35 Burst results for "One Of The Books"

The Meaning in the Making: Why do we make things? Why do we make pictures?

Photography Daily

02:21 min | Last week

The Meaning in the Making: Why do we make things? Why do we make pictures?

"I'm going to talk to sean. Tucker about being creative. And hopefully it's going to inspire you along the way to keep going with your own make shown tuck it. It's probably important to say. Because though i suspect most if not all the audience listening we'll know you show have heard of you will have come into contact with through through photography film warranty through this podcast though though no of your background with a church in your rocky relationship at times with it is this is the well i i said that correctly because it does feel about is is this book of manifestation of all that time. Learning to the sharing your philosophy from the pulpit. I mean it's not as if you haven't had your published but this is something of a step away from from sharing the shadows the places. You won't photographic isn't it. It definitely links strongly with old. I mean i i. I wrote a book. Ten years ago that wasn't published. It was just me self publishing putting it out about why. I left the church and why wasn't going back but what i felt about what i thought about it. Why did still think it could be a force for good in the world and that was good practice for what i've done with this book but i think that the difference between the two is when i wrote that book before Appetizer of talk about it very much. Because i wrote it for really specific audience. I was talking to people who inch too so they knew that language and i was talking in that language but they were frustrated. Thinking hang on this is about all the wrong stuff kind of confirming that. And i suppose in a way which is why chasten mike it. I was sneaking out the back door with it so in a way. I mean you could argue i. I wrote that first book for no because people in the church didn't want to hear that kind of stuff being critical of the church people outside the church couldn't care less so is it landed in the middle of nowhere being interested in but it was really important for me to write it almost as like catharsis because it actually came out of me going to the counselor at the time when my career chips fell apart and sitting with him for six months retelling the story of the ten years that i worked for the church and going through. What was mike foale. What was other people's fault. What was just because the has been of a messed up institution. What's just because life is complicated. And so separating. All that stuff out as i was doing that right seats myself. I realize this might be a good book.

Tucker Sean Mike Mike Foale
Real Estate Investing with Gary Boomershine

The Sale Ring

02:16 min | Last week

Real Estate Investing with Gary Boomershine

"So we've got gary boomer shine in the studio with us. He's joining us from sonora california. It sounds like a nice place it does. Yeah gary is He founded real estate investor dot com back in two thousand five and he's got some interesting insight into the real estate industry We're going to talk a little bit about off market properties. And he's got a book. We'll talk about the book. That's out there. So gary we we appreciate you being on. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Yes it's a it's such a pleasure. Yes you did. Say it right. I'm in a little area. We my family. I grew up in the san francisco bay area born and raised Come from a very long real estate background we Occurrence owned a family real estate business. I was a licensed agent three weeks after turning eighteen. I'm showing my age was nineteen eighty seven and kate for college by holding open houses endure knocking and we had a rental portfolio back in the day And so i was also doing work. And change out doorknobs and painting. And then i went down the technology path. A really didn't have huge interest. In real estate it was the silicon valley dot com. Sort of move. I got a computer science and engineering degree and did that And work in. Enterprise software was two thousand four. My wife and i actually came back to our roots and wanted a new life I was kinda tired of working. The eighty hour workweeks great experience. But really we had a couple of young kids and wanted to financial freedom and a life and read rich. Dad poor dad and the light bulb came on around and that started me on the journey. So that was two thousand and four. I've been fulltime real estate investor since then and it has been quite a journey so Yes i also just about to launch my first book then on my bucket list for long time called the freedom code happy to share some insights and And what the book is about

Gary Boomer Gary Sonora San Francisco Bay California Kate
Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

Asian Enough

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

"Thank you so much for joining us mention out. It's a pleasure to be here. Tracy and jen and Yes i do have a lotta side hustles. I don't know he do it. And the pandemic even very like on your hustle and very productive seems. Well i'm fifty two. And i'm the sole provider for my family so in a way. I think that i have my priorities. And also i'm a writer. The which means that i'm a freelancer. That's what it is so you kind of have to keep your game on. Well i think for me. This is the biggest question for all writers but why novels i feel like that's one of the hardest storytelling ways that is out there. It started out with a corporate lawyer. Just wine apples while. I'm a big reader so that is really the reason why i wanted to write a novel and has really for me very very difficult. I've only produced two in about thirty years. So i've had to have all these side hustles to basically pay for these things. Because i never wrote a book before on contract and that's really important to share because a lot of people think that you have an idea you contact the publisher and say hey. I want to write a book and it just doesn't work that way. So i wrote it on spec and of course in the film industry guys no i wrote the entire thing and i presented it to somebody and said hey can i get one representation. I'd even have an agent. When i wrote my first book and it took me about eleven years of this kind of beating my head against the wall. Why did i choose novels. Because i think novels can create an incredible world. That's really difficult to do any other media. So that's why i did it but for me. It was a very long struggle. I've met young very talented writers who can just pop out. And i think that's awesome. That was not me.

JEN Tracy
Interview With Author Francisco X. Stork

What Book Hooked You?

02:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Author Francisco X. Stork

"So francisco. What book hooked you. Well when i was a teenager. I think freshmen in highschool one of the one of the books that hooked me into wanting to write about the young characters. was j. d. salinger's books Specifically i think the you know the the short stories. I found very interesting and also freddie and so we i. I couldn't imagine you know how he managed to keep me interested in a book. Were nothing happened. Essential so i figured i'd like to learn how to do that someday. So do you remember what the age you were when you were reading Jd salinger especially like frankin. Zoe yeah i was just i had turned fifteen so An hour each leverett ahead. Read other bugs before but it was. That was the kind of like where i really wanted to write for. Would characters that were that age. You know age and i thought it was. You know it. It took a while for me to do that. But that was the beginning as i think of the little. See that was planned. It of You know the kind of stuff that i wanted to write and you mentioned you were fifteen at the time. So were you a big reader. Was it easy to get you interested in books or were you You know they call them reluctant readers or were did you have to grow into your interested in reading or was it always with you know. I grew up. But i was born in mexico and i grew up obviously reading spanish. I think the first book that i read was a translation of mark twain's to princeton to popper at. I was in first grade. So i was like a big. You know a big hit there to tell people that story. And then i obviously. I started reading in started reading in spanish. I grew up a little bit in the the the latin america. Boom you know when you had all these great writers there were there. Were coming to be become beginning to be known

Jd Salinger Frankin Salinger Freddie Francisco ZOE Mark Twain Popper Mexico Princeton Latin America
Jeff Vickers on Sober Slogans

Recovery Survey

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Jeff Vickers on Sober Slogans

"My guest today is named geoff vickers. He is an author and he's currently writing. This series of books called sober slogans. The first book in that series is called recovery. Mottos we love welcome to the show. Jeff a body Definitely appreciate you tune in and listen into this podcast from this brother. That recently met man. My name is geoff. vickers and I am what i describe myself. Describe myself as a recovering addict and a sober enthusiast. And what i would i mean by sober enthusiasts is. i'm. I'm very very sincerely enthusiastic about living a life of sobriety and that's because i struggle with drug addiction as well as a sex addiction as well as food addiction for over thirty years and I came to the realization. Not too long ago be honest which was going on eight months but i came to the realization that no longer needed nor wanted to walk their path. So when i say that i'm enthusiastic about my sobriety. I mean aware it on my sleeve you know i was the kind of addict dead. I would who. I would smoke crack while police were literally across the street. In broad daylight not care you know. i was the guy that would have two thousand my pocket and i would be sleeping and dumpsters my my diction just it was was crazy. Man you know. And i'm at a point in my life where i came to the realization eh. There was an absence within me. And i had to find absent an and i looked to fill that void with all kinds of things with food. You know even though. I've never been overweight or obese because it metabolism but I tried to fill that void would food. I try to fill that void with sex. And i tried to fill a void with with drugs and dysfunctional relationships.

Geoff Vickers Vickers Geoff Jeff
Shopping for the Web

Command Line Heroes

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Shopping for the Web

"This season. We've been unpacking the longest year in tech history. Nineteen ninety five. The year our future began so much started in that time but few changes were more consequential than the advent of online shopping. In just a couple of decades it's grown from a handful of startups to a team of goliaths and we couldn't live without them. But as we'll see the dominance of certain online shops is only partly due to brilliant business maneuvers. Now like i said amazon is not the entirety of commerce but it is the big fish in the pond so let's begin their why in nineteen ninety five did amazon start delivering packages. What made it possible. And what's at founder. Jeff bezos on a path toward shipping billions of packages every year. He immediately understood the whole idea of transferring currency at making trades with this new use of this relatively new technology. The internet robert specter wrote the first book on amazon. It's called amazon dot com. Get big fast and that should tell you something about the amazon origin story. It's a story about capitalizing on a particular moment. Seizing the day in the early nineties. Basil's lived in manhattan. He was making more than a million bucks a year working at a hedge fund that relied on algorithms cutting at the time and it speaks to the sort of business. Basil's believed it. A data driven business and automated business. Meanwhile the hedge funds founder. David shaw adebayo's and a few others to look into this newfangled internet thing see what kind of opportunities were there. So jeff and other people looked at various product categories. In of all things books rose to the top as the most obvious product category. Why books

Amazon Robert Specter Jeff Bezos Basil David Shaw Adebayo Manhattan Jeff
Digital Body Language for Sales Professionals With Erica Dhawan

Conversations with Phil

02:01 min | Last month

Digital Body Language for Sales Professionals With Erica Dhawan

"Name. Is erica doron. I'm the author of the new book digital body language and my best advice is writing clearly. Is the new empathy writing clearly as the new empathy. Ooh i like that. We're gonna unpack that a little. But i. i'm so glad you're here. Congratulations on an awesome awesome book. Thank you for sending over a pdf. So i can get behind it and read an holy crap. It is awesome. yeah. I'm super excited for you. So and i'm super excited year. So tell me when we when we talked a couple of weeks ago. Maybe a month ago you said nobody thought this was important years ago and now it's like this. Oh we got so so. Take me through kind of how that because i know that this this is not. You didn't work before but this year. Best work this is really awesome and so talk me through that like when people say well. No i don't think digital body language is important. What does that mean. Why would anybody say that. About six years ago. When i la after i launched my first book. Get big things. Done the power of connection. And i travel the world helping. Ceo's and leadership teams build twenty-first-century collaboration skills especially for a world with virtual global multi generational and matrix teams but as i was focusing on really twenty-first-century teamwork kept hearing the same challenges and questions from groups. Why is there so much misunderstanding. It work today. Why are my teams feeling so anxious. How do we better connect across different ages and working styles and one of the biggest challenges i discovered well before the pandemic was that there was no rule book for how we connect in a digital world especially with research showing about seventy five percent of communication is nonverbal body language. How do we replace that in a world. Where seventy two one hundred percent. Now of communication could be virtual.

Erica Doron LA
What is Comparisonitis? The Difference Between Healthy and Unhealthy Comparison

Your Own Magic

02:31 min | Last month

What is Comparisonitis? The Difference Between Healthy and Unhealthy Comparison

"Itis is when we compare ourselves to others and in talks unhealthy way and we make it means something about ourselves like. I'm good enough. I'm not smart enough. I am less than that other person. So that is comparison itis and a majority of people are suffering with it right now. There is healthy comparison and there is unhealthy comparison and a lot of us a suffering with the unhealthy comparison. So like with all of my books. I write them for myself. Because i'm dealing with that at that time in my life and comparison itis was something that i was definitely dealing with whilst i was riding i was suffering the worst of the worst case of comparison. Itis i was constantly comparing myself to others on social media in my friendship circle. All of these women who were getting pregnant around me quite quickly and it took my husband and i eighteen months so that was a huge eighteen month battle of severe comparison itis and i remember the one day i was scrolling instagram whilst i was on the toilet and as you do as you do i was. I came across this new york times. Bestselling author who had just ridden her hundredth book and Was again a new york times bestseller. And i found myself comparing myself to her. You know why why on my books new york times still is like. I'm not good enough. Maybe my writings notice good. What's going on. And i went into this really unhealthy toxic spiral of comparison itis and then i came back upstairs to my and i sat down on my computer and i got an email from this beautiful girl. Who was telling me that. She's writing her first book. And did i have any words of wisdom for her because she was comparing herself to me and she said you know. I'm comparing myself do you. You've written so many bestselling books. And i had this lightbulb moment. That here i was comparing myself to someone else whilst someone else was comparing themselves to me. It's like this vicious cycle. And i realized in that moment that we're all comparing ourselves to each

New York Times
Interview With Mike Busch, Savvy Aviation and Author

Behind the Prop

01:31 min | Last month

Interview With Mike Busch, Savvy Aviation and Author

"What's up walling. Hey bobby how are you. I'm great we have another special guest today. I think one that you wanted to join the show for many months. And we got in touch and he was very responsive. We have mike bush on the show. Today from savvy -ation mike. Thanks for joining us. Oh you bet so. Obviously making this is a big part of my life. Wally being an airline captain and a designated pilot examiner. He deals with maintenance and logbooks on a daily basis as well Mike you've done a lot of things from your podcast on the ao pa asked the am peace and Obviously joining us today and many many things on the web the you helped pilots and not to mention your books We're gonna jump into a lot of topics today but you're you have four books today. Manifesto believe was. Your first book was that is correct. Yes that was my first book Came out in twenty fourteen and then engines in an airport aircraft ownership volume wanted to Invaluable books for any aircraft owner for sure or flights is supposed to be a series of three bucks. But when i into doing the ownership book it became clearer after we outlined did that it was going to be a thousand pages and you can't practically do a thousand page. Paperback just doesn't work. So it wound up being too. I m set on the ownership book

Mike Bush Ation Mike Bobby Wally Mike
Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

Solvable

04:38 min | Last month

Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

"Episodes are out every friday. This is solvable. I'm jacob weisberg there. Only a few real cons that exist and the bones of the story are the same and they've been the same for centuries also maria conaco. Vince would writing about these number of years book. The confidence game explores stories of con-artists opportunists people who build up our trust and then take everything we have think bernie madoff the late investors who destroyed countless lives with false promises and financial theft but before we pledged to fight to abolish scams. Remember this another side to those familiar. Stories to the flip side of our vulnerability to cons is human connection and trust and all the good stuff. So how do we protect our loved ones in ourselves. We'll scams being enduring part of society forever because we refuse or are unable to learn from our mistakes rather than admitting i was dumb. I felt for a scam you say. Oh no no cure all of the mitigating circumstances and it probably wasn't even a scam. So i think that it takes a strong person. It's embarrassing So can scams be solved. Rea- konakov thanks so being victimized by a scam is actually a solvable problem. Maria has gone from investigating the lies. We tell ourselves to mastering the bluff herself by learning to play poker at a world class level and writing about that too so i started by asking her why she so hooked on these concepts of big and small manipulations. My first book was about sherlock holmes. So i've traveled this gamut from you know. How do you be detective to okay. What are the what are the bad guys doing to kind of being the bad guy myself but within a game right so so so there are rules And one of the reasons that i've that it's been such a passion of mine is that i hate to see in re in reality. Not in a game. I hate to see people being taken advantage of. And how often that happens. And how scammers often will target the most vulnerable parts of our population the most vulnerable people and then we as a society target again by blaming them and by saying oh well. You're just stupid. You were just greedy. You were just dumb. You shouldn't have fallen for it. I wouldn't have fallen for it and that just gets me. Yeah well i was going to ask you because of your longstanding interest. I mean this personal for you in any way of you've been scammed yourself or people close to you been victims of scams. I personally have not been scammed. That i know of but one point i always make is that you know. The scams are ones that you're probably not aware of so i. i'm sure i've been scammed on small things and when you're about to get on the subway someone stops you and says hey you know. I'm so sorry. I lost my wallet. Do you have the fair for the subway for the bus for the train. I need to get back to my family. And there's so many excuses and you can do one of two things you can say. I think you're con artist. I'm not going to give you any money on. Walk on you feel shitty. You feel like a bad person because they actually needed you. I've lost my wallet. I've needed help in the past. And i think we bought we probably been on the other side of that and so the trade off is yom maybe get scammed. But i'd rather take the risk of being the victim of scammer in that particular instance and. I'm sure i've been scammed that way. Well that's interesting. I mean i have experienced instill sticks with me from high school. I remember in chicago where i was growing up walking through lincoln park and there was a guy kinda ragged looking walking with a gas can and he stopped me and told me this whole sad story about how he was trying to get back to florida to see a family card run out of gas and he needed the money for gas. Now was probably fifteen years old or something like that. I think i gave him ten dollars. Which would have been a lot of money to me. At the time and i felt good about myself for doing that and then a week later i was walking through the park and there was the same guy looking around with this gas can And it just it sticks with

Jacob Weisberg Maria Conaco Bernie Madoff Vince REA Sherlock Holmes Maria Lincoln Park Chicago Florida
How Ryan Serhant Uses "Big Money Energy" To Make Millions

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

02:36 min | Last month

How Ryan Serhant Uses "Big Money Energy" To Make Millions

"Sir hans. Welcome to the show man. Thank you so much wrapping me man. This is this is awesome. I've been looking forward to this for a while. We'll sweet well. Let's let's dig into this thing so i devoured your book or last couple of days. I have four million questions asked us today But we get them all but a few done here so first question. Big money energy. I want to know what the heck is big money energy. Because this is the concept that actually i i fell in love with. Take you back for a second big big money. Energy is is my my second book My first book was called sell. It like sir hint which was really my my sales Toolkit right for the gig economy for real estate agents. Yes but for anyone who's in the business sales which is everyone And i put that together over. The course of ten years i got into the real estate business The day leman brothers filed for bankruptcy in two thousand eight and taught myself how to sell how to rent apartments how to build a sales career Had a follow up how to structure my day all of that over the course of the next ten years And everything that. I learned everything i knew about how to talk to people how not to talk to people at communicate in general and how to operate as an entrepreneur who has to wake up every day with no inventory other than what other people control go make a percentage off of that Put into that first book. But what i didn't put into. It became very clear to me once. I put it out Because you know we had a lot of people read it and they said. Listen after reading your book i know what to do. I know exactly how to build my career. I know i know how to sell. I know what to do. But i can't. I'm freaking out i i'm eighteen. No one's going to trust me. I i've imposter syndrome in a new city. I tried to open my mouth but my palms are sweaty. My stomach is in knots. So what i realized was wait a minute. So salt lake sir then became a show on bravo which then became a large online sales. Course which we have now and it's been a big part of our business Where we teach people how to sell all over the world It is a tool kit but the secret sauce is being able to have the confidence to use it right. You can give anyone a toolkit and say build a house But if they're not the confidence to put up that house and make that foundation and do the carpentry and do the plumbing. And then they're you know they're they're not they're book smart but they're not street smart and so big. Money energy is Really big magnetic energy

Sir Hans Leman Brothers Salt Lake
Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

Judaism Unbound

02:12 min | Last month

Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

"Hershberg welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much. It's nice to be we both of you. Well where starting this kind of series which is distributed through the next few months where we're talking to a number of authors of fiction from a jewish perspective or from a jewish point of view or about the jewish experience Last week we talked to some folks who are earlier in their lives who are writing fiction and this week. We're talking with you. Who is somebody who came to write fiction after a long career as moore. I'm wondering a little bit if you could talk about where that impulse to write. Fiction comes from at this stage of your life and you're trying to do by now becoming a novelist. I spent a career in in biotech developing drugs and about four or five years ago. I decided that i needed something. A second act in. I always wanted to write and fishing was what i wanted to write so i decided to do something i wrote. I wrote it off. And when i was finished with our very proud and then did probably the best thing i've ever done. I deleted it. It was one hundred. Twenty four thousand words and out of that between fifteen. Eighteen hundred words were preserved and those preserved words went into my first book called my mother son which came out three years ago. The decision to to write was one that. If i didn't start doing it. I would have one of these regrets. Later on rai would say. Oh i could have done this. I'm so disappointed. I didn't do that. And the worst thing would happen. Since i did on my own was it wouldn't be very good and no one else would no. I wouldn't suffer any of the negative consequences. I was lucky when i sent chapters around to people who said they likely very much and they continued to push me to write at. That was at the same time. I was leaving last. Ceo job in biotech. And so now. I have more time to write. Although i'm advising a few companies now it doesn't take too much.

Hershberg Moore
The Day of the Event Arrived, and Nobody Showed Up

Side Hustle School

02:01 min | Last month

The Day of the Event Arrived, and Nobody Showed Up

"Story features katie from the county by day. She is a client services manager at an environmental consulting firm and we told the successful story of her evenings and weekends project. Way back on episode sixty four ballroom dance enthusiast triples with to guide but naturally not everything went. Well let's hear from her about one of those difficulties she calls it the book signing that wasn't so here's katie. Come back at the interruptus up. My name is katie. But i'm better known in the ballroom. Dance world as the girl with the tree tattoo you. I'm a competitive ballroom. Dancer and writer with three published books and two journals while working to promote my latest book the solar practice guide for ballroom dancing. i connected with local. Dan shop that specialized in practice where for ballroom dancers are products complemented each other perfectly so we decided to become affiliate partners now. Nearly all of my businesses online i primarily reach my audience through the girl to try to blogs and social media pages but i wanted to connect more with my local audience so minute the and shop partners arrange to have a book signing up there sort a meet the authors hype event. I did my usual promotions through my email list blog and social media pages. I was a little nervous to do an interest event but mainly excited the day of the event arrived. I i prefer. And i arrived at the store early to set up and then waited for the dancers and we waited and waited. I kid you not literally no. I'm showed up the shop owners. That i eat and drink are ways through light. Refreshments as exchange small smiles in shoulder rugs. My photographer kept himself busy. Taking photos of us and the book is play. The funny thing is actually made one books by days

Katie Dan Shop
Bruce Tulgan: The Art of Indispensable Leadership

Leadership and Loyalty

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Bruce Tulgan: The Art of Indispensable Leadership

"Our guest on this show. Is bruce togan now. Bruce is a multi bestselling author of no less than wait for it. Twenty one books books such as it's okay to be a boss. He's the founder and ceo of rain make thinking management research and training firm who've interviewed over half a million people for more than four hundred organizations ladies and gentlemen. Please put your hands together and help me welcome recovering lawyer rav harvard. I got done by the the award for the best introduction. I've ever received thank you. He's recovering lawyer. Before i've been doing this for twenty seven years and i don't think anyone has ever introduced me quite like that. So thank you. Thank you What an honor to be here with you and a privilege. And i'm really looking forward to the governor. Thank you so. That's very kind now where we always like to stop. The show is in this place. This leadership show and every amenities dog number woman seem to be convinced that they're an influence. So what i liked always the show with who is somebody that we may not have thought of may not be top of mind trust who has been a real influence on you and on your leadership even if somebody we don't know would never think of yeah. I mean look i mean. I've been doing this for twenty seven years when i say this. I mean not working. But watching people work and taking notes and interviewing people about their work and taking notes and so along the way i've met So many Ceo's and But also. Along the way i've met plenty of people on the front lines you know. I've learned as much from people who manage folks who empty bedpans in nursing homes As i have from some of the most powerful ceos in the world.

Bruce Togan Rav Harvard Bruce
Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting?

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

"Julius cut hames is joining us today. She's a new york times bestselling author of how to raise an adult which led to her. Ted talk now. Viewed more than five million times or second book is an award-winning prose. Poetry memoir real american. It illustrates her experience as a black biracial person in white spaces but her latest book out. Just this week is called your turn how to be an adult. She was also in a previous life. A corporate lawyer and at stanford the dna freshman. Hey julie welcome thank you so much. It's great to be with you. We are thrilled to have you with us so actually. Let's talk for a minute about your new book. What a great topic tell us about. This book is a response to the pleas. Coming out of the millennial generation. I don't know how to adult. I don't want to adult. I'm scared to adult. I have been rooting. For this batch. Of young folks to make their way confidently down the path of their choosing for a long long time. And this book is me. Trying to simulate what it's like to be in a safe cozy conversational space with a trusted person who's just older a little bit farther down the path of life than you so it's a compassionate to generation of young folks who. I'm who. i'm totally rooting. For and who. You've worked very closely with you know in stanford and you know this population well and you're also a mom. Rachel i am. I have a twenty one year old son and a nineteen year old daughter. Very much in the throes of to hashtag adult. I'm just so. We say the title. Because i love the title is your turn how to be an adult. That's right. I mean it's it's crafted. I suppose by the publishing folks as a sequel. The first book was how to raise an adult on the harm of helicopter. Parenting on the impact on children of an overall parenting style. This isn't some ways at back to that if you will. It's four young people. You're turn how to be an adult.

Julius Cut Hames Stanford New York Times TED Julie Rachel
Relational Mindfulness With Bart Van Melik

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:24 min | 2 months ago

Relational Mindfulness With Bart Van Melik

"Here we go now with bart van. Milk bart great to see you. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you down likewise god. Every time i see you. I think about the first time i saw you. Which was my first. Meditation retreat in two thousand ten. I wrote about it. It was like the key seen the key chapter from the first book. I wrote where. I go in my first meditation retreat. And i'm having all these interactions with joseph goldstein in the moments when. I'm allowed to talk to the teacher and in all of those moments. I don't think. I mentioned it but you were in the room because you were practising with him and he was giving me all this advice and you're sitting there nodding sagely so it's always a pleasure to see and you know. The pleasure is very mutual. Dan and funny story is. I had no idea what you do right for your livelihood. Because i had just come to america from the netherlands so i remember i think joseph said something to affect you notice person will know no and then he didn't say anything else but later on i found out. Oh it's yeah it's you. Well you were there for one of the most important moments in my life that retreat really change the trajectory of my life. So i always associate you with that home so many areas. I want to touch on with you. But let's start with relational mindfulness. Can you just give me a very basic description of what that is. Yeah i can. It's let me start just a little bit about that. We as human beings are relational by nature and a lot of meditation practices are done in a way where we bring attention to something. That's going on in early. And yet if you look at how life unfolds it. Unfolds very relational and so in relational meditation practices informa- ways. You learn not only to be aware of what's going on with a new but you'll also get instructions to be very mindful of. Let's say another person who's sitting in front of you

Bart Van Joseph Goldstein Netherlands DAN Joseph America
Beverly Cleary, beloved children's book author, dies at 104

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Beverly Cleary, beloved children's book author, dies at 104

"A beloved Children's book author Beverly Cleary has passed away. Brian Shook has more HarperCollins publishers says the Ramona Quimby writer, died Thursday in Carmel, California at the age of 104. Her first book, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950. Dozens more followed. Cleary's books have sold more than 85 million copies and been translated into nearly 30 languages. She also spent time as a Children's library

Brian Shook Ramona Quimby Beverly Cleary Harpercollins Publishers Henry Huggins Carmel Cleary California Children's Library
Beloved children’s author Beverly Cleary dies at 104

Michael Berry

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Beloved children’s author Beverly Cleary dies at 104

"Much loved Children's author has passed. Beverly Cleary, the beloved Children's author of Henry Huggins has died. She was 104 years old Cleary. Minded her home in Carmel, California. Her first book was published in the fifties and became the standard for Children's authors for generations. Among the characters Cleary created were Ramona and Beezus Quimby and Ralph S Mouth boxes. Michelle Pelino

Henry Huggins Beverly Cleary Cleary Carmel California Beezus Quimby Ralph S Ramona Michelle Pelino
"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Day pod <Speech_Music_Male> dot <Speech_Music_Male> com <Speech_Male> my name. Is jody <Speech_Male> ever again. <Speech_Male> Thanks again for listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> And we'll see <Music> you soon <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Before <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we go. I want to tell you about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a project from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> another radio tokyo. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Show our friends <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at ninety nine percent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> invisible or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> releasing a new <Speech_Music_Male> documentary series <Speech_Music_Male> called a ccording <Speech_Music_Male> to need ninety <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nine percent invisible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of course amazing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show but they also do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> these wonderful <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many series documentaries <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Male> one is from producer <Speech_Male> katie mingle who <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> spent two years <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trying to understand <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the system. We have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to address homelessness. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> In this country <Speech_Music_Male> she follows <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people trying to get help <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from it. The people working <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the inside <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the system. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What she finds is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a system that isn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> designed to help <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everyone and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> digging into it opens <Speech_Music_Male> up some really big <Speech_Music_Male> questions about who <Speech_Music_Male> gets what <Speech_Music_Male> and why <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a really important topic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and katie. The <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> person to help tell <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it. According <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to need is coming <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> december. I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the ninety nine p. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i. Podcast feed <Speech_Music_Male> or online <Speech_Music_Male> at ninety

"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"While you.

"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:30 min | 6 months ago

"one books" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Hello both happening here. And i will plug. Your latest book is called evil. Gene says the previous book. Fantastic work is called fantasy land. But we're here to talk about one book. Ulysses and kerr giving you the task of summarizing ulysses take the rest of the twenty minutes a long way to summarize. It's very long book and was short way. Too short way. I guess would be to say. It is the thoughts that go through the mind and some of the behavior that happens in the lives mainly of two guys. Stephen daedalus uphold bloom and also some women molly bloom and other on one day. June sixteenth nineteen hundred four in dublin Okay good it's noting yes. And then i will ask you kind of having looked into this story and understood this moment in history. Is it surprising to you. That ulysses is the book around which these questions of obscenity. Start to at played-out well it was useful in the history that followed because it was such as judge woolsey said a non pornographic work of of high art work of abstruse obscure. Difficult art. so it clearly. I mean even in nineteen twenty to thirty four even was not intended to arouse the passions or allow people to do what in fact at one point of the book us which is to jerk off So if wasn't surprising but it's good because it wasn't one of these cases where oh this is bad or this is not quite hard or whatever but we have to rule anyway. It was it sort of to the recreated. I think a legal umbrella for otane more freedom of artistic expression and speech it used this sort of non game saleable work of art as a pretext that this was very much a literary creation that was pioneering a relatively new style the stream of consciousness so there was a very easy way to slot it into the history of literary arts and wilson. I didn't know anything about him until you invited me to this. This is he's saying is for but he was this. You know he lived in new york city. he'd gone to colombian yale. It was nineteen thirty. Four america was becoming sophisticated and having modern artists and modern literature are made by americans so this was the moment when a guy like that. A federal judge in new york city is gonna say. Come on this isn't pornographic or this isn't obscene. And he did. And it was interesting hinge moment. Because i thought well what else happened a moment later in following spring the hays code hollywood which was the famous before and after moments that actually did the opposite it restricted off the sexiness raciness. That was allowed to exist for a few years san movies for five or seven years. And then we're an organ. Stop ben and of course the same week i think prohibition was ended right so that it was a funny moment of freeing up but not so fast in hollywood and so it was ongoing conversation in kind of big american. What i do want to get to that larger conversation and the legacy of that. But but you know sticking on the dirty words in ulysses the dirty words exactly but nikki. I mean what is. Because i'm having a hard time figuring out exactly what it was that led to the actual banning of ulysses published in paris and realized here in the united states. And then i think when this scene kurt refer to. Masturbation scene comes out You know the government freaks out. But like i just don't know why. Pick a fight with ulysses of all the books make you know. It's hard to say why it was exactly ulysses but you have to remember that. The nineteen twenties is still part of this roiling culture war in the united states and so to a certain extent. People are on the lookout for battles to have. It's a it's an era where sexual mores are starting to loosen up. Women are starting to wear like shorter skirts. Show more skin and dating culture is changing but you also have this progressive era. That wasn't actually all that culturally that was all about controlling vices And prohibition was a big part of that. We're talking about this era in which people couldn't drink hard liquor early couldn't legally drink hard liquor and so ulysses falls into that roiling culture war where we are going to have somebody step in and say no. You can't actually have a scene of masturbation being published in a magazine in the united states. And the manhattan district attorney. Made sure that it wasn't going to circulate. Also random house set out to do this right. There's new number house publishing house as a matter of fact. Random house and its famous founder Bennett served you know. Wanted to be the publisher of this book that had been published in paris for more than a decade earlier and so he paid a james choice not so much i think fifteen hundred of like thirty grand today to publish the us and he and joyce new good and had any kind of forced the issue to get accustomed guide to to confiscate it and say okay fine and have it be prosecuted. Which of course was for this giant obscure novel by irishman Publishing france fog years go was the greatest promotional stunt a practically of all time. Yeah all of a sudden people are sneaking in copies of this and it becomes this. i mean it just. It's a story. Plays out over and over you try and ban something and it just becomes that much exactly. And what's interesting is i again. I didn't know that he had been reviewed one. It was published in the new york times at length by a guy who thought too boring and discussing but he was shrink and so it taught him a lot about crazy people. He's he said in his view in the tense but but it was like so many things like the scopes trial. You know nine years earlier or eight years. It was a stunt. It was it was an attempt to have a constitutional us and we had it and free speech one. Yeah so let's talk about the way in which free speech one on. What is your reading nikki of why this was not deemed obscene by this judge. Well we should point out that it was a pretty narrow win in a lotta ways. I mean the the person whose prosecuting this the lawyer for random house. Morris ernst isn't aclu lawyer and so he wants to make a civil liberties case but ultimately you know you read the title of the case. Jodi united states versus one book called ulysses. This was only about this book. Ulysses this wasn't about the first amendment. This wasn't about obscenity. laws more broadly. it was just. Is this book ulysses obscene or not and ultimately the judge says it has literary merit. It's not there just to titillate people. This is a work of art and so it is protected but again that wasn't even a ruling and spread to other books. It was literally just about one book called ulysses So it was a win but a narrow one and it wasn't a supreme court it was just a federal judge a district court judge so it wasn't like this giant supreme court case. You know thinking about it. As i have been the last few days it did sort of t up the nineteen sixties. And you know it. Okay here ulysses is fine. You can't call this as obscene is not pornography but we didn't really get that gate that was opened a bit. I would say that and not in this. Gigantic supreme court precedent way but Open then was finally fully.

ulysses Stephen daedalus molly bloom judge woolsey otane Stop ben united states kurt refer new york city Ulysses kerr hollywood Gene dublin paris yale irishman Publishing france fog wilson
"one books" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"one books" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"Who this is. Jonathan with limitless mindset and this is why sex hacker review of the book. She comes first. And i him debating. I am considering what to title this book view. I two titles that. I'm just torn between the first is shoves too much feminism down the cunning linguists throat and then the second title i'm thinking about is kinda linguists is for pussies both kind of edgy. I'm not sure which one of those i should go with. Maybe you can drop me a message on social media. Let me know which one of those you think is going to attract a bit more attention. I have got a three star review of this book and three star reviews can often actually be. The most helpful informative reviews. You know where someone is pointing out the positives. The good stuff to be found in title and then also leveling some critiques. So that is what. I aim to do here in this review of this book. You are going to want to go and check out the article review that i did. Also that's gonna be linked below wherever you're listening to this podcast and that article is ever going to be over on limitless mindset dot com in that review. I'm going to be linking to all the resources. Everything that i mentioned here and i am also going to be having some photos. Some imagery some illustrations over there because all of this kind of linguists business that we're going to be delving into here is best exposed a visually. Wouldn't you say so being a tantric husband a cunning linguist myself for at least that's what people tell me and being ever curious about new things to try to add more spice to the roseland bedroom. I picked up this book. She comes first and this is the book on linguistics and while it's well written and informative it left an unfavourable taste in my mouth. I'll explain why. I've never been very enthusiastic about linguistics. Kind of a lot of guys. I imagine i always thought. Maybe it's one of those things like salsa dancing that i'd enjoy if i actually got good at it. The book does present a very thorough guide. And i'll synopsys some of the best stuff here but it does so. In a way that myself and many non feminist men will find downright unpalatable consider the authors kind of linguist manifesto quote to her according to your abilities and from you. According to her needs inspired of course by the communist manifesto which is from each according to their abilities to each according to their needs as a right thinking. Man i fucking hate. Communism communists murdered my bulgarian wife's grandfather in cold blood so we're not off to a good start with the kind of linguists manifesto there. My aversion to of linguists is probably due to it feeling submissive. And i'm going to say some things here that i think probably most men think but don't.

roseland bedroom Jonathan
"one books" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

Lesbians Who Write Podcast

02:02 min | 10 months ago

"one books" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

"Tips <Speech_Female> on sorry <Speech_Female> there is really <Speech_Female> no special. <Speech_Female> Formula <Speech_Female> to get a <Speech_Female> bestseller it <Speech_Female> it takes time <Speech_Female> you have to keep <Speech_Female> doing it and you have <Speech_Female> to keep doing <SpeakerChange> the same things <Speech_Female> over and over, <Speech_Music_Female> but it does pay <Speech_Music_Female> off if you WANNA <Speech_Music_Female> make a career of this, <Speech_Music_Female> it does all those <Speech_Female> little things you do <Speech_Female> pay <SpeakerChange> off in the long <Speech_Female> run they <Speech_Female> we who she stresses. <Speech_Female> Well, you'll <Speech_Female> nate his the advertising <Speech_Female> was not in <Speech_Female> these tips because I <Speech_Female> don't think that <Speech_Female> you should be appetizing <Speech_Female> you first. Book <Speech_Female> I think you need some <Speech_Female> other Revista <Speech_Female> go <Speech_Female> I'm Ed mistake <Speech_Female> you Dang it and I think <Speech_Female> it was money lost. <Speech_Female> Say <Speech_Female> we're not saying don't <Speech_Female> appetizer but was saying <Speech_Female> get books <Speech_Female> new bell. I because <Speech_Female> the best appetizing <SpeakerChange> is <Speech_Female> next book. Yes. <Speech_Music_Female> They always say if <Speech_Music_Female> you want to make <Speech_Female> money, you have to keep <Speech_Music_Female> writing. You're not. <Speech_Music_Female> It's very <Speech_Female> rare annoucing you can't, <Speech_Female> but it's very <Speech_Female> rare to <Speech_Female> publish one book <Speech_Female> and then <SpeakerChange> ride off <Speech_Female> into the sunset. <Speech_Female> All I'm still <Speech_Female> dreaming of that sunset <Speech_Female> even though <Speech_Female> I don't really want to <Speech_Female> a horse join <Speech_Female> them. So <Speech_Female> maybe I'll just get on <Speech_Female> no I'm scared spice <Speech_Female> as well. I'm just <Speech_Female> GONNA walk off into the <Speech_Female> sunset. Okay. <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> WHAT <Speech_Music_Female> GOES <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> On. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> wouldn't be that person on <Speech_Female> the bike I'd be like, Oh, <Speech_Female> I'll get the bus. Thanks <Speech_Female> very much. <Speech_Female> Brian? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Laughter> Sexy. <Speech_Music_Female> Romantic. Gift on <Speech_Female> the. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> One <Speech_Female> go bus that's <Speech_Female> that's our follow up <Speech_Female> one golden bus <Speech_Female> were all golden <Speech_Female> buses are bus <Speech_Female> right on that night <Speech_Female> thank say much <Speech_Female> listening <Speech_Female> Let us know <Speech_Female> if <hes> these <Speech_Female> <hes> I <Speech_Female> but marketing tips <Speech_Female> of helped you they <Speech_Female> have. If they <Speech_Female> made you think leaves <Speech_Female> coming on the website <Speech_Female> tweet US emails <Speech_Female> facebook or <Speech_Female> Instagram me <Speech_Female> and doing next <Speech_Female> week when we'll be asking <Speech_Female> the question, how <Speech_Female> do you recover <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> the highest lays <Speech_Female> book launch, <Speech_Female> replenish <Speech_Female> your energy, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and then get ready to do <Speech_Female> all over again. <Speech_Female> Wow. A timely <Speech_Female> question, Claire. <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Female> it is timely <Speech_Female> actually <Speech_Female> suggested by TB <Speech_Female> WHO's going through this <Speech_Female> right now. <Speech_Female> So <hes> <Speech_Female> join US next week we'll move <Speech_Female> downstream that until <Speech_Female> an have week <Speech_Female> stay

US facebook Brian Ed Claire.
"one books" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

Lesbians Who Write Podcast

01:50 min | 10 months ago

"one books" Discussed on Lesbians Who Write Podcast

"Actionable before you publish just get good cover the stop dilly dallying go la don't. If I could afford it you you can't not avoid it number two editing now. A lot of people might say I can just put my book out. Right. I'm pretty good at grammar and that you see your mistakes, this is an absolute key thing my pet thing when I'm racing is. I miss out woods. Say I think that they were words that if I put one of my books on didn't have edited. Probably about ten percent of the sentences would have missing words Something I can't see it when I read it back and might be to readers will tell you this. They have a good old chocolate copy editors and developmental addresses and preferences. They can be expensive his things that you definitely need are in my opinion. You don't absolutely need development lesser although it's good to have but you can get to readers and you can get feedback to do that. But I think you definitely need a copy editor and I think you definitely need to pretend to as a minimum minimum because it raises spelling mistakes or grammar mistakes or bad sentence structure, they won't come back I wouldn't. And you've got one chance to make a first impression to do that, and also very rarely really concentrate on your look inside Becky I, because that's what a lot of people sample before they bought by your book. So bt, we can act as different developmental editing stage for you but again, get get people to be to read for you the light the genre. I gave my first gotTa books to people leader as his junior and say go bad feedback with my with my first book. I did get it copy edited by friend of mine he was he was copious look for. By, wouldn't have put it up without gang copy edited I just wouldn't and lucky I didn't because it would just been full of missing words..

copy editor bt
"one books" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on What I Wore When

"Now <SpeakerChange> in this <Music> time <Music> <Music> <Music> for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> production of glamour <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with new episodes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dropping. Every Monday <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more podcasts from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> visit the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> APP apple <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcasts. Or <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wherever you listen to your <Speech_Music_Female> favorite shows <Speech_Music_Female> I'm your host. <Speech_Music_Female> Glamorous Digital <Speech_Music_Female> Director Perry Salmon <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> follow <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> me on Instagram <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at Perry Saturn <Speech_Music_Female> P. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> E. R. R. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I. E. S. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> A. M. Ot. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I N <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> OUR executive <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer. Is Allie Perry <Speech_Music_Female> and our <Speech_Music_Female> producers are glamorous <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Kim sorrow an <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Iheart. Jj <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Pathway. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> What I wore when <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is engineered by Emily <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mironov <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Derek Clements <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> special <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thanks to Julie Chen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Diana Bachmann <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Conde. Nast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more information on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> today's episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> go to Glamour <SpeakerChange> Dot Com <Music> <Advertisement> slash. What I <Music> win <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the only way <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> through a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> new podcast in partnership <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with iheartradio <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> under armor <Speech_Male> players <Speech_Male> coaches and athletes <Speech_Male> were intimate and <Speech_Male> personal stories of performing <Speech_Male> at the highest level. <Speech_Male> This season <Speech_Male> Notre Dame women's basketball <Speech_Music_Male> coach Muffin. <Speech_Male> Mcgraw's <SpeakerChange> battling <Speech_Female> a losing record every <Speech_Female> game knowing you're supposed <Speech_Female> to win. <Speech_Female> That really weighs heavy <Speech_Female> on your shoulders than I think <Speech_Female> at one point. Wouldn't <Speech_Female> it be great to be the underdog <Speech_Female> again? My husband <Speech_Female> said be careful what you wish <Speech_Male> for and <SpeakerChange> here <Speech_Male> we are listening <Speech_Male> to the only way <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> through available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> now on the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> APP. Or <Speech_Female> wherever you get your podcast <Speech_Female> the btk <Speech_Female> killer Dennis <Speech_Male> Rader was dogcatcher <Speech_Female> married with children <Speech_Female> Wayne. Jc <Speech_Female> doubled <Speech_Male> clown children's <Speech_Female> birthday parties. <Speech_Female> Ted Bundy <Speech_Female> was a law student. <Speech_Female> They all blended <Speech_Female> in. I'm <Speech_Female> Nancy grace host <Speech_Female> of podcast <Speech_Female> crime stories <Speech_Female> with Nancy Grace <Speech_Female> and our new original <Speech_Female> concept killers <Speech_Female> amongst <Speech_Female> us where we break <Speech_Female> down the most <Speech_Female> evil crimes <Speech_Female> and focus on <Speech_Female> unsolved homicides <Speech_Female> year crime <Speech_Female> stories with Nancy grace <Speech_Female> on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever. You get your podcasts.

"one books" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on What I Wore When

"Denison is there something that you I don't eat beets I don't is that just a taste it's down you don't like them. Yeah I don't like the Yeah and I'm very weird about cooked fish. I actually I don't eat cooked fish. I love raw fish. I Love Fried Fish and the only time I cooked. Fish is When it's done Chinese style like the you know the style like my my family would make it. Not You know not a lot of people. I think actually Corey Chow in and Thomas. Keller know that about makes every time I go to per say. They're like so amazing. And you know they feed me. Raw crew does and Fried Fish. That's about it. Which I I so appreciate have you ever not in starstruck since on the beatrice seeing you know by Clientele. I very rarely get star struck. But I think the one time that I was like truly stopped in my tracks was the week that we opened the Beatrice Diane von Furstenberg counterparty there for Jonathan. Saunders and I was walking around the corner to go say hello to her and she was sitting next to Valentino and he was in an Emerald Green talk and they were both eating duck wings with their hands. Amazing and I just stopped in my tracks. That isn't visual. That probably will never leave your no. It wasn't it was artist to paint that hanging in your house. Is there anyone that you're dynamic four? Oh whom I you know. Cardi beatings to come in. Why hasn't you loves food? I feel like we'd get on quite well already. Stop playing around go. I know I know she likes chicken. Feed all about that. Okay good for your skin is not come in fear skin. Collagen wow. I didn't know that Collagen now. I'm interested what do you do? What do you do you? Would you have like a skin carotene? I mean yeah I was gonNA carry team but honestly I just eat a lot of beef. It's that's what it is it's Collagen here hairs good for your skin so secret interesting. What was your vibe growing up fashioned wise beauty wise like what was how did you just when you were a teen like high school or a tween wanted you walk into the same thing. Yeah same thing heels and sweatsuits. I've never changed. That's amazing. Yeah I've literally been the same person since I was five. Where did you shop when you were ten? Oh God so many places I think I was definitely doing vintage thing when I was when I was young acts impressive. Yeah I feel like that's not something most young people. No I definitely definitely had some really antastic. Don't change on a pieces when I was a child that like when I was like fifteen sixteen that I loved But you know my. My mother has always been like so so fashionable So I think I really get you know. Get that love of fashion and style from her. What was her type? What was her style Gosh my mother is such a chameleon. I don't think she ever met a burberry trench that she didn't lying. That's that's that's for sure that's for sure But you know she's. She had everything hanging in her closet from you know Dior Universtiy and burberry and you know just like a very classic in classic suits so not a bargain shopper. Very much until I know she's bargain shopper. Oh yeah no she and I are bargain. Shopper for sure You know but she you know she loves vintage in consignment stuff to you know finding those like rare one off pieces but yeah that's very much higher up the last thing I wanna ask you. You mentioned when we talked before we recorded that the way you design your menus were similar. It might have been an off handed comment but similar to the way designers design collections. Do you change your menu twice a year keenum area. That's really interesting to me. And why why do you only do it twice a year? Yeah I mean you know. Obviously we do. We do spring summer menu and Then we do an autumn-winter menu because it takes months. It takes months and months of work. I'm not a not a person who believes in seasonality per se if you walk into my restaurant in December there'll be foot of snow on the ground and I'll have fresh cherries And I'll be the only person in the city who has them because I've flown them from Chile or somewhere ridiculous. But I just really believe that we should just be creating an eating and indulging in the things that we love all time. What are you having for dinner tonight while tonight? My family's in town as we will be eating in the Beatrice for dinner last night. Where was I oh I had Chinese last night at home or I know I was at picking Kaos last night. Nice Yeah Cows. Night with sixteen people and You know magnanimous of Dom Perignon what were you wearing? I was wearing sweatsuits. Last night dom perignon also sweat Sudan diamonds..

Beatrice Diane von Furstenberg Dom Perignon Keller Valentino burberry Denison Corey Chow Chile Dior Universtiy Saunders Thomas Sudan
"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Noakes in Yeah uh-huh yeah consigned dino make us the wedding sir in August..

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"The you know destabilization in Central America. The KUMON dudas sponsored sponsored by Obama and Hillary Clinton all these immigration and hatred towards migrants and the apostle shooting. They have an element of story either. The lack of the story or a story. That's a lie either. One is destructive to the cause of our dignity so this is why this is is what is all about and whatever price it as if it if it means that Janine come and get some more books so be it our lives. Our dignity are worth much more than fifty million books like that trash of a book for a widow Lovato with dignity area. I just want to thank you for being on and you know it's always it's never a dull moment with you my friend ever and I say that I hope people know. Actually I have to have a sense of humor man p no you are. You're you're you you have a sense of humor. You're not an angry your your teddy bear. I know you you have a heart. I mean I appreciate your passion as always Mr Lovato. Thank you so much I yeah go for it last thing. You want to say you know. When you know Latino Latino rebels and you individually played your part of the ECO system that helped bring this to to awareness in the United States right you you wrote articles you you do your stuff on the radio you you know you extend your? We're the voice of the community. That's one of the things that people don't understand about us as we are reporting community tells us now that and because we're close to the community we see it before other people you know but but now I think one of the a great kind of outcomes of this beyond even publishing right now is we ourselves and the kind of like the Brown tweeter Weiner Latino. There's something yeah there's something special I what I love what I see out there is sort of an uplifting what I've always told you about this word. Take them with me when I started. Latino rebels is like I tell this to people all the time do never you never need to ask for permission. Do It go do you would go see it go be it. I have seen the last two weeks and I've you know like I said I've followed this community for years. This is incredibly unique. It's incredibly organic and anyone that tries to discredit. It doesn't truly understand it and I will say this for the people that are criticizing for the people that think they know. Have that conversation. I will give McMillan flat iron and Oprah's representatives credit that they took took a meeting with you more that needs to happen but at the same time it over the like in the end the guy told us to marry him. It's like at some point. It's about the voices. It's about our voices and who we are and done absolutely. I mean Julio I don't know if people saw are maybe you could put up on the website or something but you know our our initial flyer or call to action. Yes we yeah I. It's it's literally a community invitation to share creativity that is the initial purpose of the media. And anyone else thinks that this is just a protest movement or movement against Janine. Cummings things are against. It is so much deeper than that. And you're losing and this is the part that I don't get. Here's an opportunity for a community. It's not the publishing industry to actually start learning about what this community says and you still want to discredit it and that to me is such a shame but with voices like Utah Lorde the Lotto and medium goodwin doubles. I don't think that's going away and I really appreciate your time. You get the last word here. Meal Grass yes I can do I care which are hinting. How good is our ally by new? Emi Yeah in my hand illegal killing. Why do that our ASO's mono we'll keep talking? Thank you so much where to buy. I want to thank you for being on the show. Again guys again. I hope you learned a little bit things that are happening with this denied Beathard Adia Radio Movement. We'll continue to follow it. We'll see where it goes like are at though says McMillan and flat iron. They made a commitment but they're also GonNa hold them accountable knowing Robert. I've known them for several years. He's not someone who forgets deadlines especially these especially especially these type of deadlines so I continue to follow. We'll posted up on Latino rebels DOT COM also. Follow the Hashtag dignity that lethal idea. If you WANNA I see more of what's happening where people are sharing again. It's not just a protest movement against a book. That's something that you might hear from other people people but not here because I've been following it from day. One talking to organizers and like I said it's a kind of it's a different. It's something different different than I haven't seen in a while so we'll see where it goes but anyway guys if you like what you heard please please rate review share this podcast with friend tweet. Data's Latino rebels like us on facebook Latino rebels instagram Latinos tweet at me liter seventy-seven back next week like we always do. I think I'm going to New Hampshire Hampshire for the primary. But we'll see I might have another show from New Hampshire. Who knows what we'll do something else next week and like we always do? We always he's goes out with the Latino rebels. Radio we add again.

Mr Lovato Janine McMillan Beathard Adia Radio Movement New Hampshire Hampshire New Hampshire Obama Central America Hillary Clinton United States Emi Cummings Robert Oprah
"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"So but but again from a strategic stamp. But when you do that somebody like me. He's GonNa go. Oh Oh man we really got to you because you're going you're breaking your your white liberal of packed ethos you're breaking. Are you going Trumpian. Yeah at that point again. It's kind of check chess game of strategy and politics. That was a check back. I I'm repeating this because I really think it's important to make a to to look at dignity that literati as another teachable moment in Latino politics that extends beyond just publishing literature but to deliver very conversation included to fight back and do things like start work of inspiration to defeat Donald trump and to destroy the the racist murderous politics that we saw Paso so sticking on on this subject because the other thing that people say about the liter audio or people that speak out against this book or whatever is that you're just giving it more a publicity. You're just giving everyone more publicity that this which I think is such A. I don't know I mean what do you say that I mean it feels like this to me is a moment that has moved something so if you had to take advantage of a book being a bad book it's it seems to be opening new new opportunities and new avenues right or wrong to say that. So how do you answer to all that as well. Well you know I mean the book again was marketed like a marvel comic movie because it was a movie deal attached to multimillion dollar movie deal. It had already been greenlighted just dealing with union comments or the book you're dealing with this multi-platform deal with I've talked with people in the industry about this book. And how they did it. And they've done young they really. It's not just the book. It's the whole package that they were doing all the economic and intersecting economic interests and so so so that was going to bring news to it regardless and we just happened to kind of do Jitsu on on the fourth power of their emotions Russian apparatus to use the weight of their power against them Brag. Right that's what strategy does you especially if you're like you know people if you're a student of guerrilla strategy that's what guerrilla tactics do using. The poorest of this industry gets it to dry out. Its contradiction profound problems. So we've had we've had a teachable moment across the entire the United States and even beyond the US. 'cause people in America are talking about this now so so we've got a teachable moment. That cost the on. The industry's time. Yeah so oh this is beyond again. We now almost three weeks ago. Pivoted away from Janine Commons consciously. I think that's something that people are missing right. I think that's the big because I saw that in the roots of this is that early here and also early. What people are forgetting about what you guys said is like not only was the pivot against you need Cummings Cummings you guys never wear for the cancellation of the books? You never were involved. You never were saying. Oh let's go let's go to these protests and like create havoc. You Ray serious issues about how. There's a sort of a worshiping of the Oprah Book Club which a lot of people say is good and bad for publishing you also raise the series issue of the fact that for this special that was on apple. TV that's going to be happening. This two sides conversation and from what I understand people were approached. Someone like Miriam said no other people said No. And they're like we don't want to be part of this. We want to create our own conversations. Get Out of the way I mean. What is that? What what's the problem with that? I look at that dawn. I'm Mike and the problem with that. Is what approach. I mean this is exactly what I mean if if a community is not going to move in the start looking at its own conversations and not asked for permission anymore however we're gonNA advances events is a community. So what are your thoughts about all that. I mean my by my gut reaction is it's sometimes it's okay to be a problem to be an effective problem. Yeah Bat Insert itself at key inflection points to change change a game of an entire industry because this is not just about flat iron or Macmillan even this is about the industry in the national national conversation and I can swear to you by every Tortilla and do ample Busa in this world. Our our our thinking on this always was that this was about something far larger. Something that's let's you know the stakes for us and let me speak for myself. Is You know I look at the journey described in American me. I mean American there. Yeah right I look at that. And I spent thirty years on the migrant trail and traversed twenty five hundred miles as the most terrifying real estate in the world including my family's homeland by Lord where I saw War I saw death-squad I saw victims. I saw families. I saw the birth of the gangs thanks to US policy. I've been on the migrant trail. I've seen you know I've seen in so I see this book with a with the you know the barbed wire fencing and its promotion the barbed wire fencing and I after all my experience of seeing children blown up embalmed and their homes after seeing their home after they've been blown up embalmed or seeing children mangled in different ways including by their little tender skin being A shredded by barb wire near the borders along the way right and I look at this book that centered on barbed wire that reads like a cartoon and I just I I just want to you know just really scream and cry at at that and so that's really. There's no price on on what we're doing it's it's not even about publishing it's about that's why I gave it the name. Dini Liter Aria. Because I knew this was about dignity. This was about the dignity that we have to rescue in order to rescue our community segments of our community. Mm Unity whether it's you know you know there's this relationship between the story. Tell about a person and in a group of people and the policies the violence the destruction of those people. There's a direct relationship stories matter. I committed my life after life of activism to life of writing as a journalist and now as an author and so I I know in. And when for example in her son by when the way they talked about people in the opposition certain ways on television calling him btk Wackos in other. You're really charged terminology during the war and the next day those people would end up dead now. That started getting me on the on the realization that people people like A theorist of Nazi language called clamper Tatas about the way that the Nazis used language and framing to to to to dehumanize people because in order to kill somebody you I have to dehumanize this is something the war top me so the war on Immigrants Ansah literally the war on Latinos the war on that results in the colony continued and intensified colonization of Puerto Rico the destruction of the the.

United States Oprah Book Club Donald trump Trumpian Cummings Cummings Janine Commons Macmillan Liter Aria America Puerto Rico Miriam Paso Mike apple
"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"That just that Innov- itself at a at at an institutional level and the level of US publishing history. There's never there's no precedent for that in publishing history noren Latino history in the United States so then and were they so it was a good meeting was cordial was very according to you had people who obviously knew us and one other. Pr People in the room. Who I'm sure it's giving them all the information about what we're tweeting about him? All our ranson concerned that we were being followed Lewd Levato. Julio you know maybe some your readers no I'm surrounded by by death. Squads on both sides of the border order. I know I know reported in swimming. I had come from a guy that I think was from the CIA department. So you know almost Okada tatum. WHO's archaeological talking right? So so it's no surprise that you know private sector has its own intelligence resources and they deploy them and so we were acting in ways that assume that and and craft out a strategy that clearly brought them to the table including the fact we were even able what do predict for example. There we're GONNA shut down and Council Janine comments book tour. You can see a tweet. I tweeted about or you. Did I predict they would cancel them and they would do so in a manner that turned. Janine comes into a white victim Latinos into a barbarian horde of censorship. And that's what happened because that's exactly what happened quite frankly from a strategic standpoint. That was check because at that point if I could predict what you do you know what I can do next and we did that as as a as a social movement and we succeeded and they they they were tense a little bit because they're just getting to know because I mean we are in fact in. US District Barbarian kind of force given that we are completely legally marginalized like the visigoths. Are Your your teddy bear. I know you so you're like a teddy bear. Once you get to know you know. Oh Yeah you young. There are no but I'm saying so. So what are our movement has pimple aspect of it by necessity. So listen the meeting. They get past attention. They're like Oh wow these people that are actually people well. Wow there are pretty intelligent. They're very you have and let me just say this. I am so fortunate in so I'm talking about you guys. Not I'm I'm talking about the unique set of skills and competencies and intellectual capabilities that Miriam for example brought amazing here. Leadership is five foot zero. A schoolteacher you gotta you know who's doing this why she's also teaching her high school students. You know she sees in between classes tweeting and messaging and doing things and being really brilliant. Oh you know what yeah you know. It's a great man when I talked to her she told me and I don't know if we got it on the radio show or not but she told me that she read read parts of American dirt to her high school students And they laughed out loud as to how unrealistic it was so this this is not just marrying Gorba- this is like young Latino students and Latino students in high school who read that and go. That's not my world so I think I I just think like power to marry him for for being what she's doing to marry him. Shave inspired all of us. And I also need to mention bowls. Yes another pitfall other brilliant guy man he you know. He teaches about children's literature and the Economics and the politics of Literature. He writes children's literature. He speaks now watching teachers. I mean we had just a confluence of different capability. I don't know what I added to this but I just want you added Lovato so anyway. So they agree. What do they agree to? They have ninety days. Do you believe what are they agreed it. And then I'm I'm I'm still skeptical. Go about the ninety day commitment read it read it read it go. You said that the women it goes substantially increasing the next president across McMillan Alan Authors titles staff in its overall and in its overall literary ecosystem secondly developing developing an action plan to address these objectives within ninety days. And here's the clincher. The third part that I have to say I insisted on regroup within thirty thirty days with the valley area and other Latin next groups to assess progress. So it's not just like we have a built in accountability and unless we are just vegetables the vegetables objects and you know intellectually incapable people who Gore just tropical sidekicks in the national narrative of the United States. Unless we're really are that they were not going to do anything because I'm just waiting for the yes. That's not the case right now. Yeah have this whole week. We've been agitating around Latinos and the crisis of US literature and Publishing. And so there's actions in Tucson Los Angeles New York El Paso. Yeah New York tonight. La Tonight and Houston and other cities are doing. San Francisco stepped up. They're going to do something. I mean this is growing and we're agitating of not just around McMillan flat iron but around our condition Russian within US literature. Yeah so let me ask you. This question is one of the things that we're finding. And when it comes to allies allies especially allies of color so when we publish the analogy that we when we said Latino rebels last week said you know Obama's book club only a chosen chosen no. US next like authors ever for a book club and we got a lot of shit like we got a lot of like what were you Latinos thinking like going after Oprah. She doesn't owe you anything like you're jealous like you are you guys don't you. You don't do anything so it was kind of bizarre what what are is that a normal. That's what's happening others. It just like Oh per people. That are defending Oprah. I'm assuming that this has support from other communities of color. No or my wrong you saw yesterday. You know this. This explosion has been solely just incredible yesterday Barnes and noble decided to event where they were going to promote the classics books. Yeah they put black that face on all the characters like for black history month history of some some genius at Barnes and Nobles decided to do this and it blew up in their face where he aunt segments of the black community being very critical and then immediately let you know because we're like really awoken and on fire about these issues right. We saw this people ending the literati. I saw this across the country especially here in New York and people are already mobilizing to that Barnes and nobles for an event and they cancelled it which was then cancelled. Yeah so I mean we have let me just say I won't name them out but we have intelligence sources throughout US publishing among agents among Inside of publishing houses people in the know people in the know in the critical class. Yeah we have friends and allies in these sectors. We called upon them to mount this campaign. We weren't I mean you know you know who their My own background includes the campaign to take Lou Dobbs CNN. I remember that were critical role in that was the intelligence gathered from within CNN itself about about what was happening in them and whether or not you know their responses were informed by confidences. Could kind of pull get away with things or what do Pitas. There's even or whether they were. Actually you know fearing the barbarian horde so we kind of did the similar thing and this. I'M NOT GONNA name names. You don't have to listen a couple of other questions because I know you're busy and you got you got the events but just a couple more and I just WanNa get me William. I love it all right so I want to get into this notion. It seems like you also tweeted out. You did tweet your like Lola though breaking news tweet I repeat there. Were no threats against the author. There were no threats against the author because this was referring to a statement that flat iron books Released last week saying that they were cancelling the book tour because of security concerns. I try to get them back on record. They didn't WanNa talk. But what can you can you. I talk about what they told you at the meeting. Have you heard from anyone. Because there's also been sort of this wave of opinion-makers makers mostly white or like big big critics like Stephen King and Others who are like democracy can never survive without if if authors are threatened. But but what can you share about that because that seemed to come out of nowhere and we in meeting the issue issue of deaths of of threats. Let's say came up in the meeting right. That was kind of a tense moment to be real frank because on Miriam side Miriam. UNBEKNOWNST to most most of the time that murmurs took a public stand on this the entire time she'd been getting regular death threats. I know we talked. We talked about. Ah when I talked to her and she told me about the death rates when I talked to her and I when I started hearing about death threats I think about having been pursued by Salvadoran during death squads in my neck tightened up in a very particular way so very intimate and personal and real issues for those of us who've had like many that especially the women who have to live under the boot of being terrorized by men and others. Yeah and so. This issue came up in that a tense but then one of the women in the room said Actually Janine Cummins did not receive any death threats threats so you have executives and other executives confirmed this. She hasn't received any death threats. And if you look back their statements their statements were very vague. They references and so you know these are the kind of the way. The coachwork right back beyond Flatiron McMillan. Just the way that the the announcement take the cancellations played itself out was again. I predicted it. It happened in exactly the way I said it. Would you know and they played us to be out his barbarian horde of censorship.

US US literature and Publishing Janine Cummins CIA Miriam New York Okada tatum Barnes ranson Innov Flatiron McMillan Council Janine Obama San Francisco CNN Gorba Lovato president Lou Dobbs CNN
"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"I had this opportunity to talk to throw at the Lovato of the Nina area on a Thursday Thursday February six bright before before he went to an event Dignity Daria Event in New York. Loretta Lovato check him out. He's actually written several pieces for Latino rebels. Several commentary analysis pieces. I've known Robert Though for several years but anyway this is the conversation that we had Thursday afternoon February. SIXT I. He's in New York. I'm in my undisclosed. Latino rebels studio location somewhere in the northeast so here it is or Delaware title and Latino Rebels Radio and leave that idea Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that respect. I can even read you if you wish. The language some of the language that came out of our meeting you can but I just WanNa make sure that I'm curious about how the meeting went. How did the meeting go like did you have did you have were the representatives from Macmillan flat representatives from Oprah as well? They're black fourteen sixteen people in the meeting. Wow Yeah we're four of us and people in the room were top executives again of one of the most powerful publishing entities in the in the United States in the world so.

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Loretta Lovato Macmillan Roberto Lovato McMillan Robert Delaware MPR Maria Hinojosa MS magazine Brian Salma Hayek Janine America Mary Ranchera
"one books" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

"We can access that through the mind the mind is either uplifting you or pulling you down at any moment we learned to master the mind if to navigate the mind then we can learn to navigate authority and of course Mostra life how can I be more productive where did I waste time today I'm sure if you're a business owner this is something you ask Gulf daily now growing business is hard especially when you're wasting hours moving data from emails to spreadsheets Luckily Zappia can help with this Zappia is the easiest way to automate your work what it does is that it connects all your business.

business owner Mostra
"one books" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"one books" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

"Software and handles work for you so you can actually focus on the things that matter and require your creativity and attention this means no more wasting your time on task that you know could be automated because that's exactly what Zap go to do you instantly engage with leads send them to a crm or spreadsheet that notify your team so they can act fast on every unity Zappia supports more than fifteen hundred business applications so the possibilities of virtually endless well my team.

"one books" Discussed on LI News Radio

LI News Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"one books" Discussed on LI News Radio

"Well now i start the editing process but it's in the editing that's hard it's hard but i've great editor and desmond the chapter on teddy roosevelt blows chunks but it's hard to write about people you don't like so or at least it is for me if you really hate somebody then you can let it loose but i found that with writing about the people who did not like like roosevelt and george wallace is harder because i don't want to be hatemonger so the roosevelt chapter is a little but the rest of it is i think survivable and i am so relieved even though i'm wearing the same clothes somebody who works here goes we ring taya said yes oh yes yes i was congratulations i thought you were going to talk about tom wolfe oh may he rest in peace first book club that was our first book club and it was a book i liked and whatever else our understanding the book that he wrote in nineteen eightyseven bonfire of the vanities shaped our understanding of what the eighties were about what late capitalistic american life and new york a celebrity all of those things in huge ways and he was very influential but i think in the end the thing that i love most about tom wolfe was that he was fearless he was really fearless writer he was fearless critic he was funny and he did it all without being you know of his generation guys like norman mailer and you know john updike wrote one good buck and then he wrote it seventeen times who else who that he was very rough with that generation missed out on the steinbeck stuff and they were sort of you know mailers imitating that and wolf call them on it and talked about it and can you imagine and i say this i will only ever right positive book reviews now because now i've got a book and what if they don't like mine right so here's tom wolfe critic who then says oh all right novel you know they're gonna destroy you but he did it anyway and they destroyed him and.

editor taya new york tom wolfe desmond teddy roosevelt george wallace norman john updike steinbeck
"one books" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"one books" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"It's a sign of the times when major magazine can tell its readers, it's okay to ignore the bible. Stay tuned to breakpoint from the Colson center for Christian worldview. Here's Eric Metaxas with breakpoint. Ask any child would his or her favorite thing to eat is and you'll probably hear pizza or ice cream, but grownups hoping to live there full three score and ten would do well not to harden their hearts or arteries against more healthy fair. When you become a man, you put aside childish things, but just is there are people who never grow out of their juvenile pallets. There are folks who never move beyond childish tastes in literature G Q magazine recently published a list of twenty one books. You don't have to read seldom. Have I seen an example of the blind leading the blind as blatant as this article condemned where such classics as the adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the Lord of the rings, the magazine's editors described these beloved titles variously as racist sexist and just really, really boring G Q turns up its nose at some of the finest, literary dining around the editors. Poor taste is only surpassed by their poor reading comprehension, Mark Twain's Huck. Fin, for instance, which G Q dismisses as racist is actually a satirical polemic against slavery. The real thorn and G 'cuse flesh though is the bible which they describe as repetitive, self-contradictory and foolish. The most important book in western history is according to the spirit filled with men's grooming tips, just not worth the sweat of your brow. Jumping Jehovah fat. Where do we begin at the risk of casting pearls before swine? I can assure the editors of this magazine that not only is reading the bible worthy effort, but none of us can hope to understand our own civilization or even speech without it. I've already used nine popular expressions from the bible in this commentary. For example, why do we have a seven day week? Why is this the year twenty eighteen? Why do we use printed books? Why is the average westerner literate at all? And the answer to all of these is the bible without reading the bible. You could never comprehend works of art like the Sistine Chapel, the pita or the. Last supper you'll never fully grasp Dante Milton or Bach. Indeed many great masterpieces wouldn't exist. If religious patrons hadn't paid artists and composers to celebrate the message of the bible, if you don't have a working knowledge of the good book, most of Shakespeare's allusions will be okay CT to you. You'll not understand why the first European colonists came to New England. You'll miss what motivated the abolition of slavery and you will find Martin Luther King junior's letter from Birmingham, jail, unintelligible that is a drop in the bucket of the Bible's influence this behemoth of a book and the Judeo Christian tradition. It represents are the reason why we value women equally with men. Why we don't think it's okay to leave newborns to die outside. Why we think mercy is admirable, and even why we believe history had a beginning and will someday come to an end simply put if you don't understand the bible, you won't understand who you are and why you think the way you do. Maybe I'm a voice crying in the wilderness after all studies show that most people who own a by. Able don't read it. Maybe we no longer treasure this best selling book of all time because it's truths are no longer hidden in our hearts. If so, the writing is on the wall for the west. But for those with an appetite for the sumptuous feast found in God's word it is waiting on the shelf. The average American household has four copies folks. Don't listen to G Q, do not sell your birthright as a westerner for mess of periodical pottage and don't miss the message or the severe that set this book apart from all others by the way that's fifteen biblical phrases for breakpoint. This is Eric Metaxas.

major magazine Eric Metaxas Colson center Sistine Chapel G Q Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain Martin Luther King New England Dante Milton Birmingham Shakespeare Huck seven day Milton