35 Burst results for "One Person"

Joe Biden Gives License to Violence Against SCOTUS

Mark Levin

01:01 min | 23 hrs ago

Joe Biden Gives License to Violence Against SCOTUS

"They do not think that You haven't found one person one world leader to say America's going backward America is better positioned to lead the world than we ever have been We're such a disgusting liar But go ahead I mean the world are inflation rates are lower than other nations in the world He's such a liar That's so untrue but it doesn't matter Does it Go ahead And to stabilize it is the outrageous behavior of the Supreme Court of the United States An overruling not only roe V wade but essentially challenging the right to privacy So let's stop there It's propaganda like this Coming from him coming from AOC Coming from Nancy Pelosi coming from Schumer and coming from the American meter media among others That is essentially giving license to the violence

America Roe V Wade Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi Schumer
Why Is Cassidy Hutchinson Considered Credible?

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 2 d ago

Why Is Cassidy Hutchinson Considered Credible?

"Why is this witness cast hutchison considered credible She's seen as credible I keep hearing that Mick Mulvaney the former failed acting chief of staff to Donald Trump He's all in That many faces admit He wasn't an eyewitness to anything but don't worry He knows everything that took place Old Mick Mulvaney That's fine Saw wisenheimer former assistant independent counsel working for Ken Starr He was convinced Convinced that we now have absolute evidence of culpability culpability That Donald Trump has committed seditious conspiracy Wow Based on the testimony of one person Whose testimony was never challenged Or was it This young lady's 25 years old some say 26 years old She's young She was not a senior assistant to the president of the United States She testified before this committee in secret four different times You saw those of you who watched or listened her 5th time Why would they need to talk to her 5 times Why Ask any real lawyer why Because they were wearing her down pressing her pressing or pressing her Many hours each time

Mick Mulvaney Donald Trump Hutchison Ken Starr United States
Caller Who Attended Jan. 6 Never Saw a Gun, Knife or Threat

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:56 min | 2 d ago

Caller Who Attended Jan. 6 Never Saw a Gun, Knife or Threat

"When I got to the capitol time and amongst the crowd and I was there for several hours, I never once saw a gun, I never once saw a knife, I never once saw anybody communicate in a threat either as someone in attendance or a capitol police officer. I never heard one person say, let's go burn it down. Nothing at all like that. So Charles, here's what gets me. Charles here's what gets me. About the AR-15s, because Cassidy Hutchinson, she says that she heard from somebody who heard from somebody that there were people armed with AR-15s all over the place. My question is, okay, well, why didn't the D.C. police department step in? If in fact, the D.C. police saw these weapons, that's a crime those kinds of weapons are illegal in Washington, D.C., so why didn't they intervene? Exactly. And I can tell you that the police department was around the capital, hundreds of them, and you're exactly right. If a cop stall, somebody walking with an AR-15, they're going to either arrest them, or they're going to take them out. And if the crowd was so heavily armed, why weren't any weapons confiscated, why weren't any police officers shot by the protesters? The only people that died that day were all Trump supporters. And the only person shot was actually by that. And they know it's a lot. And I don't think that this committee is what they're doing is designed to reveal the truth is just designed to do damage to Donald Trump. But here's my thing. All these little lies that they tell and they told over the last four years, they get away with it. There's never accountability. And my hope is that when the Republicans take control in November, that we not only launch investigative committees on January 6th, but also on November 3rd, 2020.

Cassidy Hutchinson D.C. Police Department Washington, D.C. Charles D.C. Police Department Donald Trump
Court kills Flint water charges against ex-governor, others

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 d ago

Court kills Flint water charges against ex-governor, others

"The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled that charges against former governor Rick Snyder and others in the Flint water scandal must be dismissed AP correspondent Norman hall reports According to the court Michigan state laws authorize a judge to investigate subpoena witnesses and issue arrest warrants as a one person grand jury but not to issue indictments The dismissed charges range from misdemeanors to involuntary manslaughter because of 9 deaths related to legionnaires disease Flint managers appointed by governor Snyder switched the majority black cities water source to the Flint river while a new pipeline was under construction State regulators said the river water didn't need to be treated to reduce its corrosive qualities Lead from old pipes flowed through the system for 18 months community activists calls the situation a disgrace I Norman hall

Norman Hall Michigan Supreme Court Rick Snyder Flint Governor Snyder Michigan Flint River
Russia strikes Kyiv as Western leaders meet in Europe

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 d ago

Russia strikes Kyiv as Western leaders meet in Europe

"Russian missiles have shattered weeks of relative calm and Ukraine's capital I'm Ben Thomas with the latest Emergency workers battled flames in rescue civilians some apartment buildings in Kyiv Klitschko says one person was killed 6 injured It's maybe symbolic some more like aggressions He's got game with western leaders meeting in Europe bearing to reaffirm their support for Ukraine and condemnation of Russia President Biden speaking with German Chancellor Olaf scholz at the start of the G 7 meeting We have to stay together Yeah His Putin is counting on from the beginning And somehow NATO would and the G 7 would splinter and what we had And we're not going to Good message is that we all made it to stay united which offers you never expected I'm Ben Thomas

Ben Thomas Ukraine President Biden Klitschko Kyiv Olaf Scholz Europe Russia Putin Nato
Charlie Welcomes One of the Foremost History Experts, Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 5 d ago

Charlie Welcomes One of the Foremost History Experts, Bill Federer

"With Bill Federer and rob McCoy, Bill, welcome back to the program. Hey, Charlie, great to be with you. Bill is the history Wiz. Yes, he is. I mean, rob, I've never met anyone like Bill. Prolific is one way to describe you. How many books is about 25? All history books. Yeah, try to learn lessons from history. People say history repeats itself really human nature repeats itself, and you observe the patterns. It's sort of like the government is collecting all the information on you and all the listeners from their cell phones and emails and web searches and they're taking all that data and running an algorithm on it to get predictive. And so if you study enough history, you see the patterns, you can be predictive. And so I tell people that history is not prophetic, but it is predictive. So what does history tell you about the moment we're in or tell us? The default setting for human nature is gangs, tribes, power wants to concentrate into the hands of one person. And you go back through history and you have the most common form of government's kings, nimrod federal Caesar Kaiser sultans are and you can plot it out. At some point it's going to max out on a global level. And you know, if Genghis Khan killed 30 million people, if he hadn't had died, he didn't have to keep killing. You know, Mao Zedong kills 80 million. If he hadn't had died. And so that spirit is still there and then but Jesus says wheat and tears grow together until the harvest. So you always have, you know, I always try to spiritualize, but you always have the spiritual descendants of Cain always trying to kill the spiritual descendants of Abel. You know, and the only thing that changes over time is military advancements allow the king to kill more people and technological advancements along the track more people. The stakes get higher, but it's that same fallen nature and at the same time, the stories we love best in the Bible are when things look hopeless and God raises up little nobodies with faith and courage and

Bill Federer Rob Mccoy Bill Caesar Kaiser Charlie ROB Genghis Khan Mao Zedong Cain Abel Jesus
Trump's Legacy Is the Overturning of Roe v. Wade

The Officer Tatum Show

01:18 min | 6 d ago

Trump's Legacy Is the Overturning of Roe v. Wade

"Welcome back. Welcome back. Welcome back, ladies and gentlemen. Gentlemen and lady shout out. Oh, let me clarify this real quick. Because you know I've been talking about roe V wade and all this stuff, but you know who I didn't give credit to? I almost feel like I should be ashamed of myself. I didn't give credit to Donald Trump. Do you realize that Donald Trump when he was in when he was in power when he was the president of the United States of America, he got us, I don't know how many two or three Supreme Court conservative Supreme Court Justices, Conor berry, Kavanaugh, and Gorsuch, am I saying, is that right? I think those are the three Supreme Court Justices who are conservative. So he did a pretty good job putting these conservatives in place to navigate this. I think a lot of people are missing out on giving Trump some credit because I don't care if you like him or not. If you believe this was a victory, there's no way this would have happened if he had been able to put in that many Supreme Court Justices. Now, you know, I'm hoping that we can get more of them in there. With the whole course was conservative. The whole court was conservative. Maybe minus one person that'll be our life will turn around quickly.

Roe V Wade Donald Trump Supreme Court Conor Berry Gorsuch Kavanaugh United States Of America
Dinesh Answers a Listener Question About Video Surveillance

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:04 min | Last week

Dinesh Answers a Listener Question About Video Surveillance

"Let's go, I don't do our next question. Hey danesh, sorry if I missed it just a couple of quick questions. On those videos where you've got the person at that Dropbox, does the cell phone data match the exact time of that person that was there? Because then again, then you wouldn't need video of any other lockbox that that person had had visited if you at least had them on one because I know one of the objections is that we don't have any video of one person visiting multiple dropboxes, but again, if the video that you do have matches the cell phone data, then that's great. And the second question is, I think you also said there's like 4 million minutes of video or something like that and so it's just kind of interesting that out of 4 million minutes or what have you, there isn't more videos of the same person at different dropboxes. I mean, what sort of what other information is on those 4 million minutes of videos. So it'd be great to know what else might be there. Thank you very much. Bye bye. Now, I'm going to answer those two questions in reverse order, because while it's true that true the vote has 4 million minutes of video, it seems like a lot of video. But think about it. If you're getting video from a single Dropbox from October 1, early voting through election day, you're going to have lots of video that's just blank space. You're going to go through the day, you're going to go through the night. And so most of that video is just nothing happening necessarily at all. At least in terms of mules. You might have people coming in and depositing one vote in the Dropbox, something like that. That's fine. There's nothing untoward about that. But to the degree that you're looking for mules, a lot of that video is truly you may say empty space. The point is that there was so little video taken compared to what should have happened. The rules call for video everywhere. 24/7. And so that would have been a lot more than 4 million, probably more like 40 million or a 100 million minutes of video had they done their job, but they didn't do the

Danesh Dropbox
The Mis Diagnosis of the Uvalde Response

The Officer Tatum Show

01:00 min | Last week

The Mis Diagnosis of the Uvalde Response

"It appears that you've all the response from the beginning was misdiagnosed as a barricaded subject for whatever reason. And they treated it like a barricaded subject to the T from start to finish. Now that we go back in hindsight with the information we have, we realize that this was an active shooter situation should have been treated as an active shooter situation. So why people are criticizing the response as if they are treated like an active shooter situation and not doing active suit a protocol is beyond me. All you have to do is say they misdiagnosed a thing from the beginning. So everything that they did was wrong. You can't say that, oh, this is wrong. They got shields and they should have went in this time that should have went in this time that should have went in this time without acknowledging that not one person on the scene, not one commander, not one officer, is perceiving this to be an active shooter.

TRUST YOUR RESEARCH, NOT the MEDIA

The Officer Tatum Show

01:10 min | Last week

TRUST YOUR RESEARCH, NOT the MEDIA

"You're going to hear a lot of people come out and make statements and I'm talking to you to help you fine tune what you hear and see from pundits, what you hear and see from the news media, there's a strategy to it ladies and gentlemen. Understand that there are individuals who are our only in this game to get clicks, likes, and subscribes. And they want a day will do anything to clickbait you or play on your emotions into getting you to believe what they want you to believe. My prescription to you do your research. Listen to DPS testimony. Go on to Texas tribune, which I thought they wrote an incredible article about this entire shooting that's unbiased. It's fact based it's unbiased. Do your research. Find people that you trust that are actual experts at a subject matter. To hear their opinions, compare that with knowledge that you have gained, don't never just listen to one person. Don't go off of what the media says.

Texas Tribune DPS
Darren Beattie on a New Bombshell Story Out of the J6 Committee

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:08 min | Last week

Darren Beattie on a New Bombshell Story Out of the J6 Committee

"So there's a lot of questions about what's happening this summer. And I'll be very honest. I haven't watched a second of the January 6th prime time committee. I do know one person who is watching it very closely and also has a phenomenal peace out at revolver news, and that is Darren Beatty, who has done some of the most rigorous and I would say important investigative journalism legitimately important investigative journalism in the last couple of years. Darren, welcome back to the program. Great to be back. Thank you for having me, Charlie. So Darren, I haven't watched the prime time committee hearings. Can you just give our audience? I don't think our audience has either really, what have they been talking about? Do you believe that they're building momentum towards a criminal conspiracy case against Trump, give us the update? Yes, and in fact, look, you're not missing anything by not watching it. And I would recommend anybody waste their time watching it because as I've stated on your program before, what's important about January 6th is what they're not talking about. And so you're not going to get anything of value from them. But you might get something of value from this latest revolver dot news piece because it really explores this latest push of the January 6th committee toward criminal prosecution. You're hearing a lot of commentators say, oh, what's going on? Is this an audience for one, which I guess for them would be good because it's been a ratings flop, actually. And that one person is Merrick Garland, the attorney general. And the idea is the committee will serve up effectively and indictment for Merrick Garland to use to prosecute Trump. Now, the political dimensions of this are manifestly scandalous and inappropriate. For the regime, the Biden regime to hang over the head of Trump, who is the presumptive GOP nominee. Biden's presumptive political rival to hang over his head, the possibility of criminal prosecution is really

Darren Beatty Darren Merrick Garland Charlie Donald Trump Biden GOP
Should Christians Watch Content Like 'Ozark'?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Should Christians Watch Content Like 'Ozark'?

"Liking the Netflix series Ozark several podcasts ago, and I'm not mistaken. It was just a side on to all that would happen to Netflix diminishing ratings as of late. I decided to check it out and I enjoy new dramas and fillers. Thrillers to an extent. I am only a few episodes in the season one, and while I actually enjoy the storyline of plot, it does seem to contain hold on one second. Contain all the modern day adult content language sex nudity violence, that most drama series do. After mulling it over, I want to ask your opinion on Christians watching such content. This is really not about Ozark specifically, but Ozark did ignite a spark of all movies and shows that provide such content. Please do not misunderstand my question as stemming from judgment from a place of genuine sincerity. It's beautifully written. Thank you. I know we are here to walk in our convictions with fear and trembling and one person's convictions may or may not be another's, but I know the Bible also empathizes being wholly as he is holding. How do you reconcile what you watch in here back to the Bible? Is it just a matter of fast forwarding certain scenes or actually watching them? Because they are not your convictions. Again, this is said with complete sincerity. Thank you for your potential response. I very much enjoy your podcast and listen just about every day. God bless TPUSA and all the work you're called to do cheers Brooke. What a great question. So I'll take kind of the Ozark question in particular. And look, this is a struggle that I have and I think a lot of other people have, which is kind of where do you draw the line between the content that you consume when it might be filled with all this other bad language and potentially sexually explicit scenes and also trying to find some form of entertainment or appreciation of art. And it's a kind of a constant struggle. So I've developed a couple rules for myself, which is I don't watch it alone. I'll watch with my wife. And if we feel that the smugness or the nonsense of it, just reaches such a threshold, we just turn it off. Now, I'll be very honest. Ozark is an exception to my general rule. Ozark, first of all, the last season was absolutely dreadful and awful. It ended terribly. So don't waste your time. But the first and second and third season of Ozark I think is some of the best written television that I have seen outside of the smutty Ness and the gross awful nature of some of the content, but the actual storyline of what will you do with your family? Will you descend how far can you descend into darkness? Can you stop yourself on the moral continuum? Is legitimately very, very well written art and very real

Netflix Ozark Brooke
Why Did Jack Posobiec Just Go to Ukraine?!?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:26 min | Last month

Why Did Jack Posobiec Just Go to Ukraine?!?

"Jack posobiec is, I don't know if he's back from Europe. He might still be in Europe. Jack are you still in Europe? Charlie, I can report that we have returned. We are back on the territory of the United States of America. This glorious land. You got your rights back. Congratulations. So believe it or not, man. We were not asked. Two and a half weeks, we were gone, not asked once for a COVID test for a vaccine pass, anything like that, either going into Europe. We were in ten countries or coming back to the U.S., not ask once. Not ask for your papers, not even going to Ukraine? Not even, oh, no, they didn't answer anything going to Ukraine. Just passport. Well, I want to ask about that. So you did the scenic tour of Europe. You went from Rome to Hungary. To Davos to Geneva, to Poland, and then you ended up in Ukraine. Let's start at the end. Why did you go to Ukraine? Oh yeah, hey, Charlie. I went to Ukraine last weekend. I didn't actually tell anybody I was going to go. Especially your turning point USA productions team. And I asked our teams, I said, do we have war insurance? Okay. Well, there were a number of people that did know. One person on the production team did know, but we were trying to keep this. It did make it all the way up the ladder, but that's okay. So how is Ukraine right now? Besides awful and terrible. Right? That's that main city. We are seeing a lot of western party. Western reporters, it's directly across the border from Poland. My family lives just on the other side of the border in Poland, so we were visiting with them, stay with them. And then we went across the border the next day. Levi still hustling, bustling city, very open, very free. We were there on a weekend, a beautiful gorgeous city, but then as we got further and further east, we ended up taking a night train down to Odessa, and then we're able to take a car through the checkpoints. That's what you're seeing in this video right now into the city of Mika liev. Now Mikayla is only a few kilometers. Just a couple of miles from the front lines where in Russian occupied territory of her son, which is the very next city over. So we made it about as far as the highway to her son and we were essentially stopped by military saying, you know, we can not allow any civilians to go further than this point, but the city of mikolaj itself has received shelling, has been struck a few times. In fact, it was struck just the day after we left the morning after the shipyards there at strategic shipyard city on the Black Sea. And conditions absolutely deteriorating the closer you get to Russian

Ukraine Europe Jack Posobiec Poland Charlie Usa Productions United States Of America Jack Hungary Geneva Rome Mika Liev Levi Odessa Mikayla Black Sea
Why Did It Take the Police a Full Hour to Stop the Shooter in Uvalde?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:09 min | Last month

Why Did It Take the Police a Full Hour to Stop the Shooter in Uvalde?

"W and I both saw a short video of uvalde, the parents imploring these law enforcement officials like go in there. There's a massacre underway. We are the parents. We'll go in without guns. And the cops are basically like, you're not helping, step back, and obviously your heart goes with the parents. Yes. Yes. And they had apparently called for back up and back up arrived and as you made the point, the law enforcement officials on the scene were they didn't have tactical gear. Maybe they weren't equipped to be able to kind of go in. Well, and I also made the point that you were like, well, how is it that it takes so long to get these tactical people in there and et cetera, et cetera. This is oval is a very, very sleepy town in South Texas. A lot, a whole lot doesn't go happen every day around there. So people aren't just waiting around to go into a situation like this. Things like this don't happen in little sleepy towns like this, right? So unfortunately, you know, people leave their doors on locked, their cars unlocked. The school left the door unlocked. You know, that kind of thing happens. And so of course, parents were just mortified because number one, apparently this kid was making all kinds of ruckus. For a long period of time, before he even went in the school, apparently he was shooting at some funeral home, I don't know if you heard about this. No. But he was apparently shooting at some people in a funeral home. And then he wrecked his car in some ditch or something. Got out of it, starts shooting just randomly for 12 to 15 minutes before he even went in the school. So I think what the parents were upset about is that listen. This is one guy, one person doing this. Why couldn't you have stopped him before he even went into the school,

Uvalde South Texas
Pastor Tom Ascol Offers Words of Comfort in This Brutal Time

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | Last month

Pastor Tom Ascol Offers Words of Comfort in This Brutal Time

"Curiosity over the last couple of years. About the baptist convention, the Southern Baptist convention and their leadership and their direction and how they're handling some of these issues of critical race theory and how it has been engaging with the church. And there is a movement to try to restore in my opinion theological and biblical sanity back to the convention. And one person in particular is a senior pastor from grace baptist church in cape corral, Florida beautiful cape corral, Florida, Tom askew, and he's with us right now. Tom, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. I just want to first start and just ask you as a pastor, just give our audience some words of comfort from the scriptures in this very unexpected and brutal time of national mourning as we look at what's happened and you've all day Texas. Yeah, well, this is thought to be a reminder to us that we live east of Eden. We live in a fallen world. It's precisely because of that. The gods on the lord Jesus into the world. And it is only through Christ, we can find reconciliation with God. We can find the comfort that we need. God is with those who are broken hearted, he deals gently with people who find themselves cast down. So my encouragement is to look to Christ to recognize, again, why we need to save and how good God has been to us to give up his own son to save us from our sin. And we need to get that message of Salvation as widely distributed as we can because this type of evil continues in our world.

Cape Corral Grace Baptist Church Tom Askew Charlie Kirk Florida TOM Eden Texas
19 diagnosed with Legionnaires' Disease in Bronx; 1 death

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

19 diagnosed with Legionnaires' Disease in Bronx; 1 death

"And outbreak of legionnaires disease in a New York City neighborhood has sickened 19 people since the beginning of the month with one person dying The city health department says cooling towers in the hybrid section of The Bronx have been tested for legionella bacteria which causes legionnaires disease a form of pneumonia the bacteria was found in four of the towers which the department ordered to be disinfected In addition to the person who died 8 people have been hospitalized the health department says people get legionnaires disease when they breathe in water vapor with the bacteria It isn't contagious and most people don't get sick but symptoms are similar to the flu and those with symptoms should seek healthcare Julie Walker New York

Legionnaires Disease City Health Department Legionella Bacteria New York City Bronx Pneumonia FLU Julie Walker New York
The WEF's Goals Pose a Specific, Targeted Threat to the American Way

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:48 min | Last month

The WEF's Goals Pose a Specific, Targeted Threat to the American Way

"In Davos Switzerland right now and everything that impacts your pocketbook and your livelihood actually goes through Davos more than Washington D.C.. The puppeteers of Joe Biden the people that are actually pulling the strings are the ones right now in Switzerland. Unfortunately, because America is not as strong as it once was, especially under this president. There's more power being concentrated in the hills of Switzerland than in our own land. Now the power in America could be re invigorated almost instantaneously. With proper leadership and proper vision. But here's the 8 predictions for the world for 2030. Now, they changed some of the branding and some of the wording. Because it was a little bit too, let's say it was a little bit too spicy. Number one, you'll own nothing and you'll be happy. This is a goal, a prediction by 2030. Now they word it differently on their website as of today. They say all products will have become services, quote, I don't own anything. I don't own a car, I don't own a house, I don't any apply. I don't own any appliances or clothes. Shopping is a distant memory in the city of 2030, whose inhabitants have cracked clean energy and borrow what they need on demand. It sounds utopian until she mentions that her every move is tracked and outside the city lives in swathes of discontent and the ultimate depiction of a society splits into. The second one, there is a global price on carbon. China took the lead in 2017 with the market for trading, the right to emit CO2, setting the world on a path towards a single carbon price and a carbon tax. Goal number three, which is the U.S. will no longer be the world's superpower. U.S. dominance is over. We'll have a handful of global powers. Nation states will upstage to come back. And America will no longer be the world's superpower. Western values will be have tested to a breaking point. What are western values? Separation of powers. Consent of the governed. Western values are what keep us together. Western values are the best way to design and run a civilization. Some people say, well, Charlie, how dare you say western values are better than other values. Well, I think it's a good thing that we have the presumption of innocence. I think it's a good thing that we have a protection of individual and constitutional rights. Western values are derived from the teachings of the Bible. They are human rights. Western values respect the right to speech assembly to run for office, independent judiciary, that not one person should be able to control. There's western values are that the few should not be able to rule the many, but the many should be able to rule the few.

Switzerland Washington D.C. U.S. Davos Joe Biden China Charlie Assembly
Kash Patel: Robby Mook's Testimony Just Destroyed Clinton

The Dan Bongino Show

01:18 min | Last month

Kash Patel: Robby Mook's Testimony Just Destroyed Clinton

"I know you were a humble guy but you guys really exposed this thing from the start and it's kind of interesting isn't it to see media people now recognize basic facts in the case that we knew a while ago like Robbie mook the campaign manager just blurting out in court on Friday shocking everyone saying hey the whole pee pee tape collusion oaks Yeah yeah Hillary knew about it I mean so Anthony climactic right I mean I was expecting some big splashy moment and now it all finally comes out No you're totally right And look remember I interrogated Robbie mook four years under oath just like I did with Susan and those transcripts are available for the world to see And even I as a former federal prosecutor you as a former law enforcement agent no witness is usually prepared But when they give you a gem like that and they blurt out something like that that basically is Clinton's number one person is saying that Hillary Clinton has been lying for 5 years and not only did she know about the operation for disinformation but she authorized it and sent her team to go leak it to the media I don't know how much more of a damning statement you can make under oath about Hillary Clinton That is And that's nothing to do with the indictment which is even crazier part to me It's just like he just destroyed Clinton

Robbie Mook Hillary Anthony Susan Hillary Clinton Clinton
"one person" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:29 min | 7 months ago

"one person" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"I am going to create because if it's not going to happen, when it's going to happen. So if we don't start, it's not going to. That was Shelley's Alice. She's CEO of the female quotient, and her story, it's a lot like that of my second guest, Gina glance. Gina's a friend. She founded gender avenger. Gina's inspiration came from frustration. Specifically, she was fed up with an event held at Harvard. Here's her story. Every four years, Kennedy school has a recap of the presidential race. And they bring in the leadership of the campaigns and the press and they have an all day session. And that night, the culminating event is at the Kennedy school forum. Many Davos. It's where the president's of countries where CEOs where major figures around the world come and speak to students. Well, in 2012, I looked up on stage and there were 5 white men we're talking about after the reelection of Barack Obama. Well, this sent me around the bend. So I went on my personal Facebook page and said I'm skipping the quadrennial presidential review. I'm tired of all white men all the time. Where is Gwen Eiffel? Where Stephanie cutter, where is Beth Meyers, all of whom I'd seen during the day. And I got an extraordinary response. Loads of likes, many comments. Well, that night, there was a blackout. And they had to cancel. So the next morning I went back on my Facebook page and I said, God heard our plaintiff cry. She turned off the lights. Well, hundreds of likes, dozens of comments, including some from individuals who were important to the Kennedy school. Hillary Clinton's chief of staff, a variety of people. So I received an email, rebuking me, saying, how could I do this? And I wrote back and said, it was easy. There were 5 white men on stage. I began to talk about it with young women whom I knew and was this just politics and what I discovered was it was commonplace. And the young women who I talked to are women of all ages said the same thing. If we speak up, we are dismissed. We are disparaged and we're not invited back to whatever the event is that we have complained about. And so this really began, not only to annoy me, but make me more aware. As I looked at back in those days, ads for conferences, I remember one for The Wall Street Journal. 17 men and not one woman to be featured. On its first Wall Street Journal conference, then I received an anthology about politics, 21 authors 20 men. So I turned my annoyance into action. I've known Gina's story for a long time. And every time I hear it, I'm stunned. Public stages being monopolized by white male voices has been a problem for as long as there have been public stages. I wanted to understand what made Gina think that at this stage of the game, something new could be done about it. In part, it was because I was post ambition. I didn't care who I would offend. By going after the individuals who had some influence over my future potentially. And so being able to find a platform to call out the lack of women on stages at major events or on lists was easy. Because I was no longer taking any risk in my view by doing it. I love the idea of being post ambition. Gina had achieved a ton by this point, so if she pissed off the wrong people, it wouldn't really harm her. And that made her powerful. In a way that she thought we'd lost sight of. You know, I lived through the 100,000 people signing petitions and all of those things to make change. And I had a sense that we lost the understanding of what an individual could do. And if I could create both awareness and tools for individuals to use to provoke a response and it was backed by a community with a lined values that was perceived to be powerful, so that if someone sent a tweet and it had the gender avenger hashtag and made a point about a conference that there would be a sense by the conference organizers that maybe they should pay attention. And once that attention was paid and that individual who started it saw that they could have an impact, it just gave them a sense of accomplishment, which I thought was really important. Not only was it important, it worked so well. Gina managed to get giant tech conferences to confront and reformat the shamefully unbalanced slate of speakers they were offering. She has this great story about how she did this at a huge annual tech conference in Las Vegas called the consumer electronics show or CES. Here, a letter tell it. It was back in 2018, when CES had 6 men as their keynote speakers. And just as gender adventure had done for over a year over two years, we sent out our blasts and said CES has no women on the main stage. And the response came not only from our fairly small community, but it came from CMOs from major organizations from Twitter from JPMorgan from all sorts of places that CES was interested in. And so it began on Twitter where I think actually the CMO from JPMorgan wrote and said, I'm sitting here with my napkin, writing down the names of 6 women who could have been on stage. And at that time, it garnered some press and fast company started writing about it. And I wrote a op-ed about the importance of women on stage. Well beyond CES, but what it means to the perception of power. That is how we often measure power this country is a public presence. And that meant presence on stage. The wonderful part about this story, as you know, Jesse is that a year later they were awarded a gold stamp of approval from gender avenger. They had reset their main stage speakers.

Gina Kennedy school Gina glance Gwen Eiffel Stephanie cutter Beth Meyers Wall Street Journal Facebook Shelley Alice Harvard Barack Obama Hillary Clinton JPMorgan Twitter CES Las Vegas ed Jesse
"one person" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:14 min | 7 months ago

"one person" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Several years ago, Shelley Salas got an invitation. Shelley was a proven entrepreneur, she'd built an online research company and she'd sold it. And this invitation was to attend the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. My invitation was as follows. We want you to come to the World Economic Forum, but you might not feel welcome. That was my invitation. Now, why wouldn't she feel welcome? Well, that was the World Economic Forum acknowledging what everyone knew. Davos, as it's often called, it can be a boys club. Big time. And so, of course, you know, had a choice. Don't go, 'cause that's not a very welcoming invitation. Or do what I said, which was great. I'll come. And I remember calling my girlfriend who was the chief operating officer, Bloomberg, and her name was Jackie Kelly. I said Jackie, you've got to come with me to the World Economic Forum because I don't want to go by myself. Today's episode is about the power one person has to make a difference. There's so much wrong with the world, so much that each of us wants to be different. And sometimes those problems like institutionalized sexism and racism and global warming and hunger to name just a few, they are overwhelming. I feel powerless even thinking about it. So today I bring you two stories from guests who decided to do something and then each of them did. We're going to hear from Gina glantz, who is a veteran political strategist. Gina got fed up that there were never any women on stages that the conferences she attended, so she came up with a quick and practical approach to change that, and it's working. But before we get to Gina, let's go back to Shelley. Because Shelley also was sick and tired of being the only woman in the room. Davos is a particularly exclusive room, or rather a series of rooms behind a number of security barriers near the very top of a mountain. The very highest town in all of Europe. So the World Economic Forum takes place in a small little town called Davos, which is in Switzerland. And it is a tiny little city and world leaders go. So it's invitation only. And it is for the presidents of countries and the CEOs of Fortune 500 organizations. Invitation only. And to be invited, you have to be either the president of a country or the CEO of Fortune 500 and the top 5 people of Fortune 500. Right. And so who is the president of a country? A man, right? And who was the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, a man. And who was the top 5 people in Fortune 500, a man, a man, a man, a man and a man. And what color is their skin, white, white, white, white, white. So when you show up in Davos, it's all white men. I have attended Davos a couple of times, as a journalist. And here's something else that's important to understand. Davos sets the agenda for business culture and politics for the year. Full stop. No matter how you feel about it, or even whether you knew this before, the ideas that you read in magazines, the stories you see on TV, even the political candidates that rise to power. These ideas all get set at this very small conference by a singular group of people gathering in basically the middle of nowhere. So when Shelly accepted this invitation, she also decided to take it upon herself to make Davos friendlier to women. She set up a vent just outside the conference Gates and she called it the equality lounge. So when I came, I called my lounge, the place for the 18% because it was less than 18% women at Davos. So I called it the equality lounge. The place for the 18%. I love that. I love that. So year one, I had a little hole in the wall, thinking no one was going to show up except Jackie and me. Both of us were going to be sitting there and I said, okay, we'll have a good time. We'll be in Switzerland in gorgeous place, whatever. And lo and behold, everyone would come and peek in. Like, what's this equality lounge? And you know what? We were a little popular. You know, we got a little, you know, curiosity factor. And year one was interesting. Shelley doubled her space in year two. She quadrupled it in year three, and then in her fourth year at Davos, Shelly brought 50 women to her lounge, and something curious happened. White badges started showing up. Those people with the white badges. They get to go to the main event. That main event is called Congress. Now, lots of other people come to Davos. Lots of people who will never have white badges and never go to Congress. They just come to take meetings with attendees and do other business. These were the people who showed up at the equality lounge at first. But over time, it's become its own center of power. The white badges have shown up. The most important thing that I did, which I do at every place I host a quality lounge. So I create pop up spaces, call the quality lounges. And every major conference around the world, from CES to the World Economic Forum. And everywhere I go, I make sure I host the lounges in places that are non batched. Because I never want to create a space that people can't attend. That is very important to me. So I will always hold it in a space that anyone is welcome. Period. Now, 6 years later, we are the destination for quality. Everyone attends. We are standing room only. We have the best content, by the way, where Congress wants us to broadcast inside a Congress. From a hole in the wall to a two story glass house, we are not only hosting the most important conversations defining and shaping policy around the globe. But it truly is the space we're action happens where we are closing the gaps. We are truly changing the equation. We are creating this space where women are visible. Women are heard. We are creating the changes that are happening around the world country by country. And where the most important conversations truly are happening, they are happening in the equality lounge. More so than in Congress. Shelley turned to space designed for equality into the room where it happens. She's created a place where everyone wants to be and her floor belongs to people who might never make it into that main room. Congress, let alone on stage, I wanted to know what gave her the chutzpah basically. What made her think she could make a difference? You know, Jesse, I decided at this stage of my life and this is why I love Gina is I'm not going to wait and watch..

World Economic Forum Shelley Davos Shelley Salas Jackie Kelly Switzerland Gina glantz Gina Jackie Shelly Bloomberg Congress Europe Gates Jesse
"one person" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"one person" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"And actually he had lived up to the billing he'd lived up to the billing of of being a a guy who had never really been able to get over and because of the nickname and because of all the clowning he'd lived up to the billing of a guy who had never relied on. Do you know the origin of playoff peach. You know the origin of do as a matter of fact. What is the origin. You want quiz me now to make sure i understand what this is about as you say you know. If you don't. I'll tell you well you can maybe tell it in greater detail but i think everybody and by the way for everybody. That doesn't know it goes. He's at a press conference way back when and he says something effective. What you just saw was playoff p. Meaning like that's who. I am come postseason. Is that good enough explanation or not. It's somewhat incomplete because that's clinically about about another no laugh elsie. But you could go pull up the question about his defense in a game. It was about his defense and he put the clamps on that guy. That's playoff p. He's a good defender like this all this stuff. If we're being real that's where this stuff gets misconstrued. He's not sitting there telling you that. He's lebron man. He's i mean he's hit last-second shots man at a time and that's fine at a time in which i think statistically he had only hidden maybe one such shot in his entire career he was like one for seventeen or something like that and he had a commercial where he was hitting elastic. And all that stuff and everybody was crowning him then about that. He's had his reputation long before he was playoff. P he's just for whatever reasons not forever there are some solidify reasons but there are also some added reasons that i'm unfamiliar with as to why people like the clown but he has become like one of those one of those guys is unfortunate because he is a great player he is really talented. He does have a lot of things that you are. one of your team is just. He can't get it out of the way of his own mouth. We could continue this on the other side. Plus i wanna get into. What i think was the biggest show job understand. Y'all too hard on this dude. He's good okay and the disrespect is wrong in my personal opinion. I'm not saying you to specifically. But i'm saying in general. Hey what's up everybody. This is l z granderson. Tell you about my new podcast. Abc audio life out loud this show all about preserving the history and honoring the contributions of lgbtq community each week. I'll talk to some of the most fascinating people paving the way for the more inclusive world these conversations can get heavy but this show is also filled with so much joy. And i mean after all we are called gay people right so gotta be some happiness in there somewhere. Check out out loud with me. L z granderson. Wherever you get your podcast..

one seventeen each week l z granderson one such shot L z granderson those second
"one person" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"one person" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"To you by morongo casino resort and spa good times less than ninety minutes from wherever you are. Laura what do you got guys. I feel like a really bad daughter. Why because my mom is a huge loss. Bookies fan all those bookies now for those that don't know would you say those bookies are like a mexican. bg's the i can say that. Okay take band bookies. Like like i'm gonna buki like i'm going to get down boogie down. No it was like a romantic kind of like the beaches had ballots disco band. But like what. I mean by that more like they were popular in the seventies and eighties. Hot it okay. Yeah so my mom. So they announce it after twenty five years. They reunited because their main. You know the frontman donio. Sali's did his solo thing so they reunited and they're doing a tour and i was like mom. I the first time in how long twenty five years. So i told my mom. You don't want mom. I'm trying to get tickets. So shot it to janice jackson our trying to get tickets for mama today in the morning and we failed but before we failed. I told my mom. Mom i got you. I'm getting tickets and i do not. Oh in you know. There's so much time. I felt so bad. So we're still trying by you. Know the booties. I i'm thirty two army. Can we call the rams to get you. Some gregor man do deal. They have it. I mean they're like one of the most popular mexican bands. Never and they're playing twenty five years. This is a stadium event. No question about it. you don't give up. You listen like i might my daughters. They always want to go to these concerts. And i you know all their young kid concerts and they're like dad. We gotta get tickets. And i'm like okay. So we'll get them and they're like no they're all sold out. I'm like the show's not for three months. Between now and then tickets will happen. I mean yeah but you know. I could have paid x. amount now i don't wanna be bad bunny type of money ticket but it's getting there i mean it it when they janice was finally able to get in the cheapest i think it was like seven hundred dollars and it wasn't great lers. The knowsley wasn't greasy. No can anyone help us out with lows. Bookies tickets who got the buki tickets momma find yourself buki ten is up and see what's out there right out into the universe it will come to you. Universe bless me. i am very blessed man. I didn't even know now. Do you need them and janice needs them. So we need four tickets. Janice got hers now. Jan didn't i. She says she got him for seven. Hundred dollars no no. No we do not have caused her seven hundred. Yeah we need to get four tickets. You wanna work on our to all be together. We need a miracle. Anybody know what i'm talking about. We need care if you're together. Laura now man. She's like girl but i don't care right so this is two tickets and they both moms take each other. That's true i know the the the reason is what if we can get them close. They're like well. We can only get laura. Or i want both of us to go. But if you gotta be that. We separate we separate. Yeah yeah so. Hit us up. Eight seven seven seven ten. Espn if you if you lose bubis tickets all right. So i mean on ticketmaster. All right right now i mean. Yeah you're right is pretty sold out. The only thing available is like floors and they're like who grew it's retake and then they don't go on sale for ticketmaster until tomorrow or the right now i've got presale action on ticketmaster. Right now. available is nine hundred and fifty five dollars. I wouldn't pay that no way. Would you pay that. Your favorite band is playing. Which even if pearl. Jam was playing. I'm sorry eddie. At nine hundred fifty bucks a ticket on out at two thousand bucks a ticket. I'm out. I'll watch it on youtube. Thanks anyway but come on. Would you guys really pay that for a concert. It depends on what is meant. all right. who would you pay. I would consider it. I would consider it for sure on that i. It depends like if it's like if it's like a really famous artist. I think i would. I let me just work behind the scenes. See what. I can figure. We're going to work behind the scenes. You guys. I totally didn't do the story because of this. We want to help him. I mean we're a family very very disjointed family but if it s you still trying to take you to send me to. A clipper game. I told her. I said the clippers. Actually just sent me an email tickets for the next round so if you want to go back on asking us what did you say greg but i gotta like boys and stuff. Who would be like like on saturday be like. Hey doc can you give me the super bowl right. Yeah no that'll september up people like that like you know we. You guys have worked in media. I worked in in like music stations and people are like. Oh you're there. Can you hook me up no bra. I have given up my ticket. Broker days elza. I've had that exact same thing where people for outrageous things like minutes autour hand and i'm just like no no no my ticket. Brokering days are done young. The biggest one was the Was the inauguration. Obama's second inauguration my gut people were hitting me up. Like i was obama right yo alabama berry to give you a couple of tickets from people..

Janice janice jackson Hundred dollars Laura Obama two thousand bucks seven seven hundred two tickets three months twenty five years saturday obama seven hundred dollars today seventies Jan four tickets tomorrow both
"one person" Discussed on Marketing Spark

Marketing Spark

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"one person" Discussed on Marketing Spark

"Sas parking. There's lot of talk about slick strategic plans and an army of marketers term plan into action but many companies have small marketing teams. In fact some companies have one person mark. The teams between people need to do it. All what's lay for these marketers. How do they do their jobs. When they're flying solo to discover the secret to success on talking with nancy kwan director digital marketing at bubble box. Welcome to marketing spark. Thanks for having me. Let's start by having you tell me about your job. I'm interested in understanding firsthand. What it's like to be the marketing department. Yes unlucky said. I'm the director of digital marketing at bubble box. A little bit of a background where a salesforce consulting partner helping organizations integrate and continuously optimize their salesperson so this includes anything from marketing. Cloud tableau d- amazon sales and service just to name a few but to your point of the question of what does oh a one person. Marketing team do what are responsible for say wore off to the not. It could easily be deemed as you might feel round. You might feel it at being a bit daunting at times. Especially if you're not crap to position yourself for success but the daunting and overwhelming feeling could be very large especially if you're new to the organization or Role is also newt organization. What you'll probably experience is. Everybody is going to be coming to at company with all their ideas. The latest trends at the reading on what's happening. They're probably putting in the requests of mealy because maybe they didn't have a person there before so they're all coming with their backlogs of great ideas and things that they wanna see on social or in marketing claros on the website. And of course monday sometimes get often forgotten is we are. I'm always faced with that like okay. How do we optimize user experience. How do we optimize customer experience. So that is probably what will happen. If you're joining organization in there is either small team. we're just a one person team what somebody might Like myself has experienced in the past. So i've been in the situation where i have come in as the marketing person on a consulting basis. And you're right. The sales guy has something that were to be done. The ceo has their priorities. The head of sales has their priorities. How do you coordinate all those different ass to make sure that you're not running in different directions. That people don't know what page you're on what your priorities are. How do you get that..

nancy kwan monday one person bubble box some amazon
"one person" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

Journey to $100 Million

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"one person" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

"What's happening it's eric. J olson often retail the story of what it was like for me to hire my first full time employee. Once i went out on my own so operated as a one person company for about six to nine months before i realized it was time to hire someone. I had one big project that was in the middle of. I had just one another big project. I couldn't put that off too long while i finished the first projects. I really needed to someone that could help me out. And i needed someone pretty quickly. I advertise found a person. I ended up hiring her but it was one of the most difficult decisions that i've ever made as a business owner to date because it was just a huge decision i was taking someone on and i was responsible for their livelihood and also their career so i get asked this question a lot by other entrepreneurs that are currently one man or one woman shows. I got this question on lincoln recently from daniel. Keever who. I know well because he used to work here for us at a rate digital until he moved back home and started his own marketing agency. So now he is a one man marketing agency and he wanted to know which role do i think would be the best one for him to hire i as he expands in twenty twenty one for me. The idea of hiring someone is to get a lot of the work off of your plate to free you up either to do more of that or to refocus on the business working constantly in the business what i mean by that is when you're i'm just going to focus this on as a marketing agency. Because that's what daniel does acid. I do so. I could talk to it very specifically but this applies to really any kind of business as a marketing agency. You have to do things like create ads. You need to create websites. You need to respond to customer reviews for your clients. That's working in the business. This is the actual business at hand. Couple other examples outside of marketing. Say you're a roofer putting on the roof. Taking the old roof off lugging the shingles up to the roof. That's working in the business working on the business is not the actual trade itself but it's working on things that will improve your business. Get you more customer. Make you more efficient and hopefully make you more money or save you money which thus makes you more money so working on the business is more of a higher level tasks that requires more of your time so i like to see new entrepreneurs get freed up from working in the business so they can work on business the best way that i think they can do that is by again taking work off of their plate the working in the business kind of work take that off your plate give it to someone else and you're not going to get rid of all of it with your first employees but most of it if you can or at least a good amount so that your freedom to work on the business so for me that means a generalist i need someone to has a lot of airing skills so they can jump in and a lot of different places now i think it would make sense possibly to hire a specialist if you had so much of that specialty work that it necessitated a full-time person right now not a year from now or three years from now or maybe hopefully one day but right now if you have enough of specialty work hired a specialist but you've gotta make sure that person is fully employed from day one course once a year them training or not but you don't want there to be any downtime in their schedule because again the goal is to take just as much off of your plate and put it on theirs and then you're freed up so again to kind of wrap up i think is important with your first employees to take the work off of your plate and hopefully your new employees can take that on four you which means you need to give them work that is in the business and a generalist in my opinion is best suited for that. How much more successful would you be if you could harness the experience of a group of successful business owners. That is the exact group of people that we have in our business growth mastermind. Check out more.

daniel first J olson eric one person first employees first projects Couple one once a year three years four one man one big project twenty twenty one one day one woman six nine months day one
"one person" Discussed on Voice in Canada

Voice in Canada

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"one person" Discussed on Voice in Canada

"For monday. And today i wanna tell you a little bit about covert nineteen feature. That's now been built into lexi as you may know. You may have heard that for now. A couple of weeks lexi. At least in the united states was able to give some advice when it comes to cope with nineteen your concern that you may have the virus but that wasn't available in canada while i want to let you know that now it is and what they're using as the information source is the public health agency for canada. And so if you ask these questions. And i'll give you two examples. One of them is lexi. What do i do if i think i have. Covert nineteen and the other one is lexi. What do i do. I think i have corona virus and lexi will take you through a short series of questions To assess your level of risk of having the virus and then we'll give you some appropriate advice. I have to say that the way goes through. The skill is very very much. Like the way i had my skill. Coronavirus doc. poor got pulled amazon. So mixed feelings about this. I think it's a great service at amazon's doing i have to say i'm disappointed. A little bit in fact that mine was pulled and it really was doing pretty much the same thing as this skill nevertheless. i understand as you may have heard me talk about it in the past that This is the way amazon's going to protect the information that's being given through lexi anyway. Check it out again. Those statements are lexi. What do i do. If i think i have co would nineteen if i have kroneneijer all right now. Finally just before I sign off. I WANNA give a shout to Dennis Dennis. One of the most recent people to leave a review for this briefing on the Amazon skill store. A dentist gave it five stars. He wrote your good. I do look forward to your daily update. You have good info that I use. I also try to share. Some of your tips will Dennis. Thank you so much. I really really appreciate that. And that's wonderful to hear that you're sharing it as well. These are views really are real source of encouragement for me to keep going to know that these are these. Flash briefings are providing value to you. So if you've been listening for a while and you haven't had a chance to leave review and you are so inclined. Of course I would appreciate that as well and you can simply go to voice. Canada DOT CA. You'll see a red button there to leave review. It's that simple. Takes a few seconds. So thank you very much. You've got a couple of other review shadows to give coming up here in the next little while so be well take care. Have a great day. I'll talk to you tomorrow..

lexi Dennis Dennis amazon canada united states Canada DOT
"one person" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

10:45 min | 2 years ago

"one person" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"Hello. I'm John Josh. And we're the host of serious wraps a new weekly hip hop podcast premiered on iheartradio me. John had been France for over twenty years every week. We get together talk about hip hop life politics. Whatever comes to mind but let me ask you if you had to play one episode or one segment of serious wraps to get a new listener to understand like Oh? This is what these guys are about. This is what this show is like. Which one would you pick? Maybe the will re pitch ourselves as the next host for the Adriana Words Adult Video News News newsletter yet. They sent out letters for porn. Yeah I call them the porn awards. Yes God so I mean if you are interested in here and that kind of crazy stuff conspiracy. Theories Strip clubs stories torn awards mixed in with a little hip hop little bit. We're the pockets for you. Come on so yeah. When you can check out serious wraps premier on the iheartradio heart radio network the iheartradio APP apple podcasts? Or wherever you get podcast. Hello I'm rainbows Valentine and for the past year. My Dad husband coming clean to me about his decades long careers of big time pot smuggler. By big time I mean pretty. Big Time was sixty thousand. My Dad mom had to live a double life. One is active scoreboards. Numbers doting parents to three kids and the other is outlaws like the parents had a secret room. Coon the moves. It was a real secret room you can. You took a screwdriver. My Dad wasn't the most organized criminal criminal. He once lost half a million dollars buried in the backyard that he smuggled during the war on drugs. GonNa find out how my dad was a pot smuggler for twenty the two years and at what cost I'm Rainbow Valentine for my heart radio and school of humans. This is disorganized. Crime smugglers daughter. Listen to disorganized crime smugglers daughter on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts Bryan Stevenson is the director of the equal justice initiative the goal of Ej I in addition to representing the most unrepresented is to help people understand the true history three of our country including its darkest chapters through the legacy museum in Alabama. But I I asked him about the recent news from Attorney General William Liam Bar that the trump administration will resume executing federal death. Row Prisoners interesting. Is that the federal death penalty is not well understood. Some of the most host extreme racial disparities in the death penalty actually exists in the federal system. And we just haven't done a very good job of creating reliability and fairness i. I think that you know the question of the death penalty in this country can't be answered by asking. Do people deserve to die for the crimes committed. I think the threshold question is do. We deserve to kill and we have a system. That is very unreliable. That is very unfair that it's biased. That doesn't treat people of color the same way they treat other people That doesn't provide people with the resources that they need. You know at the end of the film. I'm I'm really pleased to have a statistic that everybody's GonNa see when they see this movie eighty and it's a shocking statistic and the statistic is is that We've now proven innocent. One hundred sixty four people on death row that means for every nine people who've been executed in this country we've identified one innocent person on death row and when you think about that. It's completely unacceptable. Notable that we're still trying to execute people if we learned that one out of nine apples in the store would kill you if you touched it or bit into it. We would stop selling apples. Nobody how do we get on a plane for one out of nine planes goes up and crashes and everybody dies but we're accepting it in the context of the death penalty and I think what's disappointing about trying to resume zoom. The federal death penalty is that we haven't done the hard work of making that death penalty reliable and fair and so I know that there are lawyers who are going to be fighting against against that and I hope this becomes a just a moment in this effort. We've seen a lot of states reject the death penalty. There's a moratorium in California right now. The numbers hours of death sentences has decreased dramatically in the last decade. Or so I think the The progress that we're making will ultimately happen. I think in an generation eight thirty forty fifty years from now people look back and say why were they executing people in this country fifty years ago. Let's talk about the legacy museum in the memorial for Peace and Justice Justice in Montgomery The New Yorker compares the legacy new Sam to a great legal argument and that it relies on both emotion and precise accumulation and evidence. There's so many powerful things in Montgomery that. I hope everyone will get an opportunity to see but Brian. Why was this such an important project for you? You know I talk about the fact that I'm a product of Brown versus board of Education. I wouldn't be sitting here. Lawyers can come into our community and made it possible for me to go to high school in college and I think it was about twelve or thirteen years ago when I began to think about that. And I had this really chilling Thought and the chilling scary thought that I had was I don't think we could win. Brown versus board of Education Today. I don't think our court would do something that disruptive I robbed up on behalf of a disenfranchised disempowered group and the reason why. I don't think they would do that. We haven't created a narrative environment that actually pushes rushes our institutions to to never waver when it comes to justice and fairness and that's what made me think we have to start working outside the courts to create create a healthier environment and environment. That deals. Honestly I I don't think we're free. I think we're burdened by this history of racial inequality. I moved to Montgomery in the nineteen eighties. There are fifty fifty nine markers and monuments to the confederacy in that city. Alabama still celebrates Jefferson Davis's birthday as a state holiday. A confederate Memorial Day is still a state holiday. We don't have Martin Luther King Day in Alabama we have Martin Luther King Slash Robert e Lee. The two largest high schools in Montgomery Robbie Lee High Jefferson Jefferson Davis High. We've been practicing denial and silent and we've created this false narrative about who we are and I just think we're at a point in our nation's didn't history but we have to change that narrative. We're going to have to commit ourselves to truth telling South Africa committed to truth and reconciliation after apartheid They have apartheid museum. That's powerful if you go to the Constitutional Court and Johannesburg at surrounded by emblems and symbols that are designed to make sure that no no one forgets the injustice of apartheid. If you go to Berlin you can't go. Two hundred meters without seeing the markers in the stones had been placed next to the homes of Jewish families that abducted during the Holocaust. The Germans actually want you to go to the Holocaust memorial. They're trying to change the narrative. They don't Wanna be thought of as Nazis in Fascist there are no Adolf Hitler statutes juice in Germany but in this country we haven't talked about the native genocide. We haven't talked about slavery we haven't talked about Lynch we haven't talked about segregation and I think that has to change until we built these sites because I believe we need an era of truth and justice and the thing we have to remember is that Truth and justice the Truth and Justice Truth and Repair Truth and reconciliation. I think these things are sequential. You gotTa tell the truth off before you get to reconciliation for me. This is rooted in a desire. And I don't do this stuff because I want to punish us for our history. I really believe there is something that feels more like freedom that feels more like a quality that feels more like justice than what we have yet experienced in this nation. But to get there we're going to have to have these conversations -tations we're GONNA have to talk about these things we're going to build institutions like the ones we've hopefully bill that will motivate people to go through those spaces when they get to the end of the space say never again when it comes to tolerating bias and bigotry and hatred. That's the hope. And of course the history of lynching in this country is something that has literally been buried from from view. And that's one of the things that was so moving for me to see the Mason jars full of soil from various lynching sites. You have done on a project where you bring the descendants of lynching victims to the site where you believe their relatives were killed were murdered hung shot burned fund and then they collect the soil because these people never had a proper burial and the stories of those victims are so heartbreaking and the different colors of soil representing all the different regions. Were these lynchings took place. I'm it's just such a powerful powerful powerful thing to see took my breath away. Well for me. It's about active truth telling and that's what I think and it's sometimes hard hard. You have to be courageous to do it but I think that's the goal. I mean we did one recently. where middle aged black woman came in? And what we do is we send people to lynching sites we give them an empty jar we give them a little implement to dig soil. They put the soil in the jar has the name of the lynching victim and the date and then we put it in our museum. We put it in our display. Play in this middle aged. Black woman came and she was nervous about doing this by herself and her site ended up being a pretty remote location but she drove down to the sturt Roden then got out of her car to go. A- dig the soil. She found the tree and she was about to start digging when a truck drove by. And it was this big white guy in the truck and he drove by any. We saw this black woman on the side of the road and he slowed down and he turned around and he drove back by and she said he stared at her as he drove by and then she said he parked the truck and he got out of the truck big guy and started walking toward her and she was terrified and we tell people. You don't have to explain what you're doing when you're doing this. You can just say you're getting dirt for your guard. And that's what she was. I was going to do in this. Big White Guy wrote walked up to her and he said what are you doing and she said she was about to say. I'm just getting dirt from my garbage. She said something got a hold of her as she told that manager says I'm digging soil because this is where a black man was lynched in one thousand nine thirty one and I wanNA honor his life and she says she got so scared that she started digging real fast and the a man just stood there and then the man said does that paper talk about the lynching and she said it does he said can I read it. She gave the man that paper and she kept dating while the man read. And then the man put the paper down and he stunned her by saying Would you mind.

Montgomery Alabama John Josh Montgomery Robbie Lee High Jef Brown Justice Justice apartheid museum Bryan Stevenson Holocaust memorial sturt Roden apple France Valentine California Jefferson Davis Adolf Hitler Coon Berlin White Guy Attorney
"one person" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"one person" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"Civil rights lawyer and Activists Bryan Stevenson of equal justice initiative group any impact as a lawyer. I've helped anybody during my legal career if I've made a difference representing my clients. It's not because I'm hard working. It's not because I'm smarter anything like that. It's because I got proximate. Awesome to a condemned man and heard him sing about higher ground. And that's why I've talked about proximity because I think there's power when we get close to the poor and excluded in the condemned there's Kamala there's wisdom there's insight there's inspiration. There are portals that can change the world and later. I'll speak with the man who plays Brian Brian. And the new movie. Just mercy Michael Jordan and Jamie Foxx Cooper trays. The client whose case put Bryan Stevenson on the map Brunson. The season has been fighting this fight in the shadows for years. So that's why this movie is so important. My next question. What made the Real Bryan Stevenson? The man he he is today. I recently had the privilege of interviewing Brian. One of my personal heroes at a dinner for the Aspen Institute in New York City. I everyone good evening gene. It's such an. I began by asking him about his childhood. He grew up in a small rural town in southern Delaware poor isolated and marginalized but surrounded by family. That taught him the values that have guided him his entire life. I was born at the end of the Jim Crow. Oh era but you could still see the signs that said White and color and I watch my parents trying to shield me from that. We don't realize that that sign it wasn't they. They weren't directions they were actually assaults. They created real injuries. My parents were humiliated everyday of their lives and yet they had enough hope. They actually believed that they could raise us to enter a world. That would be better and more just and I think it was that sense that you have to believe things. You haven't seen that. I was constantly being taught a young person and I became a church musician. And when I first started to apply you know. They didn't want me to play. During the services I had to play during the testimonial and people would come in. And they'd give their testimonies. And sometimes they say these heartbreaking they tell all these heartbreaking stories about what had happened they didn't have enough food to feed their family or something had happened. Something terrible but during those testimony services they would always in their testimony by starting starting to sing a song. They'd start singing something like wouldn't take nothing for my journey now and there was this hopefulness and I think for me. That has been the greatest this gift. I live in Montgomery Alabama now and I think about the people who were there sixty years ago trying to do what I do and I realize I'm standing on their shoulders and they did so much more with so much. Less one of the people who did so much more with so much less was Brian's grandmother mother. A woman who was born in the eighteen eighty s in Virginia who had ten children and was the matriarch of the family. She was tough and strong but Brian and says her love was so expensive that she had a way of making each of her grandchildren feel special and seen my grandmother was the daughter of people who were enslaved. Her parents were born in slavery. My great-grandfather learned to read as an enslaved person. Even though he knew he might be sold or even injured because he had that skill and she would talk about how when emancipation came. All of the Formerly enslaved people would come to their house and he would read the newspaper for every night and she would sit next to him and she would be so proud that he had that ability and even though she couldn't go to school she learned to read and she taught her daughter my mom how to read and we report and we didn't always have things that we need it but my mother went into debt to buy the World Book Encyclopedia because she wanted us to have this entry into the world. And when you see people making those kinds of sacrifices affirming those kinds of values it's sustained it energizes you and then the last thing my hi. My I feel really fortunate to have been given was a commitment to loving people might my my grandmother told me always stay on the side of love even when people treat you bad even when people hate you even when people mistreat you have to stay on the side of love because once you leave the side of love you give away the most important parts of yourself you become come vulnerable to all of those emotions that will destroy so you have to stay on the side of love my people my parents my grandparents despite the brutality in the mistreatment is treatment. Didn't hate anybody. And it's a precious gift that they have given me and I've tried to hold onto that gift and the gift I wanNA give my clients the people I work with and it is very much much standard the work that I've done throughout my career so both hope and love hoping low. Yeah and you would think that little eight year old Bryan Stevenson knew he wanted to be a public pinterest lawyer. You know but you didn't actually figure that out for quite a while you went to Harvard law school but you weren't particularly jazzed about going and once you got there you really felt like an outsider. So at what point did you feel like this is my calling. This is where I'm going to commit my time and energy. Yeah I mean it was funny. I was so excited because nobody in my family had gone to college. I was so excited just to be in college and I didn't think much about what came next and I was a philosophy major and it was really at the beginning of my senior year that somebody came up to me and said you know. Nobody's going to pay you. To philosophize graduated from college and to be honest. That's how I found my way to law school. It was very clear to me. You don't need to know anything to go to law school so I signed up for that but I didn't have a real appreciation creation of what lawyers did I didn't. I'd never met a lawyer until I got the law school and was very disoriented. Because I was concerned about racial inequality in social injustice and it just just didn't feel connected to the things I cared about and I was really in the middle of this kind of existential angst. Everything changed in one thousand nine hundred eighty three when Brian took a course that required him to spend a month with a human rights organization providing legal services to the people on death row he headed down to Atlanta and into the prison system and it was that experience. That really became transformative. I I I went to death row. I met people literally dying for Legal Assistance and I write about this in my book. The first person I met was condemned man. I'd just been sent down there to tell him that. He wasn't at risk of execution. And when this man came into the room he was burdened with change at handcuffs on his wrists. You had a chain around his waist at shackles on his ankles calls and by the time they unchained him. I was so nervous I just started apologizing and I said I'm so sorry I'm just a law student. I don't know anything about the death penalty I'd and and I finally said but I'm here because you're not at risk of execution anytime in the next year and he was so stunned by that statement he said. Wait say that again and I said you're not at risk of execution anytime in the next year and then he said wait. Wait wait wait say that again. I said you're not at risk of execution anytime in the next year and this man grabbed my hands and he said thank you thank you thank you said. You're the first person I've met in the two years I've been on death row. WHO's not a death row prisoner? Deathrow Guard he said. I've been talking to my wife when my kids but I haven't let them come and visit because I was afraid I'd have an execution dates now because of you I'm GonNa see my wife. I'M GONNA see my kids. Thank you thank you. Thank you and I couldn't believe how even in my ignorance being proximate to that man was so transformative and we started talking and when our turned into two hours and two hours turned into three hours in the guards were waiting for me to finish and they got angry that I didn't finish the visit after an hour and make came bursting into the room and they couldn't do anything to me but they were mad and they threw through this man against the wall and they pulled his arms back and they put the handcuffs on his wrists so tightly I could see the metal pinching his skin they wrap the chain around his waist. They put the shackles on his ankles. They were treating him so roughly. I begged them to be gentler but they ignored me and they pushed the man near the door. When he got near the door I saw this condemning planters feet and when he planted his feet and the guards tried to shove him he didn't move? And that's when this man looked at me and he said Brian don't you worry about this. You just come back and then that man did something. I've never forgotten. He stood there and he closed his eyes and he threw his head back and he started to sing and he started singing this him I hadn't heard and he started singing. I'm pressing on the upward way new heights. I'm gaining everyday still praying as I'm all rebound and he said Lord Plant my feet on higher ground and everybody everybody stopped. The guards were covered. They started pushing him down the hallway. And you could hear the chains language. You could hear this man singing about higher ground. And when I heard that man Singh everything changed ancient. That was the moment that I knew. I wanted to help. Condemned people get to higher ground but more than that. I knew that my journey to higher ground was tied to his and I went went back to Harvard law school completely radicalize. You couldn't get me out of the law school library. I needed to know everything about federalism and comedy in the doctrine jurisprudence. And that's how it happened for me. I window death row and I met a condemned man. And he's saying to me and it changed my orientation it changed. My path changed my life. Let's talk about just mercy you just for a moment because it's coming out on December twenty fifth and of course that is the case at the center of the two thousand fourteen book when you defended Walter mcmillen played. I think so incredibly. I was lucky enough to see the film Jamie Fox and I thought he did an amazing job. Michael Jordan of course plays you. How weird was that to watch that? It's pretty weird you know. I'm just I'm really. I feel really good about the film. I was very apprehensive because Hollywood. oftentimes we'll take a story and they'll do something formulaic and. I didn't want that to happen. But Michael who producer on the film was really committed to doing it right the director after destined a credit and was also committed in the whole cast came together. And we're really committed to doing this in a way that would honor the people that I represent it and they really put their heart into it and I feel really good about the so. Why are you doing this? Why am I know you go down in Alabama taking these cases? That ain't nobody GONNA pay for when I was a teenager. My grandfather was murder over a black and white TV. We kept waiting for someone to show up to help. And that's when I realized that outside my community nobody cared to sit him. He's another black man killed in projects. I know what it's like to be. Santos it is surreal To to have a film come out and and Michael Bey is obviously so so popular and so wonderful wonderful and and he was very committed. We spent a lot of time together and just wanted to do everything he could to get it right any asked me. Is there anything I need to do. Do that to kind of get ready. I said no you've got it. I said there's just one thing you don't need to do and I told him the one thing you don't need to do is to lose the Black Panther creed the body when you play me. You should keep going to lawyer Diet. Don't try to you know. And so I appreciate. She ate him holding onto all of those assets that he brings on a roll Sir but no. It's been great and I'm really excited for people to see the film and for me. It's just a way of getting people exposed to these issues. I've always believed that if people saw what I see on a regular basis they would respond the same way and if a new C. unfairness and abuse.

Brian Brian Bryan Stevenson Michael Jordan man Singh Harvard law school Kamala Montgomery Alabama Aspen Institute Virginia New York City Jim Crow Jamie Foxx Cooper Walter mcmillen White Delaware Jamie Fox Brunson pinterest
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Like it really is. That's why if planning is important for freelance you're contending with his complete wildcard. That is it's humane way freelancers retreated on that front in this country. And there's been a little bit of progress was ObamaCare. So that I I heard not sure say to me that they weren't hundred happy with their plan. But it was something that they had now things are inflex again. And you look at other countries, you think the other countries have gotten this better than us. But it's just reality Asian stop anyone from starting business, but you do need to you need to plan accordingly. So one of the reasons we have a smaller house, we realized what was happening with those costs rate. It's basically payments. Well, one of the better not be a stretch mortgage is going to be eventually hopefully that will get fix. It. Just seems like there's so many I have little confidence get fixed in his car administration or the next of inspiration. There's too much money at stake hospitals from Ceuta companies insurance companies. All making gobs of cash like what we put into the system. And what we put out what we took out of the system was. So was so off Allens. It wasn't even it was laughable. It's really literally felt like I was robbed. You know, what that is the number of people who engage in freelancing keeps going up and whether they're doing it. And I know there's a lot of debate about the numbers. But when you include both the seiger's, and the people that do it fulltime, it's a lot of people. And I think the more critical masters more people are gonna start asking these questions. Like, why am I paying this insane amount of money for my health care when I go to the doctor once a year, why am I not part of the social safety net. I with the policy articles fewer people read them, but empty in this book kind of talking about that. Well, that's underneath the surface. Because it why do you need to make that much money? You need to make it because you treated almost as a second class citizen. It's very very true. You know, what it is is the the whole sit the whole system in industry has to change like I would love this. I'd be like, oh, I love for like Amazon or Google come in here and just disrupt this entire industry like what you're talking about with sheets in blinds. And all that good stuff. But it's not because the government's involved with Medicare and Medicaid. And here's another not to get actually want to wrap this up. I don't wanna get too deep into this. But we when we were switching plans. So my wife worked like like three or four years ago, and she was on we pay Cobra and from Cobra transition to my company plan, and there were two weeks where we were uninsured which we weren't aware of and my wife went to go get a mammogram or some sort of scan and she Cicek into they looked at the okay good to go. She gets it. She's she's in another twenty minutes. The Bill was thirty eight hundred dollars. We were not covered. So then it takes the costal six months to find out this era, and they send us a Bill for.

Ceuta Medicare Amazon Google Medicaid thirty eight hundred dollars twenty minutes four years six months two weeks
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Well, could take them one more freelance project. We're really prices a little bit to build in part of my overhead, which is providing for my own retirement. You can think that way you can't really do that in a job if you have a side business if you're in a job, and maybe you do have benefits covered. But maybe you still not saving enough. Maybe you say, you know, what maybe I should drive for Uber. Little bit on the side and build up my nest egg for couple of months, and then just not touch that money. You can do that too. With different extent. It's you know, is it is a challenging environment for for an entrepreneur. I mean, I listen to this in your book with healthcare benefits. My my wife just recently went back part time, she's a nurse and she went back strictly for health benefits. It was almost inconsequential what she got paid the benefits that I had to pay for the family was agreed asleep. Ridiculously unbelievably high, and it went up so much each each year where once clips my mortgage payment and this past year eclipsed by a lot. I said this is pure insanity that we're we're spending this much money. And I go to the doctor once once a year, my two boys fourteen and eleven I mean, sure, they go to the doctor but for checkups and if they get the flu and my wife goes twice a year. And we were we're spent I don't wanna say the number. It was just so. Agreed. It wasn't even it wasn't even funny. I said this is this is this ridiculous. Absolutely insane. Yeah. It's gonna similar Megyn. So I know exactly what you're talking about you. It's insanity. And even if you go to high deductible plan that we have seen point NBC. We finally have to cry uncle go to a high deductible plan, even that is not cheap on actually what my husband had a client who he loved offered him to come in house, and it wouldn't change his freedom to work when in where he wants and that sort of thing, and he did that about two years ago, and I agree with you benefits are valuable. I think I would I recommend if it business you really need to make a hundred. Forty percent of what you were making before you. Forty percent more other than what you were making to make the cost of benefits. Government research is thirty percent. If you had a really good job with good benefits. I think you have to allow for a little bit more because a lot of people companies. They don't realize how the benefits actually are the healthcare is just a nightmare. It's a nightmare even the high deductible plans. Like, I I wanted to get insurance just for me where like I'll pay for the doctor's appointment of pocket, I'll pay for the dentist. But.

flu Megyn NBC Forty percent thirty percent two years
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Yeah. It's I believe it's believe it's tougher. Guests. Oh. He would be on the the New Jersey transit off. I I don't I I have an office in Manhattan, which today on thirty six eighth. But I when I had the chance to work from home and do work from home, and I commute on the Long Island railroad, and we could take a right turn and just absolutely trash commuting. But I'm gonna I'm gonna silence myself not gonna I'm not gonna take carrot. But you're right. If you had if you commuting into Manhattan, for instance, you would lose a solid I don't know where you are in jersey. But I'm saying you lose a solid two hours each day. So a lot of people they just they they get up. They you know, they shower some eat get on that train get into work work a full day, come commute back home at the time. They get home. They have just enough time to eat dinner may watch TV read a book and then fall into bed and then rinse and repeat five days a week. It's it's brutal. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Right. A lot of people. Right. Again, also to to mitigate that financial risk is don't quit your job. You you've got nights and weekends..

Manhattan New Jersey Long Island five days two hours
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"The men read by like window, pane, plaids, and that sort of thing. So they so they they knew what customers wanted. They offered something that they saw was missing in the marketplace. And that was a winning formula for them. But they also scaled up gradually now, they're they're I think the last time I spoke with them they were twenty three employees and they went onto res Mensur funding. The the point of the one person businesses is they have options, you could there are some that have made a conscious decision. I do not want employees in what my freedom others have decided, let's take this as far as we can go, but they have choices not available to the average person in a struggling when person business in that. That's what I'm hoping to address is that people who listen to this podcast and read the book will come away with tools that will help them into their revenue and profit. So they have options. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, we all businesses start off as one person. Well, I mean, there could be a partner. But yet the idea I mean, it it all starts small, and then expands I don't see the book, as, you know, anti scaling, you know, but, but it it's very practical. And that's very great. It's a great. A what am I I liked that story about the sheets? Another thing that I can relate to is curtains. I don't I don't know if you can relate to this. But like, I couldn't believe how expensive curtains were for my house. It isn't it? Literally like it literally is insane. I remember moved into my house. I live on Long Island, and my wife, and my my two boys we live in we live in center, port, New York. And I guess within the first couple of months we had someone come in. And I I can't remember how many windows it was. But it was a lot of windows in the house like it was like over thirty windows, and we had someone come over from Huntington to look at our our windows and our curtains, and they gave my wife the price and she literally like her heart skipped a beat. And she's like. I know what you mean. It's it's funny. I think I mostly have blinds in my house because we were looking at drapery or something, and yeah, it's it's it's even worse than she is if you're if you're listening to this podcast, this is this is an opportunity, I'm telling you, you you come out with a direct to consumer curtain business. You will make a fortune there. They spoke with the salesperson. And I was I thought they were literally trying to skin me the price was so high. It was in the five figures. I was like you are you're smoking crack, absolutely not. So then what we had to do was we found somebody else, but we did like room by room because it was so unbelievably expensive it was. It was insane..

Long Island partner New York Huntington
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"He experimented with different types of printing like print on demand. And I believe the first year that he was in business. He brought in it was either twelve thousand or fourteen thousand dollars he kind of road tested on Amazon. So what customers liked and didn't like and then each year he built up a little bit more. He knew more about how to do this efficiently. He knew more about who his core customers were and then after two or three years he hit six figure revenue, and then he felt confident that he could continue to support his family. He had a steady income. He had a steady. Customer base. And now he does it a hundred percent of the time. And he built it to about two million in revenue just by himself with some contractors and then recently hired his first employee, which brings me to another point. I'm not against hiring employees, and I'm not against scalable businesses. I think there's room for all types of businesses in the world and is a natural point in some businesses. We're it does make sense to hire an employee would never discourage someone from doing that. If they it's great to create jobs, but the challenge for many when person businesses is they don't have the cash flow to support a job. You can't just hire. Somebody put them on payroll and then in two weeks when your customer pays you lead fire them, and then hire the the money. That's why they use contractors and NAT allows them to extend what they can do. But there is a point with some of them where they really grow way past being a one person is a good example would be Brooklyn. In which was a husband and wife team. They're based in Brooklyn, they sell sheets direct to consumers. They came across the sheets that they loved and discovered that they were eight hundred dollars a set, and everyone anyone who's ever shopped for sheets knows they're sort of strangely -fensive, and you have no idea why they actually researched it, and they found the reason was there's all kinds of middlemen involved in it. So they taught themselves this whole industry. They had no family members in the linens business at all the husband had been in. He went to NYU. He studied business in the way Vicky was in PR, so they had some good business skills, and they wound up on putting up their own website. They manufactured them starting small, and then they built up, but one way they tested their idea was they went to the floor of big box stores in may ask people. What would you be willing to pay for sheets in good quality sheets? They also noticed a gap in the marketplace. Was most sheets are marketed to women and rich the husband. He didn't wanna go by floral sheets, right? Let's offers asleep..

Brooklyn Amazon Vicky NYU fourteen thousand dollars eight hundred dollars hundred percent three years two weeks
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Yeah. No. It's it's very it's very difficult. You know, the freelancers in the gig economy. But I would I would agree with the premise of of do what you love, which is which is tough. You don't want to do something that you hate. But you know, from a business standpoint if you were to start a business you just have to solve a problem. You know, what what what do a lot of people? What obstacles, you know? It's a shared problem. And if you solve that problem. I mean, obviously, you're gonna have competitors. You could make a business out of that. And I that's what I read through with your with your multiple case studies in stories in the book is a lot of people would would start off as a side hustle or they'd had this problem that occurred in their life, and then they would build a business around that. And then they would deliver it to people at. Reasonable cost and people would buy it. It sounds so simple. And I know it's from speaking as a business owner entrepreneur myself, it's not that simple. It's hard work. But it is you you you find a problem you solve that problem. And then you gotta make money though. Like a lot of these big companies like Facebook Instagram, there was VC money poured in private equity money poured in and they didn't make money they were using other people's money to scale. So they were lose their hambur, gene money, and there are still companies like Uber is hemorrhaging money there. There are still companies like we work as losing hundreds of millions of dollars, and but they're getting investment. So they can they can prop prop themselves up. Anyway, I'm I'm going off on a tangent. I wanted. Really, that's true. If the I mean, your point that the average person cannot lead money like venture back. Is can they can't? And in the vent in the venture. And let's the other thing that's kind of ingrained in society is like, oh, I had this idea..

business owner Facebook Uber
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Lose your voice you start to see double. Its sounds silly. Because you wouldn't think it would be a difficult task. But to read a book is I mean, you must have come home. He must have been exhausted. It was really surprisingly strenuous in in a way. We I think it's the focused attention nonstop. Because when you I I have my own business, and I worked from home, and I break up the day with exercise, and I have four children, and there's a lot of activity, but to sit in a room like that is is very intense. But it's really the only way to do it. I I would love to actually get some more training in it because I realize it's valuable skill. And I think that's one of the beauties of having your own business. You can find new areas to get into areas where you can develop your skills. So I I'm actually looking for coach on that to anyone's listening who's a coach I would love to hear from you owe their coaches out there. And if you your if you get very good at voiceover work. As an audio artist you can make a very nice living, very very nice living in its own little like. Subculture? I actually when we when we get off the podcast. I could give you some names if you're if you're interested, but we're we're we're diverting. So going back to I really loved the book, I loved the the what was great about the book, Elaine gave specific examples of individuals who started out some started out as a side hustle. And they started a business and eventually worked away up to one million dollars in revenue. And so you have these examples, and then you also have this kind of this practical guides at the end exactly how these people did it in exactly how you do it like how how would you create a website? How would you hire a designer? How would you create an app? How would you get the legal papers together accounting? So so the very specifics. So Elaine, could you give our listeners of brief overview of the of the book the million dollar one person business, and who who is it written for. Sure, I be happy to do that the million dollar would person business sprung out of some of the reporting. I was doing on one person businesses. I came across some census bureau statistics showing that the number of individuals and partners. They're called non employer businesses. If by the census bureau in the government, if they don't have W two employees was growing, and I didn't realize that you could actually break one million dollars in revenue in one person business. So I got very curious. I like data I started slicing and dicing the data to figure out who are these people. And I wrote a blog post about what I found based on industry, and that sort of thing the census dated as Intel you which exact businesses are doing these things that's more like, you know, the retail category or automotive retail. If you want to drill down a little bit. And people started writing to me and saying this is really interesting lead like to learn more. We need to know who these businesses are they starting ecommerce stores. So I wrote to the readers because you can't really get that kind of information from the census bureau, and I said if you're one of these businesses people would love to hear from you, please write to me. So some of them wrote to me, and I wrote a post for Forbes that went very violent had five entrepreneurs in it. And if I think today, it has something like three hundred forty thousand page views, and it was a crazy experience. I I've been a writer for many years I had my phone on the dining room table. And it felt like it was about to leap up off the table with. People really were hungry for this information. So I started doing case studies of the entrepreneurs to find out what are they doing? Why are they different from the average solo preneurs freelance or gig economy worker, wet what's different in their mindset in their business practices? And so this book is the outcome of that research, which took place over period of years often. I would interview them for shorter story that I published online, and then went into more depth in the book, and that would enable me to hear what readers were really interested in..

Elaine Intel writer Forbes one million dollars million dollar
"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"one person" Discussed on The Working Experience

"Everyone in welcome to another episode of the work in experience. We have the pleasure of Elaine PO fell joining us, the author of the million dollar one person business make great money work the way, you like and have the life you want. We're very excited to talk to Elaine today. Elaine, could you give us a short bio for our listeners. Just so they have a general idea. John, and it's great to be here. I am adjourn lists. He writes about entrepreneurship and careers. I was a senior editor at fortune small business magazine for a while. And then I went freelance eleven years ago and last year, I released my first book the million dollar one person business. Excellent. In. Did you were you always? Will you always a writer? Do you start off as a writer, and then transition like we're did you always write for publications and specifically business publications? Well, I was born a raider funny. I started writing in kindergarten, and I never stopped. I was one of those kids that was on the school newspaper in high school, my college newspaper. My initial interest was not in business. But as I live my life. I started to realize how important business is to the whole social fabric, and I became very interested in it. And so it's been probably about fifteen years have specialized mostly in business. Okay. Great. So I have I had the pleasure of reading actually I didn't read I listened to your book on audible, which is great way. Did you were you? Did you read the book were you the or someone else? Yeah. That was my novice attempt, and I hope people will be forgiving. It. In fact, it was funny. I had a cold and I had to take cold medicine because it's a pretty intensive thing. Where you go into a room, that's carpeted and just read or eight hours a day, basically until you're finished with the book. It would it really gave me great respect for voice over artists. It's really not as easy as it looks. But it was a great experience. It's reading books is very very challenging I own a media company. So I know my way around in audio studio, and I've spent I would spend hours and hours, and this would be on gneration for for documentaries and TV shows, and it can be brutal. It can really you start to.

Elaine PO John writer senior editor million dollar fifteen years eleven years eight hours