36 Burst results for "One Problem"

How to Deal With A Lack of Passion in Your Job and Life

Building Psychological Strength

02:30 min | 3 d ago

How to Deal With A Lack of Passion in Your Job and Life

"If there is one problem that one on one coaching clients come to me with more than anything else. It's this problem. I don't feel passionate about my work. Or i want my work to be my passion. How do i do that. And we hear it all the time. Right this quote. From steve jobs is just one way but we hear all the time. If you love what you do you'll never work a day in your life and other things like that and that is a lovely idea. That's a lovely experiment and if it's what you're striving for men make it your goal i mean go for it but hear me out in this episode because i don't think that that necessarily has to be the case so in the united states we've talked about this in prior episodes where we've talked about role gulf meant this idea that our identity gets very wrapped up in our title and in the job that we do this particularly strong or something that happens in the united states. We tend to identify with our work and with our title more than other countries and other cultures. Do we also work really long hours. And so when you put those two things together the role that our workplace in our identity and also the amount of our life that are work takes up. We can almost forget that there's life outside of work or that there's opportunity to be passionate outside of work. We looked to this lack of passion in our lives and the first place we think to get it is from our job but is that the only place and that's the question. I wanna pose. I'm not saying that it's impossible. No one can be passionate about their work. That's definitely not true. But if you are not passionate about your job and there are real barriers in place for you to make a change or you're not even sure what direction to go just yet. I would offer that asking yourself the question of how might i be able to feel that passion or express that passion in ways outside of my job is a much more near term realistic way to get that passion. Engine fired up then making a sweeping career

Steve Jobs United States
Fresh "One Problem" from Mike McConnell

Mike McConnell

01:04 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh "One Problem" from Mike McConnell

"96 Folio One ish If you're watching a little bit of Bengals highlights because camps about the fire up. Oh, is it that time of the year already believe it or not. Who started the whose idea was it that when you do something say you score a touchdown. People congratulate you by hitting you in their helmet. Smack smack smack smack. Thanks. That's great. Thank you. Oh, That's the one that showed Burrow. He did running touchdown might have been his first game, I guess last year And they get in both ears. Both of your holes. No, thank you. Stop that. I'm gonna handshake. Wouldn't that be nice? Yeah. High five. Back in the old days may high vibe, but, yeah, they're hitting them in the helmet. Correct, Correct, Correct, Correct. All right. What have we got? What have we got? Traffic wise, you tell me. All right. I will. From the UC Help Traffic center. You see, Health is the region's leader in cancer and Neurosciences care. This is science and in science Lives Hope pretty much. One problem Morning. That's north beyond 75 been fluctuating between 10 and 15 minutes police to try to get across.

Last Year First Game 10 Burrow Both 15 Minutes Both Ears Uc Help Traffic Center One Problem Bengals 75 96 ONE Folio
What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

The Economist: Editor's Picks

02:08 min | Last week

What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

"Optimists long hoped that welcoming china into the global economy would make a responsible stakeholder and bring about political reform as president. Donald trump blasted that week now. Joe biden is converting trumpian bombast into doctrine that pits america against china a struggle between rival political systems. Which he says can have only one winner between. Mr trump and mr biden have engineered the most dramatic break in american foreign policy in the five decades since richard nixon went to china mr biden and his team based their doctrine on the belief that china is less interested in coexistence and more interested in dominance. The task of american policy is to blunt. chinese ambitions. America will work with china in areas of common interest like climate change but counter. Its ambitions elsewhere. That means building up the strengths at home and working abroad with allies that can supplemented economic technological diplomatic military. And moral haft much about mr biden's new doctrine make sense. The optimistic case for engagement has crumbled under the realities of chinese power led by president. Xi jinping china has garrison the south china sea imposed party rule on hong kong threaten taiwan skirmished with india and has tried to subvert western values in international bodies. Many countries are alarmed by china's wolf warrior diplomacy but the details of the biden doctrine contain much to worry about not least that it is unlikely to work. One problem is how. Mr biden defines threat because politics in washington is broken. He seems to feel that he needs the spirit of pearl harbor to help. Rekindle a sense of national purpose. That is a miscalculation it is true. That republicans jump on anything. They can as soft on china even though every time. They say that the presidential election was stolen. They do the work of chinese propagandists

Mr Biden China Mr Trump Donald Trump Joe Biden America Richard Nixon South China Taiwan Hong Kong Biden India Washington
The Biggest Intermittent Fasting Mistake

Keto & Intermittent Fasting Lifestyle with Alex Yehorov

02:21 min | Last week

The Biggest Intermittent Fasting Mistake

"Mistake that even seasoned beer intermediate faster does and obviously almost every beginner. It's actually breaking. It's related to breaking the fast because believe it or not. Everybody can fast fast as simple as just you abstain from something right in this talking. About intermediate fastens usually abstaining from the food so have stained from the food and there is nothing heart with that the most important part over this how you break a fast wise people know how to break the fast the right way so they can maintain their health health and the weight loss itself. So what i've done. In the past. I would go probably for doesn't matter what type of let's say sixteen hours fashion. And then i would right away chunk on myself everything. I would drink everything out. Eat everything and i felt that i didn't actually burwell with that. I felt tired and felt oversleep bloating and inflammation so problem number one with that is when you combine protein carbs. Fats all of that together in the first year meal when you break it fast right away. That your insulin get spike double. Because you believe it or not at the end of your fast uber. Insulin subsitute to begin with meaning. Everything that gets will get storage will spike your insulin. More than usual because At the end of the fast you already haven't gotten any food and your body looking for that food right yourself looking for that carbs for that food and whatnot. So so what. I'm saying is there is a downside of getting all of that food at once and dublin instability insulin spike in is only one problem but actually when you combine those fats and those Carbs and protein together. You get even you could say triple a. Fact because now you Not only carbs. Gets you insolent rice. Get your sugar level up. And insulin gets up as well so when you combine protein fats and carbs. You get a lot faster and lot of your insulin. Level will increase higher at the same time. So that's one of the reason. We are trying to avoid breaking the fast with everything together. And i will explain how

Burwell Dublin
"one problem" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:34 min | Last month

"one problem" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"With with arnold What allen draft. So the fritz all right so anyway you had a problem with one problem with A terminator he's very well thought through so well thought through through so he goes back in time to kill the the possible parents of of John connor leader of the of the new movement are the resistance but only add to do is prevent his parents meeting each other. I mean you can go back four generations earlier and just put on a different train so they never meet and that entire genetic lineage cover exists right right so this idea that he's got to kill them and it's gonna be all bloody that made it like a violent movie but it could have been on a little more with with less blooding gore but also just the fact that when he comes through he comes out butt naked. Remember that out in this bubble and you remember why had to come through but naked. Because i am flesh off into skeleton because nothing no living tissue. No dentition may go through right. Nothing's ever the time machine. Except of course hair is dead so he would have been totally bald. Come with no eyebrows. Nothing okay. I just thought i'd say that was an inconvenience alabi..

John connor one problem arnold four generations allen
"one problem" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

03:22 min | 2 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"A. You're curious about this one Problem that you've been trying to figure out and up sorry about that. You're curious about this one problem. You've been trying to figure it out. You tried and tried and tried finally after three days. You had figured out you know. And you've spent maybe an hour of your peak-time over those three days. You figured it out when you figure it out you get little tawny burst of dopamine and all of the neurons that were in kind of this little trail that led to you getting the the solution. It's like that dopamine goes..

three days one problem an hour three one days
"one problem" Discussed on Risky Business with the Coverage Queens

Risky Business with the Coverage Queens

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on Risky Business with the Coverage Queens

"When you're looking at nutrition and disease there's to two aspects after consider i are you do anything actually damaging yourself and damaging your immune system and are you giving your immune system yourself what they need to repair them and sue. The problem that we have in our society is to full. We have a lifestyle that creates constant damage. Yourselves horsely high stress and terrible eating all right because it's actually true. You are what you eat. Your building sells out of your diet. So if you're eating what. I was eating french fries ranch even if you do eat a salad kind. Things on high amounts of meat dairy processed foods all that stuff crees inflammation nance right. That's one problem that most people have then the other side is. How do you repair the damage. Will it turns out that we need certain ingredients to do so that your is actually know what to do a little instruction manual like you get with that key furniture yourself out of that damage it what to do. But it needs right tools right. If you don't have that allen wrench. I don't care you're not getting any kia bookshelves. Nothing's happening right. So same thing with your cells. If they don't have the right ingredients they won't repair the damage. In what happens. Is you get chronic disease right. Instead of a disease away becomes chronic because the damaged continues. There's no one there to fix it and so these chronic but if you number one stop getting sicker that's helpful him really awful new so curated to keep yourself happy and lower stress and don't eat on the season make you sick instead. Give yourself what it uses her parents so the raw vegetables. Her husband was right on track. Raw vegetables especially cruciferous the ones that most people don't like to eat kale cabbage broccoli cauliflower. All this process crowds the ones that people are mean to turns out they have we need. They have the highest of vitamins and minerals antioxidants and other fighter nutrients at your cells need to repair damage..

one problem two aspects
"one problem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"However, it doesn't fix everything. Even after those affirming interventions, they still have higher rates of anxiety, depression and thoughts of suicide than this gender people. And that gets used politically. People will say, Look, they had surgery. But there's still more depressed, then sis gender people, and that's true. The reason is you fix one problem, but you also have to fix the way society treats transgender people. What's really insidious is the more you're exposed to those external factors. You start to believe that you're less than for being transgender, and then that drives the Depression. I'm seeing this with patients all the time. They're starting to internalize what's being said, but these conservative politicians and hating themselves. Hard to watch is a therapist. It's not easy going to is there something I should have asked you a misapprehension that you encounter. Lot. That you love to address. Yeah, This is another thing that I think people get hung up on being transgender is not the same for all kids. Some kids well be transgender and what medical interventions? There are a lot of other kids who identifies transgender and are fine with their bodies and don't want any medical interventions. For instance, I've had patients who are birth assigned females who Just really hate the way society thinks about women. So they identify as non binary and may be used They them pronouns but a very clear that they're fine with their bodies. This is more reaction. Tonto societal expectations based on their gender than it is about body just for you, and so they don't want medical interventions. There's this idea. Those kids air somehow tricked into thinking that they want medical interventions. And you know, sometimes kids aren't sure what they want. They want to be working with the therapist to figure out which under means to them. So I WASI assist gender boy. I grew up.

one problem
"one problem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"However, it doesn't fix everything. Even after those affirming interventions, they still have higher rates of anxiety, depression and thoughts of suicide than his gender people. And that gets used politically. People will say, Look, they had surgery. But there's still more depressed, then sis gender people, and that's true. The reason is you fixed one problem. You also have to fix the way society treats transgender people. What's really insidious is the more you're exposed to those external factors. You start to believe that you're less than for being transgender, and then that tries to depression. I'm seeing this with patients all the time. They're starting to internalize what's being said. These conservative politicians and hating themselves. Hard to watch is a therapist. It's not easy time do Is there something I should have asked you a misapprehension that you encounter Lot. That you love to address. Yeah, This is another thing that I think people get hung up on being transgender is not the same for all kids. Some kids well be transgender and what medical interventions? There are a lot of other kids who identifies transgender and are fine with their bodies and don't want any medical interventions. For instance, I've had patients who are birth assigned females who Just really hate the way society thinks about women. So they identify is not binary and may be used a them pronouns but a very clear that they're fine with their bodies. This is more reaction. Tonto societal expectations based on their gender than it is about. Body dysphoria, and so they don't want medical interventions. But there's this idea those cancer somehow tricked into thinking that they want medical interventions. And, you know, sometimes kids aren't sure what they want, and they want to be working with a therapist to figure out which under means to them..

one problem
The USS William D. Porter Was the Unluckiest Ship in WWII

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:01 min | 2 months ago

The USS William D. Porter Was the Unluckiest Ship in WWII

"The troubles of the uss william d porter began immediately as they were leaving port in norfolk virginia. The first problem was when they left port they raised their anchor improperly and they damaged one of the ships it was dock next to they tore off one of the railings a lifeboat mount from one of the ships. No one was hurt but it was a very inauspicious. Start to their journey. The next day things didn't go much better. They accidentally dropped a depth charge into the water which exploded the reason. Why so many ships in the fleet was to defend themselves against german u boats as no one knew the depth chart was being released. Everyone in the fleet assume that it was a torpedo attack which caused everyone to take evasive maneuvers. The porter had to sheepishly. Notify the rest of the fleet that they had accidentally caused the explosion and that they weren't under attack after the accidental depth-charge. The willie was hit by a rogue wave which washed one of the crew members overboard and he was never seen again. The next day it got even worse. President roosevelt wanted to see anti-aircraft drill to see how the ships would defend themselves against an they also went through a torpedo drill to simulate how they would launch a torpedo. Normally when you drill like this you remove the primer from the torpedo which is what makes it a shoot out of the torpedo tube. however the torpedo man aboard the porter forgot to take the primer out of one of the tubes when they simulated launching a torpedo they actually launched a torpedo and the torpedo is heading towards the uss iowa which had on board the president of the united states. i should add. It wasn't just the president of the united states aboard the iowa. Roosevelt had brought with him. The secretary of state cordell hull chief-of-staff admiral william delay chief of staff of the army. George marshall chief of naval operations ernest king commanding general of the. Us army's henry. Hap arnold secretary of commerce harry hopkins and a bunch of other high ranking officials. If the iowa were to be sunk it would've taken out almost all of the american senior military leadership during the war.

William D Porter Porter Norfolk Virginia President Roosevelt Willie Iowa William Delay United States Cordell Hull Ernest King Hap Arnold George Marshall Roosevelt Harry Hopkins Us Army Army
Covid vaccine comes just in time for wedding and prom season

WBZ Afternoon News

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Covid vaccine comes just in time for wedding and prom season

"Are blue out there. We've got a nice spring breeze. The flowers are blooming the Paul in his back yet for sure. That's how you know it's wedding in prom season. Well, there's just one problem. We're in a pandemic that Kristina's and handover manager Debra Baldwin says. This is the second season. The stories had to work through fitting people for a celebration when we're not supposed to touch each other, But with more people getting vaccinated for the first time in a year, there's hope where Close contact business and, you know, we get up close and personal. You know with these ladies, you know, so everybody has to be careful and we just have to continue, you know, doing what we need to do until Till everybody's healthy and safe again. I asked her if she was prepared for the platoon of brides preparing to land upon her shore. She says that her store alone 500 brides have postponed and the last year She says yes.

Debra Baldwin Kristina Paul
"one problem" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on Science Salon

"One problem with with gratiot and this is something that we do really the book Again we're inside. Experimentally greg's colleagues invents a pill which renders won No longer Likely to commit a crime and the first mother the one that didn't deliberately trying to get away with murder on we catcher. He said okay. I take the pill thank you. Now let me blow my the rest of my life this line. I'm no longer a threat to anybody. i did it on purpose. i did it deliberately. I did it with men's raya. Now that i've taken the pill i'm not dangerous. So of course okay. Yeah.

first One problem greg gratiot
The Hiring Debate: Skill Set vs. Cultural Fit in Landscaping

Landscape Disruptors

02:18 min | 4 months ago

The Hiring Debate: Skill Set vs. Cultural Fit in Landscaping

"Hey everybody mark bradley here Thanks again for joining us. Today today. have ryan markowitz from creative roots landscaping here to tell us a little bit about His story when it comes to people You know obviously the number one problem that most landscapers are facing today is finding people and then keeping them and certainly motivating them and and really bring out the best in people. And i've i've noticed ryan has a a true for that. In a thought today we would speak the ryan and sort of hear. His story of of how things have unfolded in his landscape company. Because i've definitely felt that He's truly an airliner an outlier in in this area. And you know over the past twenty six years. He has You know really sort of learned shifted and and Made lots of changes over the years Based on some articles that i've read of his and and lots of conversations so today i thought we'd ask ryan a few questions. And and maybe you know ryan to get started. Maybe you could kind of tell us a little bit about how you got into the industry you know you've been on the show here regularly For those who may just be hearing from you for the first time. I just thought. Quick intro it'd be great and then we can chat a little bit more about your team. Ex- mark thanks for having me back appreciate it elements doing a great job of Contributing to the industry. And i'm proud to be a part of it whenever i can so My story Quickly is twenty six years of running a landscape business. I started in nineteen ninety four with a truck on a lawn more and just really was just kind of passing time. While i thought i was going to figure out what else was going to do with my life and i just saw i i. I kinda fell in love with working with my hands and i saw fraternity everywhere. And so it just evolved from that you know from one truck to two trucks. Three trucks to Five employees ten employees to twenty employees. And and now here. I am

Ryan Markowitz Ryan Mark Bradley
"one problem" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

07:11 min | 4 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on People Helping People

"Adam morris this month. We're exploring how to logic social enterprise. I'm excited to introduce this week's guest. She that wednesday's business coach for females social entrepreneurs and ceo and founder of silo circular passion. Collective a sustainable retail brand. She'll is based in the philippines. And i'm always curious to explore social entrepreneurship a new country. So la welcome on the podcast wine really excited to have you as wondering if we could start off a little bit with your journey from when you're in baking in and how you start it's something new yes so my profession is the on king. I have a buck count in economics. I read it. Didn't expect that. I will be taking this fast but then at got really curious when i met one of the social entrepreneurship philippines and i saw the deeper meaning. Why we do it. I really want to serve people because that makes me feel so flu fattening. So i wanna try but as i started doing our fashion for budget and so i'm doing it while i'm working at. I don't really consider it as a serious business because i just love doing it so i am a passionate about sasho and so we started clothing brand online and then i came across apu's of fashion. Revolution are very active in promoting in looking for sustainability in the fashion industry. So i got Serious why are they asking for transparency. Showing the stories behind the process of manufacturing. What are some of the issues around fashion number. One is unethical practices. So most of our clothes are made from developing countries vied. I have learned that. They're providing below minimum wage. Nato have enough room or a good working environment and there are issues on child labour And so much more so it really bothered me in. Then i've went further. Doing my region said. I need to stop doing this fashion business. And we we need to shift the sustainability and. Yeah that's how it started the house. La's what has looked like so far. We post for a while this. We're active on last less event dream pandemic our doing like online events because we still want to raise awareness and to engage with our community. 'cause we formed a community here defense begins with then we realized at during the pandemic fashion industry is one of the biggest incident was hit by the pandemic so we said we need to change our business model in shift to a service based business. But yeah we're still active in terms of connecting with the community. And that's goal really we want do for in this community of sustainable fashion advocates. Not just in the philippines but really want to promote the nation. What do those activities look like. We hosted workshops online of virtual masterclasses. On how they can start their will understand what fashion bantering for how they can changed their mindset to align with their visa their values. Because that's very important for interpreters and in terms of the consumers. Were doing some sort of sample fashion. Wanna one glasses and virtual up for our communities. What are some things that people can do to start a sustainable fashion brand. My number one day usually is not over think because the sustainable fashion day think that it's too complicated. An agree because we have to consider a lot of things in this obliging. Every process should be sustainable. But then it's okay to start without process it's okay to start a with division and be clear about what you want to do and what problem. We want to solve in the fashion industry because there are a lot of problems especially if you're sa interpreter you can solve everything so don't over. Think overcomplicate but just start with one. One product one problem to solve entirety of your vision in from there that. What's that one thing you can implement the start that sustainable practice inside your business whether it is. I'm doing ethical practices as labor process or it could be using unicycle clothes. That's long way. So you don't need to buy those hundred percent natural fabrics leads. It's expensive so find a creative way. Insulation that problem so you can use your own clothes for example you can ask for indonesia. craves how does that work building a brand off a recycled clothing in terms of the manufacturing process. Of course it's not that easy compared to building it using the usual fabric but there are a lot of designers here who are very active. The they cantered use glows into another excludes for example some designers. Here i am seeing them doing this like in one big dessert they will cut it in house and then they will just fix the top in make it like cropped up for women in the balkan will be skirt Something like that. So they're eight. Seems like project where you get very unique close based on what you're starting with. yes now. In addition to this you work as a coach for other female social entrepreneurs. I'm curious to hear just a little bit. What social entrepreneurship looks like in the philippines. Yes in the philippians. It's already a growing trend. Unlock of fianc by preneurs. They are looking for that bath that it's not just about building a business for them. They want to do something better for the society for the community. And i'm seeing a lot of fiat interest and also in university students in the philippines. They have mid that they're very passionate about doing something with the country. Are there certain topics that people gravitate towards when they're starting things i unless say they want to explore things that they are not just confined in one solution that they have this idea for example that the very open to try validate.

Adam morris this month wednesday indonesia one problem One product this week philippines one thing one solution eight one big dessert hundred percent one philippians one day one of the biggest incident one glasses One Nato
"one problem" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:58 min | 4 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"There was only one problem. Above me in the far back of the balcony, where tourists the white people in line from outside, hundreds of them slapping softies and gawking, hovering like a gaggle of anthropologists studying black Baptists in their natural habitat, every expression of worship Every tear. I should every hug. I gave every arm outstretched. The God I felt like I was on display for them. I felt exposed their baptisms. Some of the devout being baptized, overcome great odds. One in particular, got the holy spirit and sobbed in the pool. Something unnamed and sacred had led them to that moment, and all I could think about were the white people upstairs, taking pictures of someone's life altering, spiritually journey. They could share them over brunch is really messing with my worship white tourists visiting black churches is a thing. Especially in Harlem, showing up for free music. It was my first time hearing about it, but I never experienced it before. Sure, there were some white congregants sprinkled throughout downstairs, but their members Black. We better phrase they're invited to the cookout, the choice in the balcony. They just want a song. I kept going to this church every Sunday. But I felt like I was in willingly participating in their gospel concert and struggle to focus on what matters to me. Most My own relationship with the big guy upstairs. I was navigating all that I learned about the reviews. Tourist critique the church online writing reviews on Web sites like Yelp and Trip advisor Somewhere Find soon they love the experience and thank the church for welcoming outsiders. Others were not so nice quote. The music was loud, repetitive and vacuous. Churches to elevate us to God not bring him to human level two stars from France. This is a scam, The Children singing our circus animals. One star. From Italy. Don't choose this place If you're expecting the gospel style of Sister Act one star, and this one is meant to be a compliment that I bristled from Spain. I will definitely repeat this experience. If I go back to New York. Do not be afraid to go to Harlem on your own. A lot of white people lived there. Four stars are worship was being grated on a gentrified curve. I got angry. E don't like the choice, but I do love the church. It has the familiarity and the warmth that I grew up with..

New York Harlem Spain Italy one star One star France Four stars Yelp Trip advisor one problem two stars Sister Act first time God hundreds black One Baptists tear
How to Reliably Improve Workplace Trust and Collaboration with Jill Ratliff

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

08:14 min | 5 months ago

How to Reliably Improve Workplace Trust and Collaboration with Jill Ratliff

"One of the things that you write about. Is that the most important skills in leadership are gaining trust and knowing how to collaborate under stress. Absolutely what is it that good leaders do and stressful moments that promote trust in collaboration. We're you know. I think that The place where trust is broken and the place where we stale lead effectively is when the situation or the circumstance that we find ourselves in is greater than our capacity to maintain equity calm clarity focusing kindness right so the the root of trust and collaboration relationships right and then that ability to build them have them maintain them and to lead be able to lead in adversity. Because honestly you know when things are going well. We don't need help when things are going well. Our personalities aren't a problem when things are going well performance. Coaching is easy. So for me. Adversity is the jewel of leadership. And it's the metal that task your own leadership development and your ability to lead in those kinds of environment. I love that lane and it's where a lot of my work said okay. So you're working with a leader. The sauce has hit the fan. There's a mess and so how do you coach them to stay calm. And everything's going to be all right. I mean those are highly stressful times and okay. Sometimes people could react a little better than they do but most people aren't ready to sink combined and like you know let's toast marshmallows stuff that needs to be done. There's clean up that needs to be done and it's not about you know pointing fingers of blame but it's like hey chuck going here. So how do you counsel them when everything inside. Them is screaming white hot. Hey let's get on it and yet that emotional outburst may or may not be the best way to express themselves at that point in time. Yeah what on the the truth of it is. It never is the best way. Because and how. I counsel them as you know i start with helping people understand. It's all about energy where i meaning that at quantum physics right if you have a negative situation negative energies very strong. Right when you walk in a room and someone's upset or something's wrong or dares challenge. What does it feel like when you walk in. You know it immediately right. And even if you're in a group of people where five people are doing fine and one. It's really upset or concerned or or off. It tends to call it the other people in the room to follow that negative energy and then when we get that way literally inside our brains we lose the capacity to think clearly and to problem solve. So what you have to understand as a leader is one and this is sort of one of the key sort of foundational principles. My work is that as a leader. You came to solve problems. That's what you get paid to do. You know when you run an organization when you are promoted into management. You're basically you just got the job title problem-solver because that's what the company's paying you to do so one you have to think differently about adversity at work in problems. Because how could it be any other way I work mostly with organizations and leaders that are leading business transformation and change and i think we all know that leadership in the role of leadership in today's world is to navigate transformation and change used to have the transformation once every couple of years we'd have to say organization through now they roll one on top of another sort of constant pace of change so it's foundational skill as a leader to understand. One problems aren't the problem. They come every day all day. And it's your job to help solve them to the energy you bring into a room when there's a problem. Is everything about creating the ability to problem solve effectively with others. So if you're not able to do that and you're the leader then clearly you're gonna waste a lot of time and set back. The process of problem solving all of that is perfectly logical. Yeah makes a lot of sense powder you do. And why don't they do that. I mean why isn't that. The accepted norm instead of somebody. Exploding because and everybody you know diving under the table because we weren't taught you know think about it. How did you learn how to solve problems. What to do when things are when your situation or circumstance you're in greater than your capability you learn from your parents you know so we. We've learned by watching how the people the adults in our lives when we were young problems. And unfortunately you know. They weren't taught either so it's not a curriculum that we teach people so part of my work. I start with sort of three fundamental ways to think about work and the very first one is self mastery but you have to understand that before you can lead anyone else you have to be able to lead by example in the first place you have to be able to lead examples and adversity. So you i help people start looking at and understanding challenging moments and situations like this game on. This is where you build your leadership muscle. And i can i guess. Make the point by sharing a story about A guy named dorsey levens who the running. Back with the green bay packers. He played in two super bowls and he is a green bay packer hall of fame forty five years old and he has a mental toughness and sports utility training company. And my son who's a professional athlete His organization higher dorsey to train my son scott and after a couple of weeks of training. He said to dorothy. You should meet my mom to. You'd think so much. Like and dorsey tells the story now. I could sure i'd love to meet your mom. You know i'll work on that and he put it off and put it off and put off and then finally said georgetown. I don't think you understand. I think you really need to meet my mom. And so dorsey says later just to be nice to scotty agreed to meet me for a cup of coffee on morning and we were gonna meet from nine to nine thirty. This was his idea and at noon. We were still sitting there. And then dorsey came to work with me and what he said. Is you know as an nfl. Running back was tough. I thought i understood versi. And i thought that you know i wouldn't have survived an nfl. He goes but what you've taught me that. I didn't understand that why i was successful as a running back is because i could take a hit will keep on going. It was yards after contact. They measured my success by and the truth of it is if the defense party company and i ran straight into the end zone every time and scored nobody would share for me. And that's that we in life like as leaders and as teams that get in a foxhole together when we solve problems for our organization or for our team and we overcome like where we cheer ourselves. That's where we grow. That's where we where we build confidence so when we look at adversity or challenge of the problem. That shouldn't be happening is hilarious right in business today. How could we go through transformation. So everything into the air have competition like we've never had before have challenges in the world like we've never had before and somehow think that we're all gonna get together under that kind of pressure and not have challenged us so we have to change the whole way. We think about adversity at work and managing other people stress. When you're leader and step one is you can't begin to help people under stress if you do not understand where you hold where you fold and what i would say hannah. If it's a skill it is not a personality trait. You learn how to do it with a few simple tools and practice

Dorsey Dorsey Levens Chuck Green Bay Packer Hall Versi Super Bowls Green Bay Packers Defense Party NFL Dorothy Scotty Georgetown Scott Hannah
Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

Wow In the World

04:13 min | 5 months ago

Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

"Okay ready to go. How are we getting their guy. That is used scared me god. Did you hear getting the gang back together. We're like harry run and her miami. Obviously harry sorry. Dennis really love for you to come but for taking guy roz yellow bananas scooter. And you know. It's only got seating for two people vote and a giant pigeon. Aw plus we need you here to spy on the neighborhood and watch out for danger. I guess yeah. We promised bring back a souvenir. Dierk many yoga. I think we have a little problem. Why what's going on. Well i kick it the banana scooter to start. It seems like the battery might dead. Maybe the banana is overweight. You know according to popular fruit and veg mechanics magazine. Overripe produce is the number one problem with perishable transportation. Know what happened to have your rollerblades handy do you. Oh boy. Do i know almost reggie got to ride gadfly dennis. Thank you still got. Tripling is the banana scooter. All the way down to the convention center. No problem indie rollerblades. Four oh come on you to hand you reggie. The entrance is right over there. What what what what i wear. Welcome to the bathroom showcase. Are you considering bathroom remodel. Yes i am looking to build a bear tuba lazy river in my bath. Tab and my buddy guy over here is tired of pooping in the kitchen sink. Mendy danny house. Well actually. It's a solar powered energy efficient. Modular in oversized debbie doll dream. Well i think that it's just super and i believe we've got some lovely compact laboratory options that you are going to a door. Come with me right this way but what what what what look at this of this place mindy now over here to the left you'll see be during the latest in portal body technology. Oh i think you mean florida party right. Yeah as in portable potties not poor tongue or tau you see traditional porta potties. Need to be transported to a location but but let me guess portal. Transport i bingo. Oh it's like the rollerblades of toilets now that something. I can get my behind behind once properly tested. These portal policies will be able to transport poopers through time and space past or future time. Travelling toilet signed me up. I want to see inside. Oh please don't go in their bodies bigger than your new house guy. Rise please sir. The portals are highly unstable. They have access to urine and feces from all of human history. Do i just flush myself to another car. What no sir please. it's just a prototype with. It's still in beta testing.

Harry Run Roz Yellow Bananas Dierk Veg Mechanics Magazine Reggie Mendy Danny House Debbie Doll Dennis Miami Harry Mindy Florida
Boomer and the Millennial February Special - burst 01

Boomer and The Millennial

07:39 min | 5 months ago

Boomer and the Millennial February Special - burst 01

"So we we. We need to get started before our neighbors waco away said we will be providing the soundtrack. Oh yeah for for our show they go. It's been interesting. I wonder if they're going somewhere. Probably they're young church their young and in love. You're probably going somewhere. Church may have enough. Maybe a little late for them. What better what better place to go. It is sunday. Look i'm just saying you live with with to opie we got cynicism all right exactly. I don't have a boomer. Father whatever generation you are was the one. After boomer i don't know gen-x the thing is genetic after boomer at the generation that came after them Well you know some say oh. You mean the generation after the boomers genetics boomer. Yeah nobody prehistoric. Nobody cares about that though. Talk about it being the the greatest generation ever really what happened during that generation World war two. You know they came back and what about the great depression that was probably part only front country back so we're going to corona right now dan. we're trump. Yeah so you know. I mean we go through i last we. We might be we greatest know we get out of this you know. I don't know the greatest generation given all the stuff that we've gone through at least it's still going through. that's true. welcome back as banter or done with the banter back guys. Another episode of boomer and lineal episode boomer and the millennial date do i'm ready to boomer marmande millennial and Thank you for joining us once again episode. Who knows ten me. I think it's ten or eleven can never keep up but we are coming up when anniversary. This is facts Next one because we march de during the morning dean bidding of the pandemic. Well it's a special day. Yeah it is. Valentine's day happy valentine's day thanks. Valentine's day youtube. Sorry to record valentine's day on what's going on. I just had so many plans with. Yeah yeah it's also black history month but you know you spending valentine's day with your parents so that's a good thing. Yeah i mean it's totally cool people. You love yeah. Valentine's day is not just about significant. Others you know what i mean this is. This is the first time that. I've been single on valentine's day in quite some time. Though i will say that and i just you know that's a hick so yeah you didn't know what you mean your granddaddy used to see how used to break up with his girlfriend right before christmas. Did he make up like after new years. Have the new right then. They have like this huge argument. Like the end of january beginning of february and then on the fifteenth sixteenth like. Oh hey i'm sorry. I misunderstood you on valentine's day. I think we should work this out. He's getting even have to do anything. I know it's kind of genius. Yeah that is so i. He was such a cazenove. He did have one problem though. He didn't know that he thought you call. You know when you were serious about somebody dating you know a friend. Yeah he would call him his fiancee. How do you make that how you make. That was state. There's a big worse as a big day. That's a big difference and you can imagine you know the young lady was like. Oh my goodness is got big fiance. Yeah he was like. Oh yeah i guess because he got that kind of response you know. He was like cool to christmas. Yeah right you can't be my fiance. When i thought we getting married. I guess we're gonna hit him that that's what it meant. Yeah he was like. Yeah we gotta we gotta dial that back a little bit care but anyway it's it's it's it's i don't know also saints sentence. Please please say sentence. So you modernize your mom. And i had this thing about. We would just you know if you really. If you celebrated a holiday holiday. But valentine's day on fifteenth you'd be good to go man could get flowers candy and a card for about fifteen thirteen bucks. Yeah sometimes not bad. Yeah so. I guess i'll be telling your mom have you tomorrow. Right right yeah. It's it's valentine's day somewhere in the world right exactly so you learning a lot from the boomer here. Yeah i see i mean. Apparently apparently i. Yeah so i'm single. And i have no valentine but that's okay You know life goes on. Yeah you got to do two things one. You got some very good advice okay. No good advice but in the second thing is you have a new tattoo. Yeah why did you disagree. Grace kings just love. You love vaguely talking about my life. Before i can even get to it like suppose. I didn't want to tell people oops now. It's not even that. I think yes. I did get a new tattoo. I'm a few days ago. Here's my thing though. My thing is. I don't really like i don't really like just flaunting it like i won't. I won't like post about them on social media and stuff. I have a lot of friends who do that. They'll get a new tattoo. Tattoo them and like. Oh look my tattoo that i don't post about. I'm guarantee you a lot of people. Don't even know how many i have or have seen all of them. I'm just saying. I mean it must bother you too much giving you ever almost asleep. Yeah almost we're almost done but yeah this won't hurt. I'm not gonna lie was pretty bad. Well it looks nice. Thanks no derm is yeah you got to take it off. Saran wrap wound healing it. I guess it's doing everything done safely. Yeah everything yeah i mean. They're super kobe. Friendly like in kinney was wearing a mask face shield. Okay yeah like well. this is not your first one. Yeah yeah this is actually my fourth one. But i got nam sorry. This is actually my during kobe. Kobe because i got four kind of all one two three four all at the same time and then this one but yeah so. This was kind of like my valentine's day gift to myself. I guess you could say. I've been working madman. This week drained me. Yeah i mean you've been really doing a lot you getting up early. Yeah coming in late thursday. I got up at four thirty. Got home at four thirty in the morning. Yeah that was tough.

Generational Boomer Millennial World War Two Donald Trump Sunday Valentine Marmande Opie Depression DAN Grace Kings Youtube Saran Kinney Kobe
Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

Software Engineering Daily

04:52 min | 5 months ago

Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

"Joey welcome the show. Thanks for having me. You are the founder of auger which is a decentralized prediction market. What is the function of a prediction market. Yes so a prediction market is basically a platform that lets people bet on or against real world events and by taking the odds of those bats you can basically get a forecast for how likely event is to actually happen and practical functionality. does that serve. Yeah so it does a couple of things one. Is that it for the people who are actually betting on the market. It lets them actually. Just make a straight bet if they're betting on something like a sporting event but it also lets people had risks so as an example which is a fairly real example. Say you're a person who wanted to hedge against the risk that taxes increase a new democratic congress. Well you could basically bet on the democrats and if they win you've hedged a little bit of whatever the tax changes you basically make more money if they win if they lose you. Don't get the tax hike but you also lose your bet. The other uses somebody who has just an opinion. They're not looking to hedge risk. They're looking to take risk on because they believe they know something about the world that someone else doesn't and prediction. Markets have a wide range of things you could bet on. It could be sporting event politics. You know whether it's based extra lunches there next rocket successfully really anything now in order to actually make those bets substantive and to make like if i wanted to make a significant hedge against the incoming tax policy makers i need a lot of liquidity to be able to place that bet against what are the challenges in a prediction market aggregating enough liquidity on either side of a trade. Yes so there's a bunch of challenges with it one is that prior to being blockchain based prediction markets most prediction markets were run and owned by a central company which means they tended to fragment the liquidity you might have a prediction market which focused on say new zealand might have another prediction market which focused on spain separate one for the uk and so on and so forth and so one problem is you had this to quitter fragmentation. the second issue is that just forming. The quality for new events is hard so if you look at something like the stock market it has you know these huge systems in firms and entities exist solely for providing liquidity and. There's a ton of different ways that they can hedge their risk but with a prediction market. You're betting over real-world events and not only that but if you're wrong you hold the risk in the wrong way. You could actually lose all your money. They example this is like you know. Take a presidential election if you bet on trump and trump loses you lose all the money that you bet on him and so for market maker. That's very risky. If you look at say like market making apple stock you know the the worst case scenario is that apple moves a little quickly and you end up holding too many or too few apple shares and you may be lose you know in a in a big move a number of percents though of prediction markets. You know something can swing from a ten percent chance to zero percent chance to one hundred percent chance in a matter of seconds or minutes and so that's what makes marketmaking getting liquidity very difficult before you started augured. There were a number of centralized prediction markets. What are the problems with centralized prediction markets. Yeah so if you look at the problems the centralize prediction markets. There's a couple. There's one problem that you know. Even when i got into the space. I thought it was just a problem in theory. I didn't think it would actually be a problem in practice but it turns out it is a problem in practice. Sometimes as well in that problem is because these things are real world events they have a resolution date some point where the event has to be paid out immediately clear winner in actually sometimes controversy over how it gets declared so that's one problem with a centralized one that in an e centralized system. You could have more community driven process for resolving market and pain out that sort of ensures more people are are happy with the result. So it's less arbitrary in that sense. The other kind of big issue with centralized ones is that they tend to be located in you know one or two jurisdictions or handful jurisdictions. Nobody's really created a global centralize prediction market mostly for the for the reason that the compliance cost of gain licensed in a one hundred eighty countries would just be too much overhead in in too much burden for anyone entity to do it.

Auger Joey Apple Congress New Zealand Spain Donald Trump UK
Radicle: The Decentralized Platform for Code Collaboration

Epicenter

04:33 min | 5 months ago

Radicle: The Decentralized Platform for Code Collaboration

"So united site air like what what is radical. What's division you guys. Have pursuing a radicalization. You kind of code collaboration network on this Designed with certain golden mine It's designed to be through sobering Infrastructure behind the scene It's also designed with security in mind and then finally it brings together a concepts like centralisation value flows. Things things that we see you locked in the in the in the blogs eco-system it brings some of those closer to the gulf collaboration experience. And maybe just to kind of wrapper heads around a little bit like why. Why is it important to have code. Collaboration done in alway decentralized way what's wrong with the existing waste of done we. We see a number of problems with ash centralized our code. Collaboration providers on the biggest problem topic right now in the world is the problem of user perfect censorship unfortunately most of the existing centralized providers basically have to limit usage to certain areas. Like you know. Iran crema like no. There are a number of places in the world so so when we thinking about open shores being through the open you immediately start to realize that they're all of these different arbitrary wolves come into play and that limit basically the openness of the of water infrastructure though so that's the first problem additionally many of these centralized forces have not been designed with security in mind you know we can zoom in on that quite look but the example that was give as a a few months ago. There was Significant hike on twitter. Where some of the most Most high-profile on accounts were compromised. And then i think the your which basically tweeting some kind of bitcoin like send me coincide with link So imagine you know similar attacks on your code. Collaboration infrastructure where someone put index something. You know very significant go based end. You know you as the maintain the tragic. Potentially you wouldn't even be able to notice Simply because a lot of our commissioner have on top i signed for example and then additionally you have like like when we're looking at the centralized forges. There are a number of attacks of being pulled off on the on the source of large fraction. Only on the code side of things associate cure are good collaboration. Distribution of code basis we think that the fundamental problem with centralized infrastructure osso centers one security second and then additionally. You have a number of other problems like than they're looking on. Most of these a lot firms today provide they speak get so they actually operate based on an open protocol but they haven't near the number of things around those the most common being. I'm social collaboration in this. Obviously you know are looked into their own to to their own platforms. These are the three things that we believe are really relevant for for everyone and then additionally you have a number of problems that actually are are specific tuesday decentralized world so at the decentralized world especially last year a lot of we show we show the emergence of dollars right. These are these are groups of people that actually go through the process of coordination. And you know the pain of coordination many times to actually align incentives. And what happens there. Is that actually like when they They all of them. Usually you know have some kind of go. Drip dory like where where the code Most of these things are today on Hub in virtually there. They actually they have to go through the classic abdomen flow of of some of the centralized providers where it doesn't matter if you are. It doesn't matter if you have all of these very sophisticated coordination schemes. You need the one adamant that actually will have overarching powered over over the such of the code base. Or you might like you can have multiple wants but actually many ways this even worse given the and everyone over them now has has a little over. the community. allows there's allows up decentralized organization decentralized obligations to control software trust listening which we thing is a relevant point for

Iran United Twitter
"one problem" Discussed on Equity

Equity

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on Equity

"Would call this customer success success. Yes we just. How do you create success in customer success which sounds so obnoxiously dumb but in reality. It's not enough to just software. I think best practices. Software is trying to solve one problem which is like hey maybe your customers are dumb. Like don't give them any customization force them to do exactly what you want to do. But most often can't literally force you in exactly these small grooves and so you need these people who help you guide you to using the software the best possible way and if you do that you're much more likely to use the software you're not gonna turn as much it'd be a lot better. This strikes me as kind of a hybrid like customer success and just having people that you services at a saas company most companies have a software business and they have a services business. And you know they're very different and the service people help you implemented get started going. I think the idea of having on band pooled experts. That are great at a thing is pretty cool though. I just brand to my calendar to find this meeting from last week. I can't find it. I was talking to a cybersecurity company and they are doing a hybrid of standard cyber security software and also they have a pool of experts that kind of independent cyber security folks who helped do penetration testing on their clients and so they have a human and computer component and with the to combine. They can do so much and so to me. This is the saas version of that. And i think it's great but inside. Were now splitting so finely the different roles and nuances. I wonder if people are like guys. We've already had that before. Are you just cutting same hair and did more pieces. That's so true. I mean. I have to be honest when i was i thinking about this idea. I was like okay. The idea of bringing a human into a software solution is not radical or innovative at all slash should not be exciting or newsworthy..

last week one problem
Michigan man killed after cannon explodes at baby shower

News O'Clock

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

Michigan man killed after cannon explodes at baby shower

"We need to talk about normal people using cannons over the weekend. A couple in gaines township michigan held a baby shower except there was one problem. They fired off a cannon and the gunpowder inside the cannon exploded factoring. it's metal frame. Launching into the air that shrapnel killed a person police have said that the firing of said cannon wasn't meant to be part of agenda reveals stunt agenda reveals. Stunts have caused major concerns recently especially since over the summer when caused

Gaines Township Michigan Cannon
"one problem" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:47 min | 6 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Yeah this is why the wall street bet story so interesting to me because it's like feels like connected And looking at how just looking at the forum wall street bits. It's i was talking earlier about. How how can you make Credible claims you're anonymous. Okay well maybe you can take a screenshot had will. Maybe you can up vote someone. Maybe you can have karma on red. It's and those kinds of things. Make this emerging thing possible numerous i. It didn't work at all when we started. It didn't work at all why people made multiple counts. They made really random models and hope they would get lucky and some of them did yes staking was are at like solution to could we. Could we make it so that we could trust. We could know which model people believed in the most and we could wait models that had high stake more and effectively. Coordinate this group of people to be like well actually. There's no incentive to creating bought accounts anymore either. I state my accounts. In which case i should believe in them because they could lose my steak or i don't and that's a very powerful thing Having a negative incentive and a positive incentive can make can make things a lot better and staking is like this. Is this really nice. Like key thing about blockchain is like something special you can do where they don't even trusting us with their stake in some ways they're trusting the blockchain ride So the incentives like you say it's about making these perfect incentives so that you can have coordination to solve one problem and nowadays i. I sleep easy. Because i have less money in my own hedge fund than our users are staking on their models as awful in some sense from a human psychology perspective. It's fascinating that the wall street bets worked at all right. The the amidst chaos emergent behavior Like behavior that made sense emerged..

one problem street
The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

People of the Pod

04:53 min | 6 months ago

The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

"A controversial curriculum for teaching ethnic studies. In california's public schools will face a final vote in march. Since the first draft of the curriculum came out in two thousand nineteen a coalition of jewish organizations including the american jewish committees. California team has worked together to fine tune the content to be more inclusive define anti semitism and avoid perpetuating the stereotypes that put jews endanger here to talk about the debate surrounding the california curriculum. And why it matters to. All of us is rabbi serena. Eisenberg director of ajc northern california serena welcomed people of the pod for having me so exactly. What is california's ethnic studies curriculum. A start back in two thousand sixteen when the california state. Legislators passed a law. Mandating that the state department of education developed a guidance document for the teachers and administrators so they could implement ethnic studies courses and schools and the reason was because in california students of color account for the majority of the population in our public schools. They speak about ninety different languages so the goal was to prepare pupils to be global citizens with an appreciation for the contributions of multiple cultures. Ajc supported that effort. We believe that k. Through twelve students across california should be able to learn the role of ethnicity race and religion in the life of all of the citizens including maybe even especially those groups have been largely left out of other textbooks and so high quality. Ethnic studies courses can help combat bigotry. He'll some of the really difficult. Racial and ethnic divisions we are facing in this country so whereas we support an inclusive and balanced approach to ethnic studies. What some might call multicultural or constructive. Ethnic studies which focuses on the contributions and challenges of a broad array of ethnic cultures. What happened with the california curriculum. Was that state. Department of education appointed a small advisory committee of teachers who are committed to something called critical ethnic studies. The critical studies association was formed in two thousand eleven with a specific goal of radical resistance. It was anti-capitalist anti-imperialist somewhat neo marxist ideology and this group was what guided the development of the very controversial first draft of the curriculum which was released in two thousand and nineteen. What was controversial about that first draft. The first problem was that it lacked balance running through the entire curriculum. The goal was promoting this narrow critical. Ethnic studies ideology the los angeles times. Editorial board wrote that the curriculum talks about critical thinking but usually offers one side and one side. Only it's more about imposing predigested political views on students than about widening their perspectives. That was the los angeles editorial board. So a second problem was that it was an inclusive. We talked about more multicultural approach which looks at the diversity of olive our california population but this curriculum actually left out a lot of groups including sikhs hindus. Korean syrians armenians jewish americans. It had a very small focus on particular groups and because of that. Ajc formed a multi-ethnic coalition with a number of other ethnic groups to ask for a more inclusive curriculum one lack balance to not inclusive. but three. and. I think what was so outrageous. It really contained a lot of offensive material. There are some examples of antisemitic material the material and even more so material that wasn't even included for example a really extensive glossary in a curriculum. That's designed to combat discrimination didn't include a definition of anti-semitism. This was released just after the shooting and powei so the jewish community was particularly eager to see that anti semitism was going to be taught about in an ethics studies curriculum for california. Was there any kind of explanation as to why anti semitism was left out of the first draft. This paradigm of critical ethnic studies sees the world through a lens of people of color and whites oppressed and oppressors and in that paradigm jews are considered to be white and of course we know jews have a complicated identity managers of color. Many jews meese rothley were middle eastern origin huge number of persian jews in california and so unfortunately the curriculum just consider jesus whites and focused only on four groups of people of color that would be african. Americans latinos native americans and asian americans.

California American Jewish Committees Rabbi Serena AJC Critical Studies Association Eisenberg Serena Department Of Education Los Angeles Editorial Board Los Angeles Times Powei Meese Rothley
"one problem" Discussed on Merkaba Chakras

Merkaba Chakras

05:34 min | 6 months ago

"one problem" Discussed on Merkaba Chakras

"I asked too many questions as too many questions about things that didn't make sense to me And so i think may i love. It might students as a lot of questions to ask the question. You have a very important idea. I two bally dated ought to refill it either way you look and you get a response to your question. You're no longer the same person. Yeah good teachers will know how to answer the question if not would know how to refer to to find the solution but But you know. I found you through taking some of your online. I change therapy hypnosis courses. Can you explain what makes i change therapy. Unique from other modalities. Well the notion. I change therapy. Came to me because i'm fundamentally a health educator and my job is to teach you how to make choices that help you become healthier and hiring and i realized that when i got trained in hypnosis and i was doing hypnotherapy as in most conventional hypnotherapy help you saw out one problem once interview monday loose weight on deal specific issues. I find that is not enough. That to me is what. I call symptom management so i get you out of your phone. Guide you out of your phone. Now what So individual buried mind by the time of comes to my office we get to a rat because of a function of multiple bat choices remain lives compounded s is one after another after another and you come to me and i hope view. Sort them out. So you emerge from this pile of entangle. John and you got out of it being out now if i don't teach you how to make choices in the future. It's only a matter of time you might as well buy a season pass. You'll be back you'll be back yes. My goal is my clients. Seldom ever need to come back. And if they do is because their life circumstances change and they want to have a refresh It usually when i work with them. I said there is no recovery period. Right my work your recovered or.

John monday one problem two
Tangible Tips to Connect with Your Kids

Kingdom Mom

03:51 min | 6 months ago

Tangible Tips to Connect with Your Kids

"I am curious. What are some. Because you're all about giving moms tangible tips on how to create that connection with their children. So what are some tangible tips on how we can connect with our kids. Yes i love this question. I'm super excited to share three different things with you today. So it's been sad. Maybe you've heard this quote that children's spell love t i m e time so that's the basis. That's the main thing that we really need to acknowledge that it really comes down to spending intentional time with our kids so as far as these three specific things the first one is be a great listener. Listening is hard for almost every person that i know and it's our natural tendency to want to talk about ourselves but when you really think about it god gave us two ears and one mouth so we need to learn meet our arcades where they are become interested in what they are interested in and then be an excellent listener. If will intentionally shut off. All those distractions. Turn off the tv. Put down the cell phone and social media and actually look our kids in the is be a good listener. We'll find that they will open up to us and it will mean everything to them right. It'll really build that relationship and trust with that so we talk all of our kids into bed at night and we spend a pretty good length of time. Some really intentional time together at bedtime with every child every night it does take a little little bit of time. But it's totally worth it and it's really special and sweet time and my daughter chloe. She had told me expressed me that. She absolutely loves that time with us. And so i wanted really to understand why on a deeper level so i asked her. Why does this time means so much to you. And her response blew me away. She said mom. It's because you listen to me so powerful. I was floored. So that's tip. Number one is the a great listener. The second thing is look for joy and create those joyful moment. So i've found that in motherhood along with every other situation in life that you'll find exactly what you're looking for. I have to tell this. Quick little story when i was nineteen this basement apartment which it was a great little apartment. Everything was fine but there really was. There was one problem for some reason. There were these giant slugs. Yes you heard that right slugs all over the place and inside the apartment like they were climbing up the concrete basement walls and they'd be on the floor and the door and the windows. I kid you not you giving me the he. Gnv's over here a greater 'lustration though because here's what happened is it gave me that he'd be too and so i began to look for the slugs. Guess what. I found more and more and more of them everywhere by the way i only lived in that apartment for three months but i found what i was looking for and that's still applicable to life. We will find exactly what we're looking for and we'll find more and more of it. So i've learned to look for the joy in the every day journey of motherhood and i love that the word joy j. o. Y. is actually inside the word journey. I absolutely love that. So looking for and finding the joy in the journey of motherhood has served my family really well because joy is deep rooted. It's something that's down in our bones down in our soul and when it's bubbling out for mama it spills over to the entire family so our family looks for the joy and we love to create joyful moments or special things that are just our

Chloe
conspiracy Beliefs

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:36 min | 6 months ago

conspiracy Beliefs

"Welcome to kids myths and mysteries. I'm your host kit chrome today. I'm going to examine the myth and mystery surrounding conspiracy beliefs of where they could lead first. Let's start with some factors that increase the belief in a conspiracy. Basically they involve large scale events. Where more mundane or small scale explanation seem inadequate situations where people experienced distress over uncertainty also factors in when people encountered despair it information. It's only natural to look for explanations of make sense. you know. Connect the dots. Here is a connection that will hit you in the gut. Well maybe it's a connection of educational levels that's right lower levels of education tend to be associated with higher levels of conspiracy beliefs. The operative word in that sentence is tend. I happen to know a number of people with only high school education. That are a lot smarter than those in possession of a higher education what researchers have found is while these beliefs are motivated by a desire to understand exert control and feel socially connected. These aren't the effects. People are deriving from their beliefs. Rather than fulfilling these needs believing and conspiracy seems to reinforce feelings of confusion. Isolation disenfranchisement and loneliness is a destructive cycle negative feelings. Contribute to the belief and conspiracies yet. The believe in conspiracies results in negative feelings believing in conspiracy theories arose people's trust in their government their leaders 'institutions it also diminishes trust science research. Itsel this distrust may discourage people from participating in their social world at might also cause people to stop seeing themselves as possible contributors to society rather than helping people cope with their feelings of social alienation a political disenfranchisement conspiracy. Beliefs seemed to create a cycle of distrust that leads to even greater disempowerment. There's also evidence that people turn to conspiracy theories as a way of feeling safer and more in control when people feel threatened in some way. Detecting sources of danger compete a way of coping with anxiety. What the research suggests or at least one study found. That people who feel psychologically and politically disempowered are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories and other study found. That people are also more likely to believe in conspiracies when they are experiencing anxiety while researchers. Understand these existential motivations. There is little evidence of believing in these theories. Actually help people satisfy this need to feel control or anonymity in fact by believing in these theories that would be conspiracy. Theories people may actually be less likely to engage in actions would potentially boost their sense of control such as voting and participating in political activity so while people may be drawn to conspiracy theories as a way of making sense of the world feeling more control of their own destiny. The long term effects may actually people more disempowered than ever before people can also be motivated to believe in conspiracy due to social reasons. Some researchers hypothesize that by believing in conspiracies portray out groups as the opposition. People are able to feel better about themselves in their own social group. So how do you overcome believing in conspiracy theories well first of all. Were in the age. Disinformation perhaps we're coming to the end. Who knows finding ways to refute conspiracy. Belief seems more important than ever social platforms claim to be buckling down on those who peddle on profit off conspiracies but isn't really possible to change such views once they've taken root something to remember when trying to change. Someone's mind about a conspiracy theory. I have a friend. And he and i do get out regular basis about chemtrails one problem faced when trying to disprove conspiracy theories. Is that people who hold these. Beliefs also tend to suspect that there are factions engaged in covering up these activities. Those trying to do bunk. The mistaken beliefs are then viewed as simply being actors in the conspiracy itself while it might be tempting to simply mock conspiracy theories especially the more ridiculous ones. This usually causes believers to dig in their heels and deepen their commitment to their belief. Many factors contribute to a conspiratorial belief. Such educational background and personality are not easily or quickly changed. Researchers found one tactic however that is effective encouraging believers to pursue their goals. Come to an end. See how it really worked out my motivation for this particular. Podcast was the book. I read about the post truth era. We are in currently science and reason or battle with conjecture an instinct to determine public policy in this time of pandemic partisanship and economic interests are applying their part to meanwhile misinformation falsehoods are routine. Pay attention to what you listen to analyze it and don't believe everything you

Confusion
Play Couches Promise Hours of Indoor Fun for Pandemic

Business Wars Daily

02:40 min | 7 months ago

Play Couches Promise Hours of Indoor Fun for Pandemic

"There was one item. Parents went crazy for this holiday season. The play couch. it's part couch. Part photon part gymnastics. Matt part fort parts sleeping pad. You get it right. The company nugget comfort puts play couch on parents radars. Last holiday season it was so popular then that it sold out of all colors at once but this year well we can officially say that the for indoor play has blown up with family stuck at home playgrounds closed and working parents needing space. The need for open ended creative. Indoor play pieces has skyrocketed holiday season demand for home decor jumped. Sixteen percent play couches. Straddling both the toy and home decor markets seem to scratch a very specific each nugget comfort which was started by two college friends and twenty twelve has seen its wildest year yet while the pandemic has wreaked havoc on small businesses. Nugget has drubel that staff. finding a nugget. Play couch in stock is not next to impossible. It's literally impossible. When the couches were restocked in august nugget. Comfort calls it a drop ally nike shoes a record. One hundred thousand people logged onto. Fight it out. Over around forty thousand play couches. The l. a. times reported. And if you wanted one under the christmas tree well we're sorry you're likely didn't get one unless you won the lottery. Literally so desired was the nugget is a holiday gift that the company started a lottery system hopeful parents could enter once a week from the end of october to early december for the chance to win. One of the sixty thousand coveted nuggets. When it comes to sleek functional in-store the play couches nugget company was first on the scene but in the wake of their success and with the pandemic still far from over competitors have stepped up their game with a goal of taking a bite of nuggets thirteen thousand percent growth over the last three years. Four months ago the company shenanigan kids didn't even exist now it spacing nut it head on with its own play couch. The figgy the big. It looks an awful lot like nugget. But it'll run you and other seventy bucks. And if you're willing to forego the nuggets signature micro suede that fits in with a more grownup decor. Try to block. See kids couch by phone nasal him. It's vinyl that one problem neither figgy nor the blocks or anywhere to be found on backorder for another month at least so parents. If your kids are hanging from the chandelier you'll have to hold on just a bit longer or you can do what we did in my day and just take the cushions off the couch

Gymnastics Nuggets Fort Matt Nugget Nike Times
Humiliating run continues for Trump legal team's vote-fraud arguments

First Morning News

02:08 min | 8 months ago

Humiliating run continues for Trump legal team's vote-fraud arguments

"Christie telling President Trump the election is over. President has had an opportunity to access the courts. And I said to you know, George store and get 2:30 A.m. on Wednesday morning if you've got the evidence of fraud presented What's happened here is quite frankly, The contents of the president's legal team has been a national embarrassment to more key states in the presidential election due to certify results today, Let's get an update on that. Joining us live is NBC Radio National correspondent Bills in for Good Morning Bill. Hey, Joe. Good morning, and one of those could be very interesting to watch that is Michigan, one of two states at all certifies, You said today Pennsylvania's the other. But in Michigan, the canvassing board meets this afternoon at one o'clock eastern time to go over the vote totals and to vote to certify one problem. One of the Republicans on that board. Norman Schinkel has already indicated he will vote against certifying the vote in Michigan, where Joe Biden beat Donald Trump by 154,000 votes If the other Republican on the board joins him, and he has refused to comment on this, that would be a two to tie on. Nobody is quite sure what would happen after that it would go to the courts in some fashion, and it could go down to the governor who could replace members of the canvassing. Board. It could get very ugly there, so we're going to keep an eye on that one today. On then in Pennsylvania certification is expected to take place today. This coming after a judge over the weekend not only rejected the lawsuit presented by Rudy Giuliani in court last week. He body slammed it, Joe. He said that it contained strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations. UN supported by evidence and those were the nice things, he said S O the fact that that was a major setback. The certification in Pennsylvania will go on today, even though this move by the judge has been appealed. S so we have a lot of action going on today. If you thought maybe the political wild fires were put out over the weekend. I'm sorry They were not no, not at all.

President Trump George Store Michigan Norman Schinkel Christie Pennsylvania NBC JOE Joe Biden Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani UN
Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

Developer Tea

06:14 min | 8 months ago

Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

"If you were to evaluate the landscape and let's say you. Let's say bill didn't exist today and you were to look at the available tooling out there and maybe find that there are some other self hosted kinds of things and would that have deterred you you know. Just kind of trying to rewind back if you had found something kind of filled that that need for you would you have gone and built something yourself or was that really the the critical kind of crux of the matter. That didn't exist yet and you wanted to. I think if i'd found what i was looking for the time i probably built it I just felt compelled for this thing to exist because my problem. The problem wasn't solved. If someone had sold to. Or any for me. I would have been great. I would have been very very happy and over the moon 'cause i'm way more about the problem being solved in solving the problem myself And so yeah. I think that if if the tool head existent of her would have used it already. But it didn't so i just felt like the need to build it so that's the story it it it was this. This need that you had and you were able to recognize that you're able to see clearly can of what you wanted to do. You saw the other competing or not even competing but can of the pieces of the puzzle. The different pieces of the puzzle One did one thing you liked another did another thing you liked but they didn't you know none of them did everything that you needed them to do. It wasn't necessarily. I'm going to put words in your mouth wasn't necessarily because it was a novel idea was because it was a mix of multiple ideas that had already been executed on just not together. Would that would that. Is that true. Yes that's right. I wasn't i took the best of both worlds sir Felicitous that may not know much about cic d- There are two different sort of flavors of cic d. The flesh flava is the self hosted option. And that's you run the tests yourself on sevens that you control and then you run the plane yourself as well And that's going to be done in in if you have a distributed team where the needs to access the tool from harm A lot of these tools aren't really that great of being run on open internet so a lot of sort of kept within. Vpn's or hidden inside offices that's the self hosted option. The other option is the hoisted cic de tolls Your circles you travis's and and those tools you handle that. Will you occurred to them and they manage the orchestration plane and the running tests yourself. The problem with that is twofold but the host options are two major problems. The first problem is you have to you. Have to handle a all of your employees if you want to do continuous deployment which i'm a big fan of Yet the beautifully keys to potty which for some organizations is inaugur the second problem is those tools ernie go so fast if you go to their pricing page. We'll see the slider that earning goes so far out of the rut and you can integrate lost without there. Being a big sign that says contact us to go foster And i didn't want any of those. I didn't accept the cons of the hosted option. It didn't accept the cons of the self hosted option. And so i was thinking to myself. Surely there is some middle ground And so i sort of set out to kind of cherry. Pick the best of both worlds sort of crepe credit mashup of what i thought would be the perfect tool and that's kind of how do was born and i wanted. I wanted to zero in on this idea. Because i think it's important to recognize especially for engineers who are kind of thinking. Oh i have this idea. And it doesn't exist but people can do it themselves if they go and you know mix x and y these two existing things out there A lot of these ideas that tend to be A kind of remixes of multiple other ideas together or you know taking one thing. The best of both worlds like you said. The new product is multiplicative in value. rather than additive. Right in other words somebody could probably go and run. You know two different things to get this same values but when you put them together. It changes the landscape. It's not the same thing is just running those two things back to back. It's changing Kind of the fundamental shape of that product in so it's important to recognize that because critic most critically i think a lot of people who are thinking about starting a business or they're you know they're they're thinking. Hey you know. I'm i'm might do the side thing. I might build a product on the side. I think a lot of them are thinking. Oh i have to come up with a truly new completely novel idea. or outs. Nobody's going to want it right. There can't be at shadow of this idea on the market. Otherwise you know it's it's already saturated every ideas already taken. And i have to come up with something totally new for to be successful and it couldn't be further from the truth. Yeah that's exactly right. There's no such really. there's no such thing as a new idea I think south park said it really. Well they have this episode of the simpsons already did it and there's a recurring joke where they have these themes or plots within the episode. But simpson's already done that particular plot. It's the same product as well. If you look at the big ones rubio burs taxis But they sort of took it and did a mash up and made it better airbnb. Her tells But they've taken it mashed up and made something new. See i city. I didn't invent the i. C d i didn't invent it at all. I just took the best of a bunch of really good ideas and put them together to create something new a new product. And i think that's kind of what a lotta the tools these days. I just improvements of existing ideas.

Travis Foster South Park Simpson Rubio
"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

09:53 min | 2 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Site. They know what's different about us and they know why they've arrived arrived what they can expect <hes> but that's a continued. I mean that's something that we focus on. Every day. Is how do we how do we differentiate you know how do we maintain the freshness <hes> while appealing to our both our returning customers and expanding our customer base to that were continuing to grow and evolve and <hes> i i think what's so great about being a digitally native brands that you really know your customers are and we've invested so much in those feedback loops and listening and really growing with our customers. Not you know we're trying to build a brand that people don't grow out of <hes> people really grow with and i think that sets us apart. I think you said something that that most people just assume normal but like know who your customer is because some people think that their customer can be everybody and it's really not no it's segmented it's specific nick and that can be a lot of segments pacific people but trying to like cast the wide web and then wonder why you're failing yeah i mean i think it's really important to to know who you're talking to and and how they like to be communicated with <hes> and you know we joke that everyone sleeps and everyone showers so like yeah. Everyone could be our customer but when i when we come down to you know how we're communicating and who the parachute customer isn't on what our voices <hes> it is really important to be specific and then then to be consistent <hes> and so people know what to expect and i think you know because there is a lot of competition and because there's a lot of noise in general and the market building a brand that people can trust is so important but you can also lose that trust so quickly so really you know being very careful and thoughtful about how you know you're evolving. I think is critical so one of the things i love this womb like environment to be shared his struggles or moments of leg. I don't think this is going gonna happen or moments of not making it. Would you have any stories like that. Have countless ones actually <hes> you know i mean i think there's been so many highs and lows throughout this process. <hes> there's been moments early on inventory was a big struggle for us. We just didn't have the experience of how to purchase it accurately lee and so we were in and out of stock sometimes selling through products before they even arrived. Those were some really hard moments early on because i felt like we had failed our customers emerged and we had you know if we didn't have inventory for three or four months you know would anyone ever come back and so that was certainly really challenging and just really i mean is frustrating. You know it's it's sort of like a good problem to have. If you think about the problems you can have when you're growing and when you re so want to give people a good experience and you can't. It's just sucks you know. Fundraising is also not always come easy. There's been highs and lows there and and that's a process that really takes me away from the business <hes> you. It's also a process where you learn so much about how to run a business but you know there's certainly been moments where i'm like. Are we going to not be able to do this and close round and as the business it's going to fold yeah. I mean those those are real fears that have happened. You know i've struggled with pro personnel. You know team. Growing and growing changes isn outgrowing spaces. I mean there's so many but it really makes you stronger as a leader and <hes> i think how you approach those dark moments winston how you the move through them <hes> is really valuable and feel like this is becoming a theme but like problem solving become so important and you know being resilient is is really important. I think when you when you're doing something that you truly love. There's the silver lining that is kind of present you know at least has been for me even in the darkest moments. It's like i. I do have something to really be grateful for. I get to wake up every day and be surrounded by people that believe in this passion of mine and this idea that started from nothing and so it's time to just get up and figure it out you know and i think it's okay to have moments where you want to give up and scream and you feel like it's just over and then you know but if you can see-through and see through to that you know gratitude it's make you can find out of it and just as a note. You have those moments every day where you want to give up my gosh literally literally every day and i do. I think that's like you know it doesn't way and that's the craziest part about being an entrepreneurs at the highs and lows can happen in a moment of five minutes. I mean you could literally feel like you're on top of the world and then two seconds later feel like you're about to lose it and then somehow manage to feel great again. You know it's this roller coaster of emotion motion and <hes>. I think that's why in some ways being entrepreneurs so exhausting the manual labor. There's like hustle. There's those tireless nights but the emotional emotional you know up and down is is a really exhausting part of the business that i don't think a lot of people give credit to or recognize. It's a lot it's a lot to be always on. It's a lot to be that you know backbone and to really push through and then have a brave face. Also another people are doubting you so. What do you do to relax relax after those moments. <hes> you know i i've definitely especially in recent times have tried to focus more on self love. I love and care <hes> you know it's funny because we're a business that talks a lot about getting a good night's sleep and resting and taking care of yourself and we really do as a company try data practice what we preach and that way i mean it. It's important that our team has a life out of work and that you know people are getting inspired by the beach action living outside of our four walls. I think i've never been one of those people who thinks that you need to work all hours of the night in order to be successful. I think you can be really productive active during a normal work day <hes> but for me it's it's working out. I like to work out as often as i can almost every day. <hes> yoga for the trainer made it kinda mix it up but i need to get a good sweat in <hes>. It's also like good time to just not be able to pick up your phone <hes> which is helpful and for me i need. I need forcing functions nations around that <hes> because it's hard to put it down. It's hard to stop and turn off. I've started meditating in the past year. <hes> sorta late to that game but it's it's been helpful actually recently started doing some breath work classes which are totally new experience to me but have been really helpful so i mean taking personal time <hes> a walk around the block fresh air <hes> you can come in different forms but i do think it's important to disconnect and and to be kind into yourself totally so you have a mantra called you belong here. <hes> tell me about this. That is something that actually it's been in my life for like ten ten years i had i got a neon sign on my wall and new york. When i lived in new york that said you belong here and for me it's just about the moma men and being present and being grateful and and recognizing that you're sort in the right place at the right time and it's very simple but it's <hes> <hes> it's nice and and having it on my wall actually at home i feel like has been such a warm and comforting thing to see when you walk in the door for friends and family and and we had to recreate it at my wedding. That's awesome yeah so one thing i liked to get out of everyone that i interview is something that we'd be surprised to know about you. <music> can be personal can be work. I've had all sorts of people sharing different things i in my past life. I was classically trained opera singer uh-huh that's crazy. Did you perform. I performed by entire life wanted to be. I went to school to be a singer. Wow that's awesome now. I just do karaoke listened when i carry okay so i'm like yoko ono so i appreciate anyone can sound good. It's it's fun unfor- a so. What are the other reasons why i started. This podcast was to give actionable advice to my listeners as they're as they're listening to this. What is something you would love to share as great advice that someone can take. I often say because i think it's something that i continue to remind myself. Every day is don't sweat the small stuff. I think it's so important to i think you can be your own biggest biggest advocate but you can also be your biggest hurdle and roadblock walk in in progress and so for me learning how to like oh perfection how to let go of the idea that i had to be right all the time i mean it just it's been so helpful <hes> and so you know not letting these ideas of what it should be or what it needs to be getting away and really focusing on progress send.

new york yoko ono nick lee ten ten years five minutes four months two seconds
"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"A._m. I'm for him and then get back to working <hes> and then this press moment had and all of a sudden we went from you know two three orders a day to thirty and our first day and then forty the and kind of tapered off after the initial press buzz but it was amazing and so you know then all of a sudden u._p._s. was coming and needing these bigger or carts to take out the boxes and it was really cool. I'll never forget this home. It's i'm still nostalgic about those moments like when i was shipping <hes> my first order order to a big department store i have my fifth floor walkup and the guy was like i'm not bringing those boxes down five stairs yeah. I was like fuck. I mean we are first round. The first i batch after i launched the first orders that went out were mostly based in l._a. And i drove them to everyone's houses myself because i wanted to save money on shipping cost total and spent three days in the card which was so dumb but fun. I remember one person who was like who i knew who had been sort of. An adviser. Leon was like my husband called me. It was like we got. This girl showed up wearing heels to drop off this box like did you order like what is going going on and she was like yes the startup life that is what you do but yeah then you know it was those similar i mean i had a storage unit <hes> because i didn't have a place to put them and i would go there and i like perpetually had these bruises on my arms and legs from lifting heavy boxes and was full full situation so being that you are one person in doing it all <hes> i empathize with you because that was my me <hes> with my brother on like my call a friend for every once in a while. What is it like now going from. I'm that to now. Obviously you have a team. Had you sort of make sure that you keep the original values or or not of what you started with now a team. That's been super important to me. The the culture parachute is something that i think about every day. It's you know probably what keeps me up at night. Most is making sure that we do have values that are really strong wrong and that we are building an environment that people love to work in and everyone works hard and but it's really all about the people and i think customers can see that too. I think there's so so much about your brand that comes through through all the people that are creating an but the it's been an experience. I mean bringing. We're now a team mm-hmm of about fifty people in our q. and it's been great. I mean hiring people that are smarter than you and more talented than you and can help with. You know a lot of the different sprint parts of the business that you're not the best. I mean it's amazing. I mean i've learned. I learned something new every day from my team and i think that's what building business is all about. I mean when you launch business. You're in the business of problem solving and solving like big challenges. I mean that that never goes away. I don't imagine ever being the well oiled machine. That doesn't have to solve problems. I mean that's what you do and so making sure that you're surrounded by people that also love to solve problems is really important. I think it's a great way to look at it because i feel like some people including myself and i had to disabuse myself this idea that like at some point you get to coast or just a becomes easy easy in the newly meat. That's that's actually never gonna happen but that's what business is. It's like you said it's problem. Solving there was definitely a moment probably two years in where i i realized that this was only getting harder. <hes> it actually wasn't getting easier and i think i also expected there to be the switch where all of a sudden it felt like we had gained in some momentum or all of a sudden. It entered this phase where it was just going to get easier and that's ever happened. It's really only gotten harder but also more fun. I mean it's like the problems get bigger to solve like to my point like we're in the business of of solving problems and and that's what's fun and rewarding and exciting but but it's not easy it's definitely not easy so one of the things you also decided to do which probably made it even harder was you were direct to consumer online only up and then you launched to work and mortar stores. What made you want to go offline <hes> yeah so now. He actually four okay well. We're opening a fifth and a few weeks gee. We're now. We're five. We're all about the retail. <hes> you know for me. It's really so much about connecting with people we view ourselves and have always uterus removed as a relationship business not a transactional business. The transaction is so secondary to the way that we're trying to build <hes> which is really thinking talking about connecting with people and adding value and and so there's a part of that that is just so it's so different offline. When you're actually face is to face a people and people can see our products and then goes back to the way that our products are purchased off line and so i think our products are pretty amazing zing and they're really soft and they feel great and <hes> they're beautiful and we <hes> we've been able to create these environments that are so inspired and really help. Bring our products to life in this physical environment. I think we're not a traditional homestore. You know it's not this big huge multi-floor experienced that <hes> where you're asking twenty five people where the products are before you find them. You know we're creating these very intimate places that kind of feel like you're in a home and then they're fire away for us to get our products out there for people to feel them but also we host events and do workshops and really kinda make it this living breathing cool place to be so so now that this jerk consumer and homegoods has sort of become. You know there's other players in the space now. How do you make sure your message still is different and that you offer different value proposition to their customers. They know not to go to others that we will not name. Yeah i mean i think it's a huge part of the business is educating your customers customers and being really focused. I think one of the things that i learned from my background and branding and marketing as important a clear point of view is his <hes> and having a real message and staying consistent and true to that message even as you grow and expand and for us that means entering new categories and launching a lot of new products products but you know it's it's.

l._a homegoods Leon three days two years
"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"Everyone. You're listening to superwoman today. My guess is ariel. K the founder of parachute. I had the chance to interview her are sometime ago. Actually before she had a baby she had a beautiful baby and <hes> we talked about all things launching a d._c. Brand of an area that was bright for disruption so take a listen. I'm with aerial k the founder and c._e._o. Of parachute i high what is parachute shoot. I know what it is but you know parachutes home essentials brand we make all sorts of cozy comfortable products from sheets. Delay covers offers robes towels. We also make some baby <hes> products but really anything that you can start anne enger day with that gonna make you feel more comfortable uh-huh and more relaxed <hes> we'll. We'll make it so between your first job to parachute. What was that path like and then how did you you have this moment of. I'm going to start a home essentials brand. That's that's a loaded question. <hes> i didn't really follow a conventional path half <hes>. I had a lot of different jobs over that period of time. <hes> i started. I was living in new york. I started in p._r. Doing fashion and beauty p._r. We are worked for a few different agencies <hes> and then. I decided that wasn't for me. There were a lot of things that i liked about p._r. And a lot of the storytelling i'm getting to connect with other small brands but ultimately wanted something different ended up moving into an advertising type role which i found to be more creative and and more interesting and then decided i had no idea what i wanted to do so impacted grad school but the thing that was happening on the like behind the scenes was this this love for home and interior design so i started at interior design home design blog when i was i guess wrapping up my first p._r. Jubran two thousand seven so early blog time they weren't that pretty and <hes> but really it was just a creative outlet for me and place to log my interest and passions and and i was helping some friends in the city decorate their apartments and having them photographed and featuring them and it was really fun and so <hes> continued as i then continue my professional career which after grad school ended up at a big ad agency where i was for almost five years and i've just always been been a home enthusiast and so in that process i became the super consumer which helped to inspire parachute so i guess there's two different things there was my career career in advertising which i had for five years at at digital big agency here and i was on the strategic side of creative doing a lot of consumer behaviour research really thinking about how to build brands brands how to inspire people and i loved that <hes> and then i was doing this kind of side gig of pretending to be an interior designer and <hes> <hes> in two thousand and twelve i sort of hit a roadblock and was feeling less inspired at work wanting to do something more entrepreneurial wanting to <hes> have a bigger impact act and had this moment of you know what if i could merge my interests of home a design and brand building and connecting with people and <hes> this is around the time that the direct to consumer landscape was really shifting and i was seeing these brands start and like gain momentum and like pirker and ever lane and so inspired even as as consumers look at this is this makes a lot of sense to me and realized there wasn't anything in home space and one thing after another. I decided that parachute was a concept that i wanted to follow really believed in so when you started parachute and you saw this void in the marketplace i try and find voids all the time in my spare time. I'm like what's what am i going to advance that. No one has done. How did you sort of begin to understand that it was a void in the marketplace so i mean this is a category where people historically have pretty much entirely shopped offline there. Ninety percent of purchases were being made offline so there wasn't really this digital whole world for <hes> home products and then when i took a step back and looked at this home category i realized that your bedroom is such an intimate part of your home and you spend thirty relief in bed <hes> and sleep impacts everything and so you know as i started kind of running through different scenarios of of what to start and how to get into people's lives and how to create a brand and build trust the bedroom kept coming back to me as a perfect place to begin because has i felt like you create loyalty and there was ability to mix that the physical products with this wellness component and <hes> a more sleep centered food brand. I realized that there had never been a brand that of sheets that had ever asked me how i slept at night and that felt like such a big missed opportunity to connect deeper with people people and create a product that wasn't just something that you're going to take out of the packaging and then forget what it was and not have any relationship with so i mean i a lot of research in a lot of a lot of tireless nights but ultimately. It seemed like that was a really great place to begin so clearly because you had p._r. Experience advertising taming and branding and then you found this void you didn't you don't have some of the struggles that some women have when they launched companies if they don't have p._r. Branding background so i'm curious what were your obstacle. Oh my gosh so many so yes i have branding and marketing and i had this vision but but the you know really the nuts and bolts of business were a huge mystery to me. I mean i had never i never worked in an inventory based business. I had never made products products before i knew what i liked and i knew it i didn't like and i had a strong opinion around what aesthetics <hes> i wanted to kind of capture but <hes> the actual making speaking of a product was new to me how to buy a product how to bring a product from europe because i had decided very early on that i wanted to manufacturer near up because that was where this quality quality in heritage and i felt like i could build trust there but i also am horrible at excel and and math and you know i mean there was there. There were a lot of things that were really over my head. I mean i had such a crash course in building a business and to be honest. I'm still learning all the time but yeah i mean i definitely had a part of the puzzle. You know where i felt some confidence but i think when i think back to those days my confidence levels bulls were pretty low and i was also very naive. Which i think is you know. Sometimes your greatest gift when you're starting a business is not really knowing and understanding the complexity of what you're getting into because if i knew what i would i would run i would never you know there's like no chance that i would have left my job and you know a salary the and <hes> you know i had all sorts of totally you know off expectations of what this was gonna look like so. I'll never forget when i didn't pay my first electrical bill. I didn't think anything could actually happen to until the teamsters showed up. Oh shoot a huge like men that were triple my size now like we're not leave him until you give us joke for with the electricity like working yeah just a little i mean i thought i was going to be able to leave my job at eight this great idea and i would move to l._a. And i would raise money and i'd be able to pay myself a salary and you know i just continue to build this business and then we would launch and it would be i mean it was just so off base like why hilarious areas vision that i ha- i mean it could not have not happened more so but thank god for that. You know even because i would never have. I would never have done it mother eight. So did you start fundraising right away. <hes> i started meeting with investors pretty early on i did not was not able to raise money until after after i launched the business so i took meetings where i could and i had friends introduce me to people and i you know i thought there was a world in which i would get some pre product capital because i was sort of on the customer that was still happening bed and more common but i <hes> but yeah no people were not not as excited to give me money as a first time entrepreneur without having product on without having any sort of product fed and so but the the meetings meetings were helpful and they actually helped me think through you know what does progress look like and you know people say this is a great idea and you seem really cool <hes>. Let's let's see some. Let's see you get a little bit further and so i built relationships with people on some of whom actually did end up investing quite a bit later but it was helpful. Money also would would have been helpful but it was a helpful experience. So how did you launch it with like we launched and we couldn't get alone. You know my brother mortgage. His house. Assira maxed out his credit cards <hes> so we waited seven years before taking in funding. So how did you bootstrap it. In the beginning used the small amount of savings that i had i also <hes> borrowed sunny for my parents <hes> and had two friends that ended up giving me a small investment and then i actually which took me i mean it was under thirty thousand dollars at this point of what i had <hes> which was helpful for building a website basically and not much more <hes> and then i ended up joining an accelerator program so that was what was able to give me the money to then by our first batch of product. <hes> and accelerators and incubators are great for people that are prelaunch although some now require you to have launched a product i mean there's there's a lot of different types of of these programs that you can join but for me as a first i am founder and as a sole founder at zero team <hes> it was great to have a place to go and so i joined accelerator called launch pad and they gave us the gimme a check <hes> which went into my bank account one day and immediately left the next day to buy products not the worst feeling one day but it also like you know as these things happen even happened like i needed to get that order placed you know asap otherwise i wasn't gonna happen in time and so it all sort of worked out but i was very it was very fluid movement just out and so then i launched an you know we because of my background in p._r. And marketing yeah i really believed in having presses. I knew that press was gonna be really important for that launch moment and so i- invested in having <hes> some p._r. Assistance and as as a result we got this huge amount of press and that was really helpful with getting sales and then i was able to subsequently raise some capital quite fast and so i'd love to walk. Have you walk me through the minute of you launch. You have a website when when it became live and no longer like private what was that moment like <hes> totally surreal. I mean one of the most exciting moments and it had been a lot of work and i couldn't really believe that it was happening. I mean at this at this point also is still just me so you know the first few weeks we had sort of soft launched and i had sent it to my friends and ask them to send it to their friends and <hes> for the first i would say the first few weeks <hes> pre this press moment. I could kind of connect. The dots of who everyone was purchasing and you know it was like six degrees of separation operation at most but then you know and i was basically packing boxes all night i was working during the day and then at around midnight. I would stop and pack boxes until three a._m. I'm for him and then get back to working <hes> and then this press moment had and all of a sudden we went from you know two three orders a day to thirty and our first day and then forty the.

p._r founder anne enger teamsters europe new york l._a five years one day thirty thousand dollars Ninety percent seven years six degrees
"one problem" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Kickass News

"You also have some light or moments where you're talking about recent trends and other kind of issues year dress goat yoga at some point this season. I keep hearing this everywhere, and I truly don't understand the concept. I get yoga and Onoda go as but when you combine those two words, you may. Will be saying chicken, Jeannie or something. I I in fact, I take that back chicken genie actually makes more sense than coat yoga with the hell is goat yoga, go yoga. I as well had no idea what go yoga. Was and I thought way people are doing yoga with like. Adult goats what what's going on? So what it is is it's people doing yoga with baby goats, and so baby goats are less inclined to. I hurt and maim u they they're not strong enough. But it's a it's an interesting thing. I think for the people that do it they seem to really enjoy it. And I think there's it's almost like having a companion animal on like a flight or something like that that like the, but the goats will climb on people. And I'll say that watching it. I didn't do it. But watching it what did seem what did seem kind of like nice about it was that people were kind of giggling through the whole thing. And I feel like whatever insecurities people may have in a yoga class. It seemed like those went away because they were all just kind of they didn't have time to be awkward about their bodies. Or their inability to make a position because there was in good on their head. I will say though, you know, if you're gonna go yoga their baby goats, they're not house trained, and so you go in knowing that there's a chance ago, it's gotta take a piss on your yoga mat? And. Yeah. Okay. Ring a change a yoga pants. Yeah. Again season. Two of why it's the next problem areas. Debuts Friday April fifth at eleven PM eastern on HBO. Why had good luck with the show? And thanks for talking with me. Thank you. Thanks for taking the time. I really appreciate it. Thanks again to why it's enac.

Jeannie HBO PM
"one problem" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Kickass News

"And there are things that could be happening right now that people could get involved with their school board decisions and things that are happening in people's local school districts that they could be having an impact with right now. They're things that are happening in city council meetings that people could be having an impact in their own communities right now. And so I think to me those are the things that are just as important, and and in some cases, maybe more important than you know, spending four years wishing that it was twenty twenty right, right? Not everything comes from the White House. And I have to say, you're probably the only late night show that rarely if ever mentioned Donald Trump, do you think that the very mention? Of Trump is just too polarizing that it becomes a nonstarter, and it's sort of antithetical to the goal of bringing folks together, and the kind of conversations that you're trying to start on the show. The overall thought with the show is that there's a national conversation that happens on just about everything there's a national conversation that happens on healthcare. But when you actually go into a community, and you start talking to the people who live within a community. There's a conversation that they're having. And that conversation is different from city to city from community community and. And so I think to me it's understanding a what does that conversation? Look like in this city and with this community, and what is that conversation? Look like at this in this other city with this other community, and maybe there's some overlap there because at the end of the day with the national conversation, the national conversation isn't as interested in the nuance of what's going on from community community. And it's not as interested in. Living in a story for as long as it takes its those national conversations that you see on the cable news networks, they have, you know, five to seven minutes to devote to something. And then they move onto the next thing. It's like, you know, and it just becomes a cycle. And so the I think sometimes when we get so caught up in the national conversation. It allows them the national conversation to dictate the rhetoric, and that rhetoric becomes I think, you know, like, you said polarizing, but it also becomes distilled into sound soundbites, and it's just people shouting sound bites at one another, and when you start actually talking to people and looking at people in the eyes and hearing what they have to say and why they have to say it. I think there's there is a place for understanding there. And there's a place for perhaps trying to see where that over. Lap exists and see where are we are trying to move in the same direction? And if so how do we find the momentum to do that where we can actually create some kind of a change we're gonna take a quick break. And then we'll be back with more with Wyatt snack. When we come.

Donald Trump White House Wyatt seven minutes four years
"one problem" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"one problem" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"The problem with fake news is that it really really works from American public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm Molly would. Make news is enemy number one right now as companies and governments try to figure out who should be in charge of spotting misinformation and getting rid of it. But MIT researchers, the Nana Rawl has found that the not true stuff. What he calls false news is not only hard to stop, but that it's really effective. A study published last spring found that false news travels way more efficiently and much farther than the truth. And in a recent article in the Harvard Business Review Arale says that misinformation can come at a real cost. Here's a story of from Brock Obama's presidency where a false tweet that indicated that he was injured in an explosion, wiped out one hundred thirty billion dollars of equity value in a single day. These types of stories can have consequential impacts on our democracy on businesses on our national security. And so it's a problem we really need to concentrate on. So. So what can be done? One of the things you talk about changing the incentives for companies either disincentivising them to spread misinformation or incentivizing them to fight it. What are they doing? What could they be doing? Yes. So when it comes to changing the incentives, we know now that a lot of the false news that spreads is not spread for political reasons, but is spread for economic reasons. The social media advertising ecosystem monetize this attention or eyeballs to content. And if false news spreads farther faster, deeper and more broadly than the truth than it is incentive is as producers of false news to produce more false news in order to earn more advertising revenue. If platforms like Facebook are to be responsible for the spread of known falsities than they could use policies, technologies algorithms to reduce or dampen the spread of this type of news, which may reduce the incentive to create it. In the first place. Talk to me about consumer behavior because changing consumer behavior seems like the most uphill battle of all like, will this alternately fall on companies and or regulators. So it's interesting. You talk about consumer behavior because as we were doing this study, there was a lot of congressional testimony talking about the role of bots or software programs and spreading false news. And what we found was that in fact, Botts spread false and true news at approximately the same rate so s- could not explain why false news traveled so much farther faster deeper and broadly than the truth over the ten years of data that we studied on Twitter, what that means is human decision making is contributing significantly to the spread of false news. So understanding how to think about consumer behavior is a really important part of dealing with the false news pedantic. The non-royal is a researcher at MIT and head of that school's initiative. On the digital economy, his paper argues that algorithms will play a huge role in spotting false information, online researchers at the university of Michigan unveiled one last week that outperformed humans at detecting fake news stories I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This

MIT Brock Obama Harvard Business Review Molly Nana Rawl Facebook researcher university of Michigan Twitter Botts Ali one hundred thirty billion dol ten years