40 Burst results for "One Hundred Years"

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

The Promised Podcast

02:35 min | 4 d ago

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

"The day before yesterday as we record a gardener found underneath a bush at number twenty two cream as street a cache of world war two vintage bullets artillery shells and grenades which ordinance was stowed under a bush three quarters of a century ago by members of the haganah jewish militia to keep british soldiers and centuries from finding it such a hiding place for weapons was called a sleek from the hebrew root some lama couth to make rid of and in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s there were hundreds of maybe thousands all around the country though most of them were dismantled as soon as the brits left palestinian nineteen forty eight. But you know how it is. You put your grenades and your artillery shells in your bulletin a whole under bush in your yard and then you get busy ensure the brits go home but you tell yourself you'll empty the gun whole tomorrow and if it's not one thing it's another before you know it seventy odd years of pass that is just life in the big city so this week. The police bomb squad piloted remote control. Sapper robots under the tree and they exploded some of the grenades shells and bullets. And they neutralize the rest and sent them to the tel aviv. Forensics lab for further investigation. And for those of you wondering and who isn't wondering isaac jacob adolf. Crimea was the french jewish attorney who in eighteen. Forty along with sir. Moses montefiore made the trip to alexandria egypt to plead before Dive mohammed ali for the release of jews arrested in damascus blood. Libel that rocked the jewish world that year and crimea and montefiore secured freedom for nine of the thirteen syrian. Jews accused of killing christians for their blood. The other four having already died while being tortured after that chromium became minister of justice of france under the second republic in eighteen forty eight and he later founded the 'alliance eastern elite universal in paris in eighteen. Sixty one gathers that isaac jacob adolf creamier would probably not himself have hidden guns in tel aviv in nineteen forty eight but he probably would have understood the sentiment and arguably nothing captures the haphazard semi history city of this forever new and yet never really new city. We love so al tel aviv. Alto better than a gardener. Finding an old bag of old bullets and such tucked under a shrub to shield it from the prying eyes of the brits on a street named for a man who one hundred years before that sailed with an english financier to alexandria a city. Just four hundred fifty kilometers. Southwest of tel-aviv. In order to gain the release of wrongly residues in damascus a city just two hundred kilometers northeast of tel

Haganah Jewish Militia Bush Lama Couth Isaac Jacob Adolf Moses Montefiore Aviv Mohammed Ali Crimea Alexandria Damascus Egypt Al Tel Tel Aviv France Paris TEL
Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Top 5 Comics Podcast

Top 5 Comics Podcast

01:14 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Top 5 Comics Podcast

"These marvel. They opened the gates and they say do whatever you want any company. Do you have like a a dream character. you like to work on. I mean as far as a properties. Whatever i think think if there was if it was any proxy probably the fan. I think they've always been trying to one of the most fascinating kind of brawled. Just like comics concept out there. I mean like even just with the carbon stuff the way to finding new ways to push it forward three exciting. And i just think it's always really kind of value prints kind of just world to play share wounds the forest characters. Lots cares lots of options. I mean x. Men has a very broad branch of of pieces. You could play with so yeah. I understand that it'd pretty cool story wise so the current project commonalities time before time right yet and it's coming out from image comics The short pitch for that and you can tell our audience. So take no you guys. Sh the short pitch. I mean as long as you wanted to be a friend. Let me think okay so in about one hundred years in the future. The world has gotten so bad that people are turning to at crime syndicates. Who time travels acknowledgee to smuggle them back in time now. Our story trying to up to smokeless have been working for this crime. Syndicate for a number of years will finally decided they wanted to start a new life for themselves so they plan to steal the time machine and don't plan pretty much. It's some of the. We've kind of been pitching into people's looper reed saiga..

About One Hundred Years ONE Three
Trina Spear on the FIGS Revolution in Medical Scrubs

Made By Women

01:51 min | 4 d ago

Trina Spear on the FIGS Revolution in Medical Scrubs

"Figs threads for threads initiative donate scrubs to medical professionals in need around the world. No wonder fixes made lists like fast company's most innovative companies for branding and inks roster of fast growing companies. Not bad for enterprise that started by selling scrubs out of the back of a car. I spoke with trina spear about figs mission. Method and challenges. I hope you enjoyed our conversation. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me so for those. Who don't know. Tell us a little bit about figs. Sure do what we're doing here is we're really looking to empower. Celebrate and serve the healthcare community We do that in a number of ways but this was an industry. Medical apparel scrubs lap. Goes everything medical professionals word. It's an industry. That's been around for one hundred years in had no change earn a nation and there were two problems one being the products. And i'm sure everyone's seen it right. Ill-fitting uncomfortable oxygen baggy Is not something that. I would wanna wear to work every day. And then the second was one where out distribution model was broken where you know as a medical professional. You're pretty much subjected to go into one of these stores in remote places to find your scrubs on iraq and that was the shopping experience so what we do here really totally change those dynamics and in summary what we've done is we built a brand around in unbranded industry decommoditizing. What many believe was a commodity product. And then think what we're most proud of is building a community around this profession or helping to bring these bring healthcare professionals together and in really look to serve them in any way. We can

Trina Spear Iraq
Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:01 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Organize a gener in general flynn's owner selective group of people who ease bed to have dinner with jonathan and present a historical research and your research was was on the stalin era nine hundred thirty s right. Okay and so obviously that involves spycraft and things like that but you're an historian one hundred years later and you're you're british citizen so right and also in this particular case even document that i was asked to show general flynn at dinner so each were to present research. I just found a postcard in our guy said before. Signed became the leader of soviet union in this famous Grievously he was actually himself. A revolutionary on the ron from the secret police and i found a price cut. He says when he's actually scaping the police chasing him so it's a very different so that's sort of thing would not cambridge is challenged people's opinions about the subject. They not right so it was something which was very interesting to researchers but then at the same time had nothing to do with current events in america. And that's that's since thousand. Fourteen months old twenty fourteen. We forget and i have myself for guy had the privilege of meeting. General flynn a couple of times. But since i'm not russian i wasn't threatened with jail time. Female well listen. I have to say that you know it is amazing to me. It's hard for me. It's one of the reasons i wanted to have young. Most americans cannot get their heads around the idea that we descended into this madness and the left and the democrats have never apologized. They've never come clean on this issue. the they keep harboring it in a sense has as a kind of a vague threat. That well maybe. It wasn't proved but we still believe it's true when the hunter laptop Blockbuster information came out. They actually said oh. This is russian. Disinformation this a few months ago. It's just absurd so your story is right in the center of this here. You are doing your work studying in cambridge and simply because you russian they decide. There's a way to link you to general flynn and to make it look like something is going on so experience. How did it happen for you. And so this is what is right is suggest people forget that that that twenty fourteen there was no from president trump. Right and doesn't seem like a long ago but as a historian ritz. Let's go for days right since maine. Fourteen the president was obama and there was no way in the world. I don't think donald trump used was even going around for the price. Let alone wing. Bright kind of connection with you know rush saying you know whatever they call it Election staff at such a such. So general flynn visits as the head of president obama's day. We have this great basin. He leaves the denied his accompanied by security detail. And that's it and i get picked up by By my colleagues and then my family. And that's that sandoval And that should have been end of it and then three years later three has later. I find myself in the newspapers. As a i earned his says is a british historian. I'm now in the newspapers. It's kind of like a professional spy whose job it is to use your generals in particular is connected to the trump campaign and it comes out of nowhere right and i have no idea what it's about because as you say..

America Jonathan Donald Trump Barack Obama One Hundred Years Later Three Years Later Fourteen Each Stalin Era Nine Hundred Thirty S Twenty Fourteen Russian Democrats Few Months Ago DAY British Fourteen Months Old Thousand President Trump
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

The Book Review

02:50 min | Last week

Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

"Carl. Zimmer joins us now. He is a columnist for the new york times and he is the author of many books. He was last on the podcast for his book. She has her mother's laugh. His new book is called. Life's edge the search for what it means to be alive. Carl thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right so right now. You're kinda busy. You've been reporting on corona virus for the times. What is that leg. It's kind of overwhelming You know i am kind of startled that you know the whole world wants to read what we at. The scientists have to write about. You know this virus. But i will remember this experience of the past year for the rest of my life really. It's been exceptional as a as a moment in science journalism as a science journalist. Is this an area that you had been looking at for years and years. Were you especially interested in epidemiology or was this sort of switching gears for you. I've had a obsession with viruses for a long time. I'm actually wrote a book called the planet of viruses a few years ago. So you know. I've reported on ebola and influenza over the years of have done the virus thing. And so you know i i felt like well i can bring my experience to bear on this and and so basically it just started doing the same kind of reporting about this virus but now of course this is a virus that was causing a kind of pandemic that we have not seen for one hundred years. You're not the only journalist covering this pandemic obviously not even the only journalists covering this pandemic on the scientists at the times. How do you all kind of divide it up. Do you have an area in particular that you are looking at specifically yet. None of us can do this alone absolutely and we have to really roll with the punches. You know i was focusing a lot on vaccines for example in the fall overseeing our tracker and then we started to to see these variants were popping up. Then we're of serious concern so i basically had to carve out some time to work on variants but mental really. My colleague has also been writing about various. Like crazy and ben muller and we actually have several people who who just try to keep up with the variants. You know and and there are other people who are handling the store. All the stories of vaccine distribution geopolitics and long cova. There be other people handling that. It's it's such an enormous story. What about it most interest you personally. Well i'm most interested in in The pandemic ending besides that that and not being sick. Yes yeah is unsettling jim how this pandemic has played out exactly. As scientists had warned it would

Zimmer The New York Times Carl Ebola Influenza Ben Muller JIM
Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

00:48 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Dick style thing. I just be like we're gonna pick you know one hundred years from now and like just make it really weird in a bunch of ways and not really sure how we got from here to there and just have it be kind of bizarre and i've definitely done that like i have a story called. I read yesterday called on. You know which was actually adapted into a on audio dramatization. That i really people to hunt down and You know i'll have you know is takes place like at some point in the medium term future. Probably one hundred two hundred years from now on. It's just a weird you know. Everything is kind of augmented reality. Everything is you know. People are learning in their sleep. People are like living to one hundred thirty one hundred and forty years old routinely. Everything is just like bizarre kind of off kilter and it's you know it has a lot of cartoony feel to it because i'm not trying to like plausibly. Say well this is executive. The technological and social change will play out. It's just more. Here's a bunch of wacky stuff happening and it's kind of a vaguely coherent and And self. You knows a self evident view of the future. And i think that that's often safer ground. I think that you know it's never really possible to predict even five years from now in a way that's like holistic. I think you're going to end up with you're gonna have missing a lot of stuff. Someone five years ago trying to predict now probably would have missed a lot of what we're dealing with right now like the one in march two thousand sixteen was trying to predict march twenty one and they would have seen kind of think. So but you're maybe a to land the plane here a little bit your most recent novel just coming out now is a young adult novel which is a departure for you but it's still science fiction. Yes it's still empire kind of things saving the galaxy so what pushed you in that direction. Did this a long standing ambition that you've had to radio adult novel or did you think just be fun or is that where the real money is. What's going on here. So i've always loved young adult fiction like young adult fiction. Is you know there's actually a washington post article from twenty eleven. Where i'm just like going on about how much i feel like..

Yesterday Five Years Ago One Hundred Thirty One Hundred March Twenty One March Two Thousand Sixteen One Hundred Two Hundred Years Five Years One Hundred Years Twenty Eleven Washington Post
NASA gives all clear: Earth safe from asteroid for 100 years

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA gives all clear: Earth safe from asteroid for 100 years

"With all the possible calamities that could hit planet earth NASA says there's at least one you can cross off the list at least for now remember a PA office perhaps not by name but it's the one thousand foot asteroid detected in two thousand four scientists first thought it could come frighteningly close to earth in two thousand twenty nine and again in twenty thirty six NASA eventually ruled out any chance of a strike on those two approaches but the big one in twenty sixty eight was still thought to be a possibility now NASA's center for near earth object studies says not to worry a two thousand sixty eight impact is not in the realm of possibility new calculations from a telescope and radar observations rule out any risk of impact for at least the next one hundred years of office will come within twenty thousand miles of earth on April thirteenth twenty twenty nine enabling astronomers to get a good look one note for the superstitious however that is a Friday I'm Ben Thomas

Nasa Center For Near Earth Object S PA Ben Thomas
Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

The South Florida Morning Show

00:36 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

"We had no rate. I mean nothing of all of our our our stations here and they had to work get back on and then they had to work to get the power back on so we could. Actually you know. Do our jobs here. In the morning. Though i mean just i mean i feel bad but incredible so shout out brian here at home and complaining. The cables cable like five second. I got over it all right. I'm all right now. We've got a rough gobert. That was a brutal storm. Yesterday it was as bad as any hurricane. We've had my goodness. It was crazy but isn't it weird. Though like i've had more damage to a house there was a tree between my neighbor in me in it fell off in atlanta. I was so lucky it almost took up. Both of my air conditioner units just the way it fell. It was but that happened in the tropical storm. My gosh any of the hurricanes leading up isn't that amazing. It's amazing. I guess it hits it at the right direction at the right time and the soil being wet. I dunno the funny part about it. Is you know. I try to clear like a little bit every couple of months and the guy. That's clear egos soil. You should really leave the palm trees that the palm trees. He says the pine trees. I went there like one hundred feet tall. They fall so much. Jesus name fallen he goes. He goes the palm trees. Those are going to come down. I i was like really go. He goes those other ones have been here one hundred years. They're not going anywhere. Wow exactly exhausted wrong. Face it designed to bend got are native here and they ha. They didn't landscaper palm front palm junk in my yard yesterday from the palm. Trees this nature clearing stuff out so they don't you know happened during hurricane nature trying to ruin my back and my hands in my body in your grill. My grill morillas been recovered from afraid to turn on nafta got banged up. They can okay the okay. Oh it's fine you think so As i was going flying it was going to blow up. I don't make the tanks going to blow up because they always tell you to be so careful with them. They make me nervous. Those little propane tanks. Punctures a hole. It's flying around. John's yard rocket. Anyway we found a side gig for you. You did you actually more of diener. Okay i would do it. But i can't because i'm still mad at baseball okay. Even though the moment. I said that the red sox went on a six game win streak. I'm the problem that's it so see. Stop watching the game. Oh jeez okay. So it's not a big baseball. It has baseball in. Yeah oh okay you're in. Mlb food tester eat hotdogs. Watch baseball what's wrong with that okay. I'll eat the hotdogs. Most people watch the game. I don't want the dog. Website called bonus finder looking for somebody to become an ammo. Be food tester if they pick you okay to a few major league baseball parks see. That's the part. I like though. Because i would love to go on a trip. All watch games. Eat hotdogs a report on how they are. Oh that's pretty cool so you can go to like wrigley field like someplace really cool or like the stadium in atlanta or something like that. They had your choice. I guess it's five hundred bucks. But they paid for travel and food. That's what that's the real bonus. Here got a fly the more you well..

Atlanta Yesterday Five Hundred Bucks Six Game John One Hundred Feet One Hundred Years Jesus Both Five Second Brian MLB SOX Baseball Nafta Couple Of Months Field League
The Crime of Refusing Vaccination

The Experiment

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

The Crime of Refusing Vaccination

"Hello this is robin. High is the swedish lutheran church in cambridge. We haven't been that in a very long time. But i'm the pastor. Faith lutheran church. How can i help you. Okay thank you. I'm working on a story about pastor heading jacobson. I'm sure this is about vaccination awhile ago producer gabrielle. Burbank cold called a in cambridge massachusetts in search of the origin story of an argument. We're all having right now. We're in the midst of the most ambitious vaccine roll out the world has ever seen. There is finally hope that all of this will end but this hope depends almost entirely on. How many people will be willing to get the vaccine. There's still real fear around what this vaccine will do to us and his battle between hope and fear. It's not the first time we've seen it in this country. It started in this church one hundred years ago. Thank you for talking to me. This is like such a random call discount. Wear the current pastor picked up the phone. Are you in the church. No this is organised practicing. I just put on my mask number very talented.

Swedish Lutheran Church Cambridge Faith Lutheran Church Jacobson Robin Burbank Gabrielle Massachusetts
Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

01:01 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "one hundred years" discussed on Cleared Hot

"Look at the middle ages look at the eighteen hundreds with civil like land as a bit normal. You're talking about something that has never existed and never will exist. But if your heart's in the right place and you're trying to do good but at the same time. Enjoy yourself when you're kind of off the clock. That seems like a pretty good approach. I think what's abnormal right now. People's ability to outsource almost everything in their life but on an app and i can have food delivered. I can get on my phone research. Whatever topic i want to without leaving the comfort of my lazy boy my boxers. Something bad happens outsource safety and security to nine one. That's actually what's abnormal dis- softness of what's a people is what is admirable. You go back one hundred years people like yeah you need to work that shit out on your own true and i think that's one of the things. I'm i'm glad you're raising your kids in montana and when i grow up when i grew up here i i still remember the first time i really got punched in the face in sixth grade. I don't recommend that. I hope my kids don't get punched in the face. But it's like mike tyson's famous quote. Everyone's got a plan until you get punched in the face right. Yeah but did you learn from it. I did learn xactly. I did learn from it. And and and i don't want this to come across the wrong way but you know i've got two kids a boy and a girl six and eight years old one of the things i've said to my wife and i don't mean this it can be misconstrued but it's just like i don't wanna raise soft children know them to understand. Oh you know here's a pocket knife and matches. Oh my god. I can cut myself and burn my fingers right where i. I'm sure you've got friends. I've got friends who led this kind of sheltered existence and then they're released into the world. Oh it's just like you're doing them such a disservice right. Well you can teach kids about pocket knives and matches without them. Getting third degree burns and sawing their arm off. You know it's i forget My my jujitsu colleges coach. His wife is icelandic. And there's i forget the exact quote but it's like burnt baby doesn't touch the stove anymore. Something along those lines. I think in the like sixty two percent of that quote but the point being the mistake being made is a teacher for the future. I don't think it's a good idea to shelter your kids from anything. Failure success the ups and downs of life. I to me. That is what prepares them to actually leave the nest if you will and go out and live a successful life is a contributing adult and society without a doubt without a doubt. That's what i would hope. So when you so two thousand in one. You're still working at cnn. I was in fact i remember i had. Cnn on was off that day was living in atlanta. Working at headquarters cnn center. The tian. i watched the first plane hit it. The first tower I was..

SIX Mike Tyson Two Kids Atlanta First Plane CNN One Hundred Years Sixty Two Percent Sixth Grade First Time Eighteen Hundreds First Tower Two Thousand Third Degree Eight Years Old One Of Cnn Center Nine One Things
Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

Ordinary Equality

05:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

"Welcome back to ordinary equality. I'm jimmy wilson a writer editor and feminist activist. And i'm kate. Kelly human rights attorney and feminist activist. Today we're talking about an issue that has been undercurrent of a lot of what we've covered so far reproductive justice it's a framework created by black women to center our needs in the midst of a movement that has ignored us for far too long. This episode we're going to discuss some of the reproductive injustice. That continued post emancipation. And how it spurred the founding of a movement bill to address the inequity and the mistrust caused by centuries of reproductive oppression at the end of the episode will learn white folks myself included can do to better center marginalized and underrepresented voices in this conversation. And what organizations are doing on the ground to ensure reproductive justice the slave breeding industry we discussed in episode three left a painful and persistent legacy in this country. Professor jennifer morgan talked about how the historic commodification of black bodies set the stage for ongoing mistreatment of folks embedding generational trauma that persists today that shamas sits beneath much more recent oppression of reproductive rights throughout most of the twentieth century. Eugenics campaigns flourished in the united states quickly becoming the dominant scientific view. The goal was to exterminate all so-called undesirable qualities in society through often-forced selective breeding and sterilization mental illnesses criminal records unwanted racial traits low intelligence levels and even poverty were considered undesirable indicators leading scientists. Believed that all these traits could and should be selectively bred out of the human population by any means necessary as we now know all of these ideas have since been proven to be as false as they are immoral. Time and time again. In the heyday of eugenics thirty-three states allowed involuntary sterilization on groups lawmakers claimed were unfit have children in california mental institutions. Alone about twenty thousand for sterilizations between nineteen o nine and nineteen seventy-nine unsurprisingly. People of color in immigrants were far more likely to be selected as an undesirable group worthy for sterilization mainstream. Scientists pushed these views. As fact margaret sanger the founder of planned. Parenthood got involved in the eugenics movement as she tried to promote reproductive rights. On october sixteenth. Nine hundred sixteen sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the united states. In order to push the idea of birth control rights forward. She consorted with leaders in the ever growing eugenics movement. She even personally advocated for selective breeding herself in one thousand nine hundred ninety one article. She wrote quote. The most urgent problem. Today is how to limit and discourage the over fertility of the mentally and physically defective as damning as that is. There's more to the story. Here's loretta ross. A professor at smith college and former national coordinator of sister song women of color reproductive justice collective on sanger's legacy her involvement in movement. But i also contextualized wbz devos was vaulted with the jenex movement. And so because it was a popular pseudoscience at that time a lot of people were involved in it. And so to single out margaret sanger as the demon is trying to eliminate the black race is just bad historical research because in fact. She was far ahead of her time. Even i called in a sectional list one day because in nineteen teams retired nineteen sixteen. She about poverty. She wrote about racism she wrote about all the inner sexual issues. We're talking about now. One hundred years later she was so ahead of her time and so she was an accident. Early intersection analyst. Who made some mistakes. But then everybody i know. Who's a human being makes. Mistakes if i wanted to do an analysis of everything dr martin luther king junior it wrong. It's an attention. But maybe they demonize him as they do margaret sanger. Many anti-choice advocates claim. That singer sought to eliminate black people from america altogether. That couldn't be less true. She focused the spread of birth control on poor communities many of which were largely populated with people of color. But it's because they were more likely to be susceptible to unwanted pregnancies and she wrote in one thousand nine fourteen enforced. Motherhood is the most complete denial of women's right to life and liberty. It's definitely disturbing to read about many of sanger's eugenic spaced beliefs. Today though she later repudiated everything. About the idea of selective breeding we still have to contend with the damage her involvement in the movement when a well known figure participates in such a harmful ideology it may provide others the justification to do the same. Her language may also have sowed increased wariness and communities of color after atrocities committed by nazi germany on earth. The terror born from the disgusting ideology of eugenics the vocal public support for the movement fizzled and most sleep died in the united states. But for sterilization continued behind the scenes for decades and still takes place today as we'll discuss later in the

Jimmy Wilson Jennifer Morgan Shamas Margaret Sanger Sanger Loretta Ross America Sister Song Women Of Color Rep Wbz Devos Kate Kelly Dr Martin Luther King Smith College California Germany
100-Year-Old Man Killed In Violent Encino Attacks In Los Angeles, Suspect Arrested

John and Ken on Demand

01:43 min | 3 weeks ago

100-Year-Old Man Killed In Violent Encino Attacks In Los Angeles, Suspect Arrested

"I mean you talk about a crime wave. And what the hell's going on in the city of la. Somebody killed a hundred year. Old man in encino supposedly happened before noon yesterday. Cops were called assault with a deadly weapon. An axe are you kidding me. When officers got there they found a man who had suffered minor injuries but he directed them to a suspect. They've arrested forty seven year old. Adam dimmer men. We're going to find out this is the vagrant. What are we going to find out next one of the mental issues here. He's walking around attacking people with an ax There was an officer that basically told me to stay indoors as a guy with a machete. Who's walking around here. Apparently dimmer man had a dog with him. See deborah not. People with dogs aren't necessarily always good people i know. They got an action a knife at the scene and sometime later they responded to a home in encino on alonzo place where a hundred year old man was found dead. Numerous contusions and lacerations they believe dimmer man killed him. Can you imagine living to one hundred and going that way to get murder. They've identified the poor guy as yussef mahboob ian. He'd been living on the secluded hilltop cul de sac for more than thirty years. His wife is the one who found so. I guess he broke into the house. Or i don't know we don't know a lot of the circumstances here yet. But you got a guy running around the valley with a machete attacking people and he kills a one hundred year old man. Wow

Encino Adam Dimmer LA Yussef Mahboob Ian Deborah Alonzo
How Your First Time Home Buying Decision Affects Long-Term Wealth With Scott And Mindy

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

06:00 min | Last month

How Your First Time Home Buying Decision Affects Long-Term Wealth With Scott And Mindy

"Scott trag- mini jensen. Welcome back to the bigger pockets. Podcast each of you former guest house here on the show. Now your Your guest which is pretty exciting. What's up guys. How's it going. Thanks for having us. I'm super excited to be back. I haven't seen you in one hundred years so i know it actually has been a while Kobe put a delay to my regular trips to denver but didn't stop. David greene hair from travel in the world and hanging out in mexico. What's up david. What's going on guys. Yeah i'm in kabul san lucas. It's my first time here. It's pretty awesome. Yeah sometimes you gotta take a vacation from maui. I guess right. I don't like to myself on the back. It's been very hard. I think. I just realized for the first half my life that when people say they're going to kabo and kabul san lucas set the same thing. Is that true. I think i've never realized that was the same thing to different cities. But i just put that two and two together that that was the same thing. I'm going to new york versus. New york. city apparently shortened nickname. Anyway rather than talking about my intelligence or lack thereof. Let's get into the scott mindy you guys last few years so for those who do not know you. I want to start with this one. Scott obviously you know everyone knows scott tranche. Everyone knows me jensen but for those who don't who are you. What's your real estate strategy. Ben and then. I wanna move into talking about the market a little bit. But let's start with that. We'll start with mindy ladies first. Mindy who are you and What what are you doing. My name's mindy jonathan. I do a lot in real estate. I am primarily a flipper. Which means i buy a house that is very unattractive. I move into it. I live in it as my primary residence fixing it up. So i live in a construction zone for two years and then sell it and make massive tax free cash when i sell it. I'm also a real estate agent in colorado. And i am the community manager for big pockets and the co host of the bigger pockets. Money podcast with me as always is my illustrious co host scott trench. Thanks wendy for the eliminating ensure there. I'm scott trench from the ceo of bigger pockets. I'm an investor here in denver colorado. I've got Eight units about one point six one point seven million in assets within that portfolio and the last couple of years have been a little quiet for me on the acquisition front and my personal portfolio. I have been spending more of that time. Investing in syndications and last year. I really set up property. Management rehabbed and Tackled a bit of maintenance that i had been deferring guests on this show. And i've been differing on a couple of my properties and took care that this year. And so i was able to reset them. Do a big refinance take a lot of cash out nine back into acquisition mode looking for that next deal. Awesome guys well speaking of next deal. It's been a crazy last year. Obviously with the real estate market covid doing some crazy things and things that i don't think any of us really necessarily expected i shouldn't i. Was you know worry that we're going to see a crash or something happened and all of a sudden instead it's just like somebody shot him on steroids into the real estate market the last six months. Why do you think real estate has gotten so competitive. And i don't even call hot as the best word i can use for it. Real real. The real markets gotten hot almost everywhere in the country. Why is that. And then i'll ask. Where do you think it's headed but let's start with that one mindy. Why do you think it's gotten so crazy lately. I think there are a bunch of actors of course cove it. I think a lot of people who were considering selling but maybe didn't have to sell has decided that i'm not gonna have random people traipsing through my house bringing their covid into my house and then i catch it and maybe die so i think there's a shortage of sales just based on the market are the pandemic itself. I think there are ridiculously low. Interest rate why. No they're low interest rates that are fueling people. Ooh i can upgrade to a better house and we didn't have anybody building houses from two thousand eight to two thousand and twelve thirteen fourteen. I mean in my area. They're just starting to do these massive builds again and it takes time and there's people that are still moving here but there's nothing to buy so prices just keep going up. I just sold a house on friday for more money than i thought was ever possible here in the story over and over. Scott what do you think. Yeah i would agree. I think the the first biggest lever is going to be interest rates. The payment matters more than the price to most homebuyers and frankly most landlords like all that fifty percent rule your expenses are not magically changing. You know in those two in those types of things based on interest rates so if your interest rate if your your payment goes down you can afford to buy. You can pay more for the same property and get achieve the same or greater cash flow so i think that interest rates are the number one biggest lever and then the second one is going to be the stimulus and just the in injection of cash and liquid into the economy. In general. I think that last year a lot of people weren't spending as much money as they nip term typically what at least those who would be potential competitors of yours when buying homes and rental properties and so people are now in a position to buy with liquidity and low interest rates. I think fundamentally the that's what's driving it. And then i also think diminish point the other factors are all many of them are also fueling this. There's been an exodus from apartments to single family homes red single-family rents have gone up apartment. Rents have fallen over the last year. Single family housing prices have exploded by more. I think it was like single family. Rents went up by three four percent and prices went up eight nine percent over the year. I think that's that's showing a fuel in demand from apartments to single family homes as rentals but an even greater preference to buy. I think fueled by that interest rate shift so other things. Lack of housing starts continued population. Growth and then Inflation in expectation of inflation. In general are all you know fuelling real estate right now. Who knows how long that will continue but hasn't been a bad year for those who held real estate going into twenty twenty.

Scott Trench Scott Trag Mini Jensen San Lucas Kabul Kabo Scott Mindy Scott Tranche Mindy Jonathan David Greene Mindy Denver Colorado Kobe Maui Jensen Scott Mexico Wendy
How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

The Digiday Podcast

04:08 min | Last month

How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

"So much. Bring on podcast nikki. Thank you for having me. So you've been at harper's bazaar now for what was it like three or four months. It's a it's a new role for you right. this is a new york. But you've come from other notable fashion and lifestyle publications before so you're this is a strong suit for you. This isn't like a new kind of area but how was it starting a new strategic leadership role during a pandemic when the world's remote yet it's i mean starting a sort of new role i think whether you're in leadership or you know just starting your job is weird when it's remote you have to think about how you're going to get to know the team how you're going to deliver feedback. How you're gonna energize. They seem to want to continue working during these like quote unquote crazy times. So it's on. It's tricky but i think it was really great for me to come back to a place like harper's bazaar where i knew a lot of the team already And just sort of hit the ground at the ground running. I think what's particularly interesting about your position and what your colleagues are are looking to do is Harper's bazaar is a legacy fashion brand. It's been around for decades I think i have a coffee table book of lake the covers from the early nineteen hundreds of harper's bazaar it's beautiful but my point is it's a it's old publication Your task though with turning that into a modern digital brand for a younger audience what goes into that process. And how have you been able to do that. during a pandemic yeah. I think when we when i came on and joined late. Attorney coffin. samir. Nassar join the two of them in sort of figuring out what harper's bazaar harper's bazaar dot com gonna look like. We really wanted to go back to you know fashion first and really leaning into our luxury routes but we also have a lot of roots in the feature space so we wanna take back into that as well and so you see a story take for example. We just put a story up today with a profile of martha stewart. And so you see. Somebody like martha stewart. Who is a legacy in a number south but we dressed her in gucci and fear of god and so we wanna make those sort of juicy internet e profiles at people will love but really just speak to what we as a brand do so well and have done so well for well over one hundred years though in that example. I'm assuming that there's probably a lot of like maybe social media elements tied in to take a What would normally be maybe spread in magazine and make it come alive for a much. Larger audience Key talk about you. Know the role that social media on that platform how that's been playing in your editorial strategy and digital strategy. Yeah i mean for the martha stewart story in particular. That story was sort of bread from following martha herself on social media and so she posted over the summer. I believe she posted that amazing sort of like you know beautiful photo of her coming out of a pool and like giving a kiss of the camera and we were like. Oh god martha stewart's kinda major right now like she. Obviously everyone knows apple. What if we lake put her into a sexy little dress or we put her into this suit and put some congress seekers on her and so that story particularly started it was born out of social media and then we were able to blow it out in the pages of the magazine and then have beautiful imagery to put back on social media and so really just sort of trying to think three sixty and trying to really not It's not about A print story or digital story. It's really thinking about the brown. The brand holistically and so when we have a profile like martha you know. How are we going to blow it out on all of the

Harper's Bazaar Harper Martha Stewart Attorney Coffin Nassar Nikki Samir New York Gucci Martha Apple Congress
WWII plane fly-past honors Captain Tom Moore at funeral

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

WWII plane fly-past honors Captain Tom Moore at funeral

"Captain Tom Moore the one hundred year old veteran he single handedly raised millions of pounds for Britain's health workers by walking laps in his backyard has been laid to rest the world will to Europe plane flew over the funeral service was soldiers also performs ceremonial duties for the captain he died on the second of February in hospital after testing positive for cave in nineteen the private service was small attended by just eight members of the patrons immediate family but soldiers carried his coffin draped in the union flag from the highest requirements for him and for him to ceremonial guards moved to Tennessee tech Serra said how proud she was of him what you achieved your whole life and especially in the last year Karen Thomas London

Captain Tom Moore Britain Europe Tennessee Tech Serra Karen Thomas London
Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

"A red painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh who we put on public display for the first time the head of an old next month the Parisian neighborhood painting a street scene in March two picks a windmill named the Peppermill seen from the street under a bright sky Sotheby's auction says the picture painted in eighteen eighty seven has remained in the same family collection for over one hundred years on scene to the public online the paintings will be exhibited next month in Amsterdam Hong Kong and Paris ahead of an auction scheduled for March twenty five in the French capital Sothebys has estimated its value between six and ten million dollars I'm Charles the last month

Vincent Van Gogh Sotheby Amsterdam Hong French Capital Sothebys Kong Paris Charles
Customers Go Nuts Over Grape Nuts Shortage

Business Wars Daily

02:44 min | Last month

Customers Go Nuts Over Grape Nuts Shortage

"February sixteenth throughout the pandemic we've been discussing shortages ranging from toilet paper to patio heaters. But here's one that's oddly specific grape nuts. That's right the post brand cereal equivalent of tom. Brady in other words. You either love it or you hate it. His missing from many grocery store shelves despite their name grape made from either grapes nor nuts instead. They're hard little balls of malted barley flour whole grain wheat flour salt and dried. Yeast tastes like a mouth full of gravel. That is according to one wall street journal report but whether you eat them with milk or sprinkled over ice or yogurt these tough little nuggets have softened enough to keep the brand going for more than one hundred years but like so many products during the pandemic a combination of supply chain and manufacturing issues have made them tough to come by. Since late last year they're manufactured using proprietary process. That is tough to replicate. The company said in a statement. Usa today and what happens when bran loyalists get wind of a shortage. You know what happens. They start hoarding. Grape nuts fans took to social media and read it to bemoan the loss of their favourite breakfast food and there's even a secondary grape nuts market. You can find boxes on ebay for prices ranging between fifteen and two hundred bucks a piece. It's sister product rape nuts. Flakes is a little easier to find but still facing shortages in some areas post said in a facebook comment that it made changes to its production lineup to ensure that cereals in highest demand were being manufactured i so for those seeking alternatives with sky. High boost of fiber grape nuts provides. The pickings are slim but kellogg's has some options for you. All brand buds are a good alternative. Even though judges in one tampa bay tribune taste test said they looked like quote rabbit pellets Last month kelloggs also introduced a revamped version of its raisin bran cereal with toasted oats added for more fiber in the uk. The company's all brand probiotic odi clusters are marketed as an aide to gut health just before the pandemic the outlook for cereal sales with soft but being cooped

Brady Wall Street Journal Nuggets TOM Usa Today Kelloggs Tampa Bay Tribune Ebay Facebook UK
How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

The Small Business Radio Show

08:19 min | 2 months ago

How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

"During the pandemic the use of amazon sword but so has small business owners selling their products on amazon. Here talk about how they can help. Your small business is carry kucic. Who is the of small business empowerment amazon. The small business powered team is focused on driving. The success of amazon's small business partners and works with teams across amazon deliver programs. Investments that support their growth carries a graduate of the university of florida's levin college of law where she earned a juris doctorate degree shows holds in history of english from covenant. College carry welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me very so i could ask you. How did you end up being a lawyer from studying history and english extensive amounts of reading and writing. The really is i. You know when. I was In actually in high school had an opportunity to participate in a youth leadership program That included a track on the judicial system. And i just kinda got hooked on on everything that was involved in of course. Reading and writing is a big part to sorta leaned into those superpowers. I guess so. How did you pass from being a j. d. lead you to amazon and out small business owners. The phone question I do. I've today describe myself as a recovering lawyer. A my favorite time. Yes you know the thing that was fun for me about practicing law was you. You get to spend all day identifying issues in solving problems and so i really From day one enjoyed solving ambiguous problems. Where you had to figure out the root cause of whatever issue or opportunity was in front of you and then inventor way to the solution and so that took me from practicing law Up through a variety of roles on the business side where i've gotten to solve increasingly problems. focused on solving challenges For usually for others which leads to my my role today which is very good to spend all day everyday focused on helping solve issues challenges and make the world a better place for small businesses. I think a lot of people carry don't realize how many small businesses actually work through the amazon channel. Tell us about that So amazon in the us alone on amazon works with more than two million independent partners. They come in all shapes and sizes celena stores. They operate delivery service businesses. They use tools trim. Aws a build alexa skills. They published books with kindle direct publishing so amazon supporting small medium. Sized businesses is a fundamental part of our work there. It's a core part of what we do everyday. An extension of our customer centric culture. Our success depends on their success and our global head. Carrie i was gonna say in our in our store worldwide. We have over a million independent businesses selling in the account for over half of all products sold. And we've seen their sales continue to outpace our retail so we know that customers value them in this election they bring in an incredible way. The amazing statistic that over half of everything purchased on amazon is sold through independent third parties. Small medium sized businesses. That it's not really amazon. Really is the amazon marketplace right absolutely. Yeah the outlive sewing partners. The independent businesses bring those products role and bringing such a wonderful and diverse array of products across all categories. That customers enjoy now. Even i know most of us were surprised by covid. Nineteen who would know that once in every one hundred years right what happen last year but was my biggest surprise is that when ordered some from amazon. It couldn't get here in two days. I thought would never ever happen. Carry tell us about the challenges. They're really amazon. Face in the small business partners did during the height of the covid nineteen crisis absolutely right kobe. Nineteen created many challenges for small businesses. We you know despite it. We were encouraged to see that sense and through that time. Small companies have continued to grow with amazon. You know twenty twenty the number of us long medium sized businesses that surpassed one million dollars sales grew by more than twenty percents and more than thirty seven hundred surpassed him in sales for the first time. Which is just a really great business milestone for any prisoners owner. I'm those businesses have created an estimated one point one million jobs which is phenomenal. It's such an important part. Is you know what keeps our communities going and so we've seen as customers of increasingly shopping online on the past year. The businesses were using e commerce. House channel have continued to sustain grow. I'm in our commitment to supporting them. And adopting for the future has has never been more steadfast done a number of things both continuing work. We've been doing for years and new things. We did in twenty twenty to continue supporting them through that journey. And i think that's really the key role. The amazon plays a lot of companies have got into e commerce for the first time during covid nineteen and like all right. I'm gonna go set up a store. But they no incomes and i think that is really the key of getting involved in the amazon marketplace. Because you already have so many people looking for products right there absolutely One of my favorite stories. I think one of my favorite projects from twenty twenty was last year redesigned prime date support small businesses and we committed more than one hundred million dollars to help their growth over the shopping event through the holiday season and that included holding our biggest small business promotion. Yeah so during that promotion customers. Purchase dollars and products from participating. Small business selling on amazon. Ten dollars credit to spend on prime day. It's on a two week. Lead up to prime day. Small businesses included in that promotion generated more than nine hundred million dollars. In sales on prime day independent third party sellers had their two biggest as ever surpassing three and a half billion in sales which is nearly sixty percent year over year increase and even more growth than our retail business and then it also came with stories like the story of lia foods actually a seller based north aurora forty minutes outside of chicago and she makes african inspired spices but The fun part about her story. It demonstrates the power of selling on amazon and an event like prime day to find those new customers over to help those new customers find you. She shared that coming out of advent not only has she almost doubled her single day sales but her daily started trending upwards with all that new customer acquisition those stories. We really enjoy seeing so those who've never really men sold their price to amazon. What kind of rain moments are there. And what is it in a cost to market on amazon. Yes so our public schedule. So if you if any seller or someone considering becoming a feller looks online at those public public information fees range from eight to fifteen percent depending on product type and for business selling amazon. Really do that as a marketing cost because of the access to that three hundred million customers that it creates and then beyond the monthly in referral fees. everything's optional so sellers choose. What's right for their business. We offer as i mentioned a variety of services in programs than in its pick. What's right for you right so if you want to lean into advertising their options for you could choose what suits for your business if you want to move away from fulfilling your on products create more bandwidth for yourself to do other things there options to leverage by amazon into leverage the customer service support that comes without. So it's it's very much a choose your own adventure but each business owner can select the right fit for them and what fits their

Amazon Levin College Of Law University Of Florida Carrie Lia Foods North Aurora United States Chicago
Is Sourdough Bread Better for You?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:17 min | 2 months ago

Is Sourdough Bread Better for You?

"A listener row with some questions about sour dough. He says i use homemade whole grain. Sour dough daily. And i'm convinced it has exceptional health benefits but i can't find any nutritional info on it. It seems to me that it has to have probiotics. For instance with so many people stuck at home over the last year bread baking in general and sour dough in particular have seen a big rise in popularity and i think that many people share this listeners conviction that sour dough must somehow be more nutritious than just regular bread but are those beliefs backed up by any science. Sour dough is a traditional method of making bread. That's a bit more time and labor intensive than modern methods. And maybe that's why we assume must also be better for us a lot of bread. These days is made with dried yeast. Which are reanimated when their combined with warm water and then when mixed with flour the reanimated yeast start to digest the sugars in the flour. Releasing carbon dioxide gas and this gas gets trapped in pockets in the dough and causes the dough to rise sour dough bread also uses microorganisms to generate the gas. That makes the bread rise. But in this case lactobacillus bacteria are the ones doing the heavy lifting these bacteria along with some uncultivated or wild yeasts are naturally present in the flower as well as just in the air so to make a sour dough starter. You just combine flour and water and you let it sit loosely covered for several days in a warm room and just let nature do its thing as the bacteria in the flower start to reproduce. They give off carbon dioxide gas and lactic acid. And eventually you end up with a tangy. Bubbly mixture with enough umph to levin a loaf of so sour dough bakers will typically take a lot of this starter out of the batch and then replace it with fresh flour and water because unlike a packet of dried yeast. Which you can store in the fridge for years before using it a sour dough starter is a living breathing colony that requires ongoing care. If you don't periodically add more flour to it the bacteria will run out of food and die and this is how people end up hiring sour dough babysitters when they have to go and extended trips. Bread made with sour dough as opposed to baking. Yeast has a characteristically sour tangy taste. And that's one of its chief attractions. The texture of the bread is also usually a little denser moisture and then yeast rice and bread which adds to its charms and the lactic. Acid acts as a natural preservative. Meaning that sour dough breads. Keep well without a lot of added preservatives because the specific metro organisms present in a sour note depend on the type of flour. That's used and the kind of yeast that happened to be hanging out in your kitchen. Every batch of sour dough has unique personality even a tear warr and one that's constantly evolving and this can be a source of frustration as well as joy if you talk to a sour dough baker about his starter. You'll soon start to get the feeling that they're talking about a member of the family or at least a pet with a variety of quirky traits and preferences. It's not uncommon for bakers to name their sourdot an opera singer friend of mine for example named his brune hildalgo. If you somehow get really lucky and get a really good starter. When that produces a nice springy loaf with the perfect balance of tennis you can get even more neurotic about it or at least so. I'm told seriously really good sour dough. Starters are valuable not like game stop stock or anything but still you divide it and give it as gifts you can even sell it. Case in point was once on a hiking vacation in wyoming and idaho and one day. We had breakfast in a diner. Where the pancakes and the breads were made with a famous one hundred year old sour dough starter that had been continuously cultivated since pioneer days. So obviously we had to buy some of that starter for the rest of the vacation. We carded this stuff. Around in a tupperware container carefully. Keeping it out of drafts and direct sunlight occasionally adding more flour and water to keep it going and somehow we manage to get it all the way home to maryland without leaking out into our luggage. And i'm afraid. I no longer have my hundred-year-old started today but i did keep old jedidiah going for several years before that relationship fizzled out turns out. He was just too needy. In any case. I think you can see why sourdot lovers might assume that sour dough has exceptional health benefits the same way we just know that our poodle or our four year old is smarter than the average ninth. Grader can just feel these things.

Levin Baker Tennis Wyoming Idaho Jedidiah Maryland
GM going electric

Motor1.com Podcast

02:55 min | 2 months ago

GM going electric

"Starting things off talking about general motors engines. And the reason we're doing that are two very interesting in pieces of news. We've got Last week gm announced that as of twenty thirty five th they are going to stop offering internal combustion engines in their light cars so basically you might still be able to get a va in your silverado. Twenty five hundred or something like that but vast majority of their vehicles probably even performance stuff like your corvette if the camaro still around then those are all going to be e vs or maybe plug in hybrids but basically gas a purely gas powered engines are not in their future and so i wrote up the road up the story last week and it really got my gear. Spit on that. You know g. m. is one of the oldest auto makers in the world nerd. They've got over one hundred years of history and there are some absolutely fantastic internal combustion engines in that town at also. Interestingly this week. I'm this is a story that you wrote about it is at you know. Cadillac announced that the new cto four. V black-wing c. T. v. black wing. Those are going to be the last v models from cadillac with internal combustion engines and so it really seems like gm serious about this at least for right now So yeah it's it's a weird time. Jim anything to add about the cadillac part of that. Well i mean yes. And no. I guess the bigger question is whether or not gm can actually pull this off than our commenters brought up as well as you know. Twenty thirty is a long time and time away make makes promises that doesn't necessarily keep so they they sometimes don't always follow through most of the all of the time. Maybe i i. I don't wanna sound too harsh on gm. Because i mean they're they're they're going forward and and i mean frankly they have to go for it right. The whole industry is moving in that direction. And we're we're faced with a gm lineup right. Now that is pretty much almost completely devoid of any electrification Damning they have some Just wanted just a couple of vehicles right off the top of my head. Of course they've got the the gmc hummer okay. i. I don't know if a hundred and ten thousand dollar luxury electric pickup truck is really going to be the the mainstream savior but yeah fourteen. Years can get there and cadillac. I mean these These amazing looking sports sedans. That's going to be the the end

GM Cadillac JIM
The History of Drum Lessons with Mike Johnston

Drum History

09:30 min | 2 months ago

The History of Drum Lessons with Mike Johnston

"Mike. Let's jump in and Yeah why don't you go ahead and teach us about the history of drum lessons men. It's it's one of those things that right when you think about anyone. Acquiring a skill you have to think that as soon as that skill is acquired then that skill is ready to be taught to someone else and so we can assume that in the history of drums dating back to people banging on things that it was taught to other people the rhythms the traditional rhythms. All of that stuff. So i think if we're looking for forms of education and that's what you and i have discussed as in the past about like what a cool topic that would be informs of education. We have to start at in person lessons because that would have been the first way this would have been done in and that would be with any skill and so when you have in-person private drum lessons one on one. I'm passing on information to you in a skill set to you. That has it's own pros and cons. I mean all of these have ups and downs all of these things. it's like. Oh that's the best way to go except for this except for this and i think that that becomes such a cool topic because people like me. That are obsessed with education. We're always trying the best trying to find the best way to pass on that information to someone else. And i gotta say i would assume by the end of this. Podcast will wrap all the way back to the beginning which is in person lessons so i think the first thing that would have happened before published books and obviously before the digital world would be in person private lessons on the instrument. And i think it's probably safe for us to just do this coming from the drums set perspective instead of cavemen hitting random skinned instruments. No i think. I think totally and i think that's You know before that and and a lot of it maybe we can kind of dislike. Assume that a lot of the lessons that would have happened. before kind of our modern in person drum set would have been your were taught via the military Yeah seems like a safe assumption. From what i've learned over the years of doing the show is You know it's you're taught the snare drum for a reason or in other cultures. Maybe you're you know it's it's traditional music and you're playing and like a pub or in you know at a party quote unquote. Maria is. it's you know the function Was a big thing you know. What are you doing this for. It wasn't the modern day of like. Oh i play drums. Because i'd igam. I'm doing this to go along with this. Traditional dance or this traditional ceremony so going from those but if we consider like modern day private drum lessons they wouldn't have been that different even one hundred years ago. You would have had to go to someone's house or a music store and you would have had to sit down and take a one on one private lesson now. The pros the positive side of that is the i think the biggest one is this personalized when someone writes a book. It's not personalized. It's general but if i walk into a room to take a lesson with somebody hopefully as long as they're doing their job right they're going to be creating the education specifically for me and my desires on the instrument so getting personalized instruction is a massive plus the other thing is you have someone in the room watching you mess up. That can correct in the moment. Yes dead of submitting video and then waiting two weeks for someone to get back to you in the moment they can even and i don't mean this in like a whiplash kind of way but they can grab your wrists and turn them over a little bit and i. I still remember being a kid and having my teacher grabbed my hand and turn it over and just that feeling of like some another human being note. Do it like this. That stuck with me forever. Yes oh that is amazing and the other thing that never gets talked about enough but as someone that taught private lessons from the age that i was seventeen and from five and tell seventeen i took them and then i taught from seventeen on the teacher becomes a life councillor to the student because the teacher is the one person that is removed from their social circle. So the student who's going through whatever it is in their life whether they're a kid or adult they have this person they can tell their problems too and that teacher can't spread. The rumours can't yarn into drama. Because i don't know anybody so that's one thing that you know you get out of private lessons as you get a bit of a life coach yes someone in the room to correct you and you get personalized instruction. You're absolutely right. And and i just have a funny thing that happened because i i mean you're obviously on another planet from what i was doing so i taught at sam ash for a while and i taught private and then at another store here and i guess my specialty would be working with really young kids not as much shredding like. Let's go you know. Rip through a bunch of books and stuff. It was like getting kids to really like the drums. And i had a little kid. And you know. I won't name obviously but he They were. The dodd was from country. Where i believe. It was a little stricter on the kids. Um i think that's fair to say but the kid the young five year old would very often just kind of like talk to me and tell me stuff in like you said. It's like a psychiatrist thing almost but one time he said. My dad told me to grow a pair. What does that mean. And i was like. Oh man talk to your mom. I'm not. I'm not getting into that. I don't. I don't want sam ash to come after me but again that is such a normal part of being a private drum instructor is that you're you are the person that they can go to and just say like look i. I have no one else to talk about this stuff. And you know you can also end with the problem is you can't step in and be their parent because they already have parents and you just have to kind of be there for them and listen as much as possible. But i think that's that is one of the few things that i never hear mentioned and i think lake man even so my last private instructor that i was actually in the room with was peter manga dini and that was just such a blessing because he's just a legend in the world of education and i would drive two hours to go have my lessons with them and we would be in his basement and i was in my twenties so i wasn't a kid but i was able to tell him. Hey you know. How i'm touring and i have this record deal. Something doesn't feel right and he was the first person to tell me. Education can be your plan. You just have to choose it. Yeah and to have somebody say that to you when you think like. I don't want to admit that. I don't enjoy the rockstar lifestyle to have somebody believe in me and say look man. You're you're meant for this thing. I don't know where my career would be. If i didn't have an in person life coach at that moment To say those things absolutely he was on the I probably should have sent this to you before. He was on the show From when recording this a couple weeks ago a month or so really. Yeah he did We just talked about career and his life and he talked about you and Told a bunch of embarrassing stories. Awesome beautiful now now. He was super proud of you. Obviously but Yeah that was another suggested Episode by someone but I agree completely where you can like. It's almost like a It's just like someone who's been down the road before and can And can kind of steer you in the right direction. But i think maybe that brings up the point of but a a bad teacher can really affect things negatively as well right so so and you know for the downside of private instruction i think the biggest downside is that you are limited to the people in your local area and we don't all live in san francisco. La atlanta new york. London where there's top level pros. And that's i think why you see the success of books. Eventually later later in the timeline. The success drum clinics drum touring Even online lessons. That's because when it comes to private lessons whoever works at your local store. That's who you get. I mean i know as a kid. I didn't choose my german star five years old. My mom got me drum lessons and whoever the teacher was at the store that was closest to us that was going to be my new life coach and it didn't go well for like the first three teachers. I wasn't clicking with the people. And i had the jazz teacher that told me. The only way to play is like this and it was. You know god doesn't really sit well with me that i'm trying to get better in an art form in. You're telling me that it's the military that there's rules has to be done this way and so i think that can be a bad side of in person lessons. The other thing is that. And this is something you'll know from sam ash and either positive or negative but you are also limited to how much the store or the school supports their lesson program. So you might go to an amazing store that has killer gear but because of where. They chose to have their location. You don't get to take lessons on a drum set you have to take it adds or an electric it and so that's another really bad part about this is like oh man. I signed up for this instrument that supposed to be loud and bombastic. And i've never played one

Sam Ash Peter Manga Dini Mike Maria La Atlanta San Francisco London New York
Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

60-Second Science

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

"Time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee you can learn about muscle mass loss during spaceflight track the migration of asian hornets and explore the supernova. That caused extinctions at the end of the devonian period subscribed to science sessions on itunes spotify. Google play stitcher. And wherever you get your podcasts. I'm scientific american assistant news editor. Sarah lou frazier. And here's a short piece from the january. Twenty twenty one issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe in costa rica researchers embedded gps devices in decoy sea turtle eggs to track poaching patterns in their first field test. Five of the hundred and one decoys which had similar size weight and texture to real eggs traveled significantly potentially reaching consumers in latvia dna harvested from a seven hundred year old public toilet in riga as well as a six hundred year old cesspit in jerusalem will help researchers examine. Human microbiomes have evolved over time. Microbial dna from both sites matches some species common in modern hunter gatherers and some in today's city-dwellers in antarctica. New analysis suggests a fifty million year old foot bone found on seymour. Island comes from a species of bird whose wingspan reaches six point. Four meters across the researchers also attributed part of a large jawbone with tooth like structures to the species in a madagascar garden researchers found several volts goes chameleons a rare species whose females can change from green to vivid black white and blue excited. The short lived species had not been documented for more than one hundred years and no females were previously recorded at all in indonesia. new research shows that fluffy but venus slow lawrence's frequently bite one another to settle territorial disputes a rarity in venomous animals in australia an enormous newfound coral reef off the continents northern coast is taller than the empire state building rising more than five hundred meters above the sea floor considered part of the great barrier reef. It is the first detached reef structure discovered there in one hundred and twenty years. That was quick hits. I'm sarah lewin frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Rica Riga Latvia Costa Google Antarctica Jerusalem Seymour Indonesia Lawrence Northern Coast Australia Sarah Lewin Frazier
The Psychology of Gaming with Jane McGonigal

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

04:50 min | 2 months ago

The Psychology of Gaming with Jane McGonigal

"And super better and what is it about video. Alex people have an aversion to video games. But there's so many useful tools and insights and lessons that we can draw from them. People who don't play games have two games that you'd out. I mean there are two point three billion people on the planet now who regularly play video games like one in three people have actively chosen to make games a part of our lives which is really exciting moments now. You don't even know. I i would. I bet she might be. I mean she might be doing something on her phone like a little cat collecting game or something. I talked to so many people who swear they'd never played a video game and they are on level twelve hundred of candy crush saga all the time. So what is it about games. Look i mean my god. We could have like a twelve hour. Podcast series at least on this but The the most important thing is this. This is my life researching. The potential benefits of games played by the right person at the right time for the right reason and the number one thing we know any game that you love i don't care if it's the legends. It's fortnight is candy crush whatever. Whatever you feel drawn to We know that there is a transferrable benefit. Which is you get better at learning new things at dealing with systems that are frustrating and having to adapt. you know. you're learning new rules. You're winning new interfaces. It's designed to frustrate you and you have to adapt and get better and build confidence in your ability to get better and every game does this. And it's it's something that we shouldn't trivialize. We shouldn't pretend that that games are just escapist or just a pastime that they actually build you know this kind of growth mindset. They build this resilient way of dealing with challenges and they especially for young people for kids who grow up learning game after game five year old twin daughters who just got their first tablet this year and they've already taught themselves to play over a hundred different games on this tablet and every day they come show me like mom. Look at this game. I learned. Watch me play this game and just the confidence that you can build in. I can learn anything. I can teach myself. I can get better. I can develop new skills. Even if i'm terrible at this the first time i tried it That's something your whole life until you're like a hundred years old desperately trying to keep that neural plasticity going. How do i keep my. You know. Brain healthy and active. Where's the gray matter gonna grow. You can grow it by learning something new. That's hard for you so from five years old to one hundred years old any game that's designed to be challenging is going to give you that benefit. So how should parents think about that with kids. Because there's a lot of questions around screen time. And whether i should let my kids play certain games or not. How do you think about that okay. So the number one thing is you have to be in conversation with your kids around what they're playing and they're three really powerful questions that i ask my kids and anybody. I'm trying to get to know better. Understand the relationship to games and understand their personal strike so you ask them about whatever. The favorite game is right now. What does it take to be good at this game. What skills does it require. What kind of personality or temperament require you ask them. What have you gotten better at since you started playing this game and you ask. What's the hardest thing you've accomplished in this game and asked them to tell you about how they did it you know. What did you have to do in order to meet that challenge because it turns out that people who can talk about what they've gotten better at. What real skills. Whether it's you know being able to manage my breathing under pressure my heart rate under pressure there competitive e sports player or if it's creativity. Maybe i don't give up when things are hard. It's communication stressful situations of my teammates. It's i can get. I know where to look. Whenever i i don't know what to do. I really good information. Finder whatever it is people who can talk about that. They tend to bring those skills to their work to their learning to their relationships to their hobbies And all you have to do to get somebody to transfer the benefits of games to real life is just have that conversation and you can do it with yourself to like just have a little game journal every time you play new game. You're like what am i getting. Better epic playing this game. It's the hardest thing that i have achieved by one. Been playing this game. And what did it take to do it And so if you're having this conversation with your kids. I don't care what they're playing. I don't care if you're playing fortnight twenty hours a week in that stresses you out on by the way twenty hours a week is like the tipping point where we do start to see. It can get in the way of physical health your mental health. So you know

Alex
"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:08 min | 4 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Are appreciate even have. After fifty years. He became a catholic like me. It only took me fifty years to convert. You want out in the end though. So we're real happy. We have three wonderful men. I call them our boys but they're just wonderful guys just proud of all three of them and we have a happy life. We have a happy family. it's expanded somewhat and we like that too so we're glad that you found each other. You thank you so much for talking to me pressure on. We appreciate it. If you wanna to get any back yes please thank you. Thank you so much. You're welcome. And he's in perfect health. It just takes a little longer to get up estimate. Okay well that was a pleasure. Thank you pretty good interview. I'd say so so. I wanted to ask you know because a lot of players will be coming back in the coming year. After taking a year off. Essentially you know minor. Leaguers whole season was cancelled or players who opted out because of the pandemic. So there will be a lot of players coming back from a long lay-off and of course you and a lot of your contemporaries did that too because you served in the navy and of course you played ball during the war but you came right back in nineteen forty six and picked up right where you left off and hit right away but i wonder what that was like for you and for everyone else. That was coming back from the service just to get right back into the swing of things literally so to speak. You really didn't know what was going to be like you came back and and just you know when you're young you can make you can depth and I'd it got my timing back hitting getting your timing is big. And i was lucky i i had a lmu here and ninety four to six by your back. And i was very disappointed. When i went to cleveland the next year and and didn't do well. I thought i should do better. Jackie robinson did well brooklyn. Bobby brown did very well with the yankees. And i floundered and i was disappointed but i find it caught up. I think catch up until i got washington. Nineteen forty nine. Were there any of your contemporaries. Who saw struggle when they were returning from the service trying to get back into the swing of things and was very helpful and understanding. There are a lot of you know when you when you're in the military a lot of the guys in fact. Most of them were like me. I got to play a little baseball. I've missed one full year. Nineteen forty five but a lot of guys miss three years and some of them. Four bob feller went in early. He was the first one to enlist and They had a little problem coming back. But a lot of the unfortunate ones were the ones who there were like thirty one years old when they enlisted when they went into service when they came out they were thirty five or four Near the end of their career and that was really tough on those i was. I was lucky. I was in the beginning of my major career. And you talked a little bit about playing ball in the navy during the war on your podcast and some of the other work that you did and i was kinda curious because you mentioned that you worked on submarine warfare do about that and it's fascinating so i wonder what you did and how you were able to help well Yeah i want to training forward and wicked simulate. A submarine being there and We had a one. It was a protruded from the bottom of a destroyer.

Leaguers navy Bobby brown Jackie robinson cleveland yankees bob feller brooklyn washington baseball
"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Paul rogers who co-authored my book with me Lucky me the three of us. Go out to dinner with our wives about once a month and paulin. I've been trying to get bothered to do a book. He and i would do it together. But he's not he's reluctant to do it just doesn't seem to want to so you can't get out of a tournament and he didn't wanna you well. I'm glad that you're preserving of these stories. And i'm curious because it seems like you have been very open minded and adaptable throughout your career. When it comes to trying new things and now you know at ninety nine years old starting a podcast seems like you're very open to new thing. Well you know. Podcast is interesting. Because i am unique and i go back that far and unless i tell it was gonna tell it. I don't know if there any other players living at played with point four it. I guess there are but Mickey mantle greenberg. joe gordon. I look booed ro. I'm and i'm happy to share my experiences with those guys. Warren spahn and johnny sain. Just so many joe dimaggio and i'm happy doing then. I like doing it so why not do it. In last time we talked to you. We asked you bet. Jackie robinson but this time i wanted to ask you about larry doby who i imagine you just talked about in your nine thousand four hundred. Yeah i'd talk a lot about. Larry doby because i don't think he's received anywhere near the credit right that he should receive. He was first black in american league. He went through the same indignities that robinson did. I don't wanna take anything away from jack. Up played against jack in nineteen forty six when he was he was in montreal and i was in baltimore and the international cannot and i had occasion to watch him and and play against him all that year and i admired him. I thought he was a very good player. And a good guy on the proved to be just that he was very deserving lehrer dovy very very deserve. What was it like when when he came up in forty seven well he was accepted. It was the same thing he had to sleep in different hotels. He couldn't eat in a restaurant and he did all the things. that jacket. larry was a very nice guy. Good teammate and a damn good hitter and with power power hitter. One thing that i was struck by as i was reading through some of the coverage of your birthday and i wonder if this might be a topic of the future podcast episode was a really lovely answer that you gave to. Mlb dot michael clare about the role that your wife played in your career and the support that she gave you. And i wondered if you could talk a little bit about what life is like for the wife of a major leaguer and a farm director in baseball executive. Because i imagine that she has a fair number of stories that she tell the podcast to come onto. You wanna talk to her. Sure she put her on. yeah. I'll.

Larry doby Mickey mantle greenberg joe gordon Paul rogers Warren spahn johnny sain paulin joe dimaggio Jackie robinson jack american league robinson montreal baltimore michael clare larry Mlb
"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:46 min | 4 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think that jj kind of illuminated for me that there are a lot of open questions still when it comes to what the long term effect is going to be player development going forward and quality of play that some folks are gonna see and who gets a chance to play affiliated ball and who doesn't and the economic future of both the affiliated miners and the baseball that used to be played in the affiliated. Minors and those franchises still kind of uncertain. But we're trying to do was answer. The question like who is going to be there in person access to baseball disappear and who is going to see the character of that access change so it's one thing to have you know a minor league team within driving distance of your house. It's another thing if the only baseball team you have access to say the major league team because that's going to be a more expensive proposition. Maybe the pro partner leagues the summer. Wood bat leagues. Don't have the same emotional resonance for you. That affiliated ball does even if the odds of everyone you see on the field making it to the majors or sort of slim so we wanted to now that we know what teams are in which teams are out sort of culture that analysis again and i think that the top line results is that over five million people at least as it stands now and i will say that there are nineteen teams whose futures are uncertain. So it could be that these five million people have access to a new pro partner league team in the coming years. It could be that they have existing summer. What about leagues. That are near at hand. They might be within driving distance of a good college program. So you know there's there's still some options here but basically over five million people across the country are set to lose access to close in person baseball and that's a real shame. Meanwhile nearly twenty three million people who had minorly access are now going to have to go elsewhere whether that's to the pro partner leagues to the major leagues to the summer. Wood bat leagues. We do want to point out that over. Ten million people who only had major league access are now going to gain minor league access because of the way some of these affiliations have changed so folks in minneapolis. Who were like. I can't afford to go watch. The twins can now go. See the saint paul seitz which are going to be the aaa affiliate of Of the twins now so. I think that our conclusion is that they're going to be people who either have as much access as they had before or going to have to pay more for that access or see it shift and while we might end up with a more efficient system than we had before and there certainly some some benefits to this plan which we talked about on that episode with. Jj you know. More than forty million people went to a minor league game in two thousand nineteen and that sleep more than half the number people who went to a major league game so there is an audience for minor league baseball. And i think people enjoy that. It is inexpensive generally and that it can be kind of funny and it can be light hearted and it can be a nice night at the ballpark for self family. And for many of those people going to the park just got harder. And that's a real shame. Yeah a link to that research and we talked about the merits of this change on the podcast but one thing that we maybe touched on but didn't well on his just. Some of the minor league team owners are so up in arms about the sort of strong arming that. Mlb is doing here and we mentioned how they've extended the quote unquote invitations to join affiliated. Paul in sort of mock that a bit. I was just reading an article. In athletic. By evan drellich where he was talking about. How even to like see the terms of the agreement the professional development license this ten year contract that the teams are going to sign if they want to be affiliated ball in order to review that contract they basically have to sign an nda the teams and also an indemnification of mlb. So even if they want to see the terms they have to agree to not talk about the terms and basically like not to sue. Nlp or hold him responsible for anything before they even see the terms of the contracts the tactics that mlb is usually here like they have all the leverage. I guess and then just figure well they need us more than we need them and if they pass then we'll just move to the next team on our list that we did not extend quote unquote invitation to and So they don't like it then they can lump it but imagine like here's the ten year contract that is going to govern your business for the next decade. You can actually see it in less. You agree not to tell anyone what's in it or speak publicly about it or sue us or anything you have to sign away all your rights before you even take a look at it so i think that's a big part of what has rep people. The wrong way is just like the way. Mlb when about this even apart from the merits of the agreement in the new structure itself. It's like teams finding out on twitter. That they are inner out. Were being in limbo for months on. Just not the best way to implement this. I think they want what they want and they can get it now. So they're gonna all right so we are finished with followups one more thing that we want to touch on before we bring eddie on here. There was news this week and it's long awaited news. And it's that the cleveland baseball franchise is changing. Its name not immediately which we can talk about. But they have Finally agreed to go along with the public pressure that has been building for quite some time now. Decades really going back to in stanford changed its name but with greater urgency of late and of course the washington football team. Belatedly begrudgingly agreed to change. Its name earlier this year and now cleveland has finally retook along with this and they are not doing it immediately. They are taking their time to implement this change so for at least twenty twenty one the franchise will have the same name which is really going to be sort of a strange situation. I think because once you agree that you have to change the same and that the current name is unacceptable. Than how'd you even like. Go about your business for another year without chasing him. Like what do the broadcasters say. What do the pa people say. What will the program say. But i guess we can sort of celebrate that it happens while also noting how long it took the happen and how oddly it's happening it's like very much like the qiming discussion that we had. It's like this is great. This is long overdue. Glad tapping but boy. did it. take a really really long time to happen. Boy did they stumble at the finish line. Yeah so. I think the way that we can be happy here is to applaud the activists and community members and fans who have been working for such a long time to exert pressure on the franchise to change. Its name Which has been so obviously bad especially in conjunction with while who for such a long time. But yeah i understand that while i don't care about this. I understand that the brand concerns are important in this conversation. At least from cleveland's perspective. We don't have to care about that stuff. But i understand they do. And they are trying to maintain the value of their franchise. And so changing. The name is a big deal. It's thing that happens in sports. But you know..

Mlb paul seitz evan drellich Wood jj minneapolis nda cleveland Paul eddie stanford twitter football washington
"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:07 min | 4 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think all of that is good to think about. But i also just find it really hard to believe that. If you're the mets and you have all this steve cohen money and you got all these cohen bucks and you want to shower someone with them that you can't go to real muto and be like how 'bout this wild number that he wouldn't go y- okay. I mean maybe he doesn't wanna play in new york. Maybe he doesn't wanna play in queens. Maybe he doesn't want to be the face of this new era of the mets. Like i don't know. I don't know remove show. I don't know what his hierarchy of needs are when it comes to the next contract that he sides but it does strike me as sort of an odd excuse. Because it's like if you're willing to spend the most money then it seems like it's a non issue and you know there is reference made to a bidding war. And what have you. But it's like you're never. It seems hard to believe that you're going to get more efficient sort of bang for your buck in this market than signing realmuto. He's the best. And it's a position of need on your roster like what are we doing here right sandy. Alderson seemed to suggest that it was a matter of timing that they didn't want to weed round for him. But maybe you'd better off. Her would have made up his mind. You know i was reading another report. There was a report that digitally mayhew and the yankees were like. Twenty five million dollars apart but it was like well lemay mayhew wants for years and one hundred and the yankees want to give him four years and seventy five or something and like even four seventy five. I think that is above what most people projected for will mayhew in this market. Which was expected to be so depressed and so if that is the real difference between them and there were some subsequent reports that suggested maybe the difference between them is actually bigger than that. But if that's the low number and maybe they end up meeting somewhere in the middle. Then that's another data point. That sorta says well. Maybe this market won't be quite so disastrous. At least not for everyone and in a piece i was reading about that at j. dot com. It was mentioned quote. It's believed the. Mlb players association has strongly suggested to free agents not to accept deals just yet unless their exact prices met technically. It's still early in the offseason with spring training not scheduled to start until mid-february there's a sense in the industry that spring training and opening day could be pushed back as the owners and players worked to navigate another year in the time of the coronavirus and vaccine news. Get your price or wait. It out is essentially what free agents are being advised. The person said so. If that's the case then yeah maybe the people who are signing got their price but the fact that some players are getting their prices may be better than people expected coming into this. Yeah i think that it's i mean. It's never a bad thing. If what you want is your expectation and hope for the market is that players will be paid commensurate with their talent when you see players meeting or exceeding your understanding of where that lies from a dollar perspective. That's not a bad thing like it's such a bad thing. I do think that like the back end of this deal. Might end up looking of gnarly for the mets because even as craig edwards pointed out when he wrote the suppress at van graphs. Like even if you assume that what he showed last year and in two thousand eighteen is his new baseline he's still a catcher advancing into his thirty so he's gonna have age related decline regardless of what his new sort of defensive and hitting is. But also your steve cohen and you have billions of dollars. So maybe don't care about the back end of the deal lake riding on our. It's funny how cohen has become such a celebrity. Really since he bought the mets. It one needs to chill out. Yes i know that. His twitter presence is abusing right now. Almost endearing in a way in like cow a oddly punctuated. It is times like it. It seems like he is writing these tweets as opposed to getting someone else to write them for him. Yes i mean he is maybe not quite as cuddly his tweets but it is just sort of striking like how you already are. Multi-billionaire like steve cohen. And a big person in the business world but like most people didn't know who steve cohen was. Your average new yorker didn't really know who he was and yet may be. Bobby axelrod was based on him but he wasn't like a household name or anything. And yet you buy a sports franchise and suddenly everyone knows who you are. And millions of people in your city love you and follow you and hang on your every word and peace seems to be really enjoying this personal tweeting. That he's doing and just kind of goes to show you like. Buying sports team is a money making venture or is treated as such by many people who purchase sports teams. But it's also just really about echo in about getting recognized in a way that you weren't in kind of like being the big man in town you know by the sports team like get recognized. People know who you are people care what you say. Outside of the boardrooms you know people are talking about you. And so that's i think a big part of the reason why a lot of people wanna by sports teams. I mean if. You're steve cohen yet maybe you think it is a valuable asset to add to your portfolio. But i'm sure he could invest that money in some other way. That would make him just as much so really. You probably do it because you wanna be famous and you want to be liked in a way that you can't be just for being rich really so i guess that's a big part of why you would want to buy a sports team. I can hear our listener saying that. You always say that. You want more steve bombers in baseball which i think is the the sort of basketball equivalent to two cohen right. We're here flamboyant and clearly super invested almost to the point of mania. And i think that yeah like if we're picking a mold of billionaire to engage with the sport. I'd rather one whose i'd like to win. A world series and the way that i'm deriving my sense of personal ego and satisfaction is by mets twitter liking me which like as an aside seems like a thing that should be examined with the help of a professional but we all like what we like and some of the stuff we like is really weird. So that's that's steve. Cohen's thing then go with god and a good wind but i do. I do want to do want to caution. people should just okay just. It's okay to enjoy it clearly. I'm not going to tell people to not enjoy something and twenty twenty. I'm not a monster. Just remember like you don't have to just don't give yourself away cheaply as all i'm asking for just saying you don't have to be impressed. You don't have to be impressed. You're not obligated. He should a good team on the field. That's what he should be obligated to do as an owner. You are not obligated to find him charming he want to. That's cool but you don't have to s- okay. I get it. If i were mets fan. I'm sure i'd be seduced by now. I mean i don't know if you can even say like eh. He'll get milkshake duct at some point. Because like you know. He's already like ben dineh his company. You know plead guilty insider trading so like that happened already cast. But you know it's like if you've been living under the wilpon regime for perhaps your whole life or or decades and then suddenly a competent person appears and Speaks to you in a way that you would want your owner to speak and you know easier said than done but hey he signed a couple free agents and that's encouraging the so i get it. I understand the cult of cohen. I just thinking about it from his perspective. Like you're worth fourteen billion or whatever like what more do you want or need like what do you lack. And i guess the only thing money can buy really at that. Point is the kind of fame that he has now in like people carrying about him in a way that they would not have cared about him before or even heard of him. So it's just overnight. You know you're a big figure in the business world. Most people don't know who you are. Then you buy a baseball team and suddenly you're famous and everyone's talking about you and liking you. He had very very few twitter followers..

steve cohen mets mayhew lemay mayhew cohen Mlb players association yankees craig edwards Alderson Bobby axelrod queens steve bombers new york twitter ben dineh baseball basketball Cohen steve
"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:37 min | 8 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"That don't have anything to do with the technology of when they were photographed or when they were published but have to do with something else by the same token poets can have their work appreciated one hundred years after they've written their poem and gone into that Great Poetry Library in the sky, the same thing can happen with photography. It points out that. Every artist I think is living at the cutting edge of whatever their technology is. If if you were a novelist one, hundred years ago, the cutting edge might have been the typewriter I don't know when the typewriter was invented but let's say it was a hundred years ago and before that it was the cutting edge was the quill and ink, and maybe the cutting edge fifty years ago was the typewriter. Every artist lives at the cutting edge in history of whatever technology is used in their particular art medium. But If we're careful if we're sensitive if we pay attention as artists, what we also realize. Is that in. To being at the cutting edge of whatever our medium is we are also simultaneously. coterminous with all artists throughout all history be they photographers or painters or sculptors, or poets, or novelist, or dancers, or singers, or whatever. And this brings me to one of the reasons why I think we're not only connected to all of history. But we do live in a time that's going to be very interesting in photography's history for reasons that don't have anything to do with the technology of making photographs and it's this. Up until now primarily because of stieglitz I've mentioned this and other contexts but primarily, because of stieglitz fine art photography has been presented to the world more or less. The same way that painting has been presented to the world. In a frame on the wall in a gallery. But we're in the midst of time when that is radically changing. When a lot of photography is starting to be seen off the wall out of the frame..

stieglitz Great Poetry Library
"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

05:01 min | 8 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"At the cutting edge of technology, the cutting edge of the thought process of what were engaged with with photographic art. It's attribute he thought he was at the cutting edge. In fact, he was at the cutting edge of technology with his photograph Viewer Magazine Camera Work and with his creative thinking about what photography could be in terms of an art medium. He could have no more imagined the future of. Football Books and dual tone printing and galleries all across America and huge events like photo plus Houston photo festival that would have been. Literally inconceivable to him. But yet, it all came to pass. I would propose that it is equally difficult for us to imagine. What photography will be a hundred years from now in twenty one twenty what the technology will be in twenty one twenty, what the means of distribution will be in twenty one twenty. But isn't it interesting that when we look at Alfred? stieglitz photographs. We can still relate to them. The technology has changed the Zeitgeist has changed. The method of presentation has changed everything about photography has changed except. The content. Content is the one thing that hasn't changed. It's evolved sure and there are things being photographed today that Stieglitz can only imagine photographing. But when you look at Stieglitz work in general. And the other photographers of his generation. We can see the content threads that are still alive today. There are photographers today who doing. Essentially. The same kind of thing or an outgrowth of the kind of thing that Stieglitz did. I would propose the same thing will happen one hundred years from now our technology will seem so primitive our methods of distribution will seem so quaint. All of the things that we're worrying about now in terms of gear and process and methods of distribution will seem. The product of our times. But in fact, the content that we produce. Will. Possibly maybe. We hope. Still be of interest. Because whatever we do in terms of. Addressing, the issues of being human being the nature of being alive the nature of observing. What, goes on around us and capturing something in our artwork will be just as valid. It'll be hundred years old, but it'll be just as valid then. As it is today. By the same token, we read novels that are a hundred years old and we can relate to that they may be the language may be a little different than what we use today and all of that but. But. Nonetheless when they touch the human heart and they address the content of what it is to be alive. They still carry forward and they're still valuable even. Novelists who aren't famous and well remembered. There's something to be gained by reading their books. There will be something to be gained by looking at our photographs. One Hundred Years from now just light. There is something to be gained by looking at photographs from a hundred years ago. Now I mentioned Stieglitz Stieglitz is famous and he's still. Appreciated, today. But if you have the opportunity, go back and look at other publications from. Well, it's hard to find them from one hundred years ago 'cause Stieglitz was sort of unique but you can get a hold of a book that has all of the camera work photographs in it. That's well worth getting not too. Surprisingly the book is called camera work the complete photographs it's published by. It's really interesting little book kind of small but very thick and supposedly contains every photograph that was published in camera work and a lot of them seem. Somewhat dated but still interesting. But..

Stieglitz Stieglitz Viewer Magazine Football Houston America Alfred
"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:57 min | 8 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing. Bruce. Jensen I had a truly weird and strange experience this morning that I wanNA share with you I had to dry for about an hour this morning down to Anna Cordis and as I almost always do when I have that kind of drive I use that time to do some dictation to make nodes to. Possibly, put together ideas for an editor's comment for Lens Work and sometimes actually do the dictation and I happen to be doing a dictation about Alfred. stieglitz. And this particular dictation was sort of a bit of a test if you will because I had purchased a new Bluetooth headphone and I wanted to test how the quality of the audience would be while I was dictating in the car with the car noise driving down the freeway at seventy miles an hour. That's oftentimes a problem when it comes to try to transcribe those dictation because the car noise is so loud that it sometimes gets difficult to. Understand the words and for the dictation software to translate correctly. So I was really hoping that this new Bluetooth headphone would work. Fine. So there, I am I'm driving down the freeway I'm dictating an article about Alfred Stieglitz, and it dawns on me that Alfred Stieglitz was doing his thing. Almost, exactly a hundred years ago. and think about what Alfred Stieglitz was doing a hundred years ago. He was trying to make a place for photography in the art world he'd. Published Camera Work for a number of years, and then there was a to ninety one, the gallery in New York and he was essentially promoting photography as an art medium. When up to this point, it hadn't been promoted much as an art medium. And let's look ahead of Stieglitz for a few years. What was yet to come well yet to come in. Roughly Nineteen nineteen or nineteen twenty were gelatin silver paper and certainly things like enlargements were yet in the future and most photographers in his day were probably printing on. Platinum palladium prints or something like that. So Pretty primitive in terms of the technology that we think about today I forward today here. I am in the car driving seventy miles an hour down the freeway using my Bluetooth headphone to dictate an article about his time in photography onto my smartphone, which I'll have transcribed by the computer later so that it can appear in the digital version and print version of Lens work so that all of you can see it. That's what happened in a hundred years of technological advancement. Can you imagine what Alfred Stieglitz would say if he had been sitting next to me in the car listening to me describe in my thoughts what I think his point of view about photography was and where his place in photographic history was it it would be beyond his comprehension. To think about what I was doing. In the period of a short one, hundred years after he was. Publishing Camera Work and doing to ninety one. Now, obviously, the point of this is to project forward. Can we possibly imagine where photography is going to be a hundred years from now we like to think that we're.

Alfred. stieglitz Jensen editor Bruce Anna Cordis New York
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Well. It's like there's all these unique advances and technology but we're just not a neighbor with like we were in the past because they're not speed records. <hes> that's interesting rick kennedy. Wanna thank you for joining joining us for <hes> a great conversation. <hes> i'd really encourage people to take a look at this book one hundred years of reimagining flight and and even if you're not just purely an engine nut like some of us. Maybe i think you'll find it really really fascinating because i mean you can't talk about the the engines you can't describe the history you can't talk about the people involved and the decisions that were made in not talk about the airplanes as well obviously <hes> one is no good without the other so <hes> if you're interested in aviation in general in the in the history of both commercial and military <hes> we we haven't really talked much of the military aspects of this but there's a lot of that in the book as well so check it out really encourage it encourage. You take a look at it then rick thanks again. Well dave maximum max. I appreciate the chance to talk with you guys about. I mean just we're. We're all very blessed to be engaged in. A fascinating inch in this industry is so fantastic and it's booming. It's just booming. I mean it really is. It's just a continuous. It really is booming so thank first time. I really appreciate this. Are you a bit of a musician yeah as a music major in college. I played jazz. I've written a couple of books on early jazz music so yeah ah i thought i saw something about that. What what do you play yeah. I play piano <hes> which basically consist of walking the base an four four line the base. I play a lot of like monk and you know nineteen fifties and sixties jazz but my <hes> my study of it in terms of book riding is nineteen twenties and thirties jazz labels <hes> living in cincinnati. I live an hour away from richmond. Indiana where the first great jazz record label able was. I mean the twenty so i like interest on that stuff so yeah that was a journalist and i covered entertainment music and so i had a chance to hang out with all the great jazz players great <hes>. That's amazing but i i wanted. I just went in with one thing just to say and i think you'll see that in the book i i liked. I made a very big point to the site accomplishments from rolls royce and pratt and the book because yes the three of us just absolutely hate each other but respect respect each other because the big three are killing each other and just have done some great things in the aviation world so we all have the grizzly like each on a little a little bit well and i'm guessing you wouldn't have as many accomplishments if there weren't one or two competitors right i mean hasn't that really driven the the industry too far greater accomplishments schwantz than you could have if there were just you know one company out there doing this and that's why worry about consolidation sometimes because when it there i mean i really do. I mean you you know. Roles came along with a wide chord fan where he once. We got to do that and we came composite. Not roles is working on a composite and we're don't seem sees prescott this weird good system and so we're always trying to leapfrog each other and i think has made a huge difference in the quality aviation for travelers and in the military world have three guys just cotton each other up and i hope that always remains that way because the consolidation at least makes me nervous especially because they can play you guys off against each other. Oh if you look at u._t. C. a. g. guy look at u._t..

rick kennedy Indiana richmond dave prescott cincinnati pratt one hundred years
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"From inside the engine to cool parts parts so you lose about thirty percent of the air that comes to that from san the cool parts and the rest goes to the engine well with ceramic matrix composites. Is you have to do that so when we opened that plant in alabama a year ago the agreement was with the government they gave us a nice grant for that thing and they you said you will make that raw material available to defense company and the united states but guess what you press gonna be buying that stuff. They're not stupid you know they're they're good company. There are on c._m._c.'s already and so i think at some point she will probably be a provider of the material to pratt and other aerospace companies in the united states. Pratt has its own operation was c._m._c.'s g has its own r._n._d. Research in gear turbofans by the way the gear your turbofan is a company owned by g._e. In italy yeah i know i was when i i know i know i know my. Oh my goodness 'cause i remember i remember before i it was called fiatavio but maybe it's just obvio- now. I'm not sure yeah i i used to <hes> visit naples <hes> several times a year to see them and then when when i remember when g. e. bought them and i'm on thinking oh no oh my goodness so it's really interesting. Is i look in the future. I think you're the question you're exactly right. I think if you're gonna see a marrying of geared systems you're marrying a obviously ceramic matrix composites on the geared system. It really comes down to the thrust class and works the best there <hes> that can becoming yeah so. I think that's gonna come. I said the beginning to show the real challenges for all of us is going to be any new technology introduction financially. You have to be able to meet the same reliability of the predecessor engine and that is not easy easy to do at all tough. I mean look at pratt right now. I mean you know they are paying some serious money right now to get this engine gone and it's gonna work. I mean i'm a g._i. I'm just telling you and within the halls of general electric they know the press. They're good and they're gonna make that thing work. It's going to be painful foolish l. but they're gonna make it work because that's the world we live in today. These engines have to be so reliable and that's a financial arrangement when you sell them. Yes absolutely you have you have guarantees and you have remedies. It's crazy yeah yeah. Thank god for the spare parts yeah. That's a a a model. I know <hes> because i was involved. I'm that pratt and whitney struggled with as the the o._j._t. A dis the seventy seven and others was starting to wind down in that spare parts sales stream was starting to starting to dry up. That's when pregnant. He decided to engage a lot more in the side of the business. <hes> gee did as well but but i think gee strategy now is is somewhat different and in that <hes> g._e. I guess is not owning <hes> maintenance shops overhaul shops part repair businesses <hes> but <hes> i guess licensing <hes> to others to third parties that kind of the strategy for tomorrow for g._e. Aviation he's now. That's exactly right. There was twenty years of stumbling. Oh boy in trouble for saying that but really the night in the nineteen nineties the theory was was a general electric corporation was just this just.

pratt united states Pratt alabama c._m._c. naples italy g. e. whitney thirty percent twenty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Sure media about emotion oversee the israeli palestinian conflict provokes a huge amounts of emotion but there's any place for that to motion in the reporting of it yes i think there has to be how can you you know we're all human beings we will have emotions out can you convey what people are experiencing without giving some sense of how they feel i think the again the age of social media were more intensely aware of the power of images that have always been images of course they went invented yesterday that the proliferation of the accessibility images i mean i'm israelpalestine i i'm not sure that i can think of anything memorably vivid that if you look elsewhere in recent years across the wasteland of the middle east think of the pictures of six children in yemen people suffering in syria but of course your emotions also have to become texture legs time for the report should correspondents show emotion because obviously it does they are human beings you say is they're place for emotion in the reporting miles evacuation is linked to what i said earlier about the first person journalism is a famous raw wasn't of the bbc with barbara plitt osher as i recall who with bbc correspondent in jerusalem or ramallah whatever of and yasser arafat died in two thousand to the full she was overcome by emotion and whipped on that was a great idea to be honest but unite she's human being perhaps as a journalist you need to put your humanity and these theater to one side or in abeyance will save it for drinks at the bar of two new i think verge your role is to describe what other people are experiencing a not to thrust yourself to be at the center the store.

social media yemen syria bbc jerusalem yasser arafat ramallah
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Kozel i have before me is the finished product it's hard to recapture the eigen these that i went through i think the thing i found difficult was to retail the millions story but in a slightly different way i think that was what i really found challenging there are so many books on this you say my book his long their books the cover the same subject that all twice as low my weighs in at a modest sungon 600 pages so it wasn't the question so much of drafts and turning things up and starting again it was a question of turning a familiar story with those the familiar landmarks the wars the diplomatic initiatives the uprisings the peace process or whatever but not to focus solely on those to give some sense of ordinary people on both sides their lives the way their lives who are affected by not just every few years when there was a huge crisis more conventionally mole routinely as they interacted or didn't interact and ignored each other so that i think was what i found challenging was to enliven it in to enrich this familias story to give it may be a bit more depth than is conventionally tung speaking about things coming alive i mean so much of this conflict you witnessed yourself you covered it yourself and you lived through a lot of these things did you have any sort of disparity of making the history come alive because you had to research it and you didn't see yourself versus the parts that you must have experienced so strongly in your own mind i'd like to add to that unquote you from the book saying quote arguably i learned as much reporting from the streets of nablus in gaza during the first intifada as from pouring over declassified files or old newspapers in allcause in jerusalem in london i think it adds to you is questioned about creating this balance between your work as a historian and your work because it and just to say that's not a hidden criticism i think that the ends very smooth but i'm curious about your exhibit or can do criticisms to open or concealed or birth i think what i would say there's there's a show i lived through parts of the store remote the whole armed and thirty years true.

nablus gaza allcause jerusalem thirty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Figures more more peerage diesel written certain in britain on this subject go laney other middle east subject on thousands of books appear every year a english in arabic and hebrew and visit strong theme that recurs which is about missed opportunities moments in the history of the conflict when things could have been different while of course we don't touch me know because that's counterfactual we know what did happen we tried to explain why it happened we don't know what would have happened if those decisions will moves hadn't taken so for example one of the most important of those is of course never been 47 but the un voted the un in the early days of the cold war voted to partition palestine into separate states people will be familiar with the it's a very dramatic story people on the jewish side during a trusted round radios to hear the vote being broadcast live the palestinians less aware of it and very negative about and the decision the radi wall is more than the balfour declaration but among the created certainly created the state of israel did the palestinians make a terrible error well you could argue they made a terrible error but i think that if you look at the story and you've followed quite closely you understand over the list why they made that decision said mistake but in my view and actually my view of this has changed likely in the course of writing the book at undestandable mistake given that they were being asked to agree to politics what they saw was their country being handed over to another people who they saw this foreign intruders pragmatically that decision politically arguably and understandable one in addition to all this thinking about the israeli palestinian conflict per se you also have a lot of insight into the development internally of each society and i'm struck by another overall theme which is how many things do not seem to have changed or have very very old routes that we see coming back on israeli society in particular.

britain cold war israel un palestine israeli palestinian
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"You go back in the book to the origins of the design assessment of palestine in the eight 1880s and of course sign isn't did not start in nineteen seventeen all the conflict didn't start in 1917 why did you choose 1917 as your starting point i mean at least in the title i mean covering one hundred years of conflict you do 1917 messes because in through synteen or the buffet declaration but we can talk about its significance but it is amazing on many of you will know this year i imagine you're interested in this subject to those you wouldn't be here so it is extraordinary how in the seventh year of every decade for the last one hundred twenty years something significant as happened in this story i could whiz through them you've got eighteen ninety seven the first sign is congress okay nineteen oh seven was the aftermath of the young turk revolution leave that to one side 1917 is the balfour declaration 1927 there was a very bad earthquake in palestine it was unusually it was a natural disaster rather a man made one 1937 was the report of the british peel commission which of course famously recommended that palestine be politician did to separate jewish and arab states nineteen forty seven we just had the seventy th anniversary of the un's politician decision and so it goes on nineteen 67 needs no introduction by king seventy seven sold the rise of likud to power in israel anwar sadat visiting jerusalem 1987 was the first palestinian intifada and it goes on and on two thousand and seven so the hot mess islamist movement over gaza i have said before that i think the thing we will people were member about twenty seven is she donald trump and whatever effect he turns out to have on the story in what's happening right now i want to go into the introduction you have indecision to all of this fascinating archival work in a lot of detail you have insights that sort of appear throughout the book and in the right in the introduction you write that one of the.

palestine un likud jerusalem donald trump israel one hundred twenty years one hundred years
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The tel aviv review thank you very much for coming tonight i'd like to welcome you all to a city university pull this special recording of the television review podcast for me personally a particularly emotional moment i am a graduate of the generals and be a program here at city and it is really heartening to be back here at the striking the renovated tate building after more than a decade and thank you very much it's nice really nice to see see you so many familiar faces and familia is so thank you very much for coming and this is alive recording of the review podcast which is an israeli englishlanguage program dedicated to books and ideas is broadcast on tv one radio which is an online radio based in tel aviv and all program is a sponsor bye bye near jerusalem institute i'm dahlia shenlin thank you for coming everybody tonight's event is extremely special because we had the opportunity to speak with our author live and we'd like to thank these city university of london as well as dr james rodgers of the journalism department who is cohosting the event with us and of course our distinguished guests in black is a very very veteran journalist he hardly needs an explanation but let's do it anyway he was the guardians middle east editor european editor diplomatic editor and foreign leader writer for in thirty six years on the paper he's now visiting senior fellow at the middle east center at the london school of economics today we'll be talking about his brand new book entitled enemies a neighbors arabs and jews in palestine and israel 1917 to two thousand seventeen it is published by annan in an imprint of penguin books it's an extraordinarily comprehensive overview of one hundred years of conflict in our little corner of the world.

tate building dr james rodgers editor annan jerusalem institute city university of london leader writer visiting senior fellow london school of economics palestine israel one hundred years thirty six years