Berg The Wall Street Journal New Mexico Texas
Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

Tom and Curley

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

"That Branson really pulled a fast one by trying to usurp that first space flight nine days before basins. So I'm kind of team Branson Canteens Team basis. Sorry. We already had you down for Branson. You can't change your vote. You cannot There. Is there one Richard Branson, I'll be evaluating the customer spaceflight experience is this Branson speaking. Sounds even weirder than he normally does gives Sir Richard Branson this much the swashbuckling billionaire has a knack for making his dreams seem like hours in this case space. He believes it's for everyone do you like the term space tourism? Space Tourism works. On Sunday morning, Branson will become the space tourist since 2000 and four. His company Virgin Galactic has persevered through test flights and setbacks like an accident in 2014 that killed a test pilot space. Stephanie is hard. We've had our tears. We've had a choice, but I'll tell you what the joys have been fantastic. Branson's space voyaging will begin on a runway this runway at Spaceport America in New Max. To go. 12,000 FT. Straightaway for Virgin Galactic's mothership. VMS Eve is a plane, twin fuselage aircraft two pilots in the middle. It carries the space plane. The S S unity. 21 release release release at about 45,000. Ft Eve will release unity Fire fired! Cool. The spaceship will shoot straight up more than 50, Miles where space begins. Ship unity. Welcome to space. We've got massive windows. All the way around. The bill to unbuckle will be able to float around and they will become an astronaut Branson and three other passengers. All employees should experience a few minutes of weightlessness. Then unities. Two pilots will glide everyone back to Earth. By the way,

Branson Richard Branson Virgin Galactic New Max Stephanie America
Blue Origin Space Flight Auction: Bidding Hits $2.8 Million

First Light

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Blue Origin Space Flight Auction: Bidding Hits $2.8 Million

"Vaccinated by the fourth of July. Blue origin. The space company owned by Amazon founder Jeff Brazos, has announced that Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his brother Mark will be joining the winner of the first space tourism flight on July. 20th. Bidding is already up to $2.8 million for the half hour long

Jeff Brazos Amazon Jeff Bezos Mark
"one space" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on Broken Record

"But it does the best. Those those ryan's that are not rhymes or the unexpected rhymes. Like i guess they are clever but they didn't come out cleverly sessional front facing self did not write that you know my open exposed self my deepest self. Don't you ever find it fascinating. And i think it's the closest i ever got to actually religious faith that there is a deeper truth inside of you that only certain circumstances can unlock or can open up and it actually makes sense. And there's an order in their deepen their maybe an emotional order. But someone's making sense of it all and boiling it down to the most profound part of you and whenever i can connect to that part it just feels so damn good and so life affirming. 'cause i have those but i find those periods very almost hallucinatory. That's that's that trippy flow sensation. That's what i'm talking about. I live for that. You said you want to preserve that space now you have. I think because of the expectations after your first album you have had more than your fair share of harsh criticism. How do you keep that space for yourself then. A good solid grounded private life. I keep old friends even when they drive me absolutely up a wall and there's many times when my you know but i keep the person that i've always been close to me so in one space of my life i'm not a rockstar at all in. I like it that way you know. I'm still the sort of smaller with my tall bossy friends. I'm still the one that's like. Well where are we going. Well what's happening you know like i'm not the leader of my pack of friends by any stretch like just thinking about this the other day in almost all my friend circles. I'm not the leader. You know but here i am the rockstar in my career. But i'm the same person that i was when i was nine so i have this life. It hurts when you try to do something and everybody hates it and they point out something that you didn't even see coming as some transgression that you've done. That is offensive. That always feels like you know you've been slapped unexpectedly but it doesn't rock me to my core because i think via my parents and their group of friends and our extended family and the relationships that i've kept my whole life. That's not what's gonna on me. You know what i mean. That's just going to suck for really long. Y all like there's still a me behind that me. That is intact after quick..

nine first album one space
"one space" Discussed on Your Essential Nature

Your Essential Nature

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on Your Essential Nature

"You guys know whatever you're doing are you don't need my fingers to show you right unless no okay. No takers yeah all right. Its dissolution of to -ality. It really doesn't matter. What what genders are actually. Because oftentimes one will take Predominant mask conform won't take predominant feminine form. It's just anything but we conceive of as we all contain masculine-feminine within us within chinese medicine. They say the right side is masculine. Less i disseminate we. All contain masculine feminine. Balancing the two sides actually bring strength so sex is actually breaking forth duality right. it's creating unity oneness. it's actually very sacred. Holy act but you dissolve masculine feminine. Become one right thinking. Recently as you go higher up the shockers and higher up the body actually getting closer to the crown and closer to your higher centers right your mental centers where you connect with the universe the tongue when you think about kissing. You're actually a masculine and feminine simultaneously. Think about that. You're actually going inside their body and you're going as equals and you're actually moving past duality altogether. Yeah it's kind of a wild idea. It makes sense i like. I like the algae a lot because you know you. You get penetration penetration towards eu vice versa. Back and forth you know that sharing of entering one space and the intimacy that exists in that in that moment which is really funny because in that level there's a higher level of intimacy that potentially could be offered. Because not only. Can i enter your space your environment but you can also enter my space in my environment and we keep it so casually. Oh it's just a kiss near well. I mean mouth hug mouth hug you know so it really does have some really bigger concept's behind that ability to can i be honest with you. Yes when you said penetrate my but tightened. I don't know why. But it was like reflexive alison even thinking about it. Every time we said penetrator. I just kept on clenching and clenching and i felt it. Okay here we go. This is why we're taking lou ops picture putting it everywhere yes because otherwise. I'm gonna walk around in if i have flatulence. It's going to sound like a whistle. But what's really great about so inner truth check. This is is really applicable. Because what's what i've been experiencing myself with my partner. Right has been that. Duality between masculine and feminine roles. That i.

two sides chinese one space one
Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin to Launch First Space Tourism Flight

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin to Launch First Space Tourism Flight

"60 years Since Alan Shepard became the first American in space it comes to some people are about to learn how they can ride. A rocket, named for the pioneering astronaut Jeff Bezos plan is to launch space tourists inside his new shepherd from a pad here in Texas, hoist them into the weightlessness of space and then bring them back to Earth beneath three giant parachutes. In a video on blue origins. YouTube channel basis exclaims. How exciting is this? Come on today would be passengers on New Shepherd's maiden flight will learn how much a ticket aboard the six seed capsule will cost. Generally in ABC News, speaking

Alan Shepard Jeff Bezos New Shepherd Texas Youtube Abc News
"one space" Discussed on Now Try This

Now Try This

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on Now Try This

"Hello and welcome to try this. It is your boys. Nick and marcus here and ready to talk about some good as caa ten hanukah which one are you. I'm markus i'm nick. Nice nice nice near the podcast is about. I feel like you always tell me up to just did it. And then i'm about to see with the podcast was about. I introduced us. I said hey they can marcus and now you gotta tell us what we do here. Is that part part. Go straight to the. We're two best friends. Talk about stuff that they love. How does that form at work. You ask how tell you. One of us challenges the other one to watch something that we love that the other one has never experience for example. Last two weeks ago. I gave marcus. The movie scare me josh reuben. And he had feelings about it. Go check out. That episode did have feelings and marcus last week. Something weird because we did a fan challenge. Ask what we did. The fan challenge deadly lessons aka the legend of simon conjurer which is a very fair conju. A very bad movie in the vein of you'll bring films and time why so films. It's definitely worth checking out. And why did we. How did we do fan challenge. Where did that come from home. God nick i so weird that you've been on this podcast for so long. You don't know an answer any of these things. Well i'll tell you until the fans you can head over to our adriaan and send us suggestions. We have two tiers the five dollar tears where you can send us suggestions every month for us to try and the one dollar tier where you get to vote a witch selection. We do for the podcasts. That's it you almost crush it. All you forgot to tell them is what the patriot is. Its patriot dot com slash. Now try this cast. Yes other wink guys. Go into our twitter page. We have links if you go on any of her social media pages we have links to everything. If you're not following us everywhere not sure fan. That's what i'm saying. And i'll try this cast it. If you're having trouble we made it easy. Now try this. Cast dot com. All of its right there. Yeah baby and then also we love five star reviews on itunes. I feel like i feel like you heard me typing. The i did see. I swing typing. Because you didn't load it up but that's fine while you're right did it up because you couldn't leave us. A great review like sleepy dot. Org did saying such a great pair. Love you guys. You have amazing chemistry and should date you know a sleeping baby dot org. We thought about it. We considered it. Markets only wanted me for my body. It didn't work through was going to say my thing was both tops. You know what i mean. Because more can i be honest. That's probably really true. That's why we can never date. That's the only really honestly. Probably i'd be i'd be gay for a man like you. You're so pretty you to guy love hair. You heard it just honeypot market. What you know what. I was thinking last this past week. Or whatever episodes that. I gosh i wish we could do all over again. You know what. I was thinking. What are you think about the. Now you see me. Episode of podcast. What a while thinking about that. Because i watched the interview with the main guy. We'll be much jesse high gammon then. Movie was so bad. He was talking about the movie with like a lot of reverence. And like professionally about being an actor now in about daniel radcliffe in the sequel. And i was like. Oh wow that would be real serious. You're one of the only people who really funny when you see actors take their jobs way too seriously. Like acting is hard and a lot of movies deserve the credit and the challenge that they present to actors. but not. now you see me burn. What are we doing this week this week. We are doing the comic book adaptation invincible on amazon. Prime it's an animated series. I gave you the first three episodes and this is not a sponsor that you put on amazon. This is not a sponsor right sponsored episode by amazon prime does owned twitch. We are streaming on their platform so the amazon gods. If you hear us we like your show is good or not. I like to you before we get started. Tell me what's i li-. Ab tried anything new. Oh man this week. I have remember when i was saying i was like. Oh i am at moma fishy. And i feel like i have just exploded mentally. You know. yeah wasn't working. Took a break and i crashed Like a computer overheating itself. I crashed and i had a good while of just resting relaxing and recharging and now i'm back on the grind waking up running working now doing my thing it's good it's good and i also have been recently getting back into video game hobby. I feel like i have abandoned it. You know but i've been doing some more video game hunting recently. Kinda keep my eye out for stuff. A nice went to a retro game store by years so cool of before. I just wanna say hello to everyone in the chat we got an evaluation second row ran one four mr hall petty double seven. It's lively in the check. You want to join the chat live. During this conversation we have every week every thursday eight. pm eastern standard time twitch dot tv slash. Now try this cast. Yeah thank you guys check. Oh hold on. Why realize thank you. Thank you for joining us. Special shots all of you. The personal labor it. What the plane would your face. let's knock it to what i'm doing. Well tell us about yourself with your personal favorite. Who in the as your personal favorite. Because then the rest of the murga interrupted me. I want to the chat will fight about who they think. I love the most as telling us what games you're playing right now right now playing personify royale which is enhanced version of personify g. It's an rpg of dungeon exploration where you get to as high school or romance a bunch of people that you shouldn't be legally allowed to romance. How do you always find a way to make super popular like not in the game. Sound like some weird harem video game. Harem game you can romance. Everybody except for the guys know gay stuff in japanese anime apparently anyway. What was your question forgot. What did you try this week. Oh my god. I tried something amazing called quitting your job. You did it. i quit my job. Nice guys i got a new gig. It's professionally podcasting. So make sure to go. Patriot dot com. No i quit my job at the restaurant. I was working at because restaurant. Work has been awful during this block. Party it's been really tough. But i found a new gig marcus. I'm going to hopefully have many great stories about it. But i will be teaching chess shoe kids aids already to seven guys. If you have a child that you want me to teach the jets go ahead and reach out at us. Now try this cast dot com and i will teach children chess. Is it virtual. Yep it's virtual and in person in new york city through storytelling about the king and how he eats too much and he gets all big and fat and that's why he can only move one space at a time. you know. that's kind of it's like. Yeah two zero. You can be really fun. I mean honestly. I probably becoming too. You be like marcus. Can you play chess with me as i. I've been learning strategy. And yes it's for the six year olds but like if a six year old can beat me. That might be a problem cool. It'll help them like. That's how queen's gambit shoutouts queen's gambit episode. That's how that whole thing started ono. Knicks.

daniel radcliffe Nick josh reuben amazon marcus five star six year itunes last week nick twitch markus twitter this week Last two weeks ago both one space One caa ten hanukah five dollar
Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Lego is Releasing New Space Shuttle Set

"The space shuttle Discovery and the Hubble Space Telescope. The set will be released in April and was created in partnership with NASA to mark the 40th anniversary since the first space shuttle flight on April 12th 1981. The shuttle model costs $199 and has more than 2300 pieces. Looks like a doubt will give back some of

Nasa
"one space" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"It's just it's have you given your stool sample yet. Oh i haven't yet home. We go do that. I think we even broke a record for the most blood taken atta or blood draws at a conference because it's very rare to go to a medical conference and actually be taking blood and stool and urine samples and all this kind of stuff like that is not really a normal thing and actually like i feel like. That's another thing that our network is kind of a pioneer in doing which is really cool. It's like yeah if we have all of us together in one space why not use that to quickly get all this done. Get it all done because it really really helps and also we also have some like genetic what what would you call genetic counselors. Yeah yeah we like everywhere you turn someone saying. Do you want to take the survey. And it's like yeah. It's a lot of research studying going on. you can feel it. It's like a buzzing you can feel like the research happening. It's not just a social gathering it's real like we are really make progress. It's more than just a support group because it is that and it is fun but is actual really important work going on at the time and it's cool to be part of all of that at one. It's really cool. It's really cool to be a part of it. Feels like we're doing something you know what i mean like. Yeah we're a part of something bigger than ourselves and it's just such a special time and i talking about it makes we really want to go and i'm so sad but it will be fine as well. I know i miss it so much. But that's sort of the breakdown of confidence in. I think we we hit it on you guys. We.

one space
Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

Museum Archipelago

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Tehmina Goskar Critically Engages with Curation, Wherever It Happens

"For the past six and a half years more or less weekly museum. People gather on twitter for something called museum our together. These people form a peer to peer community supporting discussion and debate between those who work in enjoy and challenge museums society. That's the beauty of museum. Our is entirely independent. It is not an organization is just about holding a space so other people can talk with each other. This is dr to meena car who co-founded museum our back in october. Twenty fourteen gosper also founded the curatorial research center. Hello my name is to mean a costco. And i am the director and curator of the curatorial research center and that's an organization. I started back in two thousand eighteen very much to support fellow curator's from around the world and also to make progress in modernizing curatorial practice this month gosper officially steps back from her role in museum. Our i wanted this to serve as both exit interview and a chance to highlight other projects that she has founded based on her curatorial. Philosophies museum i started can october two thousand fourteen sophie balancer. Who was the co founder with me got together over twitter. We've never met in real life. Goodness knows whether we ever will. Sophie was based up in the north of england. I'm based in the far west of cornwall. That we both decided we'd give the idea of the discussion based hours that were kind of finding their feet on twitter at that time so we decided to give it a go and it's grown and grown and grown and changed a lot since then of course twitches also changed hugely in terms of who participates. Who feels confident about speaking out. Who likes in the background. There is a lot of polarization on the platform. Now and so we've changed adapted museum iowa to all of those trends that we've seen happen including it's growing politicize ation as well. If i'm being honest i've kind of treated the whole thing. Even six and a half years own as an ongoing experiment in trying to understand how it is people like to communicate with each other and how it is that you can provide some kind of support for this peer to pay contact is what we're really after on museum archipelago. We look at museums as a medium and twitter is also a medium one that has changed since museum. Our started six and a half years ago since then. Twitter has shifted from a simple subscriber model. One we you see all the tweets from the people you follow the order that they tweeted to a system that uses algorithms that optimize for other factors such as engagement with the tweets. This can make a global conversation about museums. Difficult with the change in. How twitter is managed. And how the concept of driving engagement and algorithms are dictating. What we see on our timelines. There has absolutely been an impact on museum our because of that. We've got to work much harder to try and get ideas for topics for example people's ideas out to as broad an interested audience participation group that we can and that has proven very difficult in fact particularly of late because people's timelines also manipulated by twitter's algorithms and because they're so much more noise on twitter than there was so. I'm kind of glad that museum. Our has managed to hold its own. It retains a light structure. It does support those intimate conversations as well as supporting bigger thoughts and opinions and even ones that people disagree about in one space. I've participated in even hosted a few museum hours. And the thing that reminds me of the most is a museum conference or at least the conversations that you might have at museum conference which is yet another medium but interestingly docker says that museum our has never been about recreating that experience. That certainly isn't the kind of experience you usually get unless you Fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to very expensive. Large international museum conferences. For example like the newseum association conference in the uk or any of items conferences but we've never really perceived if museum hours to fill that kind of gap with still kind of exploring what it is that we think we're doing and that's just by way of being very honest about no having an agenda and letting sort of the emergent process of museum our happened

Curatorial Research Center Gosper Twitter Sophie Balancer Meena Costco Sophie Cornwall Archipelago England Iowa Large International Museum Docker Newseum Association UK
The Aftermath: Texans File Insurance Claims Following Winter Storm

Houston's Morning News

02:15 min | 1 year ago

The Aftermath: Texans File Insurance Claims Following Winter Storm

"Story this hour the fall out. Us bigger than fallout. After our deep freeze. It's just beginning now Power back on for the most part, boiled water notices being lifted, including the one in Houston. The death toll, though across the state and clear we do know it's going to go up the family of an 11 year old boy in Conroe suing ERCOT. And the utility companies for $100 million What's interesting about this whole ordeal is what these power providers and Ercot knew long before. Many of us knew it That is that they did not have the capacity. They knew they didn't have the capacity. They knew that their that they had not winterized their sources of power. That is their attorney, Tony Busby, on our TV partner Channel to Governor Greg Abbott says the PUC has issued a moratorium now on customer disconnections, and they're stopping energy companies from issuing So suddenly zoomed to the top of the crop. Top of the heap high power bills that you've been hearing about Attorney General Ken Paxton issuing see ideas as investigative demands to work hot while the Texas Legislature starts its investigation this week, grocery stores slowly getting back to normal, but there are a lot of items that they just haven't been able to restock yet. Many of the local school district still close. Some, like H I s d won't be open tomorrow, either. The complete list to ktrh dot com. Meantime, we could have some of the largest number of insurance claims in Texas history because of all this Insurance companies are already slammed with thousands of claims by Texans with water damage. But unlike a hurricane or a tornado, the winter storms were statewide disaster, So the total number of claims may end up in the hundreds of thousands pipes are still falling. Right now they're frozen and one space all out, then that water damage will start surfacing first. Secondly, you still have a lot of people that don't have Internet cell service and power. Camille Garcia with the Insurance Council of Texas says it's too soon to estimate a total dollar amount. But As a comparison, Hurricane Harvey resulted in a $19 billion loss for insurance companies. Why gold speed this radio 7 40 ktrh

Ercot Tony Busby Attorney General Ken Paxton Conroe Greg Abbott PUC Houston Texas Legislature United States Hurricane Camille Garcia Texas Insurance Council Of Texas Hurricane Harvey
Jeff Bezos Passes  Elon Musk  as Richest Person in the World

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos Passes Elon Musk as Richest Person in the World

"Chef Bezos once again the richest person on earth, Test one space ex CEO Elon Musk recently surpassed him. But Tesla's shares dropped 2.4% Tuesday, setting Musk's fortune back more than $4.5 billion, And that's where Miami Palmetto senior High valedictorian steps back into the number one spot he previously held for over three years. With a net worth of $191.2 billion. Bezos, now best musk by nearly a billion bucks.

Chef Bezos Elon Musk Miami Palmetto Tesla Musk Bezos
"one space" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Let's relax a little bit. It's Valentine's Day today. Let's look up in the sky and see what we see. And to tell us about what we're going to say is our good friend Steve Cates. Otherwise known as Doctor Sky, Steve, How are you? I'm doing Great, John Happy Valentine's Day to you and all the listeners out there and John what a wonderful Segway because that's something for the entire audience to look at all of the next few days if they have clear skies and what is it? Beautiful conjunction John of the tube giant planets while the two bright planets I should say Venus And Jupiter, Venus, the goddess of love and beauty, and Jupiter, the god of the gods. What they're gonna do Jonah's. They're coming together as super conjunction visible in the southeast sky for folks that have clear view of the horizon. Will be about a full moon diameter apart and hey, don't you think that's a great way to look at the two beautiful objects together? Kind of a love affair in the sky? These two objects very close, but you and I wanted to mention something. Many people look back in history, at least in the astronomy world, and they wonder, the star of Bethlehem. There's many theories. We know about it. But from the astronomy side, here's what many people think it could have been. We go back to conjunctions John of both Venus and Jupiter, and there happened to be one on August 12 of three BC, Our calendar has changed over the years, so people may be wondering, Wasn't that after or before the birth? Yes, but the interesting thing John. Those two objects Venus and Jupiter. They came within a third of a full moon diameter, and I'm sure for those lucky single back then that got to observe this I myself like you and others. You probably be wondering, there must be some special significance. So for Valentine's Day, John Is a beautiful conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. Wow, it's really amazing. I mean, it's something you have to look at low to the Southeast, and probably to be always honest with the audience here. Is that you probably should even have a pair of binoculars. 20 minutes before the sun rises. You should be able to see that not only this weekend but also into the next week in February, But, John, I wanted to just highlight everything here with these Mars missions if you don't mind. This is something incredible. We have the United Arab Emirates their space probe. The hoax based growth craft has now gone into Martian orbit. Chinese Tian one When is also now in an orbit around the planet Mars and we're waiting for the big USA perseverance for over with his ingenuity helicopter it, too, should be in Orbit around Mars and then the perseverance of particular spacecraft with its rover. Hopefully, it's got to land first about the 18th of this month and then we'll see. Of course, China do that later. I gather in a month or two and maybe a little longer. John, This is incredible. This probably 13 or so spacecraft from Earth from all different nations around the world around the planet Mars. Isn't that incredible? I mean, just that each incredible now, Your Majesty. What do we say? United Arab Emirates? Yes, sir. How you doing today? Report Vigorously. Well, they want to do this Junker. Many reasons the spacecraft was actually built here in the United States with technology from overseas but to the Islamic world, the Arab world. They just want to show that there's great technology from their side with their scientists or what it's going to do. It's actually going to do some climate, the logical search survey of the planet Mars They want to understand more about Martian weather, and that's important because if people are ever going to go there You know, John, this is crazy. On the surface of Mars. They get dust storms that not only are localized like maybe we got here in Arizona or other places around the world Mars being have and has had many global dust storms so that their future astronauts are going to go to the surface of Mars. We really need to understand what it makes the Martian weather chick and that's probably one of the things of the hope Spacecraft will be doing along with the Chinese and our American spacecraft perseverance. Once it gets to the surface of ours. The craziest thing, and they would greatest scientific thing I think of all is that onboard the rober of perseverance, There's a small robotic helicopter hold ingenuity. So someone back at the Jet Propulsion lab and that NASA is actually going to have the opportunity of what's steering this little robotic spacecraft like you and I would fly a drone in our backyard and we wish them well, No, it's a little bit more difficult because of the unless they got the communications from Star track. There's a two or three minute delay. So you're absolutely right Helicopter could crash before you even knew it crashed. So you're right. What communications ability can they fly A helicopter? Well, John they handsome like an artificial intelligence, also, as part of this package, so once they released the object, meaning this little drone type helicopter in, obviously, as a path of which it can fly. It's already pre programmed to But they do have some control knowing you're right. This is a long legged distance as far as lifetime and radio waves So we're looking Mars. If people look down up into the Southeast guy now on clear evenings just high up into the Southeast, this object that still looks a little reddish orange, visible to the naked eye, but barely Mars now, well over 100 million miles away, So it's going to take that light like eight or nine, maybe even 10 minutes. They had radio signals to get there, so we wish the ingenuity and the first appearance for over well. His high technology on board here, John and we ain't seen nothing yet, As they say, This is going to be excited. He speak Kate's him is that you mean there's stuff we don't know. Oh e don't play here. E could play a certain kind of music right now. You know like it. Let's talk about one more subject, Venus. Sure. Yeah, a lot of people. According to certain intelligence section's I talked to is saying that Likelihood of some life on Venus is a good possibility. And some people are sending probes over there. What? No, you don't. Well, plenty, and I wish we had more time but all encapsulated in the time we have astronomers have detected what they believe is an organic molecule in the clouds of Venus. It's called hydrazine. And I do zine for those out there without going into too much detail we're in is where this magazine exists. Astronomers and organic chemists and scientists believe that there may be some sort of microbes embedded within this, but this is ironic. The cloud tops of Venus would be the area where if this is true There needs to be more research where these organic compounds like I just seen they lie. So you may even have a planet, which is, by the way, Venus that's closest to the Earth of all the planets..

Steve Cates Arizona United States Steve NASA August 12 Bethlehem Earth 10 minutes Venus John Jupiter eight United Arab Emirates next week both today Mars nine Valentine's Day
"one space" Discussed on The Innovative Leader

The Innovative Leader

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"one space" Discussed on The Innovative Leader

"In the most productive part of your day. And so i think you try to match rhythms to win when you are really productive for me. Mornings are huge in that in that regard. So i'd try to get the things that i really want done really need to get done in the morning and that that works for me but i think you also I think you need to build in optional times Simply because the rhythms may not work at this point so I liked so when my son goes to bed. That's when i get on social media when my son goes to bed. That's when i read my son goes to bed That's when i started thinking a lot of that used to be done in the morning. But i've had to make that adjustment because because it's just not working so you have to evaluate those risen rhythms and then play around with it. You know. Tim ferriss is a is an interesting guy. Tim ferriss essentially does he's a he's a guinea a human guinea pig and he does that to himself He tries things on himself. Evaluates them in if they don't work than he he tweaks it I think you've got to be willing and open to experiment in that way so that you can. You can find that that sense of rhythm that place of Productivity and in that place of Of good head space to do the things you need to do. I think there's experimentation. That has to go on. And i think if you're willing to to make those judgments not be tied down into one locate one space one location then that that allows you to adapt and adjust to uncover those new rhythms absolutely. And sometimes they're minor tweaks like where you're changing when you're working out or your changing or maybe you're just changing what you're doing. I was reading something the other day about the need for greater mindfulness as we frequently talk about..

Tim ferriss one location one space one
Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

"On our live stream of first. I want to lead with this paper here. Of I think Andrew Neil is his name. Very serious journalist from England. I wish our country had someone is serious is him in a high position. He's very tough on both sides talking to the head of Twitter advertising former head of political advertising a Twitter play tape, I think what does concern people Pizza, though, is the sense of unaccountable power. Whether you agree with what Twitter is done, whether you think it's bias that attends school for those on the right rather than the left. The bigger issue is unaccountable power, particularly when they seem to act in concert. I mean, these air is a company's far bigger Then the oil, the railways, the steal the robber barons of the end of the 19th century in America, they've got much more money and much more influence. And yet Twitter bans trump for life. And you've given the reason why, and then Incitement to violence is something that has there's not a right to that in free speech, but Trump's people then C. All right, we're gonna move to parlor. We could do stuff there and then immediately. The rest of big tech causes that down as well. The APS are you cannot get either from Google or from Apple, and Abbas says we hosting you anymore. That's a cartel. In America cartels are legal. Amen. I love Wen. Non Americans tell us about our laws. No, I actually mean that non sarcastically because I feel as if we get so wrapped up in our own. Political circus at times that we lose kind of a connection to Exactly what It's happening in our own country, and whether the Department of Justice will investigate cartel like behavior remains to be seen. Probably unlikely. With the new administration that is coming in, however, a Zenger Neil, I believe that's his name, pointed out. The behavior of these companies is that one hand washes the other. That is literal cartel type behavior that they don't put profits and even their own fiduciary interest First. Instead, they put the incumbent economic protection of the combined interest of their company's first That is not legal. That is that is that that's beyond monopolist. Just so we're clear that is a different threshold than monopolistic behavior. So monopolies are illegal because you dominate in one space. Cartels are illegal. Even more so than monopolies because then you have different types of companies that are leaning on each other, too, then go after competitors wherever they might arise. And so we've seen this now with Amazon that dominates the server space 49% of all rented out server space goes through Amazon Web services we've seen that threw Apple, which provides a majority. Of the smartphones in this country, so that through Google that has 92% of all search results in the country's Elvis. So you Google plus Apple plus Amazon. That's a cartel. To say the least. What you think is about? Yeah, we've reached a new level of antitrust violations here, and obviously we created antitrust laws in response to monopolistic behavior from corporations in the past. But honestly, that's not even touching what's

Twitter Andrew Neil Zenger Neil America Donald Trump England Abbas WEN Apple Google Department Of Justice Amazon
Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

The Art Newspaper Weekly

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"A mysterious object resembling the free standing plank sculptures of the late minimalist artist. Joan mccracken or the alien monoliths in stanley kubrick's sci-fi classic. Two thousand one space odyssey has been discovered in a remote area of the utah desert prompting theories ranging from extraterrestrial visitation to avocado installation biologists from the utah. Division of wildlife spotted. The monolith from a helicopter welcomed up during a routine count of bighorn sheep in the area. The location of melissa has not been disclosed but the footage shiny object in store within a red rock canyon suggested that live somewhere in southern utah which has distinct ecological landscape

Joan Mccracken Utah Desert Stanley Kubrick Division Of Wildlife Utah Melissa
Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

Going Deep with Chad and JT

01:11 min | 2 years ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"Monolithic structure that was discovered in utah in a cave. But like it's not natural looking. It's like a black kind of like ten foot obelisk or something like that. I don't know if that's big enough to be novelist. But monolith a monolith right so sorry. Yeah i don't know. What did you think it's aliens. You think it's aliens. I mean that's the question right. Who put it there. Yeah because there's no no one's claimed it it dropped. They said like there's no signs of it was dropped. It just appeared You know. I'm going go aliens on this one. It sounds gnarly. I mean the article Heavily references two thousand one space odyssey. Which is where i get the word monolith from because that's like what's all about and so they're like. Oh maybe it's a fans. I think they filmed that in the utah desert. And they're kind of saying like oh. Some artists did an installation like it looks artistic more than like anything else They thought like oh nassar put it. They're like bounce satellite signals author. But it's kind of like lowered into some rocks and stuff which would be interfere so it's not quite ideal for that. So i think the leading theory in the article was like like an artistic installation or something. Yeah

Utah Utah Desert Nassar
To Take on Slack, Google is Rebranding -- Again

Business Wars Daily

02:57 min | 2 years ago

To Take on Slack, Google is Rebranding -- Again

"The pandemic has taught us many things how to coordinate business attire with sweatpants, for example, also how you can stay inside all day and still feel exhausted. For companies one of the biggest lessons is how much more productive many employees can be when they work remotely. In fact, a recent study published in the Harvard Business Review, found that knowledge workers are more productive and generally feel better about their work when doing it from home, it's the attention of these workers that Google is trying to get by rebranding it suite of productivity and remote collaboration tools. Google workspace formerly called G. SUITE INCORPORATES G, mail calendar, drive Docs, and other Google apps into a single interface. It's got a new look and a handful of new features that are supposed to. Save Time. That's the upside on the downside. Unlimited storage will cost you about eight bucks a month more than with G. Suite. The pandemic shifted such collaboration platforms from some what irritating office requirements to essential communication tools. So it makes sense for Google to coordinate all of these tools in one space to compete with productivity platforms like slack and Microsoft, teams but there's nothing truly earth shattering about the new offering and unfortunately everyone including Google keeps messing up the new name Fast Company reported that in two separate workspace related blog posts published earlier this month Google called its own new brand work place. Meanwhile Google is playing catch up with slack, which has more than twelve million active daily users and enterprise customers include the majority of fortune one hundred companies including starbucks, Oracle and target at the company's annual conference slack announced it was adding more security features like the ability to send secure slack messages to people outside your company. The verge reports that slack will also introduce instagram likes stories and push to talk audio by the end of the year. The goal is to cut down on constant video calls and inefficient text conversations by giving users communication tools they already use a quick story post can update the team and replace that annoying fifteen minute morning huddle. Plus slack already has so many integrations that make it more than a messaging platform including integration with Google workspace. But all of those bells and whistles might not matter as protocol reported. This month platforms like slack have been pouring resources into chat functionality, which is the heart of collaboration platforms but workspaces tools are already integrated into companies in other ways. G Mail is the world's biggest email mail provider and most companies already use Google docs, sheets and slides. In fact, Google now has more than two billion users who rely on at least one of those apps. So it has some home field advantage to slack may have an advantage in cool features for now. But Google has one thing that's hard to innovate sheer mass and when a player that big comes to play on your feel you better be ready with your.

Google Harvard Business Review G. Suite Instagram Fast Company Starbucks Microsoft Oracle
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan and this is intelligence squared US part of our discourse disruptor series and what we're going to be focusing on. Our the coming presidential debates they are coming sort of starting September twenty-ninth, the first of three. And of course, because everything's different this year, the debates are going to feel different almost certainly going to be. In some fashion remote, maybe the debaters, the candidates won't even be in the same place. There's only going to be one moderator. We're not gonNA live audience because you can't have that many people in one space in this dangerous time. Also what we have going on as a conversation simultaneously with which is focused on, maybe we shouldn't have debates maybe it's time to wrap up that whole institution and go back to a time of no debates. And when I say go back did you know that for most of American history this institution that we know is the debates did not exist that for most of our history, there were no debates and did you know that once we started having debates that in the first series, there was a remote debate the candidates were not in the same place and there was no live audience. And there was only one moderator. So maybe things are circling back. There's a lot of history here and we are interested in that because. At intelligence squared, we are very interested in history and we are also very very interested in debates. So that's what we want to focus on and we want to focus. In this case of discourse disrupters with an excellent source of information about the past and the present and potentially the future, and that is a gentleman named Newton Minot and Newton Minnow is an old friend of intelligence squared us and he's also known as the father of American presidential debates and we'll talk a little bit about why that is. But first, let's bring Newt Minnow into the conversation newt. Thank you so much for for joining us. It's really a pleasure to be back in communication with you. John I. LOOK FORWARD TO I. Admire your work or the intelligence squared very very much. Well, thank you. Can I ask before we start everything else I find it interesting that for folks who don't know you have lived through some very, very disruptive times and this one in your nineties a comes at the after a long series of other adventures. I mean, you have lived through I, think twenty three presidential elections. At this point, you have seen twelve cycles of the debates that we're GONNA be talking about. You lived through the major disruption called World War to. Use served overseas you went into politics You're an aide to ally Stevenson who ran for president does the Democratic nominee twice in the nineteen fifties. So you saw two elections then you joined John Kennedy's administration and you saw the trauma of his assassination and then you were very close friends with Robert Kennedy and you saw his assassination and lived through that and and now this. Just just to take a moment is, is this disruption different in dramatically in kind from all of the others you've seen so far? Well, I lived through all that, but then I had another. Exposure to politics with Obama, the because Michelle worked for our firm and and Barack came to be a summer associate and they fell in love and so we got. So we had another round politics with with with the OBAMAS. About that but all throughout, I would say the last fifty years of this you have been intersecting with this institution that we call the presidential debates take us back to nineteen, fifty, nine, nineteen, sixty, where as an aide to at least Stevenson. You actually were involved in the idea of pushing forward the idea that there there. He did not get to take part in that kind of debate but was interested in enemies interested because you are suggesting it. You have a very strong faith in the idea of technology. To be a force for good and for communication and you saw television as this, you're right as this big thing happening in the sixties. Well, it actually was in the fifties in when. In in the fifty six. Presidential, election. The incumbent President President Eisenhower. Having a heart attack. And there was a big question whether he would be able to run again. And I suggested to adly that instead of the candidates. Rushing. All over the country and speaking crowds that that. Now, we have television which reached every home. And that instead of traditional debate that. There'd be a series of joint appearances or debates between the presidential candidates. As they considered that his advisors thought it was a gimmick and it was he never suggested it. The Federal Communications Act when it was originally passed during the new deal. Required equal time for political candidates. The law said section three fifteen FA broadcaster gives or sells time to one candidate. At must give ourselves time to the opponent on the same basis. As a result that was interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission to mean any use of the air by a candidate including being in a news program. So the broadcasters were pressing to get news programs exempt. From the equal time requirement and they finally succeeded in the late fifties. But debates were not regarded as a news program.

Stevenson President President Eisenhower John Donvan Barack Obama Newton Minnow Federal Communications Commiss John Kennedy United States Newton Minot Robert Kennedy John President Trump FA Summer Associate Michelle
Getting Into America with Trymaine Lee

Black Girl Nerds

04:47 min | 2 years ago

Getting Into America with Trymaine Lee

"Welcome to the bloggers podcast I'm your host Ryan Africa's episode. We're going to be keeping the conversation going because we WANNA. Keep the names of George. Floyd, Brianna, Taylor Ahmad Aubrey Tamir, Rice Rees Gordon, Sandra Blan- and unfortunately the list can keep going and going and going, but we want to keep those names out. There want to keep this conversation going so people stay informed. And we don't want this to be got to be forgotten, so we're back in the situation again so Yes, like I said blogger owners committed to doing that and I am not just here by myself. I have a contassot. Guests with me here today to keep this conversation going. I am talking about. Pull a surprise and Emmy Award winning journalist. Tremaine, Lee. He is also MB. Correspondent in host of the into America podcast, so I am so glad to have him here with me today. They Ryan thank you so much revenue neutral appreciative. I WANNA. Start off this. This question was kinda going throughout. My might assume I knew I was GONNA. I was excited about this because I wanna Kinda. Give the listeners a different perspective that we don't get all the time with all this coverage of the protests and everything that's going on and not to say that you speak for all of news broadcasting. and I'm in production that worlds often find myself in this conversation as well. This is why this question is so important to me. But how do you deal with the idea of people asking why the media is covering the protests way their covenant, or you know certain situations. You find yourself in a maybe you don't have a choice of what the story is recovering that day. What's it? It depends I think the one thing that we do have choice over one one space did I control is how I centered the narrative. That I'm speaking to reporting on recovering so sometimes. The critique of the media is absolutely correct, because the media is not like any other institution. America, that's been a touched in racism, touched in bias touching all those things, so it's incumbent upon us working inside media. To make sure flicking the truest narrative possible, and sometimes that begins with our own experience in our own. To understand the language that's being spoken these communities right so so we're not relying on trucks and stereotypes ideally. We're we're connecting to the people in a different way and so I don't pay much mind to the critiques necessarily except for some of correct That's when we have to make sure that we are redoubling our efforts but I know from from. You know I don't I. Don't get many of those critiques because you know. I try to keep it as as true as possible I. Mean That's what I've done my entire career. So you know sometimes they're correct. Sometimes, they're not sometimes people. Are just shouting into the ether, your social media just right the shouting right, but I think the good thing is that the proof is always in the so that people can consume the information. The best dress with their concerns are. Right and speaking of getting out there and speaking the truth into America a fairly new podcast. She started up. Can you tell me about how that started and wise that important to you? Into America at this point I think we're on episode Twenty Six maybe twenty seven in the the whole idea behind into Americans really get outside of our bubbles in really go out into America. In an approach politics policy in a different conway. Along and I worked for MSNBC PROUDLY SO but you know the twenty four hour news cycle. It's kind of like a horse. Race Times. If you're not careful the way we. The Lens from which review politics? It's also who's up now. WHO's fallen behind? You know it's daily drama as opposed to the way politics policy actually impact the lives of everyday people, and so the goal of into America was to do just that. Go out into America. And speak directly to people about their concerns, their needs but also how the backdrop of policy is really impacting them. You know and I really do believe that is the kind of thing. I worked my entire life trying to trying to do right always out there with the people and trying to tell the people's story. Our care deeply about the most vulnerable among US marginalized community, most certainly a black folks in this country, but also the poor any race the marginalized anyways so into America. We've been trying to. Obviously it's shifted a bit through. I Kobe nineteen right so now we're. Quest heard in with the engaged with how people are You know the fallout from Kobe nineteen whether it's the the emotional stuff with his health, related impact was the economic impact and now in. This Arab uprising rebellion in protests. We've shifted again to to address in all of the concerns around systemic racism the the the initial ideals of white supremacy that in so many ways to guide this country. The protests respect all of those things, so that's a long answer, but that is into America.

America Ryan Africa LEE United States Emmy Award Kobe Sandra Blan George Msnbc Taylor Ahmad Aubrey Tamir Floyd Tremaine Conway Rice Rees Gordon Brianna
SpaceX Crew Dragon Is the Most Anticipated Launch of the Year

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

SpaceX Crew Dragon Is the Most Anticipated Launch of the Year

"Astronauts are expected to launch into space from U. S. soil for the first time in nearly a decade this afternoon a SpaceX crew dragon capsule will carry Bob bacon and Doug Hurley from NASA's Kennedy Space Center to the international space station it'll be the first space crew to launch from the US since twenty eleven liftoff is scheduled for one thirty three this

Bob Bacon Doug Hurley Nasa Kennedy Space Center United States U. S. Spacex
"one space" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"one space" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"First space that's fine but like I said god you have a good one those are large I I don't need to be crass but those are large nips if they can find them from the field good lord saying are they are they picking up show time on the a little sensors are they able to get that it's a multi functioning sex doll home my goodness okay a Netflix and chill I guess yeah I don't know there yeah so now they said they were sorry and they've replaced them all with cardboard or different types of dolls but then I'm thinking what other dolls they didn't say yeah creepy ones well there there is lex I saw there was a fancy restaurant I can't forget which I I can't remember which one yeah and they were putting mannequins yeah to help folks will grow the social distance to make it easier they were putting mannequins in in various seats to kind of guide you of where to set yeah why not yeah and slash make you feel not so alone the end same rules apply as if I was circling second on my way to third if I'm sitting at a restaurant I do not want to sit with a mannequin I'm sorry I just don't want to do that would that be weird how would a stuffed animal panda because in China there was a restaurant that did that they looked really cute they're like big stuffed animals no no no okay just because you want to wear full noodle on your head to make sure somebody's social distance that'll do have fun our pool pool noodle yeah yeah will prevent people from coming up do you know what I mean like bothering.

Netflix China