28 Burst results for "One Journey"

"one journey" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

03:38 min | 4 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

"They know this is not normal and yet it doesn't feel like it's an illness it doesn't feel like that it's like something's happening. I'm failing different. It's not that. I know the difference between something. That is a kind of illness and yet were you concerned. Because you don't feel like yourself. I want to read a comment. That one of the journey or sent to me. After because like i said we've talked about this before i did a show. I believe year ago because this isn't been going on for a while it's been sustained for me with little exception. This is what one journey or had to say. She says oh man. This is crazy at in response to what we're talking about every symptom. The dizziness palpitations and fatigue have been the most intense headaches. Migraines dreams muscle twitching vibrations. Depression anxiety dread tonight vertigo moments of kaleidoscope vision. I could go on and on. I've been trying to pinpoint the problem. Is it hormones. My sick am i dying talk about causing panic attacks like keep checking my vitals. Everything is perfect. I just feel like absolute s-h-i-t. Then she goes on wild vivid dreams. Lots.

Migraines dreams muscle Depression anxiety fatigue headaches
"one journey" Discussed on Wellness and Wanderlust

Wellness and Wanderlust

03:48 min | 6 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Wellness and Wanderlust

"Yeah if that's beautiful. I with up to tap into. I think we all would love to tap into more that in our lives and the has to be being around kids who are embracing the moment and enjoying themselves that has to be somewhat contagious to it. Is the fisher fisher. sofer's listeners. Who may want to pursue their creativity in a new way. Maybe they enjoy our. Maybe they've had creative outlets in the past they've sort of let those go and they have gotten into maybe a nine to five grind and haven't taken the time to focus on the things they love and they said bring more creativity into their lives. How can listeners. Start tapping into that and start using art connect with themselves if this speaks to you and it's something that you think. Oh that sounds fun or exciting. You know our you wanna try then. I say that it's great to do it in force now. Everyone has their own creative outlet. But i think just to take that time and the space for yourself is what's important but if this does speak to you i think getting simple material what i do with the kids at harlem is Watercolors just paper. So you don't have to be or have had art experience. You know any paper with a water and some brushes. It's very it's quite some to it to navigate and it's a lot of fun. I love that you definitely inspire me. Wanna kinda tap into some evatt again. i remember in school. Are you know art and art history. Where two of my favorite classes. I loved to look at art and learn about. Because i think art also tells us so much about the society that it came from in about the artist in about i think humanity and so there was that inspiration and then also actually creating doing something with your hands. I think there is something so therapeutic about that. Yes yes definitely. I think so too now you incorporate other spiritual modalities interior life. You're a sound healer and a reiki master. Tell us a little bit about what inspired that. And what all you do with with those forms of energy healing so i was introduced to someone about ten years ago. Maybe and i think that was probably the first time i had breaking down. I want to say and my body. I just responded so well to that. And i just wanted to be attuned and to that on myself on so my shaman. Actually a tuned me. And i started practicing after biden. Even prasad Breaking my heart. I rake rakia g. a lot of but now as far as the primitive sound healing i i spent some time at the chopra center. And that's where about certified as a meditation director and that was the first time i was exposed to primordial sound meditation before that i was i would say normal vegetation But without the sound but that was very interesting experience. Because i did have to learn about all different types of meditation. They're and also spent some time studying or your data and other healing modalities. It's well i think it was just one journey. You know when you open one door the next door in the just wanna learn more and more and i was. I was in that space in that things. I should say at that point in my life and i'm still learning every day new things and i love learning about all different things and other healing modalities but that was a time where i was. I was really just into learning about different spiritual teachers..

two one journey first time ten years ago one door favorite classes nine five harlem
"one journey" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"The things that we internalize our so you know like the most loving well-meaning at mike generous parents ever and still i picked up on these little things where i was like. My mom's only ever told me. I have a perfect like my body's perfect. There's nothing wrong with me. But i see her dieting. And i'm like well there must be something. The grownups aren't telling me and so really kind of unpacking my own story for my own benefit of like. How did i get to wear a got. And i can spoiler alert. Where i got was developing really obsessive food thoughts and body thoughts and you know i basically had an eating disorder without realizing it Which i thought was also important to go into because that's so common. Because of how disordered eating is normalized in the western world and dia culture makes it so that it's not weird. If somebody council their calories and has food at the forefront of their mind and you know it's all these normal things like. I thought that i was like. Oh this is what hot people think about all the time right like there's no reason why people just be like conventionally hot without thinking about and which is hilarious because everbod. It's hot like it's like. Oh you're just an erotic beaten by being it a human body. But that's neither here nor there i mean it is it's here and there a giant so basically nice for me to be able to unpack some this because i'm like. How did this happen. And then eventually. I developed a full-blown what i considered an eating disorder with bulimia and with that even though i had had disordered eating behaviors before that time that was the first thing that for me registered as like. This is not okay Even though it wasn't an overnight fix of course like that's probably one of the biggest tenants of this journey that i went on in the story that i tell it slake. I'm not holding anything. I'm not like oh and then i recovered like there's not. I don't even think the end of the book is like and now i'm perfectly allied okay. This is an evolution of how i relate to myself. And that's what i want to communicate to

katie barbaro today Today katie million dollar one journey
"one journey" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"Image higher self esteem and confidence will show you how in the body image audit check it out at bit. Dot lee board slashed the body image audit link is also in the show notes. Today we have katie barbaro on the podcast today. And we're so excited to have you on katie. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me graphic novel right legs of how you would identify it as a graphic novel. That's totally accurate. I keep saying it's weird category. I'll say look cartoon-based memoirs whatever you wanna call it there. We're gonna talk about but before we talk about your new book that up. We would love to talk to you about. How did you as a comedian. Life coach occupational therapist and up writing a book about die culture freedom. Oh great question That that's the million dollar question is this. How did this become my life Yeah i guess you know it's interesting how these different hats that we wear in life lake. They're all these external definitions of ourselves right as like i'm a. I'm a stand up comedian. I'm an occupational therapist. And whatever else. I identify with publicly. But the real truth of our being is what's going on inside and i my recovery journey is really gave me my life so my yeah like i kind of naturally love to connect with people and express myself and be you know it's kind of my comedian tendencies to communicate via comic strip or something like this but About something that really matters and feels foundational to my being just felt like the right thing to do More than painting a picture of like what. I am on the outside. It's like hey this is the real. This is what my real life is behind the scenes. I think that's also a lot in this book. You talk about the different identities that you've had over the years right and we've talked a lot about on the podcast. How like this this identity that we can kind of Morph into or accumulate over. The years could be like the fit friend or the one who cares about their health or like this person who has these disordered eating tendencies and it seems like even through all these. Let's say more externally focused identities that you had that you showed the world until you feel like. I never want to say like you got there because there's never there right but there was this through line through all of these different life changes that you were having we were still you know like going back to this place of trying figure out our relationship with food and trying to figure out your body all at the same time and that is the one journey that really kind of like manifested into this book. Definitely yes it. Was this like inner journey. That was happening in really. It was like a journey from out of alignment to into alignment. So there's no definite. There's no destination of course like you said. But there is flow incoherent. That's possible in life and it comes from this like in writing the way of what's really happening. Which was the last thing i wanted to do was the disordered eating held that exists.

katie barbaro today Today katie million dollar one journey
"one journey" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

06:09 min | 7 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Wow. Oh, Well. We? We've come off so great reasons why Dwight shouldn't be apparent in the last hour. Yes, we have. Dave. Not so much because he's step kids and been part of that. Sure raising step grand Children, right? Yeah. All right. So here are some of the toxic things that parents shouldn't say. Two Children. Okay, let's see how many we've said okay. And that toxic According to who? Right? Right, Well, some millennial. Well, that's toxic. Well, these some of these things you don't want to say. You don't want to say it, but sometimes they come flowing out. I think if I haven't seen the list, but I think we quit saying things that needed to be said like, for example. If your kid is dressing up like an idiot and going to school It's in their best interests say, Hey, you look stupid. Because when you stop saying that you have what's going on right now. Please tell me this is not on the list. Dad said you're 31. You should have a job and have your own place. No, no, it's not. It's this more serious things you jerks on. And look. You want your child to keep dressing like an idiot. Yeah, pop off like that every day and see what happens and they're gonna go all really because I'm about three more just like this. You should wear still like you should wear stones T shirts to work school just like me getting to stop dressing like that. You look awesome. I love that. You know what do do they have that in my size? Cause I think I'm gonna start wearing that. And then they go like this. What? What was then for Father's Day? You get that I lose. So you liked it. I literally asked you the other day because Maggie had a journey T shirt on and the acid washed jeans also, and I was like, Okay, 1985, and I was like she was like, What do you think, and I go all it's awesome. And then I went. Wait a minute. Should I not like it? What do you need me from? As a father? Those were your clothes. It's like, Yeah, but I didn't know what to say it and I said I'm not like it because she looked disappointed that I loved it. And I was like, Oh, no, wait. I hate it. I hate it was terrible, but no, They're all dressing like it's 1985. I said, Give me one journey song, right? No, They all know him. Yeah, they listen to journey and stuff. Yeah. Does anybody cultivating the Pat Benatar? Look Uh, you'd be surprised You'd be surprised. It's all throwback. Or John Taylor from Duran Duran. Remember that hair style? All right, Here's something you shouldn't say. Say to your kids. These are toxic. I gave up everything. I loved for you. She was like Mrs Goldberg. Wow, It sounds like Beverly Goldberg so far that we can all agree That's never a good thing to say to your child. Well, if you empty out your retirement cause they won't get out of the house talking negative about the other parent then comparing you to them who? You're just like your father. That toxic or fun? You're just like your no good bum father. It's not a good thing to do. Uh, I never wanted to have kids with your dad. Brad Pitt was taken. Uh, you look way had you to give your brother someone to play with practical, tired of watching that kid, you watch him. Now, this one. I disagree with I'm not asking you to do this. It's an order. No. What's wrong with? No No, I'm not. I don't know how many millions of times I said I'm not asking. I'm telling. I'm telling you to do this. Absolutely. When you get your own house, you can make your own rules or here's another one. I kind of disagree with, OK. Give him the all the room they want. But sorry. You don't have the right to privacy. Look, you got the right to privacy. But if I pay for your phone, I get access to your damn phone. Absolutely. That's it. Ah, Here's another one. You're being so dramatic. Oh, my God. That's not good. Some people have to somebody's that toxic, well, toxic. Because you want him to be able to to express their feelings, and if they're being dramatic in their feelings, you don't want them to kind of squash that. You wanted to share. Okay. Okay, uh, some people because you look, you don't know what's going on with them and their friends. You want to know as much as possible. Uh, some people have it worse than you stop crying. That's the old Miller story. Starving kids in China. Eat that food. I'd say box it up, said ours was India. There were starving kids in India and I said, Well here, box it up, send it to exist. Starving kids in China, but one for family. Here's another one as your mother, I have to love you, but but sometimes I really don't like you. Ah, I've skated on that one. Never wants it all. Sounds like you've been any staple to me. Well, you know what? It Z part of the problem with this list and not a problem? This these are all good things not to say to your kids. But most Children today are very liberal. They're very left leg left leaning and there's been an anti American leaning on social media. Not so what everyone wants to pick on history classes in school. My kids go to schools. They teach history. They don't teach whatever that is what they're talking about. They know what happened in history, but they lean so when they pop off with that stuff, I'm sorry. It irritates the crap out of me. And I'm just like, Hey, slow down, mister. I've been around 14 years. Yeah. How many times have your sisters and your mother and your father thought, you know, I have to love you, but I don't like you right now. No, no big time. No, there's plenty of big time. No, no, no, The emotional terror that my family put on me. Well, there was so much fun. Um, they put on, you know. Yeah. Yeah, It's completely innocent. Yes, I was a kid s. Oh, uh, These are things you don't want to tell your Children if you don't want them to be end up being crazy, or like all of us. Mm hmm. It's first payment, all right. Car insurance.

Brad Pitt Dave Beverly Goldberg John Taylor China Pat Benatar Father's Day Goldberg Dwight India Maggie Miller today 31 1985 first payment Duran Duran American millions one journey song
"one journey" Discussed on Ride the Rails with AndyB

Ride the Rails with AndyB

03:07 min | 8 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Ride the Rails with AndyB

"It's worth considering even if you're making one longest trip with a family. Yeah absolutely then. There's various other. Al qods as well so you have the the youth rally come a very sixteen twenty five. Then there's another l. card. Not sure what they call it. This cold young persons on up for age. Twenty six to thirty. And then you have the senior called for sixty years and above all all those coming in thirty pounds. A year and giving a third discounts And just a couple of others to mention. There's the disabled persons row card eligibility requirements. A needed to have one of those gain a third off twenty pounds per year and finally How much is this forces route for anybody who serving in the military And also the spices partner can also get a hey champ forces. Wral called which is twenty one pounds for year. So if you've built no no children between the ages of thirty one and fifty nine you need to find yourself a spotty or iran and then you get the relic out as spouse. I think that's the tip on our mark saving tips so royal travel. Yes mary a soldier indeed. Indeed okay so just swim. Swiftly moving on just conscious of time railroad service Row rivers a unlimited travel tickets in specified areas and Physicists to the uk can buy an insult or eurorail pass which give them unlimited travel around the uk. british residence coun- by interrail cards as well which on volley for traveling. The u k. Xm or you could take the dog alone except for one journey from your point of origin to london. Or what's can sometimes give you quite a good saving. an adult. interrail is two hundred and eleven pounds and considering that amongst the london. Standard fare is three hundred and sixty nine months. You got an instant saving there and you could then disappear into europe for a few days if you wished touch. Have you come across people using that thought. Little quirk as a way of getting cheaper tickets to be honest. I haven't and i certainly wouldn't want to suggest that being a member of the interrail scheme leads to the pseudo obstruction. 'cause i didn't think he does. I think people generally book and interoil to try and dodge the system like that most of time even if you travel in the peak. It's a lot easier just blowing advance pushes.

london thirty pounds sixty years europe twenty one pounds sixteen Twenty six uk fifty nine thirty one thirty three hundred and one journey sixty nine months A year third two hundred and eleven pounds twenty five twenty pounds per year one
"one journey" Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

The Sue Plex Podcast

03:36 min | 8 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on The Sue Plex Podcast

"Rex war stories. Kind of think of around I will. There's a hilarious story of the reason. Why i wrestled. I've wrestled. i've gone to spain twice to wrestle. And i've never actually wrestled right. I got to bilbao. Which is a beautiful country by the line. And we're gonna wrestle and the first time we do do a we run an attack that top guy and set for next match the next the next day the next map mop back out and the ring which is walking around. The rain is a bit a bit where these guys come to us. We we got ready to go out and before we got out the ring completely. Completely compliant made employees within kajol. Take some time. We tried to try and do the ring the necks guys go on complete implied again. So we're right what we can day. Okay we're gonna save. We're gonna leave the crowd. We're gonna leave the crowd. What's when the locker room with great in greater guys going to bring it back out. Credit goes out does elise music does. He's entrance guys again. People just look and just just shut down now so just walk out utah show. He's been greater. hooks them in. For a minute there will hook dead ringo's again and three times out where out now just left. Two times in spain unchanging never actually been able to wrestle fantastic fantastic but goal. Why spying and in rings imploded twice brin fantastic awesome care. Where can people find you on social media and other places on to show yourself sir. Best place to contact me instagram. Which can check my handle to make sure. It is tight. Because i never is. I think he'll tie so hate shell. Tj stay nine thousand and then on. Twitter is exactly this. I same karen. Hold hold. t. t. h. l. la hd fantastic. Karen capable i Thank you for your time. Thank you guys. Another episode in can and. He's not surprising. How much points you forget in these one journey is wrestling. I'm definitely gonna make my mission when wrestling comes back to write down a lot more about things that have happened. I completely forgot. I'd met care and all those years ago as a young child. Shall we say in opening hose of old prices so definitely need to write this stuff down to To remember more by anyway. I will let you get back to chocolate day easter sunday. If you also the brighton today will absolutely amazing easter. If you listen dissolved with hype you're not in a coma of yoenis and sugar. High that is from the easter eggs. And we'll see we'll hear next week. Don't forget to subscribe or like we are on suplex pulled or all social media platforms the light. We listen to drop us a tip. Every penny counts wake.

Karen next week instagram Twitter twice today bilbao nine thousand first time Two times karen three times elise years one journey next day Rex sunday war spain
"one journey" Discussed on EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

07:10 min | 9 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

"Sticking up and free floating in terms of the screen. It was okay. It was a little high for my liking. It was too high. Forty t for me to use Kinda comfortably i. I'm used to screen spending a little bit further down but that would take some getting used to but had the two screens so has the screen behind the steering wheel. Which is the driver info. Had everything on that you need to know the spit nice and big speed. Because i did find myself going over thirty accidentally in the in the speed limit sections and then having to off because it's easy to go fast in a navy so that was nice. That and then the gear selector is attached to the screen on the right. And if you've seen the bmw. I three guests like to this. I would say is heavily inspired by that you turn it once for dr once again or click it further for be mode which should be stronger region and then and then often away and then you put it back towards us. Do neutral number of us region. Let me talk about that. Not super powerful. I like really strong region. And i like modulating my right foot. My wife doesn't again. that's very subjective. Thing people in the vehicle. It'll tell you You know with all suddenly you must have this. You must have that strong region blah blah blah blah blah but equally doing seventy on the motorway. And you let off you want a cruise. You want to freewheel. Because then a lot of region is not the most efficient way to get your destination like a really strong region and then just driving with one pedal but it was not strong enough personally for me but it was easy to drive so i just go in and drive. I guess is my first conclusion. Which i'll come back to the end of the podcast. I just got in and drove. So richard left in the car and so once the keys in the car. It's all there's no button on the vw. Id four so there's no. There is an on off button hidden if you want to turn the car on enough but there isn't get in the car you put it into drive and you put away which is the way. It should be an old levi's because you shouldn't have an on off button. It really need it again. At the end of the drive. I go in. I got to the end of the drive. I stopped i pushed the handbrake button which is kind of on the end of the shift and just left and i walked away in the cartoons itself off so my driving impression of is you could get into this from a combustion car and just drive and i think that's the key with the vw. Id full because they'll be people coming from guam's from gulfs from other vw's that finance is coming to an end. The lease is up right. Where do i go. What do i drive next and auditing anybody if they're gonna spend around forty thousand pounds. This car costs now. a should be thinking about combustion. 'cause it doesn't make any sense. A tool to be getting into. The world of diesels. Particular fills is exhausted. Replacements catalytic converters all of that nonsense because this car does every absolutely everything. I think really really well again not gonna win. The draft drag strip won't win the top speed ones. But a did absolutely everything. I could possibly want to really really well now. Didn't have a chance to play with the app. Or have a really good rummage through the car. I did not running on twenty inch wheels. Which is the first ide- spec. The twenty inch. Wheels looked good. Didn't have a chance to play with any of the driver assistant stuff. I did notice on my short drive. That pulled me back into the center of the road. So that must have been turned. I was drifting a bit to the right sent me. I was like oh okay. Didn't know it was very subtle and gentle and worked really really well like i said the screen was was good. It was bright there. I think they could capacitive or capacitive buttons. The run along the bottom of it the same ones that the steering wheel. Now if you've driven a recent vw. Like latest gulf. The steering wheel is just a brilliant piece of design. It's got clicky buttons. It's the evolution of everything that they've learned about usability. It just works the vw. Four doesn't have those house a shiny surface where the buttons are and there are some ridges so you can kind of feel your way but i know that when i'm driving cars that have clicky buttons on the steering wheel own more buttons. I didn't take my eyes off the road. If i'm so setting cruise control over reducing the know cruise control speed temporarily or you know whatever follow distance. I can do that just by touch. Signed goes for turning things up at like up and down volume wise. I can just do it in what there's nothing wrong with the knob and you know an an a physical button sometimes. Even take your eyes off the road for safe. This had some buttons on the whale. The i think they've got right yet. Because it gives you a little bit of feedback when you push it but a lot of swiping if you want to change the volume you can swipe up and down with your finger and the same goes for the heating but really just give me a volume knob because that isn't broken like that piece of design in the world is in broken. It's like light switches. I see a lot of interpretations now. Small lights and smart light switches. And or but you know what you go into a room a light switch it just works. It's a piece of design that doesn't need to be fixed. There's nothing wrong with it. I don't think i could get on with the steering wheel without a bit. I'd need a test a test for the weekend and have apply. Because i didn't like it but they apart from that i did pop in ecoed. I did papa income foot mode. They are some. There's a mode button on the big screen. That's one of those not soft touch buttons. You i mean. And i couldn't feel any difference so i'd like to tell you. Oh yes echo was very strong region and comfort dull. The accelerator in sport was really reactive. I was on roads that were thirty. Forty and sixty miles an hour. I couldn't really tell a big difference like maybe that's why i'm not reviewing house for a living the whole time. The cough l. very much responsive too. I wanted it to do. Everything just walked usb c connections up front and rear as well so loss of usability stuff in there in terms of families charging tablets for the kids and all those kind of things big enough battery like i say seventy seven kilowatt hour pack. Probably all you need. Let's talk to someone who has driven this car in one journey. Six seven hours from scotland to the south coast and what he thinks of as the owner of the car and richard from simon's s dot co dot. uk chat with him to ask about his impressions of the vw. Eighty-four have a listen. So how long would you say your road trip was coming back.

scotland Six seven hours first two screens echo twenty inch levi three guests Forty and sixty miles an hour seventy seven kilowatt Forty one journey one pedal richard dot co dot. uk around forty thousand pounds Four seventy Eighty-four one
Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

Scuba Shack Radio

07:56 min | 9 months ago

Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

"Way back in the nineteen sixties when i was growing up most of us were intently focused on the space race in one thousand nine hundred sixty four. The united states was making the transition from the mercury program to the gemini program and there really wasn't allowed manned spaceflight going on that year but there was another amazing exploration going on in interspace natwest project lab. One well i didn't know a great deal about c. lab until i started doing some research for the segment. I did hear on the show about scott carpenter. I did read. Ben held hells worst book about c. lab and that gave me a really good understanding of the magnitude of the entire c. Lab project both one two and three. And as i was doing more research i came across a report from the office of navel research. And it's the project sea labs summary report so today. I wanna start two part series on this report in part one today. I'll take you through the report up until the c. Lab one habitat is placed in position and then in part to a couple of weeks from now will review the mission some of the findings and conclusions by the project sea labs. Some report is subtitled. An experimental eleven day undersea saturation dive at one. Hundred and ninety three feet and report is dated june fourteenth nineteen sixty five for anyone looking for the report you might want to search on n r report. Ac are one zero eight. It's not that long to sixty two pages now. The copy. I got had a stamp on the cover. Then indicated. hard copies of the report would cost three dollars while microfiche would be seventy five cents and the copy was also stamped. Archived copy of this report are ha o.'neil from the office of navel research. Gif bond captain united states navy from the united states naval medical research. Laboratory are eland. Fear lieutenant commander. Us n. office of navel research and t odum of the mind defense laboratory in the preface pen by rear admiral. Leighton he says project sea lab one was the navy's first step into space. He also states that this report is being published by the navy so that all may share the information it is interesting to note that the background section of the report the authors do reference the work being done by captain shot cousteau and mr edwin a link and that was on their man in the sea concept they they stated indeed. The navy seems to be left at the post by the well-publicized efforts of captain cousteau and mr link. So it sounds like there's a little bit of sour grapes. Their report goes on to describe a december nineteen sixty three conference with the navy's bureau of ships where they obtained support for a c. lab now at that conference. They decided that the mine defense laboratory would build a habitat needed to select a location and they had five critique criteria for the selection one was the prospect of good weather too was good visibility. Three was a level bottom for was moderate water. Temperatures at depth and five was the general features of ocean graphic and marine biology biological interest. Now the site that they selected was argus island off of bermuda by march of nineteen sixty four all the appropriate approvals were obtained and they were often running and the operations were supposed to be conducted in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty four now. The mine defense laboratory selected an old experimental minesweeping float. Now the report has quite a few pictures and illustrations in it. Unfortunately the pictures are really not that great because of this. Pdf being produced either from a microphone. Show old old dot copiers but the stations are pretty good. Particularly the architectural drawings of c. lab won both the plan view and the cross section views by marched by may nineteen sixty four. C. lab was ready for sea trials off panama city. Florida on may twenty second nineteen sixty four. It was towed out to sea and sank uncontrolled and flooded over half full of seawater. Fortunately there were no injuries. The habitat was lifted. Towed back dried out and ready for another try on may twenty six this time with success. The previous incident was attributed to a misunderstanding of line handling waters by july. They were in bermuda and ready to sink. C. lab on july fourteenth. They again had issues because of the three to five foot swells and the yard patrol boat that they were using just wasn't powerful enough like chief brody said in jaws. I think you're gonna need a bigger boat. Well in this case. It was a crane that they took from bermuda. The reach the report details the adventure of getting c. lab on the bottom but they finally did an after getting everything hooked up and twenty four hour checkout on monday july twentieth. One thousand nine hundred sixty four at seventeen thirty five. That's five thirty five pm for you. Civilians c. lab one was manned by robert e. less anderson robert a barth sanders w manning and robert e thompson. Now what were the conditions like on c. lab interesting. The report says see lab proper dry inhabitable atmosphere satisfactory temperatures. Seventy eight degrees chilly. Water supply water not available heaters operable. Tv monitor not hooked up properly. Hot water heaters not operating refrigerator not operating co two scrubbers satisfactory. Electro writer. Satisfactory calibrated microphones not functioning. Crass burgo two meters satisfactory lights satisfactory. So you can see. There was still a lot of things that needed to be repaired. So i had to do was fixed everything that wasn't working and then complete their mission so in part to this series i'll take you through the mission the findings and conclusions from project sea lab some report of nineteen sixty five americas first journey into interspace. And that will be next time here on scuba shack

Sealab Project Sealab 1 Office Of Navel Research Natwest Project Lab Navy Project Sea Labs United States Naval Medical Re Scott Carpenter Mr Edwin Captain Cousteau Mr Link Argus Island Bermuda United States Navy Cousteau United States Leighton BEN Neil
"one journey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 11 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the new administration. This week, one of the priorities set by President Biden and Vice President Harris and how did they match up with your concerns? America? Are we ready for the 1st 100 Days tonight at eight on W. N. Y C. Thistles. All of it. I'm Alison Stewart. Let's talk live jazz back in the spring of 2020 when touring was no longer an option and indoor gig Stride up. Jazz musician A legba Jackie Lee. Walked over to Prospect Park with his guitar. I started playing for whomever passed by In those early days, he was joined by sex phone player Mark Krichinsky. By the summer, They grow into a rotating crew of masked musicians with the name a leg bone friends, and they also had attracted a grateful audience who came for nightly concerts at the Prospect Park Boathouse. Like this one. Journey has been tough for musicians and street performers,.

Prospect Park Boathouse Vice President Harris President Biden Prospect Park Alison Stewart Jackie Lee Mark Krichinsky America
"one journey" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"one journey" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"In down here so We didn't have a lot of turnover there's just one or two but Generally we had some pretty good mainstays. We we did. Some great hires here and A really good a really good group of people that we have with us even today. Nice guys read dog evolved grew cross-border success got a good team coming and then end versus drilling info happens will house. Corey seems to be over the moon with the with the marriage. One for you personally. How's that been for you the transition. Yeah i i. Don't look at it as things as transitions You know through everything. I've done and reflect back and even knew that in my twenties and thirties. Everybody's a little bit different but always understood and and realized my reality and the journey. You're in right now. And the journey was in calgary in all those different stages that journey. When i moved down here this is just another journey. It's just the next journey that i'm doing embrace it You go forward with it You'd be opportunistic with it And you have a positive attitude so this is just that was one journey journeys only lasts a long and i'm into the next journey now and so we're it's great to be part of it to see the next stage. That energy link product is gonna go When when we built energy link It's there it's scalable for a a large audience and now that it's part of embarrassed It can really go to the next level and and be part of it being able to influence where that goes. That's part of that journey so You gotta quickly embrace those things and understand what you're where you are and what you're doing so one of the reasons you know. An inverse obviously is going to pick up red dogs. There's a strategic relationship but they want to grow in a certain direction and one of the problems. I've seen with getting brought into a large organization. You're you're isolated and maybe the rest of the organization doesn't adopt it and really kind of help you expand it so you stay kind of a niche little product. It doesn't seem like that's happened with. Enron is really been embraced and really become a strategic part of the company. Can you just elaborate..

Enron calgary one today Corey twenties two One thirties one journey problems
Experience a Lost Disney World Ride in Virtual Reality

DLC

04:03 min | 11 months ago

Experience a Lost Disney World Ride in Virtual Reality

"Defunct land vr. Lets you experience a classic disney ride twenty five years after it was closed. And this is something that i'm super into. I think it's really really interesting. So there's a couple things to talk about here. There's a youtube channel called defunct land which I would highly recommend you checkout. It's extremely fascinating stuff. They just but fifteen minute videos on old theme park rides That are no longer around and kind of. Why do they close. Or what was it like. And that sort of stuff. And i think a few years back it was there. The announced the patriots. It's like hey you know potentially if we get enough patrons we might try to recreate some of these old rides and vr. So they actually did it. They actually released a twenty thousand leagues under the sea. Which i didn't really know much about in fact When i saw this news i was familiar with defunct line. In fact there. Is that really great documentary. Class action park on. Espn defunct land. Did a video in action park. Actually before that even came out so anyway i was kind of aware of it but i went back and i watched their two parter to videos on twenty thousand leagues under the sea submarine voyage. And like i knew. I was going to download this. Vr thing. I thought you know what. Let me get some context. I watch those videos so cool. And finally i put on the headset and did it. And i just love this whole thing. I just love the idea of vr being away to just to just keep a repository of these things that are so the go away. You know what i mean. Yeah i mean this is. This is ready player. One stuff you know like this is like relive your child at least for me. I remember the twenty thousand leagues under the sea. Ride really super cool for folks that have never experienced it in one journey back into time that they never got to see for me this. This feels like this was what i remembered. It still feels weird that it's finding nemo on. It's been that way. Yeah how many years but That was when i was a kid. Christian. did you ever ride the twenty thousand leagues under the sea. Ride as a fourteen year old is how old i am now. I have. yeah. I definitely have and i remember where they did at disneyland. I don't know like florida like the rebrand for nemo i. It's gotten better but at first it was like. And here's nemo one clown fish in there and i was like clown actually actually wrote the nemo one i never. I never wrote the twenty thousand one. So i was kind of coming in reverse. You know like seeing what it was now and then taking a trip back in time to what it used to be. You know. I haven't done this yet is it. Is it a good experience the vr. Yeah it's pretty solid. I would say it's definitely on the lower end of fidelity it's very much an independent projects. I think he's done a new unity. And as i was watching. There's a couple of things it's actually pretty cool. Is like watching youtube videos. They talk about how the effect was created. And how you're basically in a boat. You're not you're you never really submerged under the water and if if you look up during the ride you can kind of see the surface of the water and they kind of recreated all those of You know behind the scenes things in this. Vr rights if you look at the water and stuff and if you'd like peak around to the left to right you can see the way the track benz like kind of a real amusement park where you can sort of see us to where you were and where you're going to be in that sort of thing so i like the way they did that. They didn't wear like it. They're trying to recruit the ride not the experience and so the jank that comes with it and what's funny is on a on a sub on another level like a meta level because you're now abstracting at one further with like low poly objects and characters. It's like a semi lack of a similar. Acura is kind of funny. Well i guess there's a bunch of this kind of stuff that's also in dreams like people are doing using the playstation for dreams platform which also supports vr vr to do a lot of Disney ride recreation and stuff super super. Cool

Class Action Park Youtube Patriots Disney Espn Florida Acura
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 1 year ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

Latina to Latina

04:27 min | 1 year ago

How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

"Healing, deep loving yourself coming back to Seoul. Those are big promises Christine. Yeah. So what I tell everyone is that this is a lifetime journey. This is not just a one time thing. This process of coming back home to ourselves and healing deep is something that's like an appealing right it's up constantly unfolding process right? The most. Essential thing that we can do in our life is take the time to he'll take the time to look at the wounds of our pass how they're affecting us in the present so that we can make conscious shifts to create what we actually want in our life. What is the sole call? For me, the soul call is this ancient voice within this voice. Often, times whispers and sometimes yells at you to take the next right step to walk away from a dead end relationship to take the leap to your path that you've been wanting to take up perhaps have pushed to the side and it's always a voice as orienting you towards your better. Good. What did your soul call sound like a first time that you heard it the first time that I can remember hearing yet as an adult was when I was in a really toxic relationship in college and I remember hearing. You need to get help you need to get support and it was very authoritative and loving presence. Essentially, it was for me to sign up for therapy that was the first big step in my journey of unpacking Hal. My childhood abused has had affected me in my early adult life that's a lot to unpack that unpacking happen overnight. That's the thing that I make very clear in the book and also all the work that I do, which is that this is a grounded approach to healing, which means that this unpacking needs to be done with patients. allowing your soul to guide the way and taking a step by step and being guided by train therapists and healers, and really giving yourself the space to heal depending on what kind of background you've come from, and if you have a history with trauma than you need to be incredibly gentle with yourself because it can take a while. When you started doing that excavating. My Gosh I found a felt like you know broken bones and. Dirty closets right like it was dark and memories I found memories of. Of Situations in my childhood name calling just like all the things that I had went through I had both and abused present in my home, and so it was navigating kind of those in emotional terrains that I was able to find and remember these specific kind of thorns in the timeline of my life that I needed to go attend to because they were untreated emotional wounds and so when I remembered those memories, it allowed me to go back and journey to give love to those. Parts of myself, where did you get help? You know it's an integrative process first foremost I, felt spiritual support. I always felt this kind of spiritual presence of love that was guiding protecting me also within my family though it was complex, there wasn't energy of love that was part of that. But then inevitably, it was my my first journey into therapy college I took off a semester of school when I went twice a week and then I went on a journey of both Healing and also simultaneously therapeutic healing, and that also that passed me becoming a licensed therapist and becoming a healer Christine. What happened that made? You realize oh I don't just want to heal I. Want to help others heal. From, as early as I can remember, I always wanted to help people and so that kind of seed that was planted in me as a child I kept on this to that in that morphed into, you know being a mentor and then going to school and studying therapies become a licensed therapist and then proceeding into this kind of merging of ancient wisdom with healing modality modern therapy.

Healing Christine Seoul
"one journey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"one journey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All right there the regular afternoon a Janet's house have five kids thank god I'm a dog running around and this guy call with Carrington the parents hello good how are you guys yeah when he goes on to say two fathers for the second surrogate baby she's carrying ten weeks voice I'm gonna find out the sex of the baby that's a boy with my first journey my eye peas the intended parents were from France so with that I've only seen them twice throughout the whole process and this time around my eye peas are from Montreal which is just as amazing like they can come more often because they are closer which is nice because it's nice to see them right they also they've been asking when we can get together and you know what I want your kids to come over you guys can all come down we'll take them swimming will do this with them will do that with them but not all stargates experiences are the same six two one John via teleplay with an orchestra it features mother of three and says I'm sorry okay so I chose.

Janet Carrington France Montreal John
Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

08:37 min | 1 year ago

Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

"This episode of is on Conservation I spoke with author and environmental historian Bethsheba. Demuth Demuth is an assistant professor at Brown University who specializes in the intersection between humans. Ecosystems ideas in history the work that I do as an environmental historian is broadly focused on the North American and Russian Arctic and particularly the relationships between people and animals and people in Ecosystems. More broadly over the past two hundred years or so. We talked over. Skype demuth was in fairbanks as the professor was performing research for her new book. Her first book is titled Floating Coast and Environmental History of the Bering Straits. Npr called it. A quote deeply studied deeply felt book that lays out a devastating complex history of change notes. What faces us now and dares us to imagine better in quote as we proceed and get into this interview. I will note that I spoke with Professor Demuth while she was at the university library so it can be a little loud in the background at times. It's a busy place. I can promise you however that this will be one of the most compelling and interesting accounts of the history of whaling that you had ever you look so cold yes. It's a little chilly up here. What's the what's the weather like right? Now it's actually a pretty Balmy day today. It's about twenty degrees. It was about fifty degrees colder here last week. You've you've draw the line pretty much anything around ten. Just can't do it for me of all the things that makes this whole conversation. That much more interesting demuth was actually drawn to the Arctic in her young adult life and even lived in the Yukon for two years. And yes doing all the things that you're imagining right now tracking bears hunting. Caribou FISHING SALMON. And yes even. Husky Mushin Dog sledding and no. I'm not making that up. She's that for real your your first journeys out there. If I understand right was your running dog sled yes so when I was eighteen I decided to take a gap year as we. Now call them although they weren't really called then And went to a little community north of the Arctic Circle in the Yukon territory to be a dog handler which is basically an apprentice to somebody who has a dog team and I knew nothing about sled dogs. When I moved up there I was eighteen so I thought I knew something about things but I really didn't. And that was my first introduction to the Arctic. Okay and how long you said you do that for two years. Yes do you. Do you still remember how to do it? I mean I. It's kind of like riding a bicycle except in this particular case. You're working with dogs so you can remember how to do the physical pieces of it but you also need to have a relationship with animals. You're working with so. I'm sure that if I had a team and I spent a lot of time with them would would all come back because I would be making that relationship with dogs but I'd like a bicycle. You can't just grab one and go right right. Yeah that makes sense You don't have to get to know your bike. I right I probably ended up working appear because my dad read me too much Jack London when I was a kid. So there's definitely a literary connection in there now. I could do a really poor job of basically giving it a synopsis of the Book. Or I'm sure it would be much more articulate coming from you Tell us a little bit more about the Soviet whaling And more specifically what you found so fascinating a about that topic. Yes the book that I published. Just this past fall called floating coast looks at basically the the past two hundred years or so along the Bering Strait both the Russian Arctic and in the US Arctic. It's a it's a two country history but because it's an environmental history in some ways it's a history of no country because it's looking at processes an an animals that don't really matched onto nation state borders and the the the project is kind book ended no Pun intended by could have two episodes of large scale whaling the first one being in the nineteenth century for market whalers capitalist wailers most of them coming from New England in fact some of them from where I now live in Providence. Who were coming up to kill bowhead. Whales for oil for lamp oil mostly and then the book closes with a couple of chapters about Soviet whaling in the twentieth century. Which in many ways is just the socialist analog to the to the capitalist wailing in that it is Quite excessive it kills whales far outside their capacity to to reproduce. And keep keep up with the demand and those kind of frames of the book in some ways. Show the things that I found really interesting about this part of the world as a historian. Who's interested in the ways that people's ideas influence the environments? They live in and vice versa. Which is that. It's a it's a place that has a very similar ecology on both sides of the Bering Strait. If you drop down on the peninsula or the seward Peninsula Chukchi Peninsulas in Russia and the seward Peninsula's in Alaska. He can't really tell one from the other right. And let's you know the place extremely well. Because the the flora and the fauna in geology are really comparable but of course in the twentieth century. It gets split by these two big economic ideologies that imagine each other in opposition. Which is you know. Capitalism and socialism. So it's kind of a natural experiment to see how these two ways of managing environments in some sense that the Soviet Union the United States brought with them interact with Arctic species and in the case of Wales they do it very similarly which is more or less trying to kill everywhere they possibly can ya. It's like it's kind of shocking especially when you talk about like as a concern of how many whales are being impacted or what that's doing to the ecosystem comes up that the answer kind of always came back to will. Don't worry. Technology will save us from. That will deliver a positive outcome. Okay can you elaborate on that? Yes this was one of the really interesting commonalities I found between two groups of whalers who were operating hundred years apart from each other or more and in two extremely different cultural and economic contexts is at the end of nineteenth century moby. Dick STYLE TALL SHIP. Whalers call me. Ishmael an ordinary seaman before the mast on the good ship check. What found out a man on Christmas Day of the year? Eighteen forty four on a thousand days. Voight very aware that when they entered a new population of Wales and a piece of the ocean that they hadn't been hunting in before that they would they called. Wailing it out or fishing it out that they would kill off an enormous number of the animals that were that were available locally and that they were doing this and getting further and further from home. So they're aware and using the word extinction by the end of the nineteenth century but at the same time as they're talking about extinction they're basically saying well if we put in place some technological Improvements if our ships get faster. If we're more able to navigate around the sea ice will be able to still catch these whales and there was this kind of belief that because Wales were really intelligent. And all of the whalers nudists and talk about this in detail that there were more whales. They were just shy or had gotten smart and were hiding in new places. So there's actually a couple of lines in Moby Dick Melville talks about you know the whales are just hiding behind the Arctic Sea ice and then after the Second World War the Soviet Union sort of follows the same pattern in that they have very sophisticated marine biology by that point in many ways the the research that so the marine biologist or doing is ahead of what's happening in the United States particularly when it comes to studying ways that whales are social animals and able to communicate vocally with each other They're they're way ahead of what's happening in English. Speaking Countries but at the same time as an aware that that the populations of wheels are dropping but at the same time. They're convinced that as long as they just kind of keep putting more technology online. They're going to be able to keep killing

Professor Demuth Bering Straits United States Arctic Wales Environmental History Arctic Circle Arctic Sea NPR Brown University Assistant Professor Soviet Union Seward Peninsula Chukchi Penin Professor Jack London Fairbanks
"one journey" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"one journey" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Nobody plays more music from the eighties than sunny when I was seven nine in every week nights anyone as seven nine plays the eighties at eight full hour of music and memories from the eighties songs like this one journey he's crying now Sonny when I seven nine man is family fun is here at the fifty fourth annual Saint Vincent Ferrer festival join Jennifer awesome the sunny street team on Saturday from two to four it's Saint Vincent Ferrer perish it's just east of federal highway of George Bush Boulevard in Delray beach they'll be carnival rides up food live music and entertainment and so much more and Jen's gonna have your chance to win lots of sunny prizes and even tickets to see journey and the pretenders you can find out more at sunny when I was seven nine dot com Hey this is Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans quicken loans is celebrating our best quarter ever and now we're celebrating some of the lowest refinancing rates ever rates have dropped so much that many Americans can reduce their rate you may be able to save money on your monthly mortgage payment right now the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point two three percent call us at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com to learn more rates of change it to something as a discount rate off because of mission and vision symbolism under lessons office it's an analyst over thirty three today's horoscope brought to you by geico Capricorn's today is a perfect day for romance and fun filled activities with your partner and my fun filled activities we mean shopping for car insurance luckily.

Sonny Jennifer Saint Vincent Ferrer Jen CEO analyst partner Delray Jay Farner quicken geico
How Space Food Standards Impacted the Food Industry and Changed Food Safety Standards

Innovation Now

01:04 min | 2 years ago

How Space Food Standards Impacted the Food Industry and Changed Food Safety Standards

"What if the problems NASA faced. When planning its first I crewed. Space missions was how to ensure that the food astronauts took with them was free of microbes. That could make astronauts sick. The agency the enlisted Pillsbury to tackle the problem. The food manufacturing company quickly discovered that existing quality control methods. Were not up to the task. So pillsbury developed a system for taking control of the entire manufacturing process from raw materials to the processing environment and onto onto distribution the hazard analysis and critical control. Point system was in place in time for the first Moon missions. The process was soon implemented did in Pillsbury's factories for two decades the US government has required that meat poultry seafood and juice producers. Use these same procedures and today's new regulations are still based on those initial principles developed to protect astronaut food when we first journeyed it into space

Pillsbury Nasa United States
Pope Francis accepts invitation to visit Cypress

AP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Pope Francis accepts invitation to visit Cypress

"The president of cypress says pope Francis is accepted his invitation to visit the east Mediterranean island nation next year he made the announcement after talks with the pontiff and the Vatican on Monday in twenty twenty cypress will mark the sixtieth anniversary of its independence from British colonial rule and a decade since pope Benedict the sixteenth travel to the island the first pontiff to do so Cyprus was the initial stop on some polls first journey to spread Christianity in the first century AD and he converted the islands then Roman governor to the

President Trump Cypress Pope Francis Pope Benedict Cyprus Mediterranean Island
Kanye West appears at Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church service

Dave Ramsey

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Kanye West appears at Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church service

"A rapper Kanye west and pastor Joel Osteen are collaborating the two biggest stars took center stage of those teams lake would mega church on Sunday west held a free concert at the Houston area religious center in an all day Sunday service but also promoted the rapper's new gospel album completing the second part of his Sunday service Joel Osteen Lakewood church with his riveting performance and earlier in the day West uniting with the pastor of the one journey as he began to turn toward the lord and he reaches people that we will never reaching the church world all the air again send confidence and cockiness that y'all seem to use

Kanye West Joel Osteen Houston Area Religious Center
Pillsbury in Space

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Pillsbury in Space

"To ensure the safety of prepackaged foods for he is that shave our future. What if the problems NASA faced when planning its first the enlisted Pillsbury to tackle the problem. The food manufacturing company quickly hiring process from raw materials to the processing environment and onto did in Pillsbury's own factories for two decades the US government IOS initial principles developed to protect astronaut food when we first journeyed.

Pillsbury United States Nasa Two Decades
Ensuring Food Safety

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Ensuring Food Safety

"To ensure the safety of prepackaged foods for space nasa partnered with the pillsbury company to create a new approach to to quality control. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. What if the problems nasa faced when planning its first. I crewed space. Missions was how to ensure that the food astronauts took with them was free of microbes that could make astronauts sick the agency the enlisted pillsbury to tackle the problem. The food manufacturing company quickly discovered that existing quality control methods were not up to the task so pillsbury developed a system for taking control of the entire manufacturing process from raw materials to the processing environment and onto onto distribution. The hazard analysis and critical control point system was in place in time for the first moon missions. The process was soon implemented did in pillsbury's own factories for two decades the u._s. Government has required that meat poultry seafood and juice producers use these same procedures and today's new regulations are still based on those initial principles developed to protect astronaut food when we first journeyed it into space for innovation now. I'm jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

Pillsbury Company Pillsbury Nasa Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Two Decades
Nissan, US And France discussed on Armstrong and Getty

Armstrong and Getty

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Nissan, US And France discussed on Armstrong and Getty

"Points self driving car pioneer, way, MO is teaming up with automakers Renault Nissan to make its first journey outside the US where they ride hailing service that will start with a fleet of robo taxis in France, and Japan Waymo can afford to try because it's backed by

Nissan United States France Japan Waymo Renault
"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

"Where can <Speech_Male> they learn more about <Speech_Male> this? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Go on <Speech_Female> a website, <Speech_Female> WWW <Speech_Female> dot one journey <Speech_Female> festival <Speech_Female> dot com. <Speech_Female> One cell <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> as o <Advertisement> n <Speech_Female> e <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you can find <Speech_Female> all the inflammation, <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> there, you can find <Speech_Female> a link to our <Speech_Female> event, bright <Speech_Female> let site you are <Speech_Female> key for the <Speech_Female> free ticket. <Speech_Female> You can also <Speech_Female> find us on Facebook <Speech_Female> traitor and <Speech_Female> lengthened, <Speech_Female> Instagram. <Speech_Female> You name it, <Speech_Female> and our handle <Speech_Female> is. The number <Speech_Female> one Dernie <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> outstanding <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> that ladies and gentlemen, <Speech_Male> brings us to the end of another <Speech_Male> episode of the what <Speech_Male> relief <SpeakerChange> podcast. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> R US as official <Speech_Male> podcast. <Speech_Male> I would like to <Speech_Male> think Wendy Chen <Speech_Male> and vonda Barringer <Speech_Male> from the one <Speech_Male> journey festival for <Speech_Male> joining us here today. <Speech_Male> I wanna <Speech_Male> thank them for all the lovely <Speech_Male> insightful <Speech_Male> in and just <Speech_Male> wonderful <Speech_Male> stories <Speech_Male> and information that they <Speech_Male> shared with us today, <Speech_Male> and it's a message <Speech_Male> that is important to <Speech_Male> everybody that we should <Speech_Male> all take heed <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Male> should all learn from <Speech_Male> it. In fact, <Speech_Male> if you listened <Speech_Male> to this entire <Speech_Male> episode, and you've made <Speech_Male> it to this point, and you <Speech_Male> haven't learned anything <Speech_Male> or picked up, even <Speech_Male> a piece of information, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm gonna tell you to rewind <Speech_Male> it and listen to the <Speech_Male> whole thing again. In fact, <Speech_Male> go back re download <Speech_Male> it so that helps <Speech_Male> our numbers <Speech_Male> and, and, <Speech_Male> and, and <Speech_Male> listen to it again <Speech_Male> because this is a very <Speech_Male> important <Speech_Male> episode that everybody <Speech_Male> should listen to <Speech_Male> if you wanna <Speech_Male> learn more about the podcast <Speech_Male> if it's your first time here <Speech_Male> in here in the <Speech_Male> show head over <Speech_Male> to I are USA <Speech_Male> dot org. Org slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> And over there, <Speech_Male> you can see all of our <Speech_Male> back catalogue. You can <Speech_Male> see more information. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And if you're <Speech_Male> on the I are USA <Speech_Male> USA site, <Speech_Male> you can <Speech_Male> see some of the projects <Speech_Male> and some of the things that we <Speech_Male> do, and you can <Speech_Male> learn more about our <Speech_Male> USA there as <Speech_Male> well. So <Speech_Male> once again, I want <Speech_Male> to think <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> windy chin, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> vonda <Speech_Male> Barringer, I'd <Speech_Male> also like to <Speech_Male> thank for Rita <Speech_Male> for hanging out <Speech_Male> and film in this for us <Speech_Male> today and until <Speech_Male> next <Speech_Male> time, ladies and gentlemen, <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> will say <Speech_Male> a cinema. They. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> My name is Carl <Music> and here. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> Or, <Advertisement> or more <Music> on <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> those two <Advertisement> is correct. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> I <Advertisement> have <Music> missed this <Advertisement> up <Music> yet again. <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> I didn't <Advertisement> know what you go <Music> with all of that as <Music> well. <Music> <Advertisement> We do <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> this <Music> <Advertisement> badly <Music> do better. <Music> Excellent.

vonda Barringer USA Facebook Wendy Chen official Rita
"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

16:14 min | 2 years ago

"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

"Living in South America, they were a dental hygienist like a full on dental hygienist it's, you know, they, they worked in a dentist office. But when they came here, all the schooling all that education, all that experience it kinda got washed away. It kinda got buried in so they mean when I knew them they weren't really doing what they've been doing prior, and she would tell me, you know, I'm in the process of going back to school. And in the process of getting recertified, I'm getting reprocessed. I mean the process and so it was like you've come so far in your life. You know, you're in you're you're in your thirties, you're in your forties. And then for whatever reason, whether it's by choice or out of necessity for. You know, environmental or political reasons you have to relocate and all that schooling and experience counts for not. And you gotta start all over again. In addition to what you just highlight it turns of light areas of and challenges of being a newcomer great new new country oftentimes, new culture that they're not familiar with the system that they need to get used to, but also refugees are often forced to ask, to lead hall s with such short notice, and they don't have the right documentation with them, or that they have a, you know, extended picking gap in their employment because of the situations at home. So all of that attitude that additional layer of challenges that they need to face. Essay would settle in venue hungry, and so absolutely. I paid what Longa the examples that she share. And also, your example of light knowing personally, some of those stories is essentially, what one journeys about is really creating thing, bringing people together so that they can hear NC those individuals living among us who have these incredible stories of resilience in health that they can share until getting human connection to those stories in order to inspire additional support in advocacy action to support the refugees, because they believe when in our people refugee became kind of label that replace your identity. And that is just a state of that is adjust a legal status at not an anything that was about you as a person. And I think like menu meets collect level of person that you, you know, you're, oh, this person is refugee. Of course, you know, they're struggling that can't happen to me because I'm not refugee. But if. Meet the combination near or common. Dr are common teacher are, you know, so common professional so that they can identify this and? Then is a different perspective. Then it's a suddenly, oh, this person is just like me. So that means you know, I can be in. Here's a hearse choose to. And I think that is the connection on a on a make to put the stigma out of the refugees and remind people, although that every, and each one of us in some phones in our life, even if you never move away from home Benin fugit some bay. So as you know, physical refuge or mental that huge are emotional, huge. That is also something the old share and we've on a, you know, create this atmosphere of shared humanity at all. So no, let's jump over and talk to windy, so again, in my none, Barbara Walters. Quality research. I found that you were a refugee or displaced person in. Nineteen eighty nine you left China now the one thing I read about you. That was it was a touch different. Is it sounded like when you left, you didn't have any family like you were almost traveling on your own to come? Join extended family here in the United States. I actually left China name grant. When I was a little girl, actually we came to the US as an immigrant status of. So my family. I came to the United States with my parents and my siblings. However, the refugee causes very near and dear to my heart because many, my family members were refugees at one time during the Chinese civil war, my grandfather left China during the civil as refugees and fled to Hong Kong and my aunts, and uncles of left, Hong Kong and left China as a what will today. What we call the unaccompanied minor. They, you know, they often sheer the stories in how they jumped on the vote with a stranger that they never really net by was asked by my grandfather to come and take them in as any euro in the five year old. They think we're kind of raising the the night the darkness on this of any kind of selling towards Hong Kong. The refugee stories, very much. Hot in my family history. And, and that's what I am supported and committed to, to the refugee at the refugee crisis. So no, I understand that. And thank you for clarifying. So I think my, my, my, my next question to you would be. You know. So do when you came was it? What was it as a young child or? Yeah. So how was that for you? How was that transition for you? Even as an immigrant, not, not, not necessarily as a refugee, or displaced person. But how was that transition for you? I mean, how did you find that coming to a completely new country and having to I mean I mean you joined family here, so that's good. But I mean, what was that, like for you what, what are your memories of that? It was a very, very significant transformative experience at the age of twelve and while I came with my family. It was a, you know, the American culture that the system, the schools we don't know. I don't have any friends here. I did not speak, a work of English, and if that might parents because they were grew up. They grew up in the Chinese cultural revolution. So they really didn't have higher education and growth of graduated with a sixth grade education levels, they are not speak any English. And so for me that immigrants story is really of. It's challenging it was really I feel at all of a sudden at the age of twelve I'm dressed into adulthood because when he came here with the with this by being able to swallow I was able to pick up English. She don't much faster than my parents that all of sudden, I became that who binder for the family. I have to translate on my parents, nook all kinds of transactions unsure that years resonate with so many of the immigrant to been here of the swell and step was ruin. It was it was very challenging, but it was also transformative maturing process. When the end, I particular appreciate, you know, the, the, the harsh that I parent endure a note of that. Knowing that they will face tremendous challenges in Reagan reestablishing, their life in the US, they decided to leave because they want to have a their opportunity, brighter future for their children, as very much like, so many of the refugees, and asylum, seekers, that, you know, if with persecution in the been simply just let you me, what better and more peaceful router for their for their children in their family. So you touched on something I just wanna go back to it because it's, it's, it's something I hadn't actually thought of until I heard you say it, which is, so as a twelve year old in a new in a completely new country, and it completely new environment in completely new culture, essentially, you said that you had to take on a provider role and so that's real interesting to me. So you went from being a twelve year old teenager and, you know, hating your parents because they wouldn't let you stay up till midnight to having to almost be a parent and explain to them, how things were working, and why they were working that way. And that's that's a, that's a really interesting take I hadn't really thought of that key could you speak a little more to that because I mean, obviously that that's, that's going to be something that every child or most chill. Children of immigrants refugees and displaced people are going to feel and for me. I in my environment, I'm wondering if there is a special mental health support that is that is required for kids like that, that are struggling with that. I really just want to go outside and ride my bike. But I've got a sit here and translate these mortgage papers for my parents. Athle-. I remember at the age of twelve thirteen fourteen by cistern, I literally held my parents, translated and able to support them any completing process of pertinent house so that literally happened to us, and it was it was absolutely nerve, racking beginning because, as you can imagine after being here for a year or so as a twelve year old are English still limited, but at the same time, that's all we have as a family. So you just have to make it, you know, it kind of deal with it and provide, as much as you can to help our family, get through all the necessities that we need to, you know, to get life into sort of the normal routine. I remember the very first one that I feel out as a twelve year old to get to the school was one of the school bus of form, that I literally spent two hours and look, up every single on that. That I can I can fill that out without any hell and, and then, you know, today, I look at it probably take me like five minutes, though, if it's really it's struggling it was challenging. But at the same time, it's a great lessons for teenagers to learn because we, I learned to be very independent. I learned to be very kind of goal or the anted, and I think is sort of built my character for a lot of my future, you know, career path as well as my future cut it character for my future. Nutrit- endeavor and pursuits in my life. Well, that's, that's really that's amazing. And that's you know, that's the kind of thing you don't think about in, in, in in, in these situations. You don't really process that. I mean, I know it's funny as you were talking, I and I'm you know what I'm going to ask you, I have to ask you this. So as a teenager having to fill out your own paperwork, did you ever slide something across the table to your mom or dad and say, no, go ahead and sign it? This is what it means. But it wasn't did you ever do that? Really? Because of the rule that I took on as, as adults would really like as essentially the video adult making decisions for that, for the family in many situations that have a lot more control over my tap, right compared to compared to other kids of the same age that sometimes I don't need to flip the paper to say, hey, mom signed year just signed. I also get a lot of trust, at, of course they should do so here at the what a relief podcast, we have a tradition that is referred to as the obligatory question, and essentially, what that means is that at the end of every show, which is kind of where we are now. I'm going to ask you. I'm gonna ask you both as you know, something that goes up on the internet stays there forever. It stays in perpetuity. It stays forever and ever and ever, once it's online, it can never fully be deleted. So with that in mind, and given the given who you are. And what life has brought you through what would be some final words or some final thoughts or a final remark? The you would leave to our audience from now until all. Turn ity and vonda we're going to go ahead and start with you in two of them between kind and being right through the choose being kind and engage. In the shoes they are off. Emphases needed, and that brings people together and not to divisive and. Yeah, just thri your really do make a difference with it depends, analogy, every skill that you have. That's excellent. I love that. I actually I really love that in the difference between being kind and being right. Always choose being kind. I like that. And now when do you unfair advantage because you had a few minutes to think about it. But let's same question for you. Less. So do you have to share? One is that. I just love the motto of one journey, which is many path one journey, and just wanted to remind everyone that, while we may travel on many path of light, where traveling on one jerk of humanity together. So they're saying condition that all of us year, and that's why refugees issues should be everyone's issue. A second second made that I wanted to kind of highlight which is one of my FM phone a favorite, quote of my impelling Keller that says the woes move along not only by the mighty chefs of his heroes. But also by the tiny pushes of its individual honest workers is so for us one journey this movement is entirely power by hundred percent have volunteers in each are tiny, which is because we believe together, we can win the war along. That is also very well said, I like that. So somebody anybody go ahead and, and, and hit the highlights. I know we did it in the opening, but let's do it in the closing one journey festival, June, twenty-ninth, Washington DC National Cathedral. Where can they learn more about it? Where can they get tickets anybody? I'm just going to open the floor. Either one of you could just give us the rundown hit us the highlights where can they find you on social media? Where can they learn more about this? Go on a website, WWW dot one journey festival dot com. One cell as o.

United States Hong Kong China South America Longa Barbara Walters Benin Washington DC National Cathedr Keller Reagan Nutrit twelve year hundred percent five minutes five year two hours
"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

19:33 min | 2 years ago

"one journey" Discussed on What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

"Is a nonprofit organization that provides relief and development in a dignified manner, regardless of gender race or religion and works to empower individuals in their communities and give them a voice in the world. You done. Now. Can we can, we start the podcast and having to laugh, we'll Salat was Cellamare era Suda, and he was a he woman where a water relieved podcast? My name is Carl. Or, or more. Correct. So real. Cinemalike ladies and gentlemen, is silicon boys and girls, welcome to the what of relief podcast, I are USA's official podcast where we come to educate you on all things I are USA on all the things going on in the IRS a universe. We are here today to share some information about an upcoming festival in the DC area. It'll be near the National Cathedral and, you know, before we waste too much more time. Let's go ahead and jump just jump right into it today. I am joined by vonda Barringer and windy Chen, who are the founders of the one journey festival, windy, and vonda bowl. Thank you, both for joining me here today. It's a huge opportunity to huge. Honor for me to be joining, you guys talk about this. So why don't we why don't we start? Windy, windy. Go ahead and give us a little bit of background on this festival in the organization and, and, and why we should go why anybody should care so journey. If the grassroots movement was founded by vonda myself to shift, the narrative about refugees, and combat growing native ISM that were hearing in the public schools around the world. Really and bonded. And I founded this grassroots movement because we would trouble by how recognise are being protraying in the public discourse. And we thought that based on our personal experience, that refugee countries so much to our society to our economy. Everybody create it platform to, to showcase that allowed refugees to tell their stories allow individuals to come and hear their stories here. The refugees stories of resilience in hope and also provide an opportunity for anyone who wants again. Involved with the refugee crisis to connect with wonderful organizations. They're working locally and globally on the wreckage impresses just why are US aid, so that they can learn the public and learn how to get involved at an health, though. That was the original, that's a that's reason of one thirty and however founded and where to so by site able to partner with arguments into bring the your audience, and, you know, honestly, we're, we're we're, we're on a department with you guys. This is such an amazing opportunity. And like you said, I are USA does do a lot of with with refugee in refugee resettlement in refugee, just assistance. And so it's, it's always a pleasure to partner with people that are like minded trying to help those in need and, and move things along move. The narrative along and help move, you know, help move people forward in their lives. Because when you're a refugee, you know, odds are you when you come to this? Entry. You're not coming with much in hand. So it's important to, to, to be able to, to help when it's needed, you know, vonda, do you have anything to add to what was just said about the, the one journey festival? Yeah. And the actually a really described perfectly so vandy, and I met that may two thousand seventeen that was a lot of negative messaging around immigration and refugees, and vandy, and I decided that something has to be done about it, and something has to be done about it, and oppose it, too. So we wanted to engage people who are not necessarily necessarily engaged in refugee issues. So the wanted to engage corporations to build a annual partnerships to engage grassroots. And when thinking about how to do that. The only way that seems reasonable for us was the celebration for the for the message and to do that main list director, spelling and lift the refugees accomplishments, but also connect America with own route. So that everyone who lives today in America. It's not native American has, has Gration, all Reggie Ruth, and that is something which connects us all the charter, and we just won't it this. This. And so the one journey festival will take place on Saturday, June. All the grounds at the National Cathedral. And what we're doing is what we're trying to connect people to the refugee costs through what we call the common languages of humanity food dance, music technologies storytelling in sports, and it's a really full day, packed with your refugee musicians artists, we're inviting from all over the country to come ensure their voices in the talents on the main stage. We have a storytelling ten that is packed with the amazing program storyteller her all day long where we're inviting some of these refugee of calendar refugee artists, and musicians to come share that behind the scenes story on top of that were partnered with a technology company cost share studios. Would they do is they set up these portals around the country? So the our participants had come walk into this total income to face to face have lifetime. With a refugee who were still living abroad at communities in res in Iraq in Mexico. And so that nother way to how used technology to cover the connect people to, to refugees a we're going through their, their suffering, and their, their situation. Now abroad, in finally, we have a sports on sports elements were, we're gonna have a partner with local organizations here in DC to bring sports to, to unite people. So we're gonna have a what's Clinton where people can kinda up their soccer skills alongside with, you know, kind of using what can that people in the community with refugees who are were just at, you know into soccer as anyone that, you know, United. Yeah. And I don't know. Do you wanna talk about the mood asset in maybe also the global marketplace? Yeah. Of course. So they have although twenty foot tracks, so lined up as at the National Cathedral, the food trucks, are mainly owned by refugees and immigrants. So they feel a offer that traditional food that all version. Tonia. No. Well, I think because they're usually parked in front of big office buildings, and they will have all of the global market space there. The Reggie own businesses are businesses who they are, but off its support J coz of Ville presents. The presents of their bass applies. So it will be a very, very diverts very of. Interesting and particle away to spend to spend a Saturday at National Cathedral, with the lots of activities for people with different interest. And we call it Washington's most unique festival in last year. I'm the Washingtonian magazine voted as to be one of the must see festival in June. And we had over four thousand people coming to the festival last year and a celebration, joing solidarity with refugees around the world, ambitious year were expecting more than five thousand to come, and but one of the really unique affect of our festival is that we not only raise awareness refugee prices, but we're also connected people with those organizations. They're doing work with the on the on the ground. So we have a big huge take action, tent, where reported with thirty plus NGOs locally Anglo bully on refugee of they're, they're working refugee issues, so that people can come and learn about how they can get involved at whatever capacity, they have to support refugees around the world. That's a lot. It, it all sounds very cool though. It sounds like a lot of fun. I mean, really he I mean, especially the food trucks, because I mean, let's be honest. I'm not exactly a skinny dude. So that many food trucks from them any different cultures. Sounds absolutely amazing. But I actually want to back up because you, you touched on something that I just want to clarify before we move forward. So you were saying that you're partnering with this tech company and you can give them a shout out, again in a moment. But am I to understand that the goal of working with this tech company is that you're gonna be able to essentially real-time FaceTime with a refugee who's in the field in in the field but not here like right out of the gate? Is that correct? My understanding that. Yet, and the company that were working with is cost share studios, and they said, up be container life portal's around the world in collaboration with local organizations, and we are arranging three connections with them to help so that our participants can get your absolute right? It's essentially life size FaceTime opportunity to talk to a refugee who still living in less less goes grease, or in Iraq and, or in Mexico to really and we have translators on, on the site. So she assume will provide translator so that he can actually hear directly from the refugees themselves, would they're going through what their legislate in those communities and whether hopes and dreams are, you know, for for the future. For a dim backing up just one more time. Life-size. So it's a life size screen. That is absolutely incredible. I wanna see that so. So this this one journey festival, while it is going to be helping bring awareness in helping change the narrative of and for in about refugees. It actually is very close to both of your hearts as I understand, so vonda. Let's, let's, let's, let's talk to you. I so in, in in my research, and I'm no Barbara Walters or anything like that. So let's not worry about that. But you yourself became a I don't know if you'd prefer refugee or displaced. But you yourself became one of those in ninety one when you left Kirk Croatias that correct. I left Gracia ninety nine hundred one of the start of the civil war that was not my plan. So to common live in Germany. But in the time when I was visiting Germany devoid crazy, I started and I stayed. I was of the lucky ones who had. Yeah. But unity, stay in this country. And I started my nice studies there and eventually became German citizen. But this experience that the left my country, inspired me to go. Yeah. Joined political party in Germany. And I became a spokesperson, formulation. And but if you only see for one of the parties, Germany, and for sofa my city of Frankfurt, where I was living and data passes. So when you were in Germany, at that time, and it's it's ninety one. So I, I mean it wasn't what we're seeing now did you find that he even then that you were dealing with, with certain kinds of, I guess, stereotypes or certain you were finding certain kinds of, of blockage in, in your transition in becoming a citizen and staying there is this. I mean, is this something that was happening back in ninety one? Emmy as it is now or was it different at that time? I think I don't know how is it now? So it was, I think the shock for whole L that the war like this can happen. Any Europe actually saw like five hours, right? Colorado from unique so lowering ranging. And I think so lots of people were shocked, but yeah, so that lots of roadblocks for of. For, for people who came as refugees so to be legalized and to have shown to build their life. So that is something there was something which was called dome that, that was kind of that it was those on the main, I'm yeah, I'm kind of allowing you to stay although I don't want to. So does a loving to stay for the certain period of time until your, you know, your country is becka again which which fell off? A people created a lot of insecurities them. People were living on this build on visa for five six years, even Lunga. So, of course, like yeah. You know, if you have this, this roadblock, if you are not, if you're not part of the society immediately. So, you know, it's bakes it takes time to, to, to get a pass them for the new country. And to, you know, today's children to, you know do. To build Ruth. I have lucky on that I was invest age, for something like you know, the combination Jesus news. I was young adults without the family, and I was just I was just on your student is. And I was lucky enough that after I learned enough German that I called join the university in Germany, and my fate was changed to the student status and then, so on. So, so I came. Yeah. Became. Not too fast Bach, like in, in, in a three four years. So Germany became my country. So I can't say that is that is a case for everyone else. So especially the people who, who came to the families are all the people as it was a lot of insecurity. What will happen to them? Is a is that common to what we see going on around the world today, or I mean is, is that the kind of story that you hear on a regular basis that, that it that it's a struggle and the insecurities and things like that. Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean you might have seen so before Angela Merkel let so many people come to Germany. So that was the scene gives the young Syrian girl, I think who is asking her in town hall. So you know explaining this situation. So every three months fearing that your visa, they're not be wronged, and that's your family, and you will have to go back and you don't know that this back is, and also that you actually building life and have friends and join cool. She was afraid she will not be able to finish school. And she started crying, and uncle America levels, and very opposition. She was trying to console her. But then she's a head of state. She doesn't know what to say. And I think maybe this conversation, this young girl. Yeah. Change her heart or put your heart in the right place, and say, okay, we have to do that we have to master this, but that's still a lot of obstacles unattractive obstacles for people who come doll that the diplomas or, you know, the education is not is not, not wallet. It's and of the people who of Ventoux call to be tackle for five years, and Ken, actually recall rates, and, oh, no find a job as a protector is con- to do it, because there are some obstacles, and the thing that is still very much issue everywhere in the world. So, so how to translate your skills and accomplishments, the identity. So in the new environment. And how to start a new life. Yeah. And that's very true in, I mean I, I know somebody personally, and I mean, they weren't a refugee, but they were an immigrant, and when they were living in South America, they were a dental hygienist like a full on dental hygienist it's, you know, they, they worked in a dentist office..

National Cathedral Germany USA vonda partner America Iraq Reggie Ruth vonda Barringer Mexico Carl vandy Washingtonian magazine IRS Angela Merkel town hall South America Emmy
"one journey" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"one journey" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"What's the pieces general thesis? Global climate change is real that there are almost no other venture firms focused, specifically at the earliest stages because of frankly, the last ten or fifteen years of investment performance, and that there's a real ability to return significant returns over the course of the next ten to twenty years as an early stage, venture fund, so early stage, venture not unique our focus very unique. All right. Maybe I'll call managing partner at concrete ventures. Thanks so much. Come on over his first journeys, call wrapping up Uber CEO's saying they have suffered some brand damage in the United States, that's gonna take time to repair more on that. More on that coming up. Live streaming on Twitter as well. Check us out there at technology, and our global breaking news network, kicked talk. This is. Your business landscape. Geeking that we are going to see an all out trade to does the fed term a little softer. Do we get any agreement on US China, we have something else in common towel? They right size their portfolio. The latest business news wherever we Muskie's reinventing, manufacturing processes, stay sex on Bloomberg radio. The Bloomberg business at bloombergradio dot com. The world is listening stuck at your desk. Now, your problem trying to get the latest business news, every place you have to go central banks to join all that they can probably correction than was your problem. Is this a bit of a surprise this collaboration between Jaman Honda? How does that affect valuations, that they're going to be able to realize they try to.

United States Bloomberg managing partner Twitter Jaman Honda CEO Muskie China fifteen years twenty years
"one journey" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"one journey" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Provide valuable experiences if you can find a way to do it without more debt, and then a house, and every ones journey through the film industry is going to be different film is not like Lara medicine where terminal degrees our requirement. I know many people who dropped out of high school and had happy successful careers. No one is ever going to check. If you got an MA or an MFA or a b before hiring, you although they will check if you wanna teach if you're ever like, oh, maybe someday I wanna teach in foam school. You'll almost definitely need an MFA generally. But it can be a really wonderful experience. If you walk into it knowing that it's one avenue of sort of lifelong learning, and I will say this I'm for teen years at a film school at this point. And I'm still learning stuff about the film industry, and storytelling and making movies all the time. So. So yeah. No foam schools ever. There won't be a film school that ever gives you all of the information on film. But hopefully, a good one. We'll we'll help you not peace addled with so much debt. But give you a chance to really grow into being the filmmaker. You wanna be thanks Charles. I think you cover that beautifully. Don't really have anything to add. I guess it. What I also miss about six cool in college in general too. Is that community that you mentioned, I think all the resources that you can have outside of that can keep you a little bit more isolated in on your own single path. And I do miss those discussions and just being around that on a daily weekly basis. Muscle had that sometimes what in the beauty of community is low stakes social interaction, right because people always make the argument where it's like if you really wanna see people you'll make the effort, but it's like, honestly, if I've been on the train for an hour and a half when I get to dinner, I'm already a little grumpy if they took a train in hour and a half, they're already a little grumpy and like arch petitions, and and so someone is not like, you're just like, I'm tired. I'm going to go home. Whereas like, oh, we're already both on campus. We already just walked out of the both the same class together. It's the easiest thing in the world for us to just start talking or end up at the coffee shop where like low stakes low effort social interaction is really hard to come by in a major city. Absolutely and schools are one of the opportunities to do that. I just want to say either of you can call me anytime how cold is it outside. Liz. Just kidding. Because I'm alone right now. Oh, well, I'm never in Manhattan, Manhattan. Feels like the other end of the world. I got to go. I have a newborn child at home, by the way. So everything feels like a field trip. But like I was in Manhattan the other day, and it was like, oh my God. The beak CD full of people go into so many. Yeah. I was like the award. Oh, I'm gonna I'm gonna have one more thing to my film school discussion film school is a less insane decision than it was twenty years ago twenty years ago, there were that many people working in film, and it was a very small industry. And there were very few things you can do honestly in two thousand nineteen there is so much media content getting created they're probably more US senators than our studio directors. So the idea that film schools can be a path to studio directing that is a roll of the dice. But like there is so much workout. They're making social media content making videos for institutions making videos for like participating there's been such an explosion in this that I think that you know, I would feel weird teaching in a film school. If I didn't feel like my students were mostly going to be able to get jobs. So just for the record even though I said, we're done with this segment. I would make that same argument for why you sort of less need film school, and there's more work that you can get by just having a portfolio that you've put together, you know, that you can show your worth. Without having been through that very expensive training. If you can't do it without that. If you can't right. If you can put together, an amazing beautiful portfolio, there is workout there..

Manhattan Lara medicine Charles US Liz twenty years