35 Burst results for "One Mile"

Telegraph Fire Continues to Spread Northeast, Closer to Globe, Arizona

Chad Benson Show

00:22 sec | Last month

Telegraph Fire Continues to Spread Northeast, Closer to Globe, Arizona

"Is burning less than one mile from the community of top of the world. It's now the 10th largest wildfire in Arizona history. Fast approaching 72,000 Acres and new evacuation orders today for the mass Cal fire burning just southwest of Globe. 66,000 acre fire is now forcing residents of Beverly Hills and T 11 Ranch to leave their homes,

Arizona Globe Beverly Hills
What Your Pre-Run Warmup Routine Should Look Like

Another Mother Runner

02:31 min | 2 months ago

What Your Pre-Run Warmup Routine Should Look Like

"Let's Hop on over to those questions and this is from jenny who wonders about warm ups and she seems to have stopped to call in this question. Which i know you always love. Hey guys it is. Jenny from allen texas and i m in the warm up a temple workout in one of your half marathon training plans and then just thinking should i be doing strides in this one. Look like in the one mile warmer i into some work I worry about this Wonder it and say that you can answer this question. Take care guys many happy. Well hello jenny. Speaking of the portland retreat or forward to seeing you add it. I know you and some of your buddies from texas convening here so looking forward to that okay all right back to your question i agree. It can seem jarring to jump into a really challenging. You know kinda turn on the turbo jets to do tempo. Or you know other speedier work after quote unquote just a mile or two warm-up i find the older i get the more time i need to warm up so i'll share what i do But i coach timoti offer guidance. Well i think i think The amount of warm up you need directly correlates with age. So i mean i feel like you know if you were a twenty five mile would feel really long. Can't we just get this workout. So i think you know what we did in most the train like a mother plan. Is we try to be super efficient with your time knowing that. You know we don't want to give you. I mean there are some plans for sure that have longer than sixty minutes on the weekdays marathon and training plans and that kind of thing because you have to put into mileage there but we really want to make you know be able to give you work outs. That are compact bite size and doable as possible. So the good news is that you can add anything like as long as you're going at an easy pace you can easily add onto a warm up at onto a cool down. There is no problem there. So if two miles feels better if two and a half miles feels better. You can absolutely do that. You're going to talk a little bit about dynamic warm ups so we can talk about that as well. That might also be a good way to kind of get your body blood flowing and then go into a mile but if you feel like you need one point three miles one point. Seven miles in your schedule allows for

Jenny Texas Allen Portland
The Original Windermere Tuk Tuk Company

Adventures in a tuk tuk

02:18 min | 2 months ago

The Original Windermere Tuk Tuk Company

"The original took company. So what the hell it was. Walk down the first down. So i got myself a mountain bike. My boy in bike. She's only two years old. She got a bike. Just not one of these trailers just to touch onto the back on the people said great. You should do similar lot. Peddling open elfin born to intervene revenue. You know especially pulling passages so now. You did not talk to not smoke long. We've been dented to robert. uk yet. That's where we go up to from. I spoke to the idea. Spoke to him promote stret- where i've been the idea two weeks we had to talk talk up in very very quick. The my when you're trying to get a taxi license yet so all the tests medical tests everything saw for most sent off the licensing operations that of nice in september. Who saw sitcoms six months and still wear in of sort of express to. I don't want to take people from bonus to windermere's like about from about one mile stretch. Run a twenty mile stretch. Don't just wanna do not want people to different places. Yep so many places. Mba ideal for took to get to So yeah that's my idea council. A little bit worried about I think they're just ensure the depot go facial legal procedures and things like that so just in a bit on Yeah yeah saw of we rent it. Simone more like a bike with a sidecar rickety. Sidecar the for in thailand dot for a week roy on one of the little islands Yeah it was awesome. Yeah yeah is up. She'll be six months old. Be christmas december two thousand eighteen.

Robert UK Simone Thailand
FAA investigating pilot whose X-rated rant was recorded

AP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

FAA investigating pilot whose X-rated rant was recorded

"Waiting to vote. Federal officials are investigating a Southwest Airlines pilot recorded making a cuss filled rant about Northern California liberals as his plane ready for takeoff in San Jose Moran picked up by one mile at a time dot com and sf gate dot com. FAA says pilots are prohibited from talking about subjects that are unrelated to safely conducting their flight while taxing and while flying below 10,000 Ft.

Southwest Airlines Northern California Moran San Jose FAA
1,000-Gallon Sewage Spill Closes Stretch Of Newport Beach Near Los Angeles

All Things Considered

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

1,000-Gallon Sewage Spill Closes Stretch Of Newport Beach Near Los Angeles

"Ah, one mile stretch of new of Beach and Newport has been closed because of a sewage spill. That's foul. The water there in the Orange County health care agency says operator error caused the approximately 1000 gallon spill. Happened during work on him Sewer main line. This affects the area between Bayside, Dr Beach and China Co. It's not clear when the beach will re open depends on when testing shows that the water Is clean

Orange County Health Care Agen Newport Dr Beach China Co. Bayside
NASCAR Phoenix Mini-Preview

The Final Lap

01:30 min | 5 months ago

NASCAR Phoenix Mini-Preview

"Friday. is here. so let's get you all set up for the nascar weekend at phoenix raceway. Where a couple of years back they underwent one hundred and seventy eight million dollars modernization project. We're virtually everything is still kinda new ish. I guess fan experience. They moved the start. Finish line over if you remember so all. The turns are in different places. It's going to be fun to watch no matter what we are looking at a one mile with banking up to eleven degrees. The front stretch is eleven hundred. Seventy nine backstretch fifty one cup race. Three hundred twelve laps or five hundred kilometers stages seventy five one fifteen and one twenty two last winners. Include joy llegado in the spring and champion. Chase elliott picking up the win and the cup in the fall. Check out all the dogleg. Bizarre start finish line action sunday three thirty pm eastern on

Phoenix Raceway Joy Llegado Chase Elliott
Daytona Road Course Setup

The Final Lap

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Daytona Road Course Setup

"Is here. so let's get you set up for this weekend. The two thousand twenty one daytona. Five hundred is in the books but nascar is not done with daytona just yet this weekend. They raised their again. But this time back on the road course they go. It's a points paying race. Unlike the bush clash a few weeks ago all three series or an action that track turning left and right on the fourteen. Turn three point six one mile road. Course let's take a look at the stats with a cup series race number. Two of thirty six like mentioned on a three point six one mile road course. Fourteen turns thirty one degrees of banking on the turns. Of course the cup race is seventy laps or two hundred fifty. Two point seven miles stage one sixteen lap stage to eighteen laps final stage thirty six laps. Check out out all all the the action. action. Sunday Sunday three three pm pm eastern eastern on on fox. fox.

Daytona Nascar Bush FOX
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

07:50 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"The user experience of the technology. You can have a really credible tax but if the u i is impossible us you're dead out of the gate. So by logic that means that the interface layer does actually determine the fate as much if not more than whatever's underneath and then fast forward a world where we've got api's for every service imaginable in tons of underlying services use all these like enterprise products and even consumer products that we use if we could just bring them together and superior ways will use the aggregating product and you saw new startup called texts launch. Which is trying to agree to all of your messages into one interface which is really hard to do because apple google and others are always competitive with their messaging products but the mine on the interface layer. My view is that we are going to become agnostic to the underlying services themselves. If you need a ride do you care if it's lift uber. Or whatever else no you just want to say. I don't know to alexa. Maybe i need a ride or those disruptive interfaces because their audio and if those interfaces than send that request down to a layer that competes in finds you the closest best price car. You'll just take whatever car shows up. And so that's very destructive now. Will those companies release a is that allow some company to have those compete underneath the surface. Maybe not now. But i think they're gonna have to because the interface were is like a slap a hand game the better more superior more accessible interface actually surprised if i were running one of these big consumer electronics companies. I would offer to install screens in every kitchen for free. Because if you could own that indispensable real estate of a family which is the screen. It's amazing how big of industry there is around billboards and stuff to this rotating from driving. But we were in our kitchens. If every family in america gracefully accepted a free screen in their kitchen. That is an example of disruptive because suddenly it's just there and if you buy things or requests things you're agnostic often to the services underneath and so that's fascinating to me. It's sort of like a way of saying you just want to own the front door the on ramp all the way where we started the first mile right. You want to own from user intent or interest you want to be the first place that the lowest friction place that they can go fulfill that intent you do and goes back to the power designers. I just think that the end of the day designers are the ones who are influencing the decisions that we make is in the interface. There we make every decision in our lives these days. Are there any principles of design that you would leave people with that. You've learned from working with so many over. The years of of good design means thoughts. Wine is i do think that rate design is ultimately manifested as small things. Make a big difference in whether it's the emission of something or the thoughtful indication of what's active versus inactive or are you on mute right now or are you unmuted like what is the button actually do all these little nuances really address or eat a fuel or release our anxiety based on the decisions that are made so i think also great designers are also grounded in some of the stuff. We talked about earlier around object model so and have worked with a lot of designers. What i find is that there are some people that are so talented but for whatever reason they make things look beautiful but the object model is not there in other words when i look at the design. It's not clear how. I got there what i'm supposed to do what i'm supposed to do next after that but sometimes really got that and i think it has to do with empathy in part to do with a sense of product sensibility in how things are built in what the states should be this notion of love the term when you're building a product of progressive disclosure and what that means that it only shows you what you need to know when you need see it be designer will like show everything you need and do it beautifully and thoughtfully but at a designer a level designer will only show you the things when you need when you need to see them and will really work with the product team to understand the customer's needs because the less noise the more signal the more informed we are. Do you think that were slated for a decade ahead that is explosive or is sort of aggressive coming out of covid. What is your sense. For the way that the business and sort of economic world will go think pent up demand is a real thing a rian for the roaring twenties that everyone likes to talk about. Yes i do believe we are in. I think that it's going to be a really wild emergence. I think that we have no idea. What the impact of our pent-up lives will be. But what i can say is that the world experiences never been more accessible to us. Products like airbnb products value to take audio tours of every nook and cranny of the world and really excited about the next slate of augmented reality experiences. Think pokemon go but doing scavenger hunts to find hidden bitcoins and all kinds of fun. Interactive augmented reality experiences out in the world. That technology has sort of teed up for us but over the last year all what kind of dormant and people were just heads down. So i actually do think talking to my friend. Jan hyman who runs read the runway and she was talking about her teams work planning the fashion collection for the next year. For twenty twenty two twenty twenty three and how they're really convince alongside the fashion designers that they consult that there is almost like a culture. Bending aspect of resurgence. That we're all going to have of the roaring twenties. You know where we're gonna wanna just not only get out there but maybe like a little bit more adventurous and self expressive that. Maybe we were beforehand. So listen i'm an internal optimist is actually probably why i never saw myself as a classic venture capital investor. Because i think in some ways you have to be a gift to see by default what could go wrong as a great investor of a lot of money whereas a seed investor a product person. Like me you just have to see the potential of something to get excited. But but that's my take. Well this has been so much fun. I mean such a great set of lessons on how to build great products and respect the user. I guess at the end of the day. There needs their laziness selfishness. I think it's a great set of lessons and also these fascinating trends about what the future might hold. I asked the same closing question of everybody that i talked to which is to ask. What is the kindest thing that anyone's ever done for you. Think the kind of thing is really to make time when there's nothing in it for them we all now know and you interior into a point in your career. Were you start getting a lot of inbound stuff. Just start you start to filter it all out in. It's like oh. I just need a few unusually focus on my family and make sure that i do. What's absolutely necessary at work and take the occasion opportunity when it comes from a really great source and then you start to close everything else out but when i look back i remember certain people who were like really great leaders in the industry who made time for like a kid in high school in some cases that were in business school and so i am now i realize just how kind that was. Kind of selfless. It was sort of a pay. It forward motion agus. I challenged myself to some howley prioritize that even when it becomes a little last like you know easy to do so scott. There's been so much fun. The way absurdity to mark these episodes is like how many little portable ideas can. I walk away with and go you know. Go be productive with Your time.

apple america Jan hyman first mile next year last year alexa one interface google first place twenty scott one pokemon uber twenties underlying services three twenty two
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

06:11 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Where it's more about people that are at the company than it is about the company. Perhaps so you've got these. Two lenses of lake called back in front office the back office. I think of another way of productivity. You've also written about how so much. Software is just putting workflows into now web based software to make people more productive to standardize workflow processes. And that you believe that maybe this will begin to shift more towards enabling creativity so as we cover off more and more of the productivity stuck into software paper and pen and spreadsheet prophecies that opens up people's time to be creative. What do you think that means. What does that represent in how the world will change. If there's this move towards more creative tooling this also connects of course with the conversation. We had earlier about employment and trade schools and stuff like that because take a step back for a second. It's very clear that much of the work that was done by people of course is being done by algorithms and software. We all know that. That trend is locked and loaded and on its way to happening. And so it's funny that we used to be measured in the workplace based on our productivity. And that's why companies like microsoft and others at deployed productivity software across the enterprise were the rulers of the land in still are to some extent. And that's great. I mean we were gonna be able to achieve all productivity needs with computers within. The question is are we going to stand out and compete based on being more productive anymore. Or is there something else that we become measured by and stand out through. And i firmly believe that the most human thing that only we can do is to be creative whether that means to visualize data in compelling ways to celebrate story whether that means to merchandise decisions more effectively than organization to get alignment around them whether means everyone participating in building in critiquing a prototype. I just think that there is a moment where the creativity tool deployment across the enterprise will be much like the productivity to the point was in decades past and i think that what are the implications of this number one. We're going to have to train people to be creative. It can't be class on fridays anymore. This has to permeate the curriculum. When you're writing a history report it should be a paper anymore. Should be a multimedia presentation where you're forced to our video and audio tools. These are the skills that are going to help. These kids have future-proof careers and then in companies. It means that we can't rely on training. Everyone to use products like photoshop illustrator. We have to have content. I and collaboration first experiences via web as opposed to Desktop software there's a next generation of creativity that would need to enable that sounds like cheesy but for the future of humanity. We kind of have to train people up to do stuff. That's different than differentiating. The computers i mean. It's kind of obvious. What do you think it means to get better or more creative. Better creativity or become more creative. Is that something that i can send you a generic person and you could train them. Some howard show them a tool kit to become more creative. What have you learned about making that a thing. In someone's life yeah. People do become trained. They like a blank canvas. They liked to just have their utensils and just start to work but for the majority of us. We want to see things that we feel compelled by and then we want to click remix and basically make it our own. That is that rotter democratization of creativity opportunity. And so. if you're gonna give me a handful of folks and say make them create us. Would i would do is expose them to a lot of templates that address the problem they're trying to solve. And then when they clicked one i would automatically sync with their company's brand or their past posts or whatever else so that they get the design consistency by default as opposed to a creative professional's job is still a continued design. Consistency is this whole notion of a design system and every organization where your funds and your color is all these things are consistent but if you can do that by default for this non creative pro that we're discussing then they're off to the races because now they can actually turn out real time assets on behalf of their products for all these different social media formats and everything without needing a design team to work for them. And you know it's one cool thing member of the super bowl and the lights went out. Yes and within thirty seconds. The oreo social media accounts tweeted and posted. You can still dunk in the dark amazing and allies. That's amazing but here's what's really cool about it. It's impossible that a creative professional design team in a product. Photoshop made that within thirty seconds in posted at in all social media accounts not possible but some social media marketing folks were outfitted with the right templates with the right brand elements with the right funds with right imagery and they were able to turn this out in thinking. Act in real time and if you think about the social media world we're living in now thank enact in real time might be the future of marketing and it's not going to be driven by big creative agencies in creative teams is going to be driven by social media market. I have everything at their disposal and can do it. Now what do you think is the. Maybe we'll even get into like the sci-fi kind of realm the future of interfaces. You mentioned earlier that you kind of don't want to do something new unless it's really unlocks a lot of potential. That wasn't possible before. Where do you see that being true or some sort of user. Interface is really new innovative disruptive to our current interfaces. Something i've been thinking about. It hasn't sixteen or so i wrote an article called the interface layer and my argument was that design is gonna commodities everything underneath and i got a lot of backlash from friends who are engineers data scientists. They're like scott dude like you know. I know you're all about design and stuff and you got like the bias of whatever but come on like it's all about the technology in my response is well customers. Don't love technology for the technology. They love technology for.

microsoft sixteen Photoshop scott photoshop illustrator Two lenses super bowl thirty seconds interface layer oreo decades past fridays one cool thing first experiences second handful of folks templates one
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

09:00 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"You can imagine and get certified each appliance. That's a company called nanna as two examples and then they train you up with certifications in online training. And then they say hey you're certified this is the lead gen for you to the new practice your trade in nana's in case they actually go to all these manufacturers of whirlpool and all these authors and these manufacturers get so much in down from customers with problems and then they're not in the business of service and so they're willing to offset all of that volume of demand to people who can provide for it and manas like train people up for every civic appliance and they can in a very high quality way service any need of a of an customer. And so what you're seeing. Is this vertically integrated stack of both education in employment. That is fascinating. And it's actually really empowering for the next generation of small businesses and people it's like the next generation of leveraging some of the benefits of uber some of the benefits of great -education courses and stuff like that and then marketplace's etc. And i think that also part of that is this notion of the reverse franchise model. You are an appliance repair person. But you don't have the ability to take payments. You don't have seo. You don't even know what that means all these other aspects of your stack or missing and so a company can kind of come to you and say hey in exchange for it up seven percent of your income going forward. We'll get you on the full latest stack of everything and you can operate your small business but usually like grow your business leveraging all the way technology what do you think that means for the traditional education model especially college which i feel you've been reading about the demise of especially the longer tail certainly not like top twenty universities but everything else could be a bad deal right you come out with a ton of debt and sort of as weird general purpose education. That's not tailored to any one real job to be done in the real world. Do you think that this trend might actually make that long tail start to go away. Lie do because education has been one of the most weird roi type of investments people. Ever make 'cause they pay a fortune in debt for no guarantee of any return at least not from a career perspective and yeah we have a job department and we'll have a career fair and then good luck and in this new world we live in. There will be new models that give you high or guarantee them that and so then the question will be. How will these compete can go to a small college. Maybe get a job. Or i can go to this company and get trained and get a guaranteed employment is not just some painting appliance care. It's also in digital marketing analytics. Other roles that you saw the the rise of companies like general assembly in these schools are trade schools. then there's the argument of obama. how about the classic liberal arts education and the types of things you learn to be well rounded maybe those learnings come from other sources. Were all online these days. We have instantaneous. Access to things like masterclass in like all these other online sources of knowledge like why we augment our development personally as oppose to for a fortune. It's kind of related to one. Of my second favorite trends that you've written about which is and covert obviously. Is this. you see people that have been contributors to some media organization or whatever leaving hanging up their own shingle using a suite of tools whether it's sub stack or something else to go direct to their audience. What are you seeing beyond that. Just kind of obvious. General high level trend in the way that talent and their audience grows together. Interacts gauges in commerce together. What do you think the future holds here. I think this is one of the most exciting things to me. The era right now. You know this notion higher notion of the shingle whether it was furred agency a creative agency of law firm of venture capital firm any of these entities. The reason they have names that are not the people's names but the name of the business is because there was credibility that people needed to graph onto and there were back office functions that people had to share with order to be able to be competitive. And so you just take those two needs out. Now you build your reputation based on the knowledge that you share you can really. And we've you. And i both seemed examples of people who just go on social media like twitter. Start sharing great insights into a particular vertical that they're in and inside a leak amass a huge following and no one's even met the person people just emerges as thought leaders and experts summer even anonymous and we follow them in like really learn from them etc. So if that's any indication there is there's never drew meritocracy. We've got lots of problems in society but it is kind of exciting that individuals build a following now and they don't need to associate themselves with shingle to be able to get opportunity and then of course as you mentioned the second part of that is the full stack of everything required to operate a state of the art business. These days that as we both know at this point we can all get for maybe paying between thirty and fifty bucks. A month from five to ten different vendors so exciting. What do you think are weird frontier aspects of this trend. That may emerge. Are there ways that this gets even more extreme in terms of people not needing to be a part of a firm at all. Do you think this starts to reveal certain about decentralisation like with more and more pieces like the back office handled by some generic piece of technology. Could this get really strange were. It's like basically companies of one all over the place. Well if you think about it from a customer view you always wanna work in certain disciplines. It's all about the person. So i have a lawyer. It's really about him if he said i'm going to hand you off to so and so i'd be like no. I don't wanna do that. Might countinent is a person that i've gotten to know over the years and i don't care where she works. I just want to work with that person. And i think we're seeing it in spades venture capital right now because at the end of the day as a founder. You're bringing person on your board. You're building a relationship with an individual and who that individual is what they're good at matters deeply to you historically you've had to go to a shingle and pitch a bunch of people that you didn't know and then you get one of them now you can actually get enough money from individuals that you know and follow online or here. Daughter gets no whatever who came from a a great start to admire. You know you want to learn from and you can have that specific person and actually when you tell people who's investing the new. You'd almost rather say it's that person as opposed to whatever legal entity today set up to operate in so i think that receding of people in firms. They're obviously of course i'll building a name for themselves when they are a firm that doesn't give them good economics they leave because they realize that they're getting because of who they are not because if the firm is and then you're also seeing individuals raise hundreds of millions on their own. Because that's what matters. So it's the market speaking and it's people capitalizing on this phenomenon that you and i are describing so i actually think we will if you fast forward. I do believe that we're going to have a lot of individuals that we work with that. Have all the benefits of a back office of being in a business. But are in fact. Soloists as i like to call them. What does that mean for you as an investor. It almost makes me think like us. You're messy middle term in a very different way that this future then is about this long tail of individuals. And maybe like a very concentrated set of mega massive businesses. You know the microsoft's that kind of infrastructure layer businesses that make all this long tail possible and then the middle sorta falls away the slight organization the law partnership whatever it is. That's in the in between those two things becomes less relevant. How that as an does then just mean you. Basically want to invest in the enablers in sort of the platform type plays the shop. If is of the world wasn't investor. I have a very strong thesis around this empowerment of the soloist. When how that will crack every vertical. I am looking for businesses that allow people to operate independently and solve their problems. So if one problem is lead gen or one problem is crm for the individual type business when you look at products like sub stack and others. You know those are marketing tools for the soloist generation. And so i. I do have that lens for things that i'm looking looking for and i don't think big companies are going away. I actually think though that they're going to start to behave more as people and what you're going to see is more leaders. Having a known relationship with their customer as opposed to standing behind their shingle navy will a lot more social media accounts for the people who work within companies and probably a lot more marketing campaigns..

microsoft nanna five twitter thirty seven percent two things two examples uber both two second part fifty bucks A month obama one problem today whirlpool hundreds of millions each appliance
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:56 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Instead as you've noticed a lot of these sites it gives you a little like thinking icon. It makes you wait for six seconds. Why is it doing that. It's doing that not because it needs processing time is doing that. Because it's making you believe and feel secure in its in the result like you want to feel like the computers thinking and doing searching the globe and sorting and applying scientific algorithms and blah blah blah blah. Oh and the best deal is this. And so i think there's another example of a design pattern that instill security and confidence in customer experience. How do you ensure that all of things are true. When you're building a product so what is the this kind of qualitative things you wanna respect. How do you know once you're building something that you are in fact carrying about the users insecurity or acknowledging their laziness actually make this come to life. Yeah well it's easier to know in. It's not coming to life because you start realizing that people are turning. The people aren't getting through the first mile if ninety five percent of people that come to a landing page and have certain behaviors. That suggests that they're engaged enough to take. The next step are not taking the next step. There is a concrete reason and then the question is as you optimize to get. Make it better. Are you asking the questions we're talking about. Is the copy helping them understand their immediate utility as opposed to the long term value again from this product laziness vanity and selfishness. Is this customer feeling secure with what we're offering. That's why i know we used to see all those labels on the internet about like verified blah blah blah blah. And they better business bureau blah blah blah. Whatever these badges. And i think they kinda stopped because everyone was just using them. Even though they weren't even going to certifications it was like wasteful pixels. But what they were there for is to make you feel safe so you would click that button proceeded especially in the early days of commerce online so i think it comes down to using data to understand that. Something's not working and then starting to ask the right questions around. Some of the principals were discussing to make the right changes test. I'd love to turn now and talk about some of the things you've written that you're observing in the world that may turn into really interesting trends in software just in commerce generally speaking. I always love people that are just insatiably curious about the present and try to see colonels or read crumbs for what the future might hold the first one. That really stood out when you wrote about this to me was when you call the era of edgy point and this interesting blurring line between the traditional system of learning and then going doing something. Can you talk about what you mean by that concept and what you're seeing that makes you believe that that is coming so what i referred to as edge appointment is at a new trend. I'm seeing where companies will basically solicit students for trade to learn. Come and learn. Painting with me is a company called mean street or coming and learn how to repair.

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

01:41 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Unfamiliar pattern to the product is when you're like truly innovating on something that's like never existed before otherwise uses familiar patterns of facebook. Everyone knows how to use it. I love the one foot in the known. One foot in the unknown concept respecting that user laziness. What other user psychology elements. You mentioned several. Do you find the most important to keep in mind. And i'm thinking here of like the seven deadly sins which you hear about sometimes in product design are there other aspects of user psychology. We haven't covered that you think are important to respect. We talked about leaving selfish. I think another aspect of us policy is really understanding. The insecurity of a customer at every moment in time so in an enterprise product. It's typically job security. it's not knowing what to do next. It's not having the time to spend on things worrying that they're gonna fall behind in a social product is oftentimes how people feel about their self esteem. I think that maybe this goes to the empathy piece. But i do think that a lot of note taking products these days in they make you feel more organized by way. They're designed than they address insecurity. That a lot of us have a feeling disorganized overwhelmed. I think a lot of design makes people feel secure with whatever it is. They're doing another example of that. It's kind of funny. Is that a lot of these new products out. There are driven to find a solution for you. So for example. A travel website. Where you're trying to find the best deal on something and the funny thing is that obviously these are supercomputers running algorithms and stuff it can tell you simultaneously what the best fight values..

facebook one foot One foot seven deadly
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"We've talked about leadership. How does that transfer into a unique lands for you to evaluate companies or. You're not going to be involved. It's why when i get on zoom or meet with founder. I just wanna jump into his or her product quickly. Because i want to see how they unveil it to me. I wanna see. I always use the word object model. I don't know if that's the right term. But i like to understand when i look at the product it really do believe that every product is sort of the dna of its team and so if someone explains to you the products by jumping into some part of the middle as opposed to saying. Here's how you add this in then when you do that it goes here and then if you stack you'll see that that's where it all comes together. And this is how people get oriented your that to me represents the dna of the product leader that will manifest itself in the product of something. That's easy to navigate in a product that will care about its first mile. My little theory here is that if you can nail the first mile of any product essentially if you can have a window address that gets everyone in the door then if you're solving problem you have the right team. You will do something. Once people are in your shop that will make them pay you but the problem we have in this world is that no one goes into doors. Because everyone's busy. So that's what i'm always trying to understand and i go through the same thing when i hire people to work for me at adobe i also want people who can take a step back and understand the context of where a customer is in their journey in for a long time. Adobe a legacy of products that were so indispensable and that people would feel. It was a badge to overcome the learning curve. Photoshop where to understand the cockpit of after effects and in fact now that there are lots of competitive products out there that have a very compelling front door in their easy to get started in a really easy for smiles that keeps us on our toes. We have to reinvent our. I mean that's why. I love being a a subscription business because we can really think about getting people in the door and then adding value over time. Is there example of this that stands out in memory of a company even vested in where you had this magical first interaction with the founding team and then showing you the product. You're not supposed to pick favourite kids but just one that pops to mind first as exceptional. When i first heard about uber from garrett camp he and i had a partnership because he was running stumbled on at the time which he had purchased back from ebay and i was starting beheads and we were doing a of roshan things in he like whipped out a sketch pad of this idea of summoning car and i had previously before being an on going into the industry. I was working at of all places. Where whenever i needed a car to go home at night. I had to fill out this form. And then i had to give it to the dispatcher. And the give one of the driver. One got back to me to give it to an assistant defy wish when he kind of walked me through an garrett actually is a very like i smile products thinker Does start from design. I he does think about okay. We'll a customer with just have to click this remove all navigation and all in that was actually one of the first things that compelled me about what he was building. I also gave him the worst advice. Ever which was dude. You're running stumble upon should be focused like you can't start two things at once. Like gosh like. I'm so glad he didn't listen to me. But there are a bunch of enterprise products where come to think of one good example but it starts with object model find object model and i want to make sure understand that the best way to describe it is i drop you somewhere in. Do you know where you are. Do you know a how you got there be what you're supposed to do there and see what you're supposed to do next and it sounds so obvious but actually very few products get this right because first of all. Dave always likes to say the devil's in default wherever you land. Whatever is there is what eighty percent of customers will always see someone told me that linked in profile page back in the day always had this like interstitial like welcoming you with a little exit the top ranking corner and apparently had no one would ever click that x. So it was the lincoln for years eat still have like the welcome interstitial devils in the default and then when you're there is it clear how to go back if you make a mistake. Is it clear when you go forward. What the breadcrumbs worse you kind of stand in. Why is this stuff matter. Because it's making you familiar with the product so that you know how to use it so that you don't get lost when your attention is diverted somewhere else and then you get discombobulated when people say are technophobes. Maybe what they're really saying. Is that this design. Language and this object model of this product is not native to me. And that's also why. I advise teams that. Get creative around there you i. You know their user interface and how the product works. I'm always telling teams. Don't reinvent familiar. Things familiar patterns or your friend they breed utilization the only time you want to.

Dave Adobe uber Photoshop first mile eighty percent ebay adobe first first interaction two things One example first things garrett camp one
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Your portfolio down into its parts and matt and making it all searchable and so that was our top of funnel value. Prop that you describe. There is a kind of raw utility job to be done hook. That's one version of this in the past. You and i have also talked about this concept of window dressing. That sometimes we'll get you in. The store isn't the thing you actually need. Keep talking about this concept of window. Dressing is sort of a second side of the coin of utility. The window-dressing has to appeal again to that laziness vanity and selfishness piece. It has to make sure that your accounting for the thing that the customer would take that step because there's some immediacy to the value in discovered the long term value when they're ready and actually that is one of the biggest mistakes we all make as founders and leaders of products because we become not only in love with our products but we also with our power customers and we see the value they get and we're always like if we could just show the value that they're getting to new customers they would try our product to the problem is is that the new customers see that as unachievable for their moment for the thirty second moment that they're in and so you kind of have to have in some ways to value props for everything you're promising and then wherever you put in the window is the thing that brings someone in the door and then once they're in the door you show the merchandise think about this with book titles and book graphics and stuff i mean it's so silly that whatever the illustrator that you're working with and the publisher thinks is clever ends up being the presentation of three hundred pages worth of insights and research. And how sad is that but at the same time again. Laziness vanity selfishness. And how do we get someone to crack. Open that book and read that first age and it's totally different art and science that we have to disconnect from are more purposeful long-term visions for our product. So we've talked mostly about the customer side of this. So far getting their attention getting them moving. That first mile loved the idea that that's just the way under considered i'm guilty of it too since like after thought that you deal with at the end of building the actual product. I want to turn to the product itself both books that you've written the messy middle and making ideas happen. I think are sort of an ode to hard work. Cranking it out. After the spark of inspiration more about the ninety nine percent perspiration so having built lot of products yourself and ben behind a lot of great product builders in in your investing career. Tell me what you've learned about that messy middle about the process of taking something from an idea to an actual functioning long-term high-value product the inspiration. That i had for these books really my frustration with the creative process general and you know as humans. We're not wired to embark on multi year projects. We're wired towards short term rewards if the average life span was twenty five years back only one hundred years ago yet alone. Hundreds of years ago than the idea of embarking on something without a foreseeable end is actually biologically not smart. And so how do we. Year and short circuit our teams in ourselves with our products to achieve something. Great that does take years to bake to me. It's like the funnest part of management for me. Is hacking those reward systems coming up with fun things to do to keep a team engaged long enough believing that the competitive advantage of startups is just sticking together long enough to figure it out if you have the right people. Even if you don't have to deal you'll just keep iterating. Till i find it if you have the right people so i think a lot of it comes down to rewards if i were to sum it up and with product. How can you make sure you're getting the satisfaction of satisfying customers soon. The unsung heroes of a lot of great companies out. There are the early customers that for whatever reason were so willing and forgiving to leinen despite. They didn't have any equity in the company. They weren't employees. They just for whatever reason. Were sitting in some enterprise or some kid in high school who wanted to play with something that wasn't really working at because they were so fascinated by it and then they shared feedback with the team. That was the source of the early satisfaction. That kept the team going in. So that's one reason why i always encourage teams to not try to get any customer in the beginning but get those willing forgiving customers. I am curious. The reward circuitry itself. Try this a lot of different ways breaking down. Even if you kind of know where you're going over a multi year period the most effective ways of breaking down that reward circuitry to keep people motivated and the problems that you've seen learn to overcome i'll share like a couple stories. I think eliminate what i'm talking about here. So he has bootstrap for five years before raising our first round of capital from scriptures folks. Like jeff bezos. And chris dickson and a few others but for five years. We were kind of hand off and it was rough. It was also over the course of two thousand and eight which was also hard time in in the economy and so i realized that i'll add to do is keep the team together and keep cranking. We believed in this. We knew that the need was there. We had to survive and beyond to kind of interest with our customers and so we started to have some fun with how we would feel like. We're making progress when there was no official semblance of progress. You weren't making any money and we weren't having people join our site yet. The technology wasn't there yet and so we started fun. Things we had these things called slats. I'm not sure what we call them. Slat bats we would make these little games that -tarian to see age of seven for whatever reason are like small engineering team was like what scott if we reach one hundred thousand members. You're gonna agree any form of meat. We want you to off of one of our forks. Now is like whatever you know. If that's ever going to happen we'll see so. I said sure and low and behold like three years later at christmas dinner. I was doing that but it was like one of those kind of fun short-circuited rewards it wasn't real but it was actually pushing us in the right direction. I remember two thousand and seven when we came up with the name. Be hands every time you typed into google. It said do you mean enhance and it was like really frustrating and so another short-term kind of go we had was. Let's just get enough blog post link backs to portfolios that were legitimate search results and then six or eight months later we came in and alas finally google no longer thought that we were a mistake and then i always like to tell the story that bianchi became super popular a year. Later we lost over. I but then regained it so i think you have to do some of those things. And that's why i also. I think that the talent of merchandising journey to your team is important. You are as a leader. You're driving dislike cross country road trip with your team with the windows. Blacked out in the back seat. And unless you narrate the progress. You're and i'll end with this. Like theresa mobley. I write about this in the book professor. Harvard business school did a research study on motivation and companies. She had people every day and talk about how motivated they felt and what they were getting accomplished and through this whole study her basic takeaway was progress begets progress. You have to feel like you're making progress to make more progress. And that's what. I mean by merchandising and being creative with what that progress actually is so almost your job on the coast to coast road trip to pick the fifteen pitstops each of which is celebrated and milestone along the way. I love that concept. So you have this fascinating that kadhamy of being on top of one of those as frankly one of the most interesting company turnarounds. I'll call it at adobe transition from old line soifer business to one of the leaders of the sort of cloud suite of services very successfully can look stock chart if you don't agree and also investing quite a lot in some of the iconic companies technologies offer companies of the last decade when you're looking at a company with your investment hat on. How does this learning about customer journey and product and window-dressing user progress. All these things..

chris dickson jeff bezos ninety nine percent thirty second first mile two thousand Hundreds of years ago one hundred years ago both books five years eight three hundred pages three years later one hundred thousand members one six Harvard business school one reason seven google
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

09:08 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Been so excited to do this with you. I think will make the first part of this conversation about the psychology and process of building great products. And then. we'll talk a lot about everything else that you do. You have your hands in so many interesting things. My opening question. I guess it's just very broad. Which is what is your philosophy of building. Great products generally speaking. That's a great question. And i am ultimately anchored by customer journeys. I've always believed that prototype worth hundred meetings and the greatest failings i've seen in the product world including my own are when you build something out of passion for problem rather than have empathy with those suffering from the problem which means you just have to kind of get more shoulder to shoulder than you've ever felt you could with customers and it's somewhat counterintuitive because a lot of those things you do are just not scalable but they're what you do to just really feel. What a customer is feeling. And i think that dictates not only Experience which we can talk about and the first mile product experience which i think is woefully neglected man underestimated and under invested in. But also the marketing experience the copy the email frequency the notifications. I mean every single aspect customer experience ultimately is anchored with what the person experiencing them. We'll feel so. How could you orchestrate all that without really getting close to the bone. Talk a little bit about for given customer journey whether that's a business that you're investing in and looking at or something that you're building your self at adobe. Where do you begin. You mentioned the first mile. That's kind of interesting phrase or concept. How do you begin to understand or attack one of these journeys. Do you think it starts with that. I smile because at the end of the day. All nighters is really who you can get into your funnel and then whatever. Customer potential customer sees i at the top of the funnel is the only thing that all customers will ever experience and it's just downhill from there. It's only at the anywhere. Designers and engineers and developers and product leaders are thinking. Wow so what should. The default landing state in this product be and what should the copy view into land there for the first time. These things are the tour. All these things are just kind of last minute. Decisions oftentimes especially in startups. And it's like the only thing all of your customers will ever see so. I think that that's a good anchor point nine as you go deeper. You have to start to decide and because the reality is always trade-offs which problems you want to optimize to have later in which ones you have to solve now. And that's the path of building a product. Can you give me an example from your own experience of working to make a first mile better other creative cloud which is the massive suite of products that i'm responsible for and it was built out of a hodgepodge of different products that were bundled together. I on a business level in overtime as a product so for us. It's come down to alright like let's start to understand every screen of the experience. What are the various landing pages of customers get immediately after signing up when they land. Do we know anything about them. Oh no we don't know anything about them. Well how do we build a personalized experience for them. Based on their first mile what we detect and what they tell us and then you start to go down various paths of will. If they stopped doing this how do you help them but they struggle with this. How do you help them and again. It's all empathy driven because we can actually understand what each individual customers going through. Then we start to craft those paths for them and that's where it gets a lot of data intensive experiences. Well because now you're dissecting the funnel trying to extrapolate from that personas you know in different journeys. The customers are getting lost in now. Here's the tricky part. Is that once you get a first mile. That's working in product. It doesn't mean it will continue working because every cohort of new customers is different. I think a great example. This is twitter. Twitter had the perfect first mile experience. People who were willing to craft their own timeline. Those of us who went in and would follow people and follow people over years to make the perfect time line for us. Twitter was optimized for that out of the gate and then they hit a ceiling of people who are willing to do that and everyone beyond that came for news and the idea of having to follow accounts was just too myopic for that next generation or that that larger cohort of customers. I don't know what it was like the first hundred million or so. We're willing to tolerate this. Then it broke down for and so of course they hide to lean into its topics. they're always thinking about. How do we have a more topic. Centrist experience. you're you're seeing that in a product but you have to kind of go go the first mile continually and say hey now. Let's have a new sense of empathy with our newest cohort our customers. Where are they struggling. What have you learned about user progress. I've been studying video games a lot. And it's amazing. How finely tuned the feedback. Loops are in the best. Save mobile games for making the user. Feel like they're learning something very rapidly and quickly. Does that same concept. This sort of user progress concept apply to first mile and great product experiences. You think so. I actually think it applies to every product even enterprise products and. I don't think a lot of people understand this. I call ego analytics. People want to know and see that they are being successful. And i always like to say that. In the first thirty seconds of every product experience every user is lazy vain and selfish. They want everything to be done for them. They don't wanna read something. They don't feel like their time should be spent on anything new and you have to craft hooks that get people through that laziness vanity and selfishness. What famous example they were like developers only two lines of code. You can get your product appealing to laziness to some degree. And then vanity to some extent when they are teammates and their products quickly. And i think every product actually has some of that. Even the most cumbersome enterprise products i believe are successful with make their users look good to their bosses so some enterprise products. I still have an export function where you can export a spreadsheet that is edible. That looks beautiful that is edible by its users. So that he or she can get it. Make it look like it's there's save it as a pdf and send it to their management team and then suddenly it's like. Oh my goodness who did this. Level of diligent analysis. Now that's an example of how you make an enterprise product thrive through that sense of ego analytics and making sure people know that they look good through using the product. So i think it applies to social into enterprise on the social side. It actually means you have to think about dashboards and instant sources of feedback and there's a debate about. Is this stuff a slippery slope and are we building products that then become addictive. And i think that is like the problem is that we know that these are mechanisms that work especially on the consumer product development side and we have to evolve them to some degree only click even one level up in the customer journey. Which is what. i'll call it. The attention phase so user progresses. Obviously once they're engaged a little bit before that has to be like they have to be aware you exist and care and be interested. What have you learned about. I guess that's the very very top of the journey awareness and attention and interest. A good example was early days of pinterest. Ben silverman always had the vision of a discovery network where you could discover your interests but the real reason people would actually try that product when they had never heard of it or even could barely pronounce it because it was so new was the utility of collecting stuff at the time delicious which was owned by yahoo and there are a few other book marking sites. That weren't image centric and he talked about how everyone has something they collect or wanna keep track of and so. Let's make sure that we come over the top with the utility for you before we try to get. You convinced that there is future utility that you won't get now back to the lease vanity and selfishness with hands my product. It was all about people showcasing their work to get jobs. And of course we felt like creatives wanna see each other's work and get inspired by each other's work but a lot of other competitors of ours were always focus on the inspiration side and our team was like the last thing creatives need more of is creativity. They don't need more inspiration in fact if you ask any creative. They'll oftentimes say that they have a hard time getting shit done because they have too many ideas and too many things to try and they need to actually focus and be more focused on execution out of the gate. We decided we would never use the words creativity or inspiration in the bahamas product and we also focused on top of funnel utility of manage a portfolio site that also is broken down into projects so that people can discover them who don't know them because what we found from our audience was that they had websites out there that no one other than their parents and people they knew and they wanted to get discovered for jobs and so it was like. Hey we will help you get more job leads by breaking.

yahoo Twitter Ben silverman twitter first mile first thirty seconds two lines first hundred million first time first part each individual nine hundred meetings one level bahamas many ideas adobe pinterest every single aspect
"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

01:49 min | 5 months ago

"one mile" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"This episode is brought to you by one of the fastest growing fintech startups. I discovered earlier this year. When i asked twitter for the best bloomberg alternative and the overwhelming winner wasn't intriguing. New product called griffin a web based platform. That lets you analyze stocks. Etf's mutual funds and other assets. All in one place. I now use it daily to track. What's going on in the market. And i think if you try if you will to has tons of high quality data powerful functionality and a nice clean interface if you're an individual investor research analyst portfolio manager or financial adviser. You should definitely check them out. Sign up for free at coif in dot com. That's k. o. Y. f. i n. Dot com this episode of invest. Like the best is brought to you by teargas. I started hearing by several of my close professional investor. Friends sent me passages or ideas. They'd found on the platform conducting effective. Primary research. shouldn't take weeks. it should take hours. Searching for answers. Shouldn't be lengthy cumbersome process. It should be easy and nearly immediate expert calls should not cost thousand dollars. Ticket solves these problems and makes primary research faster and better for professional investors. Tickets has built. The most extensive primer information platform available for all investors with teague gives. You can learn everything. You'd want to know about a company in an on demand digital platform. Investors share their expert calls allowing others to instantly access more than ten thousand calls on a firm tele. Doc roablocks almost any company of interest. All you have to do is logging still want to do. Your own calls has a solution experts. That are just as good or better than what you'd find in other networks for just three hundred dollars per call not the one thousand dollars or more that others charge. If you're curious about teague is called the top performing investment manager you can think of. They're probably already a teague is customer and they'll point you in the right direction because customers myself included love tedious visit teague dot co slash patrick to learn.

At least 5 killed in massive car pileup in Texas

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

At least 5 killed in massive car pileup in Texas

"Rising in Fort Worth from a massive crash. The Fort Worth Police Department says five people have died. At least 36 were taken to hospitals, including one officer who was injured in the crash. The accident involving around 100 vehicles happened at about sunrise in sub freezing temperatures and a light drizzle. That left 18 wheelers on their sides and cars piled on top of trucks down a one mile stretch of interstate 35. ABC.

Fort Worth Police Department Fort Worth ABC
NASCAR Busch Clash at Daytona

The Final Lap

01:24 min | 6 months ago

NASCAR Busch Clash at Daytona

"Today. We have racing on the racetrack from daytona. The bush clash goes down at that race track. And it's an infield road course. Oh my gosh excited. I could not be more. Does that make sense so who is eligible to race in this thing. How about twenty. Twenty busch pole award winners. There's only a handful because of covid passed busch clash winners who competed full-time last year. Daytona five hundred champions. Who competed fulltime in two thousand twenty. Former daytona five hundred busch pole winners who competed fulltime last year. And finally. let's run down this list. Twenty twenty cup series playoff drivers race winners and stage winners based on this criteria. Twenty-one drivers will race. Oh see if your favourite is on this list. Eric merola ryan blaney. Alex bowman chris buscher kurt. Busch kyle busch william byron cole. Custer matt benedetto. Austin dillon ty dillon. Chase elliott denny. Hamlin kevin harvick. Eric jones brad. Kazlauskiene joy lugano ryan. Newman tyler rettig ricky. Stenhouse junior and martin tricks junior rounds out that list okay. Format is going to be thirty five laps with one scheduled. Pitstop coming at lap fifteen. The racetrack is going to be three point. Six one miles in length on a road course that features fourteen turns and you could check out all the action all man so excited as previously mentioned seven. Pm eastern on f s one

Busch Pole Award Daytona Eric Merola Ryan Blaney Alex Bowman Chris Buscher Busch Kyle Busch William Byron Cole Custer Matt Benedetto Austin Dillon Ty Dillon Chase Elliott Denny Hamlin Kevin Harvick Eric Jones Brad Bush Newman Tyler Rettig Ricky Kurt Stenhouse
How Galaxy Digital bridges the gap between the crypto and the institutional worlds

Odd Lots

03:26 min | 6 months ago

How Galaxy Digital bridges the gap between the crypto and the institutional worlds

"A very simple thing to ask you. Which is what is galaxy actually do. Because every time i see described. It's usually a really vague. Term like galaxy is an investment firm in crypto or galaxy. Works in the crypto industry. Never see a release specific description of it i. We're going to try to be much crystal player so we have four or five businesses. Did anyone to break it out. We have one business. Which is were you know or adventure shop direct investing and so we've invested in eighty companies. That are building out the crypto ecosystem from new protocols like one inch or luna token to exchanges to custody services so anything that has touched the crypto ecosystem or quite frankly the virtual world ecosystem we're investing in so we have a giant portfolio of of investments. We have inventory of bitcoin. Theory of another coins that i personally trade And so by at one is going down and settlers going up and so that's our principal activities. Then we have what you'd call a traditional sales let sales trading credits. We lend money to people that are participating in the space that's miners. That's that are just normal. Customers lending on margin we have a derivative business. Right were the second or third biggest a market maker in options and so you want to do structure product or sell calls against your position or by plus where there for institutions we have an asset management business where we take other people's money in raise it we have a bitcoin fund We have the bloomberg. Bitcoin crypto index We have a venture fund that focus on the virtual worlds stuff and we have an investment bank a group of people that have great domain expertise in the space and we'll give advice on mergers and acquisitions on on capela raziq and so and then we have a mining division right. We are minding our own crypto. And that's mining finance its mining derivatives in its us mining ourselves and so pretty broad and diversified it's been focused on institutions not retail. And so that was a painful position to be in until about april last year. With covid happened right. i said l. the 'institutions are coming in men. they were slow and then covert happened. And they went from walking at one mile an hour to trotting to sprinting. And now it's like ninety nine mph. You know just mad dash and so you've seen hedge funds insurance companies asset managers all entering the space since april and. That's why when we went through twenty. We went right to forty in bitcoin. Those institutions are mostly buying bitcoin. But the moment you make a little money in bitcoin yelich. What else is in this space. And you look into the theory amoeba system. And you're like wow that's pretty cool too. And so then. They're putting some money in theory and then the final spaces will wear the real disruptions to happen is in defy defy really simply put his taking a blockchain breeds in the financial system. Right it is creating driverless. Banks or driverless. Insurance companies are driverless derivative markets. And that while it still. I think in the sandbox right. It's still working out the kinks in beings. Lloyd it's growing so fast that you could see the guppies jump out of the sandbox and become frog's really

Galaxy Bloomberg United States Lloyd
Is Refresh Model S/X Battery Smaller?

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

03:41 min | 6 months ago

Is Refresh Model S/X Battery Smaller?

"We know that the range on the long range version of the model s. has now increased to four hundred and twelve miles so previously and this is apn estimate previously four hundred to right before let's refresh so we only saw a ten mile increase. Which you know makes us think okay. Tussle didn't really change much in terms of the batteries there but they did note in the earnings report that they made changes to the batteries. Major changes to the modules yuan. They're still using those eighteen. Six fifty cells from panasonic But they have updated the chemistry or at least made some updates to the cell and battery architecture and general replaced those skateboard Visual image online. So it's it's definitely update in terms of the batteries but only see ten additional miles of range. Come out of that. I was pretty interesting especially when we look a little bit deeper and we noticed that the drag coefficient on the model s. has now been lowered from. I believe it was point two three before to now points two zero eight so that should definitely helped with the range. It's a pretty significant reduction in drag coefficient and then we've also seen them drop the weight so the wait for the long range model s now starts at four thousand five hundred sixty one pounds versus before. So i've got the way back machine pulled up here and this is from january twenty fourth. I'm not sure if you can see that. On the stream but from january twenty fourth the long range plus model s had a weight of forty eight hundred pounds so they've cut two hundred and fifty pounds out of the weight. They've reduced the drag coefficient so five percents rate reduction a significant reduction drake officiant and yet. We're only seeing ten more miles of range. This could be a trade off between tussles optimizing for in terms of energy versus power. Obviously the zero sixty on the stock in the long range right now has dropped from three point seven seconds before now down to three point one seconds so some of that could be impacting. The actual range that is happening from the epa tests. But if all else was held equal certainly expected a bigger range improvement from vizier. Point or the zero point two zero eight cd and the two hundred fifty pound weight reduction ver only ten miles only two percent more range two and a half percent more rain when they're cutting weight by five percent so we actually see a similar thing with the model x. As well flip over there so this current long range after refresh. We now have of starting weight and i think i think the drako fishing stay the same on the model x. but we starting wait Five thousand one hundred eighty five pounds on the model x. Verses here is again so this january twenty fifth so before the refresh. It was fifty four hundred thirty seven pounds so again similar. Two hundred and fifty pound reduction there almost five percent and only an actually in the case of the model x. We see arrange decrease so we had three hundred seventy one miles. Epa estimate before. And now we're at three hundred sixty so they only gained ten on the model last. They lost eleven on the model x. A to think that. I always this is pointing to me towards tesla potentially using less fewer batteries in the battery pack. Maybe that's not the case. Maybe these are software ltd but to cut that much weight to cut the drag officiant drako efficient and not gain more than ten miles of range. I think is pretty perplexing so dessel may have found a way to just you know they may have just said okay are target. Here's we're going to stay the same range. We're happy with these ranges and you know we think the customers are happy with these ranges. We're going to optimize for cost and just reduce the number of cells were putting in these new modules packs for the refresh That could have been an option or you know again. Maybe it's just that power versus energy exchange.

Panasonic EPA Dessel Tesla
The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

The Cut

04:50 min | 9 months ago

The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

"Idea for a future radio story. Today, is January twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. Donald Trump was just inaugurated. That was me four years ago I wanted to capture my fears and concerns about trump's presidency. So I hopped in the recording studio my old job recorded a little audio time capsule. I've kept this file on my computer for four years. Didn't listen to it until recently. So many people in this country are so excited about trump. Is can't believe I could disagree with this many people. Innocent innocent extremely privileged belief. But I guess that's why I wanted to ask you avery of the future. You who have lived through one term of. The trump presidency. So weird just a few questions. So I recorded fifteen minutes of questions about the state of the country for my future self, which is to say me. Currently. To answer did he build a wall around Mexico or did he try Oh man I mean yeah. He's still trying like actively according to customs and Border Protection, there's been three hundred, seventy, one miles of new wall completed but there's still a lot more to go. So we'll see is marijuana legal. Depends on the state you live in, but it's fully legal in eleven of them. So yeah. Yes or no Legal. Well, no. It could be. There were a bunch of other questions that I won't bore you with because I. Realize I can't actually answer most of the questions from my past self. Like they're all kind of complicated and still in process and it turns out a lot of the rights I was worrying about four years ago are still very much under threat now. Including the issue that I was most frightened about. On Donald Trump's inauguration day. The very first question I asked to my future self. Was this one. Are Abortions illegal. Did HE DE-FUND PLANNED PARENTHOOD? Of course I, know abortions are still legal for now the law of the land upholds Roe v Wade. Although I'm not sure I really understood how complicated the answer to this question actually was. And is especially now that trump has appointed three supreme court justices. So I want to start asking you that big question. Are Abortions illegal. Well, yeah. They are legal right now for some people, they have been inaccessible to millions more preceding trump's inauguration. Rebecca Tracer is a writer at large for New York magazine and the cut. So where we are right now is that we're closer to abortions being illegal than we've been in my life time nominated by President Reagan and serving thirty years on the court. He was often the crucial swing vote you know Anthony Kennedy's retirement breath Kavanagh's confirmation, and here today not because I want to be. Terrified riding completely over the testimony of Christine Lousy Ford I. Do not believe that these charges can barely per bed judge cabin from serving on the court Susan Collins vote for breakfast all these things on a court. level. were sort of big publicly covered wakeup calls and there has been women in the streets. Right there have been women and men in the streets there have been people in the streets. Four years into Donald, trump being president the like. The reality of that is hitting a lot of people hard. But one of the ways that we got to this point is that the inaccessibility and the project of making abortion illegal. Didn't hit anybody hard enough. Inaccessibility isn't just recent. It's now it happens now around the country for millions of women for whom enough barriers have been put in place that that role might as well not exist because it actually doesn't serve as a barrier. It doesn't serve as a protection of their right to get the care that they need. So there are states. In the country where the the laws are so prohibitive where there have already been people jailed for abortion.

Donald Trump President Reagan Marijuana Susan Collins ROE Rebecca Tracer Mexico Christine New York President Trump Writer Anthony Kennedy Kavanagh
All of Teslas 2021 Model Year Updates

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

06:11 min | 10 months ago

All of Teslas 2021 Model Year Updates

"Everybody, Rob Power here, and today we haven't exciting episode. We have updates from Tesla on almost every single vehicle in the lineup. So we're going to go through exactly what has changed because there's a lot here to keep track up. So tell normally doesn't make these broad sweeping changes across the lineup they sort of just update each vehicle as they have changes to make. This then is pretty unique for Tesla and it does seem like they're making these changes right at the same time that they're changing the model year. So even though on tussles website, they don't necessarily designate what model you're. The vehicle is the vehicle identification number does still indicate that and from those Vince we've been able to see. That Tesla has just now started producing those twenty twenty one model year vehicles over the last couple of weeks we'll talk a little bit more about that later but let's get right into the changes here. Predominantly, the changes have come to the model three but again, there are updates to all the vehicles which every captain a chart here. If you are watching on video, we'll go out of the traditional order here of as three X Y and switch it up. We'll start with the model three. So the standard range plus originally had a two hundred and fifty mile range that has now been increased by thirteen miles two, hundred, sixty, three the long range version saw the most significant bump for the model. Going from three hundred, twenty, two miles before now to three hundred and fifty three miles of range and the performance jumped up by sixty miles from two hundred, ninety, nine miles before now to three hundred fifteen for the standard range plus and the performance that's about a five percent increase in range. But for the long range, it's actually about nine and a half percent. Unfortunately at this point in time, we don't know what is driving that significant variance between the long range, all wheel drive, and the other trims were just going to have to wait and see once he's actually start being delivered to customers aside from the range. The long range and performance versions are now quicker zero to sixty. The Long Range non-performance has been updated from four point four seconds before to four point two seconds now, and the performance has gone from three point two seconds to sixty down to three point one as for other changes we've talked about quite a few of these earlier this week about the big one here is the heat pump house actually able to confirm that the new version of the model three does have the heat pump. This was just from one source at Tesla. So it is possible that that source was misinformed but from my knowledge, the model three now does have a heap like the model why that should improve the efficiency especially in colder climates we know that the model three has Now been updated from chrome to have black trim instead a power trunk. There is a new steering wheel electric is saying that the steering wheel is heated I have not seen that confirmed anywhere else though. So I think that's a question mark at this point in time, there's new updates. So the air wheels and the sport wheels have been updated to a new look, and then the performance model three has been updated to the Uber. Turbine wheels that are currently on the model y though on the model three, they're an inch smaller at just twenty inches rounding things out are I believe updated mirrors though I think this happened earlier sometime around September to add a heating element to the side mirrors. And then I believe there's also now an auto dimming rear view mirror for the model three. There has been updates to the windows apparently for better soundproofing, and then of course, the updated center console. So the fingerprint trap that was the piano black glossy console is no more at least for the model three does still remain on the Model Y. so speaking of the Monowai, let's move on to the updates there these are just range focused. So the long range model why has improved by ten miles from previous EPA rating of three hundred, sixty miles to a new rating of three hundred and twenty six miles three percent increase there, and then the performance model why has gone from two hundred ninety? One miles up to three. So twelve miles there or an additional four percent we'll come back to that for a little bit more analysis but just around things out for the Model S. The long range range actually stayed the same at four hundred and two miles. So no change there. But the performance had a significant increase from three hundred, forty, eight miles before up to three, hundred, Eighty, seven, thirty, nine miles incremental or eleven point two percent of course, the other big news on the Model S. This week has been the price cut. So the long range has been reduced by fifty five hundred dollars while the performance reduced by three thousand as for the X. No price cut here so. There is a pretty big spread now between the US on the ex but the long range version did see a range increase as we talked about earlier this week when we had seen that, Maroni sticker from a new delivery, it's gone from three hundred, fifty one miles before now up twenty miles to three hundred, seventy, one about six percent increase, and then the performance seeing similar level of increase to the performance model s from three Oh five before now up to three, hundred, forty, one about a twelve percent increase or thirty six miles. So to the best of my knowledge that captures all the changes across the entire lineup. But of course, as these vehicles start to be delivered, we may still. Uncover some other minor changes but to summarize all this, if we look at the average here across the entire lineup, not using any waiting by sales or anything like that destroyed up across the board previously tussles average range three, hundred, twenty miles per vehicle. Now it's three, hundred and forty. So a twenty mile increase for the average vehicle tesla sales or about six percent. So how is Tesla able to achieve all this? Well, back in July? We had heard that Panasonic had already developed technology that had resulted in a more than five percent increase in energy density on Tussles twenty-one seventy battery cells and Reuters reported that they would quote start converting lions at Gaggenau Vada from September so I think now. We're mid October were starting to see the results of those updates in the lineup, and we're also seeing improvements and s an ex and those were to use the eighteen sixties from. Japan not the twenty one seventies from Geena. Vada but if Panasonic was able to improve the twenty-one seventies while they were probably able to improve the eighteen, six fifty as well I think it's tough to find another explanation for the roughly six percent increase in the Model X. range other than updated cells. But the confusing part is that zero percent increase on the long range model s remember though when the Model S. increased from somewhere around three hundred, eighty miles up to that four hundred to rating the model extra. At all. So really it's just catching up with the previous model s updates. So I wonder if maybe Panasonic had been testing an earlier version of that new battery cell with the five percent energy density increase in just the Model S. but then it wouldn't explain why the performance model which would presumably have the same pack as the long range is seeing a similar increase. On the model here as the Model X.

Tesla Panasonic Rob Power EPA Vince United States Tussles Gaggenau Vada Reuters Japan
Model S Price Cut, X Range Increase(?)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:37 min | 10 months ago

Model S Price Cut, X Range Increase(?)

"Everybody Rob our here, and today we were talking about a price cut on Tesla's model s an update on the full self-driving rewrite an SNP credit rating upgrade some news out of China India that a couple of other topics as well. We'll start off with the price cut tesla today the US lowered the base price for both the long range and the performance version of the Model S. by three thousand dollars meaning the starting prices dropped from about seventy five, thousand dollars before to about seventy two thousand dollars now and Tesla has similar. We cut the price in China for the mile s by about three percent I don't believe. It has been updated in Europe but all the pricing those markets are different. So let me know otherwise if it has changed in your market this is the second Prescott on the Model S. This year following a five thousand dollar price cut on the vehicle back in May, which also applied to the Model X. at that time. Interestingly, this update is only for the model s not the Model X. That means the base price spread on both the long range and performance versions of these vehicles is now eight thousand dollars I don't think this is terribly surprising given. The fact that we are now in Q. Four and Tesla does still. Have a shot at hitting five, hundred, thousand vehicle deliveries this year but it's GonNa take every single vehicle to do that I, think and on the s next combined unfortunately, tussle doesn't break those out individually anymore. But on those two vehicles combined they have been producing and delivering under the capacity Tesla in their queue update letter said that they had a current installed annual capacity out of Fremont for s and x combined and ninety thousand per year. That's twenty, two, thousand, five, hundred per quarter but tesla hasn't delivered more than twenty thousand as next combined since the end of twenty eighteen excluding the first two quarters this year due to. Production Shutdowns Tesla's at that point in time has averaged production of around sixteen thousand s annex per quarter. So they certainly seemed to have some additional capacity and that should be the case for batteries as well because these used the eighteen sixties from Panasonic, in Japan, which have previously accommodated s an extra rates around twenty, five, thousand per quarter in Q. Three, tesla produced around seventeen thousand ax in our previous conversations about potential Q. Four production. I just held that study at seventeen thousand I. Now think that will actually increase this quarter q four is naturally a stronger quarter for automotive demand tussle now, early in the quarter stacks this price. Got On top of it, and we also had the Plan Model S. announced at battery. Day? Which I think could have removed some doubts for some buyers that may have been waiting for battery day in anticipation of potentially other updates to tussles lineup. So I think you for should be pretty solid for model s and not to be outdone entirely by the model as we may actually have a range update for the Model X. DMZ member cold weather e. v. last night posted an update that they had just taken delivery of a twenty twenty one then model x. and they were surprised to see that on the monroney sticker which. Is that sticker in the vehicle comes with all new vehicles and has things like efficiencies migrating, and one of those things is EPA rating this person will surprised to see that the EPA rating for Model X. was three, hundred, seventy, one miles that is higher than the previous rating of three hundred, fifty, one miles of range, which is what tussle still lists on their design studio. So we'll have to wait and see if we hear this from more people obviously this just as one source at this point in time, and this user also does say quote I haven't charged to one hundred percent but when extrapolate my current state of charge? percent two miles, it should give three hundred and fifty one miles at one, hundred percent and quote. So maybe it is still three hundred, fifty, one miles or maybe the software just hasn't been updated for this new version yet I think the latter is more likely but again, we'll wait and see this would be five point seven percent increase to range, which I think brings to mind a couple of things. We earlier this year had a similar increase in range to the Model S., which took it from around three hundred eighty at remember the exact rating up to four hundred miles per charge. But when that happened the Model X.. Actually, stayed constant. So this could be the X. catching up with those s updates previously, or we do also know that Panasonic has been working to improve energy density in Nevada by about five percent five plus percent. So maybe they made more changes to the eighteen six fifty's that supply the model x. from Japan, and then maybe those new cells would be adding this five percent plus range. If that were the case we would expect to see this also happened in the Model S. probably. So anybody that is taking new deliveries of either the or the X. Please take a look at what your monroney sticker says and let us know. Next up, we have an update on Tesla autopilot rewrite Alon on twitter yesterday said Quote Limited Fasd Beta, releasing on Tuesday next week as promised. This will at first be limited to a small number of people who are expert and careful drivers and quote we last had an update on this about a month ago when John said quote releasing private Beta in two to four weeks public. Beta. Centers opt in four to six weeks after that. Then all US Tesla owners mid-december above schedules contingent upon not encountering major unexpected setbacks and quote. So this new tweet, it's a little bit less clear on which step or in if it is that I private. Beta. That he on his talking about here or if it's that limited public Beta for early access owners but to me, it does sound like that first. Step of being a private Beta. So that will come out next week one week from today on October twentieth. Apparently, if that's the case, it's about a week and a half out from that previous timeline but I think everybody can be pretty happy with that. If we extrapolate from that same timeline before using these new dates, we'd be four to six weeks out from early access, which would put a day range for. That from November seventeenth to December first depending on how wide this initial releases that early access program update that might be the first time that we actually start to see youtube videos and things of the sort pop up for the new rewrite though it is possible that we may see some of that as early as next week.

Tesla United States Panasonic Japan Europe China EPA ROB Youtube Fremont China India Prescott Monroney Twitter Alon John Nevada
An Andretti wins first Indy 500 pole for family in 33 years

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

An Andretti wins first Indy 500 pole for family in 33 years

"And then Jedi when's the first Indy five hundred pole for the family in thirty three years now he will lead the field to the green in next Sunday's Indy five hundred Marco Andretti locked up four lap average of two hundred and thirty one miles per hour in Sunday's qualify he had tears in his eyes reciting advices grandfather marry Andretti gave him the wind will scare you but they will never rush you Mario Andretti scored the only Indy five hundred win for the family in nineteen sixty nine the August twenty third race will be Marco Andretti's fifteen the temp his own father Michael Andretti fell short in sixteen tries when Marco came off the tracks Sunday after winning the pole father and son embraced then strategized for the big one I'm Julie Walker

Marco Andretti Mario Andretti Michael Andretti Julie Walker Indy
"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"So as you think about the models you guys have developed and higher coaching the market, what would you say is one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced and a key learning that came out of that that fax kind of varied setbacks also come from, you know also some frustration, right? So there's a lot of. And desire to incorporate data driven insights and advanced analytics into the workflows and decision making. But the reality is that it's a far cry from happening, and it's largely because of you know the legacy systems that a lot of these companies are sitting on and it makes it very difficult for different departments and different teams. It's actually creepy analytics that are also consistent right from department to another and. And we see that time time again the fact that data silo away that it is very difficult and Even in conversation, you know this whole idea of data analytics really often tossed with very. You know, maybe a shallower understanding of what it really is and then the interpretation implementations difficult. But you know we take these setbacks and grew they really become our opportunities, right? So. You spoke about Hana conditions before I can ask you listeners do know what the chronic conditions are in your market meaning. Do you know exactly where they are? You know who the people are? Are you able to identify your membership with those chronic conditions? Do you know where they live in were to where they work, and then you know if you're in the Medicare fields do you You know where the Medicare agents are. You WanNa try to take care of them. Before they coincide Medicaid. Medicare. Excuse me equally is the uninsured, which is also a very large expense So with chronic conditions, for example, we've actually taken that in mapped out literally the chronic conditions understanding at at a high resolution where the propensity is for these chronic conditions so that our clients can really. Out there markets and build customized solutions both from a network perspective from a planning perspective, whatever tools they have to be able to target those people and really give them the services that they need, and at the end of the day, it really starts treating the person completely, but it does require having a much broader understanding of the data that's available and beyond the date of that happens actually within building walls. But what's happening out there in the real world that combination of both and do you understand your patient based the understand your community base of in where where are those chronic? Chronic conditions There's a great opportunity to better understand those if you have the right tools and so as you think about what you're most excited about today, he lied, what would you say that is There's a lot actually to be excited about events. Now, with the the difficult situation that we're in right now you know socially and medically with with a pandemic. But for us, it's spatially house. We are looking at a couple of very exciting projects coming on board One is working with behavioral and Mental Health, which is also very, very big problem and also working with some large. Large health plans. So really being able to take on modeling and our tools and take it across a much broader geography and much deeper problems in issues was happening right now that we're very excited about is actually an implementation of our covid nineteen local vulnerabilities math. This is math that we published back in April, which is probably one of the first maps that were out in the market of looking at local vulnerabilities. But at a very, very granular scale not just ZIP codes and counties, but really down to you know almost top levels and the goal with are the. The map was to work with what we know and working off of the risk factors that were identified by the World Health Organization. We decided to develop a math actually identifies areas that are most vulnerable outbreaks, and then of course, if an outbreak those happen, they will be in a much dire straits situation than somebody other populations. So that map was published in got a lot of conversations here in south. Florida but recently commissioned by a large non profit in south Florida to create customized vulnerability map for their particular mission, which was vulnerabilities due to health disparities and. Used right now to direct the interventions and measure the impact. So we're very excited about that going forward and seeing you know how with a set amount of time and resources, you can actually have the greatest amount of impact if you are data driven. If you're measured, they are also able to know what the impacts were afterwards. That's pretty cool. Yeah, and folks, the map is actually on their website. If you go to spatially DOT COM, you'll see a little link there where you could check out the covid nineteen map and Pretty neat stuff here sounds like you guys are doing. Doing some some great work with that. This is so interesting and I always wish we had more time when we have discussions like this, but or here at the end elite and so number one just folks I definitely encourage everybody to go to spatially DOT COM to learn more about the spatial intelligence spatial analysis that they're doing there to help you with your efforts. But he lied tell us something that we should be thinking about as we as we end here and then were the listeners could get in touch with you and your company after this is over. Sure. So you. You know, as I said before data's everywhere and every business today really is the data business. The question is, what do you do with that data? What we do at spatially health is highly visual and If if you have any questions about data, if you're interested to learn more about the first mile about a spatial analytics platform in our spatial risk score and anything else that I've covered I'd be happy to take.

Medicare World Health Organization Florida south Florida
"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"So often enough, you know we talk in the realm of ZIP codes are in counties, and that's very very difficult to understand what the real needs are, and then connect those needs and align it with the correct network and with the most operable network, we can highlight successful programs that align with value based care a big. Big Push. Now, for value based care and a lot of entities want to be able to get onto that. But that takes some strategy to going from volume to value is not easy, and because the alignments are not completely there, there is a struggle in order to get onto more value based care, plus the problem is a lot more complex because now you really need to understand of the population that you are serving and the population that you want to expand into in order to really make the equation, make sense employing predictive profiling to scale of member acquisition rates. You know that you have a population that's working. Working really well, and and you WANNA expand the population. We're GONNA find out where more of them are, or if you have a population that's really hard to manage to understand where what's the difficulty there what's causing, and what can we do as a payer provider? What can we do to improve the situation again, looking at it? Always on that first mile, the preempted side visualizing service needs and usage patterns greater clarity. So you know get out of the spreadsheets for really understand what's happening where and why are these decisions being made going to be able to gauge transit both the outperformance and the under performance of. Of different networks effectively build out the networks and efficiently you know drive down the cost so that you know where the leakages and you know what's going on on the ground and there's a lot more you know for different companies and stakeholders to work for the bottom line is that we hear a lot of fatigue in the industry and there's also a lot of station and it's really because you don't see the needle moving and there is constant pressure to reduce costs and improve outcomes adjusted regulatory changes, and you know now we have a pandemic. So there always seems to be some surprise around the corner. But, we take a deep look at the spatial patterns, and again, the are really our greatest source of data, especially new data and by evaluating and seeing any market in in a variety of different from a variety of perspectives, and by doing this man covered this connections that are needed to accelerate the real world insights in in healthcare delivery systems, you know. So it makes a Lotta sense to leak were dealing with a pandemic for the.

"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"So facial analytics platform expands the analytical capabilities and inserts new and unique data sources to complete the data. Data driven strategy. Again, this goes from hyper local national, also, very, very important because you wanna be able to compare apples to apples. The way that we're going about doing it today is really to Clunky and essentially the spatial analytics spots farm is too large than our database that's slowly developed using a bunch of different data sources that passes also the different transformations, and then we have our spatial. Form, from that, we've developed a spatial risk score which are proprietary metric that scales. Spatial data deliver measurable insights on how external factors affect health homes, and the cost for both individual and population levels and This is also very important that because of the way that we work and conceptually, if you can think about it as kind of like a continuous surface, it's very easy to both from an individual to population level. So you can almost think about it as personalized medicine at. Levels right or population medicine, it personalized levels. So the spatial risk score really came about as an inspiration from social determinants of health, which I'm sure most of your listeners have heard up a social determinants of health gotten a very big push recently but the concept has been around for quite a while and the concept. Actually, I. Remember it back in when I was at school for sitting regional planning, you know the idea that context has an effect and the ability to measure that context is very important. So social determinants came about from a policy perspective meaning, you know the big government or larger governments that have you know vast amounts. Amounts of area to managing control and very very populations their needs, the ability to understand you know where services are missing and where essentially there gaps in services, and ultimately this creates vulnerabilities right in different populations. The problem is that the way that social determinants of health spilt is highly conceptual and not operational, and this is what we've done to. The concept of social. Ten minutes of health will briefly broke it down build it within our models in order to create a fully operational model and We're able to find a lot of different patterns and reasons and granularity so that you can really identify a handful of of blocks or. Or customized outline of an area that has certain vulnerabilities, right that either have too much exposure to negative influences and perhaps not enough positive influences. So spatial patterns What we've seen also from the work using our spatial risks. Lawrence, spatial, thought one. These spatial patterns really are our greatest source of data and they're also the most underutilized because they are. Are, difficult to get you a by leveraging our data with our clients. Data were able to uncover the connections spatial patterns that are unique within each market, and this ultimately accelerates the wheel world insights in healthcare delivery systems. He lied, I think it's super interesting, right? Because you you know the the market has ideas about how to address social determinants of health. Health. Systems have experts and ways of doing things and and payers. They have their way of doing things. There's really no standardized way of doing it. You know maybe even data driven way. It sounds like what you have put together is an opportunity to get there, and so I love if you could share with us, you know how the platform has improved outcomes or made business better may be calling out something in particular. Yes. So you know data's everywhere right and between financial clinical EHR's different APPS third parties Internet of health things. The data generation has absolutely exploded on the big question is what do you do with it? It and we have a very different approach, right? So spatially health is actually forging a new vertical and healthcare spatial analytics. Ron Olympics are built for direct cost savings and for market growth So take social determinants of health example This is a problem and we don't focus. So wrong that is just one of those. You know really big interesting parts of what we hear very often an we're honing in right now on social determinants of health. You guys do other things like analytics for research and development, product? Development etc. Yes. We actually Yeah. Yeah. We have a lot of exciting things happening. You know the. The the solutions that we see today for concept around social determinants of health really is enigmatic of the tools and the data that we have. Often what we see our solutions that take care of what we call the last mile So for the entity, it's really not a cost savings, but it's unknown added cost. The end not only is it finding the additional services to provide for the member of the patient. But by the time, the patient is actually got lehrer is gone the entire patient journey and we've missed several opportunities to improve the outcomes targeting that person earlier on or being able to identify the. The needs so that the services can be aligned with the actual in that area. We call out the last mile and Severi needed service today. You hear a lot about it, but our focus is really taking the data that information that we have and the power of actually ducey models ability to test bring in all sorts of different data sources into it. Our focus is really on the first. Mile. Okay, and that allows us to set the tone and to work with different stakeholders to solve different problems and to actually identify cost-savings ahead of time and identify the opportunities.

EHR Severi lehrer Lawrence Ron Olympics
Airline Cash Flow

Airplane Geeks Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Airline Cash Flow

"All right our first story comes in from our Listener Linda. This is from one mile at a time surprising statistics about mileage, plus about united, mileage plus. In, we see that united has announced financing in the amount of five billion dollars secured through the airlines loyalty program. This is part of their to have seventeen billion dollars in liquidity by the end of September. Separately CNN reports that that's three times the cash. They normally have on hint. Of course all the airlines are. Struggling essentially with their cash flow situations and they they need to have. Cash on hand united is amongst them of course and It's it's an interesting strategy to take their mileage plus program and leverage off some financing based on that and the findings. He's GonNa come through Goldman Sachs Barclays. And Morgan Stanley and united will have seven years to repay that. These affinity programs like mileage plus our big business for the airlines united estimates that the value of their mileage plus program. If it was a standalone business, would be twenty billion dollars, so there's a lot of. A lot of revenue that changes hands here. We need Dan back as guest to explain all this 'cause. I tried to read how they mortgaged their frequent flyer program to raise five billion in my head started to hurt. Well I'm just thinking I I'm GonNa. Leave the show early right now because I'm GonNa, go start the airplane, Geeks, mileage plus program. I mean there's this is a twenty billion dollar business. We're wasting our time here, guys. I know it's It's pretty amazing so. The, the partners United Partners Pay United to award miles to their own customers, so says things like credit, cards and hotels when you earn united miles or mileage plus miles by reserving at a hotel or using a credit card. United gets a piece of that action and it adds up to quite a lot. So that large part of it comes from selling miles to other airline programs. I didn't see them call out specifically income from credit cards for example card I use most often still is the united mileage plus a credit card. I would imagine they must be earning. Some money from chaser manages that card. Even My my Hilton Program have the option the option of taking my awards, my my points, basically that I earned from staying at Hilton, properties and I, either get Hilton points which I can redeem for rooms, or I can get united, miles well Hilton. Kick something that United Four that for Hilton. There's value because it's you know. It's a service can offer its customers. If you look at the one mile at a time website. It gets down to break some of the stuff down. Like seventy one percent of the cat is offer twenty, one, thousand, nine hundred. Seventy one percent of the cash flow is from sales miles purchased by third party partners. But then when you look at how it was redeemed, ninety seven percent is redeemed by. using it on united. Right for travel, in yeah, only three percent of those milder redeemed for non travel rewards, it does make you start to wonder if the the planes are just kind of you know aside business. Instead they're making money off of mileage plus baggage fees. You wonder at some point Could this be one of these businesses where you know you give away the the razors for free, and you're making it all on selling razor blades. Absolutely I am particularly these days, but even you know even without the huge drop in air traffic is the result of the pandemic. Even before that the aircraft, just the promotional item Eb. Senses Yeah and in some in some way, so it's it's a really interesting business. It's not always what you What you think we also see here that you united his made an SEC filing an aide filing in in that filing. We learn a little bit more about the program. that united mileage. Plus program has over a hundred million members. And that fifty percent of United's flight revenue comes from mileage plus members. Which is that's? That's pretty high. Also the mileage plus program generated five point three billion in cash flow from sales in two thousand nineteen, and that's roughly twelve percent of United's overall revenue. So, Oh, another interesting The number here is it. The mileage plus program generated one point eight billion dollars in Eba, DA, which represents about twenty six percent of their total adjusted ebitda. That's. earnings before interest taxes depreciation and amortization. So that's that's sort of a A. Year of earnings from an operating standpoint, twenty six percent of united's basically operating earnings from this mileage plus

United Partners Pay United United Hilton CNN Goldman Sachs Barclays Morgan Stanley EBA DAN SEC
Desert Island Recordings - Iron Curtain Innocence by Bobb Trimble

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Desert Island Recordings - Iron Curtain Innocence by Bobb Trimble

"As idiosyncratic and hyperbolic as we absolutely always are. We certainly are not the only Bob Trimble apologists in the realm of music writing a quote from the Private Press Bible. Acid archives starts with this description by Aaron Molinski on Bob Tremble. I will make the bold claim that Bob Trimble's to albums are the best self released albums not just of the eighties and not just the psych genre but possibly in all of rock. Bob's music is able to bring a listener into a new and bizarre world in mere seconds while both his first album and his second harvest of dreams our other worldly masterworks of detached Psychedelia today with to focus on the first. There are so many amazing private press albums that are true. `Isolation Records Nineteen Eighties Iron Curtain. Innocence is a perfect example for this case study because of its utterly unique sound and the decent amount of information available about the record which helps us a lot. It's a story that can be told with realistic honesty whereas so many other private press record just rumors and tall tales. In the beginning Bob Dribble owned just three rock and roll records the Beatles second album more of the monkees and dot records oldies collection featuring the Classic Sea of love by Phil Phillips. These record carry a weight that would mold trimble sound the Beatles buoyant harmonies the Monkees Mirth full melodies Phillips's soul-stirring reverb growing up in central Massachusetts. Trimble would eventually play in bands in high school and would end up on the outskirts of Forster's worm town scene which was primarily known for punk music. Trimble worked at his dad's bicycle shop in poured all his money into studio recordings and eventually into getting his records pressed Iron Curtain. Innocence started its journey. When Trimble wrote a song that he thought would make for great single one mile from Heaven. He firmly believe it would be the track that brought him recognition. It was also one of the first songs he'd ever written. He went to a nearby studio called country. Thunder sound and recorded a couple of versions of the song a longer and more complete version and a shorter more radio friendly version. The song he recorded for the B. side was called killed the hands of an unknown Rockstar. When Trimble received the completed forty five. He was disappointed with a hollow tinny sound and decided not to release it dismayed he thought about hanging it up and stopped recording for about a year stating. I just didn't think my songs were original enough and different enough boy howdy. He came back with a redefined vision of originality. He went to a couple other studios and recorded an album's worth of material iron curtain. Innocence was recorded without a band. Despite the violent reactions being credited on the record sleeve is just Bob with a couple of the studio engineers helping out on Bass and drums the recording is rudimentary and Lo fi. But at the same time it is distinctly layered with Beatles soundtracks and sprinkles of Mug embedded throughout. The engineer seemed to be excited to fully humor all of the bizarre studio request as a break from their normal home desires of the usual patrons where the drums are obviously vanilla. The Guitar is very distinct. For young. Inauspicious musician Trimble. Truly had a remarkable guitar sound that is fully realized in instantly recognisable which is certainly an exception from the typical boilerplate instrumentation and most private press records. Hell even a lot of the major label stuff too for that matter. Triples voice is without question the most enticing factor on the record a Martian Siren. Song that has a exotic glassy feminine presence. That soaks a room in dizzying desperation. Reality Tearing beautiful for certain but also very cold it's much closer to Marc Bolan. Warbling as he's using his feather boa to restrict his air pipe during auto erotic fixation or severe trying his hand at opera than it is to any of his beloved sixties Silky vocalist. The lyrics reek of loneliness. But in a clove smoking teenage poet sense more than a man at the end of his rope. Tired tropes and tiny fragments of generic psychedelic. Forgeries are present but still packing a motive punch when joined with Eleftherios. Voice and the scintillating guitar originally called World of Lies Trimble settled on the title Iron Curtain. Innocence as a on the ever presence of the Cold War a theme. That never seems to come up in the actual lyrics. Trimble had five hundred. Copies pressed bought the first three hundred and disbursed them as best he could. By hawking them at local record shops getting them in the hands of college radio deejays and giving them to friends and Family

Bob Trimble Iron Curtain BOB Private Press Bible Bob Tremble Bob Dribble Aaron Molinski Monkees Beatles Phil Phillips Massachusetts Marc Bolan Engineer Eleftherios Forster Warbling
South Dakota National Parks

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:08 min | 1 year ago

South Dakota National Parks

"Welcome the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about South Dakota. I'd like to welcome back to the show Gary Art from everything. Dash EVERYWHERE DOT com. Who's come to talk to us? Surprise surprise about national parks. This time about the National Parks of South Dakota Gary. Welcome back to the show. It has been so long. Yeah and we never get to talk so it's always a pleasure. It has been a very short period of time since I talked to carry but we have talked about doing this show since we ran into each other. Probably at Mount Rushmore last October September September. I think yeah. Maybe it's October. But yeah we're going to t backs and and this was totally unplanned. You just happen to be a remote rushmore exact same time. It's one of those odd coincidences that happen. And it doesn't happen to meet all that often but there are some national parks in South Dakota. That are not Mount Rushmore. So where are we going if we go to the National Parks of South Dakota? They're six national park. Service sites in South Dakota and five of them are in the West located in or near the Black Hills. And then there's one all by its lonesome in the east so we might as well talk about that one. I and that is the Missouri River National Recreation area. It lies on the Missouri River as you might guess given the name it is in the charming little town of yanked him. South Dakota believe it or not. I was actually rather curious to visit yanked and because I had read a list several years ago that had the cheapest place to live in America was yanked in South Dakota so it was kind of curious to see I was kind of curious. What kind of community is this? And it's very nice and it's not rundown or anything now it's cheap. It just happens to be in the middle of nowhere and that's why the site is right on the border with Missouri arm starting Nebraska and it's fifty nine mile stretch of the Missouri River. Very nice some very large bluffs that are overlooking the river and a national recreation area. So it's not a park if you go to the visitor center and look to get your National Park Stamp. It is not a visitor center per se. It is the office. So that's where the maintenance vehicles and the office staff and they're all there and in that building there's a very small lobby and they just sort of stick the stamp out there for people that want it but unlike pretty much every other national parks that you go to. There's no movie there's no displays none of that. It's very straightforward. It's just something that you can visit. There's a bridge which goes from South Dakota to Nebraska that crosses the river and that's probably some of the best views you're going to get of the river if you WANNA take some photos. There's a place you can pull out just before the bridge. You can't really stop on the bridge nor can you really walk across the bridge. So that's kind of difficult so you just have to keep those things in mind. It's far enough east for. I think you could easily do day-trip if you happen to be in Sioux falls or if you're driving across the state I mean if you wanted to dip down interstate ninety s the interstate. The kind of runs across South Dakota East West. You could do that if you're a serious national parks. Yeah other than that. There's not a lot there. Well I should say for the listeners. The show who are either not from the US or possibly geographically challenged the Missouri River may not stick out in your mind but Missouri River is the longest river in North America. If you include the merchant into the Mississippi River in Saint Louis even if you don't include the Mississippi part I believe North think it's the Missouri Mississippi Slash Missouri. So if you took if you went from New Orleans and then just kind of banked left at Saint Louis rather than right that would take you further. 'cause THE MISSISSIPPI goes up into northern Minnesota whereas the Missouri goes much further will the I? I'm looking it up in the Missouri River just until it gets to the mouth Where it enters into the Mississippi is well for our European listers who I was mentioning this forest. Thirty seven hundred thirty seven sixty seven kilometers or two thousand three hundred forty one miles. So there's really quite an amazing amount of the length of this river not to mention the fact that it empties into the Mississippi River. The river at this point and yanked is pretty good sized. It's not a rapid river. Anything like that. It's far too big for it if anything else. It kind of gives you an appreciation for the river. Think if you go up to North Dakota there are some sites that are close to the as well and you with Lewis and Clark and these the Missouri kind of as their highway to get to the West speaking of the river. I in South Dakota many times live in Minnesota and I think South Dakota is kind of. There's two half's to the state the east and the West in the dividing line is the Missouri River it kind of goes along Nebraska and then it hooks up in when you're on interstate ninety that goes East West when you cross the river. The geography changes pretty dramatically so on the eastern side of the river. It's really flat. Is Your stereotypical great plains. Corn for miles. Once you cross it then you start to see hills instantly like instantly instantly. And that's a function of the river the meandering of the river in the flood plain and everything has basically scour out everything to the east of it and literally. When you cross the bridge you start to see some hills and that's not the black hills yet but it's kind of building up to that. I think you're still well over one hundred miles away at that point and all of the rest of the parks are in this. Western part of the state in the western part of the state is by far the most interesting. It gets the most tourists. You've heard of pretty much anything. In South Dakota it is to the west of the Missouri River in that Black Hills area. So we're talking deadwood Mount Rushmore while drug everything except the Mitchell Corn Palace.

South Dakota Missouri River Missouri River National Recrea Mississippi River Missouri Mount Rushmore Nebraska North Dakota Black Hills Chris Christensen Mississippi National Park Stamp Gary Art Minnesota Mitchell Corn Palace United States America New Orleans Sioux Falls
"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

14:02 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"This this was the better person Louis Yeah so yeah it very end of the story this has to tell her well hey I gotta go back down to Valor Esi for repairs because hey near right so so he goes down there and he has though that Oh hey you could join me and she's like I don't know if I want to wear a helmet and then then he mentions Oh by the way did I tell you that I was asked to be the new chancellor and then she thinks about it for a minute oh yeah hey wait up oh I can't do better I I know he can probably do a lot better but but yeah I don't see that relationship lasting at all I don't think so either but but it was interesting though it's like Yeah Obviously Patricia is a lot more superficial than dispossess deserves I think I I agree all right anything else about these characters before we move I can't think of anything all right all right so let's move on topic number three this should be a fun topic Clo and the Dune so as as the doctor makes reference we have did you do platoon of the Lagoon House but I'll say the full quote for that later but so what did you make clothe junior dune who saves the day and makes a pretty impressive amount of arrests and and you know the other June essentially being Andrea is our say higher goon squad so the Doodoo N- first off I there was a very early exchange where their arrests did till we can make an independent you know kind of judgment well who's GonNa make the judgment the June 'cause they're very independ- ended like the very group that rested you also the ones going to make the judgment yes they are a wonderfully interesting race they are truly and I think the doctor talks about that they are not a threat they are not necessary early not a not a threat either yet but because of their litter on this yes and the the we like the rigidity of their rules I break a door to save you and therefore but you broke the door you can't touch for an touch can't touch makes them a very interesting you know and I won't say villain but an interesting character is part of the story I they really worked in this audio drama because the they're so their voices so distinct authoritarianism yeah in this all and they are they are an exaggeration of everything that we make fun of with a either a bureaucrat or a police officer Nick 'cause if you're at a bureaucracy and you ask a question and they don't give you a good answer they asking the answer and then you're like okay are you giving me lip or you know I'm just as he questions okay I'm not gonNA put up with your lip for him so I I love seeing that thought it was awesome this this story definitely made made good work of the June essentially being rent a cops yes and there hey by Andrea the intergalactic trust kind of make sure the the tourists don't trigger any leaks or whatever you know and don't touch the frescoes they make yellow like you said don't touch don't touch and and there's a there's a moment there's a great moment where this one guy the the the frescoes starts cracking in front of him Dan water starting to come in and the guy being either an art aficionado or just he cares about preserving the culture he's desperate to hold this thing together so he keeps trying and the Dune essentially tells them Oh hey you know you're arrested because and he's like but I was just trying to save this yeah exactly and you're going to rest ah but it's like it doesn't matter to June like you said because they're let complete inflexibility about their rules yet and I loved I thought it was a small thing but they arrest the chief engineer and then later in a scene they're talking about with the doctor they can't find the chief engineer and you're like I know where he is I know where he is yeah yes so yes yeah and we gotta talk about Clo- because Clo is you know as junior June and it was so great to hear Nicholas Briggs doing like I mean obviously because of you know audio tweaking like almost like a little baby June almost and or at least a little kid dune yes and so he's got a much higher pitch you know little kid voice for June and it's just adorable as get out it is even the doctor thinks he's cute yes and poor Clo- he's just a junior officer and he's kind of you've essentially assign basically they stick him in as in charge of the prison to keep everybody that's been arrested for touched Ching the the artwork or whatever keep them in in this confined area so that you don't really think much of him yeah and especially the June captain and ultimately though Clo- with the doctor's help is the want who comes up with the Plan Hey I guess you know all these tourists are the ones responsible for damage two two so they all need to be arrested yes and that ultimately gives the Dune reason enough to lift the eighty and save everybody so he's the one in and so clo- ultimately gets this he's rewarded for it he gets like basically like what four times his normal arrest quota or something I forget what it was but and he made like the view captain is impressed he's like you know like Oh you made like twenty two thousand three hundred one judgments and his arrest quota was exceeded by four hundred percent that was at and so looks like Joe Close going to get promoted who I guess a full officer or something and and he gets rewarded for disobeying and helping the Doctor her or at least letting the doctor duty watts yes so what did you think of Clo- I loved him I you know I loved he character great character I see him on TV yeah I'd love to see him in another adventure the kind of it is just this whole idea of being young and kind of impressionable and doing the right things may just it made it a lot of fun I agree yeah and the doctor kind of change takes advantage of his youth and inexperience yes to get himself freed and to essentially kind of walk away taking take the opportunity to examine the dome yeah I agree with `spice yes and to get some much needed information but but yeah so Clo- essentially becomes an ally of the doctor yes and and it was great and I thought I want to see more of the doctor Enclo- together I think they they made a great pairing I agree I think they would do good okay all right anything else about these characters or the story for a move on no nope I like I said it was a in a lot of ways you're right it was a very traditional Dr who episode that doesn't make it a bad it was just really well done right good yeah oh and we forgot to talk about that Clo- bent essentially banished all the people he arrested yeah from Val Rassie so that actually works to the advantage because hey we got rid of the tourists yet so that's good all right it was not really well all right so what's your favorite lines of the episode the only one I got was by companions don't wear plastic shoes I just that I wrote that one right away and I just said I love that line in this whole and the doctor and Donna liked to exchange where the doctors here's the robot tour guides voice for the first time and he's like They're going to be a lot of this do you think Donna replies is this where you don't like robot announcements because it stops you telling everyone what you yes that is awesome yes yeah Donna talking to Patricia she does a great line tell me about your scale theon say I'm totally had one of those he yes I love that and then the doctor seeing Clo- for the first time where he claims Oh my word it's bring your baby rhino to work day yes and then lastly the doctor announcing to everyone as he's trying to guide them tour toward the June ship to be rescued he said a termination of your holiday oh and your arrest if you'd like to swim toward the safety wrap climb on and followed that June onto their ship it was pretty good you know I'm going to give it eight and a half leaking puddles how about you know it's we're in sync the eight and a half junior June nice in honor of Clo- who's like my new favorite character on Dr Yeah there's a lot to be setting Oh very nice so in honor of the sunken unspoken underwater city theme. I'M GONNA WE'RE GONNA go all the way in Dr Polly Ben in Jamie McKiernan arrive on a deserted volcanic island but are captured by the survivors of Atlantis world who developed the technologies they Atlanta land use to refine their with the help of the doctor and his companions polly meanwhile taken for conversion surgery into a fish person so we have fish people and off the power which gives her time to escape with the help of a servant girl named Era Zuroff tells the doctor that he plans to drain the sea so Atlantis can come back to the surface the doctor realizes this will destroy Earth and escapes to find a solution and look for his companions in the mind Bene- Jamie escape with two shifts.

Louis Yeah Dr Polly Ben Valor Esi Atlanta Bene- Jamie Era Zuroff Jamie McKiernan four hundred percent
"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

13:46 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Long run this better for my people not a good decision now and and speaking of you know we just talked before we hit record watchmen in the original series right Adrian made that decision like okay we're gonNA I'M GONNA I'M GONNA kill a few million people but that's okay in the long run because it prevents will make your war yes yeah so yeah and so I think that is a very realistic story I think he's it's not a good decision but it's an understood mandible decision how about you yeah I mean he was a very complex character I mean he starts off being like just at first appearance he yourself being the kind of the administrator there are the leader of the Valarie that's essentially been has to put up with the nonsense from Andrea and the intergalactic trust he keeps trying to warn her. Hey you know we've got these leaks around the dome not knowing of course not her not knowing that he's behind it all but he keeps warrior about it and she's all yeah well you know Hey there's no leaks here nothing that can't be fixed you know we just we gotta keep the place running we gotta make a and and you know as long as we she basically buries her head in the sand Andrea does and goes you know this is just just keep it running somehow I don't WanNa have to deal with it and you know take us meanwhile is going well hey you're having your To-do Woun Goon Squad lock up my engineers so how are they supposed to fix it yeah so presumably pick us knew that she would act this way yes and was banking on that to carry out his plan because if she like if she was more proactive of about it and went like okay yeah let's get your guys will fix this but he knew her so well and knew that she wouldn't that way essentially that she it'd be the one taking the blame I'm guessing that's that was his reasoning for this I think you're exactly right I mean I thought he wanted to you know he figured I'm going to get this going to get people back and do this and it but it's just not very smart right wasn't very smart at all no and lets you forget that you know lest everybody forget that we're talking about the doctors well the doctor once the league start happening everything starts going to hell he gets separated from Donna and ends up going to be you know like e- essentially his plan is like okay I'll get myself capture it so I can talk to the people behind this and figure out what's going on yes and so eventually does after being carson for a little bit it's free by Clo- and ultimately works his way into Andrews Office yes and once he starts piecing things together about what's really going on here understandably the doctors outraged Oh absolutely the fact that you know that the the you know the android he's obviously not impressed by Andreas callousness and just sheer exploits station of the Valor Esi because we find that we were told earlier in the story that he had previously visited Valla RASC- when it was an underwater city and he's horrified by how the city has been exploited sin when he returns with Don yes so he's already pissed off at this point and and he starts getting a little panicked for the doctor he I don't see an easy solution about how to save all the air breeders when the rottweilers rushing in and he he's you know Donna he keeps talking with Donna via phone and he's he's struggling very hard to get to come up with a plan but it nothing's coming to mind and I Donna keeps pressuring the hey you better figure this out because otherwise we're all gonna drown and It was interesting to see him a little nervous about it he wasn't wasn't the you know the guy the smartest guy in the room able to figure everything out aw so I really liked first off I thought he was very I don't know if snarky is the right word yeah but he was he he like he's that guy that you necessarily don't like This was so much better in my day Oh back when I originally saw this this was so much better you know and it's like he's kind of being a debbie Downer to Donna's trip yes he is so much You know a Debbie Downer Yeah yeah telling everybody Oh he's just an today yeah exactly and so I I thought it was very cool and you know the doctors talks about that a lot both eleven doctor the twelfth doctor on like you know just I'm faking it as I go in this one you know he he tells her oh absolutely got this going on we're good and then he's like I have no plan I gotta figure it out right He ends up coming up with pretty clever plan of horizon the city yes yeah to actually use and we'll talk about this in our last segment user dude yeah there you know often our biggest strength is our biggest weakness and so he manipulates their strength slash weakness to save the day so yeah I I like this a lot yeah love the doctor and Donna as always together they're just they're so much fun together and and you know and I'm a recent convert on the greatness of Donna so it is good to see them back and he is really good in this yeah I totally agree so that's great that's actually a great transition for our second topic so well done thank you So let's talk about intersect topic let's talk about Donna and and also let's talk about Patricia fiscus her fiance her valor ESI fiance and Garth the racist. who is essentially there and hates the idea of the Valor Asi and yes keeps making snide comments don is not at all impressed with him but she ends up getting stuck with him in because of the chaotic events in the streets and whatnot so so what did you take on these four characters in the steel I really liked the way they did this is she kept calling him racist but ultimately you know he started doing the right thing right and it ended became you when they were trying to get the people on Yeah the Dome sled yes try to get as many people on on their as possible rescue and I yeah so I I liked even even the racist guy pitched in yeah he and I don't know if he was totally regained but thinks he at least started thinking things differently right I'm you know I I assume you that and I may be stealing one of your quotes go go ahead donna inner plastic shoes yes I have the quote Yes yes you know you know I assume oh Christ Fox News I think you're wearing crop I figured they'd just couldn't say the word crock so they had fallen plastic shoes yes with holes yes but her just wanting to be turist and wanting to enjoy everything and just giving junk to the doctor like Oh hush you know I I don't know Charles if ever gone to someplace and returned and you're like oh I love this restaurant was here and now it's not God oh and you know oh they used they put in a new road and they destroyed the view or something because when you go back to something if it has if it hasn't stayed exactly name you can be disappointed but she's looking at it from fresh eyes so I love that give and take between her and the doctor I loved her interaction in with the Guide and the robot guide Yeah Yeah Yeah and you know and the doctor tipping him what are you doing but I thought it was Nice I kinda he has to remind her that the robots in a fifty for century have rights yeah and robots like robot rights in trouble yes and I think to a little bit but Donna didn't create the trouble now you know she and so she was just caught up in it yeah so I I really liked that The story splitting that way and the interactive she had with all the different people yeah yeah Set Donna her experience with Dr has taught her you know obviously already she's come so far from when we first were introduced her and away bride she's doing her best to try to get people on that Dome sled yes and you know she's looking out for them at her own expense it keeps telling her get make sure you're on that Dome sled yeah and she's more concerned about the people so much so that she ends up getting left behind when the Dune essentially take over the Dome sled and and get it out far too early before everyone's on on or whatever like you said she does get paid paired with guards to her chagrin always away but but she ends up she she sees feels ah I mean she's like you said he's trying to enjoy yourself and it it obviously things keep happening and is is it's I I want to say I don't WanNa say she's frustrated but but she's heartbroken I think that of everything that's going on and then you know when she she they encounter Patricia this woman and they learned that okay well he's this woman that is engaged to avail rassie her fiance this-this and she's an air breather but because of how society is built up that this has to wear the helmet so that he can breathe in there breather air-breathing domed city and she's very cool with that this abyss meanwhile is willing to do this for her just to be with her but if you notice when the tables are reversed when the Dome keeps flooding anticipates has to give Patricia his helmet so that she can breathe when when things get flooded she doesn't seem to like the idea so much about being there with him having to wear a helmet so and he points that out who are like hey I was willing to do this for you why were you willing to do this for me so what did you think of that so I loved that kind of twist that you know the very first line I wrote and I look to see who originally said it and it's lost the history but a you know a bird can fall in love with a fish but were they live yes and you know I thought of that immediately and you know she's kind of what's perfectly okay if you have to compromise right me compromise so I was glad he called her out obviously shows that.

Adrian sand Andrea administrator Andrea
"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

16:24 min | 1 year ago

"one mile" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Everyone's favorite partner in time Jesse Jackson how're you doing Jesse I am Great Charles I'm excited to be back in the Tartus with you we're we're tourist this week we going to see the famed sunken city of Atlantis no wait no difference second city yeah different second city Valla Rassie as it turns out in the fifty first century which of course gets a lot of attention and the in the David tennant era and and especially because of Captain Jack Harkness for one but but yeah this we're GonNa what we're going to talk about today everybody here at episode one fifty eight we're GonNa Talk one mile down and this is the second in the second audio in the big finish productions Dr who the tenth Doctor Adventures volume three set that just came out earlier this year starring David Tennant as the tenth doctor and Catherine Tate as done a noble yeah looking forward to talking about this one this episode this story rather was written by Jenny t Colgan who if you're a fan of the doctor who novels you probably might be familiar with her she's written the doctor who novels dark horizons and in the blood if you're familiar with those novels I am not yeah I have not explored too much of the doctor who new novels was when was the tenth Doctor One was eleventh doctor if I'm not mistaken I haven't read those but I but I know of them and then she's also written for big finish audio she wrote for one of the previous ten Doctor Audios that we talked about here we talked about she wrote the storytime river that we talked about back in the day and this one was once again directed by Ken Bentley who directed the first story a place that we talked about about a month ago as we're kind of working our way through this set and just as a point time weaver was the little known Gary Right follow up single to dream weaver okay well this is Time River so it's close it's close okay just off by a letter yeah yeah I guess cast this time so it little known spin off movie of a serenity time readers yes I'm in a punish mood this morning apparently you are apparently do you think you're so punny don't you all right I wish the audience could see your face it is just like I guess I've just got to put up with this Sir I I would you know I'll put up with anything just to keep talking Dr who absolutely all right all right so guess cast this time Nicholas Briggs who normally does a lot with big finish obviously returns as the Dune and he also plays Clo voices the junior executive are junior officer of the Dune who's incredibly cute and we'll about Clo- In our third segment today obviously does the voices the dog's Cyberman et Cetera et Cetera. Eleanor Crooks Played Patricia Dir sure or debris Shire and who is the one who is engaged to this one of the Valor Asi and she was in previous big finish stories she played the character Kendra in the big finish audios for the fourth actor Tom Baker called Kill the doctor and the age of suit Tek which is one I haven't listened to yet I'm looking forward to that actress famer ricky plays Andrea the main villain of the story now if you're a fan of doctor who the TV series which presumably you are you may recognize her as the hostess and David Tennant Era Story midnight you know the one that Kinda get sucked out at the end and nobody knows her name that's who that's that actress Ricky Ayla and she's also in a couple of big finish audios she played character named Paalea in and an eighth doctor big finish audio with the lords of terror and character named Lambda Epsilon in another eighth doctor audio in the garden death and she was also in the movie dread as the Chief Judge that was the one with Karl urban which is I really enjoyed that one a lot let's see other actors Christopher Naylor Plays Chancellor Pickus and he was in another big finish audio fifty Dr One called Black Thursday and he also played the alternative chameleon and slash chaos soldier in another big finish audio for the fifth doctor the Chameleon Empire and in addition he was also in the alienist if you ever saw that mini series on tv the TNT mini series. I really liked that one okay and he was in the two thousand seventeen version of Swat NFL. I love that Robert Whitelock played garth slash this dual role in this one he was on the TV series he actually appeared in a Matt Smith era episode the Bells of Saint John as a character named Mahler so he he's been onscreen as well the Elsa played professor Rick and King Maga's Mejia's excuse me in a fifth doctor audio adventure Oh drome and the characters are drawn slash Katryn in a eighth doctor audio adventure called Day of the master which is it really looking forward to listening to once it gets released here in the states and he was also on the TV series the hour which is TV series I really loved that start Ben Wishaw the guy who plays Q. in the current James Bond films I that's a aired on BBC America for awhile couple like a BBC we like their version of sixty minutes or I mean it was a fictional story set into like the late fifties I believe yeah but really good show if you've ever checked out no I have not that sounds good great drama Grou- okay all right so before we get into our main topics today I want to get your son just get your thoughts about what you thought about this story and especially compared to our previous big finish audio place so last episode we talked about that this was I didn't think much of a story but it was just good get spending time with the doctor Donna and Donna's mom and Grandpa the four of them interacting made it it a lot of fun thought it was light on story but it was okay I thought this one was a better story I found it easy to follow and I I also kind of there are two kinds of stories where the plot twists surprised the heck out of you right and then the other time is you see where the story is going and the characters don't it and you have this sense of dread of course I would make the argument that doctor did know what was coming but with the exception of the doctor so are you saying were you screaming at the actors going no no yeah yeah yeah it is this episode like okay you know way back since the titanic this ship can't sync you know anytime a corporate person says what this dome can't break right now we can't have league you're just sitting there going bad idea bad idea it's it's like saying I'll be back in a horror film yeah I'm three days three tyrant yeah yeah really really I liked this episode how `Bout you yeah I'd like this one a lot better than no place the Dune were were used very effectively here for a little bit of humor and it works rather well to balance the drama of everything going to hell in a handbasket in a story and it just I it was a much more balanced maybe it's just because it's a more traditional doctor who story but it felt more balanced and draws right in it's a typical typical adventure of like hey the doctor and his companion go to this planet and everything goes to hell and the doctor has to try to help hey the day yeah and it is a very typical episode where you know Donna and the doctor decide to go visit someplace when we get to that topic I've got some things to share about that but it was really good and so yeah I I think this was real done I would've been glad I would have liked to see it on I always says an actual episode on in Canon or on the TV I know big finishes cannon but the actual over and I would have liked to seen this one I think it would have been interesting so I was very happy yeah this is one story that I agree with you I think that could be easily adapted for TV maybe maybe we have to try to give it a little bit of budget to really make it work but but yeah it was one that you could easily easily visualize being story all right so let's get to our main topics so topic number one I want to talk about the ten Dr obviously because hey he's the star of the show and I also want a group chancellor pickus and our villain of the story Andrea who of course works for the intergalactic trust and the reason I group these two together because obviously they end up toward the end kind of early about halfway through the story they kind of get grouped together and everything kind of centers around the characters as far as what happens behind what's going on the real reason for why the Dome Ends Up Breaking INCR- in coming apart and I thought it was good eight a group these together so why don't you tell you what is your take on for the start with Andrea and Pickus and Dan you know Andrea being the representative of the intergalactic trust Pickus essentially kind of being the leader that ends up having be forced to go along with her what you think of those characters see you know Charles yes as you have been often mentioned to me I am the king of untimely references yes so I am going to do I think real Mac outdated references yes yes yes okay go go for it there is a musician then back in the forties and fifties called Tennessee Ernie Ford okay now let's let's let's set the Tartus way back to the fury's yes it s and he did a song called sixteen tons yes I'm familiar with the Song Yeah Yeah I think it is and he said Tongues and in the choruses you load sixteen tons what do you get another day older and deeper in debt yes Peter don't you call me 'cause I can't go I owe my soul to the company store right and the idea was in this byner communities not only would they pay you but the only store that was available because you're in such a remote place was the store run by the company and therefore you will would be able to take stuff on credit they could put whatever markup they want and so you're stuck in a place where everything you needed was provided by the company and they charged you for it right Yeah what does that sound a little familiar on his episode just a little bit just a little bit so that just that just we get from from the story is that the intergalactic trust kind of wormed their way into the Valley racy society and essentially decided to exploit the hell out of it they essentially take it over appropriate their culture completely and originally the this was an underwater city humans had to come you know wear helmets so that they can breathe underwater to visit the Valor Se city but once the intergalactic trust got in there they built the dome drain the city and forced the Valerie start wearing helmets. So that the could accommodate the nice humans air breeders and so completely I lift yeah the firs the other said there's a thank you for bringing that up that that has a the way they distinguishes that you know the the humans are essentially the Furs and Valerie are the thins and so it's kind of air-breathing versus watery their culture clash and the air breeders at least the corrupt ones have subjugated the water in culture and decided to like okay let's just turn this into a tourist trap and explore Loyd for all it's worth and the value RASC- will pay us for the privilege of doing so yes that's how they've set this up yeah and so there's a lot of resentment a lot of resentment from Pickus as we find out toward the end of the story really comes out and you know the and the doctor eventually figures this out through the course of the story yeah so so what did you think of pickus being revealed as the one who decided to start triggering the leaks throughout the city and to bring the Dome Down there is often a someone making the decision that they you know they think the end justifies the means right that they decide that now I'm GonNa get really obscure Yes many biblical Dimly Bill Scholars believe that Judas betrayed Christ to have him lead a rebellion he did not he did not think Chris would actually die he said I've just got to push to do this so this guy is like okay I don't want anyone to die but unless I make things every bad it's never going to get better in a few people die over AW in the.

Chancellor Pickus Ricky Ayla Tartus David Tennant Jesse Jackson Jesse Tom Baker partner debris Shire Valor Asi Matt Smith Eleanor Crooks Robert Whitelock Kendra NFL Paalea Chief Judge Saint John Karl TNT
"one mile" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"one mile" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Show. I'm Rick vertical your host. Thanks for joining us today. We have a very interesting interview with Tom Dooley. And olympian. And he's explaining to us them of the difficulties in the issues in being an Olympian and especially in long distance racing. His sport was race walking. But I can be the same thing to jogging and other things. And so Tom accounted like to pick it up there. I as as a starting to say at the last segment, I did a little of jogging myself, mainly to stay in shape and five K's ten K's think tank as the most ever ran. So certainly not long distance Meghan. I remember some of those ten ks and I was convinced they were moving the line further and further back every time. And I thought can I make it even though I've made many in the past. So you're talking about running twelve thirteen miles and thirty miles. I'm kind of curious what what what what gimmicks did you use to maintain that focus that allowed you to carry on till the very end got any hints for us. I think the main focus is exactly that is focusing on the on the goal at hand. And I talked before is starting out very small as I did with with a one mile racing being successful that over time my goals expanded to further and further distances and to be more and more successful. Which would at the time. I would culminate in the Olympic Games. And so keeping all the things that went on before and after and during that training period over those years, it was always perhaps single-mindedness that I can go from the start to the finish. As long as I keep my eyes on that goal. And that if luck. Naples, actually to reach those goals. It was I think the perseverance. That knowing that you are going to have highs and lows in your career were insignificant as long as you get your eyes on the final price. I think that's so true. And I like your way relating it to goals. I know I often tried to teach the executives that worked for me or managers that worked for me that. You know, you carve a long term goal up to in a series of small term objectives along the way. And if you give them measurable results, something that you can know about you keep achieving the next objective, and before you know, it you've achieved the long term goal. I don't know you can do that maybe analogy may not work in in a long race. But yet in some ways, it seemed to it seemed to help me at least in my little career doing that. Is there any similarity to that? Or is it just the training that really set you up for it? Well, the training certainly gives you the confidence that you have the ability to achieve your goal, but you can also in a natural event. Let's just say the Olympic trials have intermediate goals. Where will I be and how fast I would be fifty points? And what position when I'd be in those point. And would I be able to set myself up to have a good result? And that is basically how people trying to how people racing compete is by having short term goal in vehicles, and then setting up your very best in the last part of any ways. And that's exactly what I was thinking might've been there, though, we haven't really discussed that particularly. And so it is a lot like business you establish short-term goals where you should be what your what your exposure is I guess to being fatigued. And also what you're what you're factories on timing to the extent that you know, what your times are when you're going along. And you just meet each one of those goals, and before you know, it you've met the long term goal to. That's exactly right. Well, all right. I want to move on to another subject now. And that is the Olympics that you were in. For our listeners that are younger you may. Or may not remember that the both in nineteen sixty eight Olympics and the nineteen seventy two Olympics. I think we can say we're infamous for a lot of reasons and the one that I'm really referring to. I Tom is the nine hundred sixty eight Olympics where Tommie Smith and John Carlos remember correctly. Where did the infamous black hand salute while around the podium? Did you know about that? Did you know about did, you know them you have an insight that you can help us understand what that is. And how that came out for them. Sure, first of all both John and Tom. Were roommates of mine at the Olympics because we had all the tended as state together in the sixties, and we were still students I had breakfast with John many many times, and what we see Tony Smith on his way to his ROTC the meetings at eight o'clock in the morning. State. The athletes who are not involved in that actual protest very unaware of exactly what was going on on. There were numerous. Life throughout the village everybody. Sure sort of knew something was happening or going to happen. But no one is sure exactly what was going to happen. And. Just very small group of athletes who decided to protest in fact, the third member Lee Evans of Tennessee State received notice before his race. Which was later in in the Olympic Games that he was not going to protest after his gold. Not another word. A protest was considered done. Actually, have Tom and John. Very interesting. Do you stay in touch with these individuals? Have you seen them relatively recently? I have kept in contact with all those athletes that I was familiar with in the sixty eight and seventy two games, and we have reunions from every ten years, and I just got back from the fiftieth reunion of sixty eight Olympic T in Colorado Springs. Tommy Tommy was there and Lee is in Africa at the at this moment. And John have another speaking engagement. I believe it was in Spain. So he didn't make the reunion. It's very amazing. And for those of you that don't you should look up this this event because these these gentlemen changed history in so many ways, and they woke us up to a lot of what was going on in the world that the canon lean most of the world wasn't aware of and sacrificing. And that's what I'm going to ask you as we kinda run up against another break here committing some sacrifices that affected them. Do you are you aware of sacrifices that they may have come into play because of this? And we only have about thirty seconds for this. Yes. The sacrifices of both John was it their careers after the Olympics were ever affected. Another words. They almost had an asterisk after their name when applying for jobs or cooler choices for many years after sixty eight that. They were they were known as the guys who protested because it was a very very vehement backlash against their actions. Olympic games. I remember them myself. Yeah. I remember that myself. So we're up against the break again. So stick with me, and I'm going to ask Tom about the.

Tom Dooley Olympics John Carlos Tommie Smith Lee Evans Meghan Rick Naples Spain Tennessee State Colorado Springs Africa Tommy Tommy thirty seconds ten years five K ten K
"one mile" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"one mile" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Should be too hard that we can get through one mile the way it will be fun early fun um before let it go that we have to reminisce about one thing and you mentioned the quell gas it would help me bring this back was in the net the metrodome yes it's the quelque on the floor yeah summer the entire field yes it was an even on that at all just a small portion of it come in the history of that it's growth is people it was away for people to remember and on our some enough they've lost and so they would make a quell to put their name almost like a a tombstone and they'd have their name and they're birthdate on a and maybe some pictures are memories of each person i remember going to that event seeing the call to at the metrodome to and i was with a friend and we were like oh yeah let's go to be fine mckay and what we got there and you know that would just change so quickly and after that you felt like you know so many people who are you frost with from a jv so it's a very powerful and we're actually bringing in some panels of the quote to the state capital for its action day on march twenty seven where it now but the quelque there was on the field at the metrodome the entire field like you said was a portion of the quelque where is this quelque where it we're who keeps this club than its it's held by at the group called the names project and that they how's it and then they ranted out and this is this is up at so we have requested a not getting for panels and we're getting panels for minnesotan so some people might remember some names that'll be up there has it ever been totally put together and one cleats the closest would've been in washington dc and but them all their way back the ninety sometimes yes and i don't think that was all of that either or it was all that but it didn't represent all of the people that we've lost a match at me does the quell have its own website pitcher does someone have yet to look that up yeah if you go to the names.

mckay washington one mile