35 Burst results for "One Hundred Year"

Covid Death Toll Over 2 Million Worldwide

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

00:18 sec | 1 d ago

Covid Death Toll Over 2 Million Worldwide

"Two billion people. Worldwide have died from the corona virus researchers at johns hopkins university confirmed the death toll friday covid nineteen is the ninth most fatal pandemic in history and the third deadliest in the past one hundred years or so at least forty million died during the spanish flu. Pandemic of nineteen

Johns Hopkins University FLU
The Great Gatsby

Planet Money

03:07 min | 2 d ago

The Great Gatsby

"In nineteen twenty five. F scott fitzgerald published the great gatsby and like pretty much every author. He copyrighted the book when it came out which you know fair enough the way copyright worked at the time fitzgerald and his heirs could collect royalties from the book for fifty six years. All the way until nineteen eighty-one and during that time if anybody wanted to make movie or play or anything at all based on gatsby they would have to get permission and probably pay a licensing fee to the fitzgerald family. And then according to the law after the fifty six years the book would go into something called the public domain fitzgerald's kids or grandkids wouldn't get royalties any more and more importantly anyone who wanted to could print up and give away copies of the book or rewrite it from toms horses. Point of view or create gatsby on ice anything at all and you know copyright. Is this balancing. Act on the one hand you want to encourage and reward people who write books create things but you also want to let those things enter the public domain at some point so we can all share them and tweak them and build on them and make more creative stuff. The artists figuring out how long to keep something in copyright there was nothing special about fifty six years. That's just a number that congress picked and then they decided to change it in nineteen seventy six just five years before the great gatsby entered the public domain. Five years before gatsby on ice congress changed copyright law. They said among other things fifty six years not quite long enough under the new stronger rules. Gatsby wouldn't go into the public domain until two thousand one and then just a few years before that congress jumped in again and made copies of old works last even longer under the new new rules. Gas would not go into the public domain until almost one hundred years after it was written until twenty twenty one but still sounds like some meat up year from the future to me. And you know congress could have kept pushing this date making the copyright longer and longer until the three thousand or something like that but there's been some pushback on the ever lengthening copyright period. Not enough pushback to start making the copyright shorter but enough to stop making them longer and so on january first of this year. Finally the great gatsby went into the public domain into our domain. It belongs to us now. It belongs to everybody. And what we now own i have to say is a complicated book. It has the romance and beauty of america. It also has the racism and misogyny and anti semitism of america and maybe the most american thing about the It's all about money. This is a book about why people want money and what they do when they get it and what money does to them. In other words. Gatsby is the perfect story for planet money and now that gets me is in the public domain. If we wanted to we could talk about it for a minute at the beginning of the show. Yeah say hello and welcome to planet money sticking ahead break in and then we could read the whole thing. We could read the entire book the entire book and posted on our podcast.

Gatsby Fitzgerald Congress Scott Fitzgerald America
The Alethia Framework - Artificial Intelligence and Digital Transformation at Rolls-Royce

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:20 min | Last week

The Alethia Framework - Artificial Intelligence and Digital Transformation at Rolls-Royce

"Welcome to the cyber-security weekly podcast. I'm jay leno podcasting from singapore today and today we are very privileged to have dr becky bengal who is the president of south east asia pacific and south korea at rose to join us in the podcast. He repeats sharing with us. The work in a digital transformation and the recent ai breakthrough in ethics and trustworthiness at ross writes thank. You thought the bengals for joining us in the podcast today to be here for many of our listeners. dr bandou rose. Rice name has a long lasting romance and history going back to the first car built more than one hundred years ago but the motos business was separated out some time ago in nine thousand nine hundred seventy three. I believe and rose rises. Now in the business of pioneering the power that matters so tell us more about the journey business. That rose is in today and your role as the president of south east asia pacific and south korea at rose rice. Well has been rooted in engineering since we established in eighteen. Eighty four and this expertise has evolved the business to become one of the world's leading industrial technology company that we today and as the president for the region covering southeast asia pacific and south korea. I'm responsible for the regional strategy our external relations and governance of all our operations across the three businesses that we have civil aerospace is one of them manufactures of ever engines for large commercial aircraft on our regional jets and business aviation and we have decades of engineering expertise to take us through life through life. Service and support solutions for customers in the defense were market-leading aero-engines for military transferring control labor's including combat helicopter applications. I'm needles and power systems. Where leading provider of high speed reciprocating engines providing complete propulsion systems distributed energy solutions. So you can say that we. We have a diverse but volume that includes civil defense and power system and it is because w that our activities have tremendous impact on the world today and tomorrow we have always pursued clean safe and competitive solutions and we believe our technology will be fundamental in helping society transition to the low carbon future. And we're not going to do this on our own. We're going to do this. In partnerships and global partnerships to collaborate and co create solutions and with the regional hub. That we have here in singapore. We've developed collaborations with government agencies untucked -demia like a star and anti eu and us to pursue advanced research and technology in daytime smart manufacturing electrical systems. You touch on engine. That paolo many other products across the road strikes businesses. And i believe including aircraft of course and i imagine that you have been collecting analyzing the performance data of your engines for that case and in fact i see from one of your rolls royce presentation that you have been collecting data for some seventy trillion data points across twenty-sixth dimensions on your engines. So i think our listeners will be interested to know how you been. Harnessing that power data to make sense of this of information and into insight and action. And i believe in many ways is supplying the data to a machine learning throughout the life cycle of the engine from the initial stage of designed to manufacturing to maintenance repair. Overhaul that's right so we we've been applying data analytics for more than thirty years and using ai. With our real time engine. Health monitoring system but service w. lunch to back in nineteen ninety nine and our ai. Capabilities are deeply embedded into products and services so they aren't visible And not widely. Now we're able to monitor six thousand to eight thousand flights every day which is equivalent to monitoring three thousand engines in the sky at any one time so we have multiple sensors on board that continuously relay inflammation with were able to analyze five million data promises from our engines every day and we used to provide insights to our engineers for future development and services that we provide for our customers. But it's not just about the asian and the behavioral for engines. Current work includes applying a with a dedicated team that we have inside rolls royce school the day to labs to improve the risk management in supply chains predict market demand improved the efficiency of our operations and more recently nepal systems. Father of the business. We've been applying a on microbes making our industrial powered technology more reliable and sustainable and in the future we see a. I will continue to evolve. Play a bigger role especially as we saw increasing use of cloud based services which will be governed by data ethics framework and this becomes really essential and today more than two hundred projects that are starting to apply more and more of Framework so

South Korea Dr Becky Bengal Dr Bandou Rose Asia Pacific Singapore Jay Leno Demia Bengals South East South East Asia Ross Rice Pacific Paolo EU
GOP Sen. Pat Toomey's fight to end emergency Fed lending programs in Covid bill

Planet Money

03:33 min | 2 weeks ago

GOP Sen. Pat Toomey's fight to end emergency Fed lending programs in Covid bill

"Let's talk about the fed. Let's do it. I mean why not. We're we're on skis. We're in the park screams central banking. So you know the federal reserve in normal times. We think about the federal reserve setting interest rates in emergencies. The fed has this other really important job. We call lender of last resort traditionally they went to banks and financial institutions when. There's a panic when nobody wants to lend to anybody. Credit is collapsing and they did that this spring when nobody wanted to lend to everybody and credit was collapsing. Just good prevented a financial crisis. But they went even further the really interesting novel stuff. The fed was doing was largely lending not just financial institutions but also to almost everybody else to cities and states to medium sized businesses large businesses. This stuff the fed hasn't done since the depression and almost one hundred years this sort of insurance in case that the economy would down again and then all of a sudden just a few weeks ago these obscure parts of the federal reserve. Become front page news. As as you know everybody will recall. Congress was debating this big Hundred billion dollars support package for the economy with expanded unemployment checks and all these things almost to an agreement. They got a bipartisan deal. And then out of nowhere. This one senator. It's like wait. Let's talk about those random fed lending programs. This is an exaggeration. Senator pat toomey republican. Pennsylvania holds up the entire package for all the united states of america. Because he's like i wanna talk. I wanna talk about the powers of the federal reserve argument. Is you know these were emergency programs. They're like way outside normal fed behavior. The acute phase of the emergency is over and like it's not the business of the fed to just keep offering loans to cities and states and corporations and i should say by the way the political subtext that people have talked about. Here is pat. Toomey a republican. Obviously a democrat is going to be the president and so the subtext is. Is he trying to take power away from the fed because he doesn't trust the democrats. And you know. Janet yellen who will be the treasury secretary who will be working with the fed on emergency programs. I took a break from news. And i know that they resolved this issue. But how did they do it. So the worry win. Senator toomey brought this up was that he was going to sort of her. Kneecap the fed the worry. His first thing was like okay. The fed has to stop doing these lending programs very soon and people were basically okay with that but then to his next thing was and also. The fed can't relaunch something similar to this without special approval from congress so the resolution was they gave to me the okay. Yes it's gotta end now but they narrowed the second part of the way the second part worked out in the end was the law actually says the fed can't recreate programs that are essentially the same as the ones they just shut down. They can't just turn them back on and be like okay. We're doing it again. This is this is a new one. That's not okay and really. Interestingly the bill actually include specific language to say we congress are not taking away any emergency lending powers that the fed had before this year. We're not trying to make the fed weaker in the long run. We just don't want to restart these exact programs. The federal reserve retains all of their traditional powers that they've been granted in well for now

Federal Reserve Senator Pat Toomey Janet Yellen Senator Toomey Depression Toomey United States Of America Congress Pennsylvania PAT Treasury
MLB reclassifies Negro Leagues as major league

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

MLB reclassifies Negro Leagues as major league

"It means stats and records of thirty four hundred black players will count in the major leagues the Negro league started to dissolve a year after Jackie Robinson became MLB's first black player with the Brooklyn Dodgers in nineteen forty seven the late Buck o'neil played for the Kansas city monarchs he told the AP in two thousand five about Negro league exhibition games with Major League white players and the extra motivation we stress that single and a double man that double into a triple we stole home now o'neill and other players are considered major leaguers we dad in Europe fighting prejudice aha will walk to and we come back home and we segregated it wouldn't pass the Negro leagues were founded one hundred years ago I'm a Donahue

Negro League Kansas City Monarchs Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers MLB Neil AP Major League Neill AHA Europe
"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:08 min | Last month

"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Are appreciate even have. After fifty years. He became a catholic like me. It only took me fifty years to convert. You want out in the end though. So we're real happy. We have three wonderful men. I call them our boys but they're just wonderful guys just proud of all three of them and we have a happy life. We have a happy family. it's expanded somewhat and we like that too so we're glad that you found each other. You thank you so much for talking to me pressure on. We appreciate it. If you wanna to get any back yes please thank you. Thank you so much. You're welcome. And he's in perfect health. It just takes a little longer to get up estimate. Okay well that was a pleasure. Thank you pretty good interview. I'd say so so. I wanted to ask you know because a lot of players will be coming back in the coming year. After taking a year off. Essentially you know minor. Leaguers whole season was cancelled or players who opted out because of the pandemic. So there will be a lot of players coming back from a long lay-off and of course you and a lot of your contemporaries did that too because you served in the navy and of course you played ball during the war but you came right back in nineteen forty six and picked up right where you left off and hit right away but i wonder what that was like for you and for everyone else. That was coming back from the service just to get right back into the swing of things literally so to speak. You really didn't know what was going to be like you came back and and just you know when you're young you can make you can depth and I'd it got my timing back hitting getting your timing is big. And i was lucky i i had a lmu here and ninety four to six by your back. And i was very disappointed. When i went to cleveland the next year and and didn't do well. I thought i should do better. Jackie robinson did well brooklyn. Bobby brown did very well with the yankees. And i floundered and i was disappointed but i find it caught up. I think catch up until i got washington. Nineteen forty nine. Were there any of your contemporaries. Who saw struggle when they were returning from the service trying to get back into the swing of things and was very helpful and understanding. There are a lot of you know when you when you're in the military a lot of the guys in fact. Most of them were like me. I got to play a little baseball. I've missed one full year. Nineteen forty five but a lot of guys miss three years and some of them. Four bob feller went in early. He was the first one to enlist and They had a little problem coming back. But a lot of the unfortunate ones were the ones who there were like thirty one years old when they enlisted when they went into service when they came out they were thirty five or four Near the end of their career and that was really tough on those i was. I was lucky. I was in the beginning of my major career. And you talked a little bit about playing ball in the navy during the war on your podcast and some of the other work that you did and i was kinda curious because you mentioned that you worked on submarine warfare do about that and it's fascinating so i wonder what you did and how you were able to help well Yeah i want to training forward and wicked simulate. A submarine being there and We had a one. It was a protruded from the bottom of a destroyer.

Leaguers navy Bobby brown Jackie robinson cleveland yankees bob feller brooklyn washington baseball
"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:28 min | Last month

"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Paul rogers who co-authored my book with me Lucky me the three of us. Go out to dinner with our wives about once a month and paulin. I've been trying to get bothered to do a book. He and i would do it together. But he's not he's reluctant to do it just doesn't seem to want to so you can't get out of a tournament and he didn't wanna you well. I'm glad that you're preserving of these stories. And i'm curious because it seems like you have been very open minded and adaptable throughout your career. When it comes to trying new things and now you know at ninety nine years old starting a podcast seems like you're very open to new thing. Well you know. Podcast is interesting. Because i am unique and i go back that far and unless i tell it was gonna tell it. I don't know if there any other players living at played with point four it. I guess there are but Mickey mantle greenberg. joe gordon. I look booed ro. I'm and i'm happy to share my experiences with those guys. Warren spahn and johnny sain. Just so many joe dimaggio and i'm happy doing then. I like doing it so why not do it. In last time we talked to you. We asked you bet. Jackie robinson but this time i wanted to ask you about larry doby who i imagine you just talked about in your nine thousand four hundred. Yeah i'd talk a lot about. Larry doby because i don't think he's received anywhere near the credit right that he should receive. He was first black in american league. He went through the same indignities that robinson did. I don't wanna take anything away from jack. Up played against jack in nineteen forty six when he was he was in montreal and i was in baltimore and the international cannot and i had occasion to watch him and and play against him all that year and i admired him. I thought he was a very good player. And a good guy on the proved to be just that he was very deserving lehrer dovy very very deserve. What was it like when when he came up in forty seven well he was accepted. It was the same thing he had to sleep in different hotels. He couldn't eat in a restaurant and he did all the things. that jacket. larry was a very nice guy. Good teammate and a damn good hitter and with power power hitter. One thing that i was struck by as i was reading through some of the coverage of your birthday and i wonder if this might be a topic of the future podcast episode was a really lovely answer that you gave to. Mlb dot michael clare about the role that your wife played in your career and the support that she gave you. And i wondered if you could talk a little bit about what life is like for the wife of a major leaguer and a farm director in baseball executive. Because i imagine that she has a fair number of stories that she tell the podcast to come onto. You wanna talk to her. Sure she put her on. yeah. I'll.

Larry doby Mickey mantle greenberg joe gordon Paul rogers Warren spahn johnny sain paulin joe dimaggio Jackie robinson jack american league robinson montreal baltimore michael clare larry Mlb
"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:46 min | Last month

"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think that jj kind of illuminated for me that there are a lot of open questions still when it comes to what the long term effect is going to be player development going forward and quality of play that some folks are gonna see and who gets a chance to play affiliated ball and who doesn't and the economic future of both the affiliated miners and the baseball that used to be played in the affiliated. Minors and those franchises still kind of uncertain. But we're trying to do was answer. The question like who is going to be there in person access to baseball disappear and who is going to see the character of that access change so it's one thing to have you know a minor league team within driving distance of your house. It's another thing if the only baseball team you have access to say the major league team because that's going to be a more expensive proposition. Maybe the pro partner leagues the summer. Wood bat leagues. Don't have the same emotional resonance for you. That affiliated ball does even if the odds of everyone you see on the field making it to the majors or sort of slim so we wanted to now that we know what teams are in which teams are out sort of culture that analysis again and i think that the top line results is that over five million people at least as it stands now and i will say that there are nineteen teams whose futures are uncertain. So it could be that these five million people have access to a new pro partner league team in the coming years. It could be that they have existing summer. What about leagues. That are near at hand. They might be within driving distance of a good college program. So you know there's there's still some options here but basically over five million people across the country are set to lose access to close in person baseball and that's a real shame. Meanwhile nearly twenty three million people who had minorly access are now going to have to go elsewhere whether that's to the pro partner leagues to the major leagues to the summer. Wood bat leagues. We do want to point out that over. Ten million people who only had major league access are now going to gain minor league access because of the way some of these affiliations have changed so folks in minneapolis. Who were like. I can't afford to go watch. The twins can now go. See the saint paul seitz which are going to be the aaa affiliate of Of the twins now so. I think that our conclusion is that they're going to be people who either have as much access as they had before or going to have to pay more for that access or see it shift and while we might end up with a more efficient system than we had before and there certainly some some benefits to this plan which we talked about on that episode with. Jj you know. More than forty million people went to a minor league game in two thousand nineteen and that sleep more than half the number people who went to a major league game so there is an audience for minor league baseball. And i think people enjoy that. It is inexpensive generally and that it can be kind of funny and it can be light hearted and it can be a nice night at the ballpark for self family. And for many of those people going to the park just got harder. And that's a real shame. Yeah a link to that research and we talked about the merits of this change on the podcast but one thing that we maybe touched on but didn't well on his just. Some of the minor league team owners are so up in arms about the sort of strong arming that. Mlb is doing here and we mentioned how they've extended the quote unquote invitations to join affiliated. Paul in sort of mock that a bit. I was just reading an article. In athletic. By evan drellich where he was talking about. How even to like see the terms of the agreement the professional development license this ten year contract that the teams are going to sign if they want to be affiliated ball in order to review that contract they basically have to sign an nda the teams and also an indemnification of mlb. So even if they want to see the terms they have to agree to not talk about the terms and basically like not to sue. Nlp or hold him responsible for anything before they even see the terms of the contracts the tactics that mlb is usually here like they have all the leverage. I guess and then just figure well they need us more than we need them and if they pass then we'll just move to the next team on our list that we did not extend quote unquote invitation to and So they don't like it then they can lump it but imagine like here's the ten year contract that is going to govern your business for the next decade. You can actually see it in less. You agree not to tell anyone what's in it or speak publicly about it or sue us or anything you have to sign away all your rights before you even take a look at it so i think that's a big part of what has rep people. The wrong way is just like the way. Mlb when about this even apart from the merits of the agreement in the new structure itself. It's like teams finding out on twitter. That they are inner out. Were being in limbo for months on. Just not the best way to implement this. I think they want what they want and they can get it now. So they're gonna all right so we are finished with followups one more thing that we want to touch on before we bring eddie on here. There was news this week and it's long awaited news. And it's that the cleveland baseball franchise is changing. Its name not immediately which we can talk about. But they have Finally agreed to go along with the public pressure that has been building for quite some time now. Decades really going back to in stanford changed its name but with greater urgency of late and of course the washington football team. Belatedly begrudgingly agreed to change. Its name earlier this year and now cleveland has finally retook along with this and they are not doing it immediately. They are taking their time to implement this change so for at least twenty twenty one the franchise will have the same name which is really going to be sort of a strange situation. I think because once you agree that you have to change the same and that the current name is unacceptable. Than how'd you even like. Go about your business for another year without chasing him. Like what do the broadcasters say. What do the pa people say. What will the program say. But i guess we can sort of celebrate that it happens while also noting how long it took the happen and how oddly it's happening it's like very much like the qiming discussion that we had. It's like this is great. This is long overdue. Glad tapping but boy. did it. take a really really long time to happen. Boy did they stumble at the finish line. Yeah so. I think the way that we can be happy here is to applaud the activists and community members and fans who have been working for such a long time to exert pressure on the franchise to change. Its name Which has been so obviously bad especially in conjunction with while who for such a long time. But yeah i understand that while i don't care about this. I understand that the brand concerns are important in this conversation. At least from cleveland's perspective. We don't have to care about that stuff. But i understand they do. And they are trying to maintain the value of their franchise. And so changing. The name is a big deal. It's thing that happens in sports. But you know..

Mlb paul seitz evan drellich Wood jj minneapolis nda cleveland Paul eddie stanford twitter football washington
"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:07 min | Last month

"one hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think all of that is good to think about. But i also just find it really hard to believe that. If you're the mets and you have all this steve cohen money and you got all these cohen bucks and you want to shower someone with them that you can't go to real muto and be like how 'bout this wild number that he wouldn't go y- okay. I mean maybe he doesn't wanna play in new york. Maybe he doesn't wanna play in queens. Maybe he doesn't want to be the face of this new era of the mets. Like i don't know. I don't know remove show. I don't know what his hierarchy of needs are when it comes to the next contract that he sides but it does strike me as sort of an odd excuse. Because it's like if you're willing to spend the most money then it seems like it's a non issue and you know there is reference made to a bidding war. And what have you. But it's like you're never. It seems hard to believe that you're going to get more efficient sort of bang for your buck in this market than signing realmuto. He's the best. And it's a position of need on your roster like what are we doing here right sandy. Alderson seemed to suggest that it was a matter of timing that they didn't want to weed round for him. But maybe you'd better off. Her would have made up his mind. You know i was reading another report. There was a report that digitally mayhew and the yankees were like. Twenty five million dollars apart but it was like well lemay mayhew wants for years and one hundred and the yankees want to give him four years and seventy five or something and like even four seventy five. I think that is above what most people projected for will mayhew in this market. Which was expected to be so depressed and so if that is the real difference between them and there were some subsequent reports that suggested maybe the difference between them is actually bigger than that. But if that's the low number and maybe they end up meeting somewhere in the middle. Then that's another data point. That sorta says well. Maybe this market won't be quite so disastrous. At least not for everyone and in a piece i was reading about that at j. dot com. It was mentioned quote. It's believed the. Mlb players association has strongly suggested to free agents not to accept deals just yet unless their exact prices met technically. It's still early in the offseason with spring training not scheduled to start until mid-february there's a sense in the industry that spring training and opening day could be pushed back as the owners and players worked to navigate another year in the time of the coronavirus and vaccine news. Get your price or wait. It out is essentially what free agents are being advised. The person said so. If that's the case then yeah maybe the people who are signing got their price but the fact that some players are getting their prices may be better than people expected coming into this. Yeah i think that it's i mean. It's never a bad thing. If what you want is your expectation and hope for the market is that players will be paid commensurate with their talent when you see players meeting or exceeding your understanding of where that lies from a dollar perspective. That's not a bad thing like it's such a bad thing. I do think that like the back end of this deal. Might end up looking of gnarly for the mets because even as craig edwards pointed out when he wrote the suppress at van graphs. Like even if you assume that what he showed last year and in two thousand eighteen is his new baseline he's still a catcher advancing into his thirty so he's gonna have age related decline regardless of what his new sort of defensive and hitting is. But also your steve cohen and you have billions of dollars. So maybe don't care about the back end of the deal lake riding on our. It's funny how cohen has become such a celebrity. Really since he bought the mets. It one needs to chill out. Yes i know that. His twitter presence is abusing right now. Almost endearing in a way in like cow a oddly punctuated. It is times like it. It seems like he is writing these tweets as opposed to getting someone else to write them for him. Yes i mean he is maybe not quite as cuddly his tweets but it is just sort of striking like how you already are. Multi-billionaire like steve cohen. And a big person in the business world but like most people didn't know who steve cohen was. Your average new yorker didn't really know who he was and yet may be. Bobby axelrod was based on him but he wasn't like a household name or anything. And yet you buy a sports franchise and suddenly everyone knows who you are. And millions of people in your city love you and follow you and hang on your every word and peace seems to be really enjoying this personal tweeting. That he's doing and just kind of goes to show you like. Buying sports team is a money making venture or is treated as such by many people who purchase sports teams. But it's also just really about echo in about getting recognized in a way that you weren't in kind of like being the big man in town you know by the sports team like get recognized. People know who you are people care what you say. Outside of the boardrooms you know people are talking about you. And so that's i think a big part of the reason why a lot of people wanna by sports teams. I mean if. You're steve cohen yet maybe you think it is a valuable asset to add to your portfolio. But i'm sure he could invest that money in some other way. That would make him just as much so really. You probably do it because you wanna be famous and you want to be liked in a way that you can't be just for being rich really so i guess that's a big part of why you would want to buy a sports team. I can hear our listener saying that. You always say that. You want more steve bombers in baseball which i think is the the sort of basketball equivalent to two cohen right. We're here flamboyant and clearly super invested almost to the point of mania. And i think that yeah like if we're picking a mold of billionaire to engage with the sport. I'd rather one whose i'd like to win. A world series and the way that i'm deriving my sense of personal ego and satisfaction is by mets twitter liking me which like as an aside seems like a thing that should be examined with the help of a professional but we all like what we like and some of the stuff we like is really weird. So that's that's steve. Cohen's thing then go with god and a good wind but i do. I do want to do want to caution. people should just okay just. It's okay to enjoy it clearly. I'm not going to tell people to not enjoy something and twenty twenty. I'm not a monster. Just remember like you don't have to just don't give yourself away cheaply as all i'm asking for just saying you don't have to be impressed. You don't have to be impressed. You're not obligated. He should a good team on the field. That's what he should be obligated to do as an owner. You are not obligated to find him charming he want to. That's cool but you don't have to s- okay. I get it. If i were mets fan. I'm sure i'd be seduced by now. I mean i don't know if you can even say like eh. He'll get milkshake duct at some point. Because like you know. He's already like ben dineh his company. You know plead guilty insider trading so like that happened already cast. But you know it's like if you've been living under the wilpon regime for perhaps your whole life or or decades and then suddenly a competent person appears and Speaks to you in a way that you would want your owner to speak and you know easier said than done but hey he signed a couple free agents and that's encouraging the so i get it. I understand the cult of cohen. I just thinking about it from his perspective. Like you're worth fourteen billion or whatever like what more do you want or need like what do you lack. And i guess the only thing money can buy really at that. Point is the kind of fame that he has now in like people carrying about him in a way that they would not have cared about him before or even heard of him. So it's just overnight. You know you're a big figure in the business world. Most people don't know who you are. Then you buy a baseball team and suddenly you're famous and everyone's talking about you and liking you. He had very very few twitter followers..

steve cohen mets mayhew lemay mayhew cohen Mlb players association yankees craig edwards Alderson Bobby axelrod queens steve bombers new york twitter ben dineh baseball basketball Cohen steve
‘TIME’ Person Of The Year 2020: Joe Biden & Kamala Harris Named Most Influential Of The Year

Mojo In The Morning

01:10 min | Last month

‘TIME’ Person Of The Year 2020: Joe Biden & Kamala Harris Named Most Influential Of The Year

"Time magazine has named. Its twenty twenty person of the year and tapped bruce springsteen to make that springsteen author your say bruce springsteen springsteen now for nearly one hundred years time has named the person of the year in twenty twenty time person of the year is president elect joe biden and vice president-elect kamala harris all right how come back i thought you were positive for a dramatic effect. Dr fauci for sure yeah. I really thought that this guy was frontline. Healthcare workers along with dr fauci. Also on that list president trump and then the movement for racial justice bt s is the twenty twenty entertainer of the year and then la lakers star. Lebron james athlete. It's kind of weird because you think the person year is going to get it for something they didn't accomplish like dr fauci helping to fight the pandemic for the last year whereas i mean obviously the president-elect won the election but he hasn't gotten into the job to do a maybe next year you know like maybe he should win a next year after he. Every sunday one their presidency

Bruce Springsteen Springsteen Dr Fauci Time Magazine President Trump Bruce Springsteen Kamala Harris Springsteen La Lakers Joe Biden Lebron James
A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | Last month

A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

"Biggest news to hit the publishing industry this year. Possibly several years happened last wednesday. And we're betting that you missed it after all. You were probably contemplating cooking a turkey for two and planning zoom thanksgiving dinners with relatives right so just in case here. It is again the parent company of penguin random house's buying simon and schuster for two billion dollars penguin random house or pr h has already america's largest book publisher according to the new york times. Should the acquisition go through and there are some caveats which will get to pr. H will be. The industry's first mega publisher. The times claims. Let's delve into this just a little bit as we've talked about here before simon and shuster is among the oldest of today's big five publishing houses and one of the most distinguished dick simon and schuster founded the company in nineteen twenty four. The partners first product was hardly a literary masterpiece. It was a book of crossword puzzles. And according to simon and schuster's corporate historian it was a runaway bestseller today. Almost one hundred years. After the lowly crossword puzzle got the entrepreneurial venture off the ground simon and schuster or s operates in a different stratosphere. Today it is america's third largest publisher over the years it's published scads of famous even legendary authors including ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald also political figures from both sides of the aisle including jimmy carter hillary clinton and donald trump and contemporary authors. Like bob woodward stephen king and anti prue as well as judy blume s prints and authors have won fifty seven pulitzer prizes and innumerable other literary awards including several caldecott medals one of the highest honors given to children's books the company now sells about two thousand titles annually all told s and s takes in close to nine hundred million dollars a year but early this year. Parent company viacom. Cbs decided to go all in on streaming video in sports looking to cut close to a billion dollars in operating expenses ceo. Bob bakish announced that s wasn't what he called a core asset hence the sale in march the rumored price for us and s was one point two billion dollars a bidding. Were hike the final price to two point. Two billion dollars among other contenders america's second largest publisher harpercollins also vivendi. A french company. That owns a stake in. American publisher has yet and rupert murdoch's news corp clearly penguin random house's parent german media giant bertelsmann was willing to pay top dollar for s and s one reason in addition to the competition between publishers for blockbuster bestsellers the big five face. A formidable rival in certain amazon and when it comes to fighting off amazon size matters since two thousand nine amazon has been a publisher. Not just the world's largest both retailer today. It has sixteen imprints that publish everything from thrillers. To romance novels it signs. Top selling authors like dean koontz patricia. Cornwell taking them and their millions of sales away from traditional publishers in two thousand seventeen amazon published more than twelve hundred titles according to the wall street journal if those numbers have grown in the last three years amazon could well already rival simon and schuster for the volume of new works. It's producing what makes amazon such a tough competitor is a book publisher of course is it status as a bookseller. Moreover it has a number of marketing weapons that traditional publishers. Do not such as the ability to easily promote low priced e books to millions of amazon prime members and kindle owners. The wall street journal reports that along with oodles of cash to lure away big name authors as the largest american publisher penguin. Random house has the clout and logistical network to compete successfully with amazon. The merged company would have annual revenues of three billion dollars according to book industry bible publishers. Weekly but we should note here. The acquisition faces obstacles worthy of an epic novel authors and agents represented by the authors guild. Say such a deal will make it even harder for new authors and so called mid list writers to get published meaning. If you haven't written a blockbuster or a solid backlist title your chances to get published and your earnings could shrink. Pr h says. Simon and schuster will remain editorially independent and both publishing houses say they remain devoted to readers and writers still publishers weekly reports that by blending s. npr h german-owned. Bertelsmann would own about one third of the us book market. That's the number that could trigger antitrust. Investigators to closely scrutinize the deal. According to the new york times but those market share numbers are in dispute in both directions. The authors guild which causes tie up says a combined. Pr h. s. would wind up publishing half of all trade books in the us. Meaning not textbooks penguin. Random house's leadership argues not true and says future market share would be less than twenty percent and that an antitrust investigation is unlikely what happens next will likely hinge on which of these numbers comes closest to reality

Penguin Random House Schuster Amazon Dick Simon Simon F Scott Fitzgerald United States Bob Bakish News Corp Random House Shuster Judy Blume Bob Woodward Dean Koontz Patricia
Left for dead, twice, RadioShack gets another shot online

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Left for dead, twice, RadioShack gets another shot online

"Here's a blast from the past RadioShack is coming back RadioShack was pretty much on top of the tech world in the nineteen seventies and eighties the store where people bought radios walkie talkies batteries and the components for electronic devices but the nearly one hundred year old company fail to thrive in the age of computers and filed for chapter eleven protection in twenty fifteen now retail E. commerce ventures has a plan to build an online market place using the trusted RadioShack name to sell from its own website and and Amazon storefront ari V. is also acquired pure one dress barn and Modell's flipping them into online retailers hi Jackie Quinn

Radioshack Chapter Eleven Protection E. Commerce Ventures Amazon Jackie Quinn
Branson Beats Musk in Human Hyperloop Test

Business Wars Daily

03:05 min | Last month

Branson Beats Musk in Human Hyperloop Test

"A week ago a man and a woman got into a metal pod sat down on vegan leather seats and strap themselves for a trip. Unlike any other the pod was then levitated by magnets and shot through vacuum tube at one hundred seven miles per hour in roughly six seconds. Talk about a wild ride and it was actually an historic first. The two brave souls are employees of virgin hyperloop and they were the first humans to test. The new technology virgin hyperloop focuses on the high speed transportation concept billionaire. Richard branson's virgin group is a minority investor before testing the system with humans virgin hyperloop conducted more than four hundred unmanned tests. Hyperloop has been called the future of transport. The systems are designed to be giant low pressure tubes floating pods or suspended by magnets and carry passengers from point. Eight point at theoretical speeds of up to seven hundred miles per hour. Here's how it works. The pod network uses magnetic levitation two sets of magnets both repel the pod in the tube and help move it forward and the vacuum system used to help accelerate to high speeds is similar to the system. You use to send your documents to the teller at your bank. drive through. Popular mechanics explains inside the pod. G forces were more than three times that of an airplane but the passengers said the ride was smooth. New york times reported ultimately groups like virgin hyperloop hoped to deploy the technology to transport people and cargo. The speed would reduce the time. It takes to get from los angeles to san francisco to less than an hour. The times report says that's faster than a direct flight. When the hyperloop debuts it will be the first truly new transportation technology and more than one hundred years the independent reports branson isn't the only billionaire dabbling in hyperloop technology. You may have heard of a fellow named elon musk. He's credited with conceptualizing the technology nearly a decade ago and he is boring company. Boring as in boring tunnels underground has a test tunnel california that it's using to test. Its hyperloop and other technology. Each year musk's spacex holds a hyperloop pod competition where university students compete to make prototypes of high speed transportation. Pods last year. Students from the university of munich won the competition there. To um hyperloop pod set a new speed record for the competition of nearly three hundred miles per hour a longer track could help teams reach even higher speeds. Musk says virgin. Hyperloop is already designed to route between london. Borough branson says the uk route would be quicker and cheaper than the high speed rail system being put in now. The independent reports and richard geddes co founder of the hyperloop advanced research partnership believes that. There's an opportunity for a hyperloop. System linking abu dhabi and dubai in the united arab emirates. For now the hyperloop is still a theoretical transport system with more than a dozen companies working on bringing it reality and when you have competitive billionaires behind for bragging rights about being first to market things have a way getting done

Virgin Hyperloop Richard Branson Popular Mechanics Branson Elon Musk UM New York Times The Times San Francisco Los Angeles Musk Richard Geddes Co California London UK Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates
Obon and Halloween

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

06:03 min | 2 months ago

Obon and Halloween

"Morning. Hope your oh well. Today i was asked to give it to accompany. Osan suzuki sig aki halloween. Slash day dead. The dead ceremony. And whenever whenever. I think sermons. They usually look at it from the outside and how. He viewed from from the view of society but again. That's just really my projection on on Ceremony the kid. I never really liked ceremony. And i didn't. I didn't really understand it in seeing human beings. Though i've seen that we need something to sort of help. Gather on minds together to to either face up to Difficulties or to face up to rites of passage or to face to our responsibilities that we have in in in in this life you know ceremonies usually no come from From nowhere they just remember. Recently i was reading Somebody's views on on ceremony. How they how they have. They looked today and for me. It really really didn't really show the spirit of Ceremony you know if you look at the words you know. Obviously the english was ceremony. It comes from the latin would carry monia to kill or if you look at the would ritual. It means to make right. How do you. How do you do that as a human being this a very tricky thing and then i don't think i want to spend the entire period of time so that going over the ceremony thing but i wanted to read a koan or at least parts of cohen which to me is is what a ceremony is an bookmark there on one. No go get attention emperor. She could asked national teacher. Chew one hundred years after you die what would you. What would you wish the national teacher said. Build me a simple. A seamless to seamless monument. So you may you may wonder what is this seamless monument to me really is it is the heart. It's the heart to practice. You know what. What is that Well really's the the desire to really appreciate this. Life may be starting off with. How do i and suffering. It could be you know. How do i reveal the mysteries of of this. Life could be you know how. How do i help people to to appreciate this life. I'm now ceremony deals with this. It it you know. A hundred years In many ways will maybe not remember the The attainment of massive this day but we will remember the heart the tends to continue through the approaches to to practice. Now this. this oldham's are need that we we've done. It goes back to the buddhist time where Apparently mouthed ileana the black magician who had to work awful lot of karma his. His mother apparently had this vision of his mother hanging upside down in help which is not the greatest thing i guess you know so Yes the balance in the buddhist said well brealey practice very strongly. We'll get everybody in this in in the Training whole to practice very strongly to and at the end will dedicate the merits to to to her and so they do this in practice. Very strongly in at the end of the training period then the mentally on using his supernatural powers. Goes back down to hell and finds that his mother is no longer hanging upside down in house. But it's been released you know. Maybe she's right way out now but at least it worked and and you know what in whatever way that's one and that's also important in terms of say a daily a daily practice one this maintained is that feeling for this is very important and the people that are around us again on on a mom to basis the second thing with that. Is you know. Many of those. Do have an idea of attainment a maintaining that attainment then holding onto that talent one thing that this particular On does is this. The ceremony does is the. How does it feel to give that away. If it's possible to do that house. It really feel to to get away. Whatever mary you have like. It doesn't mean anything i mean. If you can. That's great you know. Also looking at that is that what does he mean to give everything. Though i feel any different for me it really doesn't. I can hold onto feel and this way i retain this. I've done all of these things and i can list them and go into a lot better not to have it even there. You know slutty go let it let it be is

Osan Suzuki Brealey Cohen Ileana Oldham Mary
The fight over gig worker status is going national

The 3:59

10:03 min | 2 months ago

The fight over gig worker status is going national

"Buber lift scored a big victory in california with proposition. Twenty two which shared that its drivers will remain classified as independent contractors taking the national. But is that a good thing. Roger chang and this is your daily charge as derek carr. Who covers the gig. Economy copies for cnn has been all over the story for the last year welcomed their hi. How's it going good. Well thanks for joining us so to properly set the scene for a listeners. Because everyone is date on california politics. Give us a quick refresher of what Twenty two is and what is going to do. Now that it's become law in california right so prop twenty. Two is a ballot measure that was authored and sponsored by five gig. Economy companies uber left. Door dash instacart postmates and it was a response to a law that california passed a year ago that would essentially make gig workers employees and so rather than comply with that law. The companies put forward the notion basically sidesteps that law would do uber lift and these other gay copies say is their argument for why they should be exempt from that earlier. California law. yeah. There's a bunch of reasons that they give One of them is that they can apply to them that their technology companies the on. They're not massive employers. A another one is they say their drivers in the gig. Workers don't wanna be employees so they're advocating on behalf of those people Another reason is that this making their drivers. Employees could really adversely affect the company's financial prospects. Which currently aren't good. Doordash uber lift aren't profitable and instacart has shown some profitability. But it's it's minimal you. What are the drivers. Say about this. You know it's all over the map and it's actually. It's pretty hard to get a clear answer. There hasn't been any Widespread unbiased polling of drivers so most of the surveys polls that we get had been funded by the companies and those that are independent. Don't tend to be scientifically based like they don't have the the methodology that you need a scientific poll. So you know. The driver's that wanted to be employees are very vocal. They're the ones who helped get the california law passed. They hold protests they have all sorts of networks on social media and a a strong presence on twitter and they really the driving force behind the the california law but uber left. Were very savvy in their messaging during the campaign put out all sorts of paid for studies and advertising by divers saying that they really don't wanna be pleased so as a common person. It's really hard to get a gauge. On what the answer is to that question. Yeah i've got a lot of friends and family who who live in california from there to talk to them about it just to get the pulse and most of them ended up voting for up to a lot of it was because they thought that was the that was the decision to make when you want to support drivers so the messaging alice clear. The these companies spent a fortune on the messaging for this effective because folk clearly thought they were helping drivers out when they were voting for To let's talk about your story. And the fact that even before the elections last november months before these companies were gearing up for a campaign to basically take this national. What what did you find right so this this kind of flew under the radar for quite a while because so much. Attention has been focused on california and california's kind of been seen as the template are like bellwether. What will happen nationwide. It's the fifth biggest economy in the world. You know what happens here can lay the groundwork for what happens the rest of the us but the companies were already thinking ahead Whether they win in california are not and had started to lay groundwork in other states. They are speaking with lawmakers and governors in various states. The companies won't Specify which states are working with but there's indications that they may be in talks with new york and maybe an illinois so it's Done a bunch of work along that front They've been emailing drivers in various states asking them to support their campaign. They have written white papers. They've done national polls to see what people think about keeping divers classified as independent contractors and then they kind of came public with this in march when the uber ceo wrote a letter to president. Donald trump laying out This plan for what she calls the third way it yet chuckled about the third way. Whigs xactly is this. Yes so the third way the way the companies say spin. It is that you know. Our labor laws are over one hundred years old. And there's it's time for an upgrade and this it's a classification of worker that is neither independent contractor nor employees so it's kind of a mix of the two It's those workers that just wanna work. Maybe one or two hours a week and not have to speak to a boss. But they shouldn't they won't get the same types of benefits. Employees have like healthcare sick leave. -cation time minimum wage guarantees all of that so essentially what was on twitter. The right yeah route. Twenty two is is one hundred percent this third way and what prop twenty two offers is it offers a an earnings guarantee that the company say is twenty one dollars per hour but a lot of economists thank after expenses are taken out and if the the amount of time drivers are working is really crunched that they're not going to be making minimum wage. So there's still a lot of discourse around us whether it's going to be good for drivers going national. It's obviously a much bigger deal than just doing this. Focusing on one. St in california they spent Ross or two hundred million dollars on five hundred five million dollars on pro-trade to go national. It's a much bigger deal. Tuggle that about the incoming president elect joe biden and vice president-elect come harris what their positions were appropriate to in just how much Sep of this take will be with incoming white house administration herber and left. The trump white house was very favorable to their position. The department of labor seemed to be heading in the way of saying gig. Workers should be cost-wise independent contractors and the biden win really throws that in a tailspin both biden and harris came out against prop twenty two. They said it on twitter. They urged voters to vote. No on prop twenty two saying decimated workers rights and they have released their plan for workers on their website called empower workers that has a whole section around gig workers and saying that they're being mis classified as independent contractors. So you know depending on how things go. The federal government could place a damper on uber lifts. Plance it's interesting. That harris take that steph. When she's from the valley she's i know she's you wrote about how comfortable she's got in terms of the relationships with silicon valley companies is that is that a surprise that just because democrat. That's democrats role with these In this position you know. I can't i can't speak for her. But this definitely workers rights has been a f- campaign point that bernie sanders and elizabeth. Warren have ran on ams. I think progressives were really hoping harris would and biden take that same torch and they definitely have and it is with harris particularly interesting because her brother in law who worked under the obama administration the head lawyer for uber and has been the kind of voice piece for keeping gig workers classified as independent contractors. And there's there's more That he will be getting a position in the biden harris white house. So you know things things could really be up in the air It's it's going to be really interesting to see how things play out over. The next few months desperately in federal route doesn't go their way. You've already started that. They're talking about other states. Do you think that the go state by state or is that zone strategy that spread themselves too thin. Yeah the experts. I spoke to kind of All over the map on that they the state by state. Now there's fifty states that's a lotta work. They had two hundred million into the california campaign. I mean theoretically not every state is gonna be as difficult as california highly progressive state. That's like berry union strong but other people say you know the state by state way is the only way they're really going to be able to get a handle on this

California Roger Chang Derek Carr Doordash Instacart Buber Twitter Harris CNN Biden Tuggle Herber Donald Trump White House
Sanctuary

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Sanctuary

"Parliament has always loved stories when she was a little girl. She asked her mother to tell her the story of their first year in america and she asked for that story over and over again not because she didn't know how it went but because there was a comfort in hearing the story of their family told and retold i would ask her about the stories of when we slept in the park because we had nowhere to sleep at night and how that came to be and that she told me you know she had gotten kicked out of the apartment we were in and all she had was her jewelry her wedding ring and a necklace earrings in she was going from apartment to apartment building talking to the landlord or whoever she thought was a super of the building offering jewelry in exchange to get an apartment for a month and those were the stories that i have always kept inside of my heart. Terrible thanks for asking is about stories. We believe in the importance of letting people tell their own story in letting them reveal. Not just what happened but why it's important. We know that if we had the budget and the staff we could make this podcast every single day for the next one hundred years and never tell the same story twice because the story is not just what happened. It's what it means. A story changes depending on. Who is doing the telling today. You're going to meet paolo mendoza. Her story could be told this her being a co founder of the women's march as her being filmmaker her being a writer and we will talk about it to of those things. But we're going to start at the very beginning. My story begins in bogota colombia. Which is where. I was born and i immigrated to the united states when i was three and i had an older brother. Who's seven and it came with my mom to los angeles and we were being reunited with my father who had come a few months earlier than us. My entire family for generations had lived in columbia and we had no friends. No family and we didn't emigrate to the normal places that colombians would immigrate to which would typically have been miami and or jackson heights in new york For some reason my mom and my father they chose. Los angeles paolo's mother had been born in the united states. Would her own father was getting his masters degree. So was an american citizen within american passport. Who had lived her whole life in columbia so when we came to the united states we came with my mom having an american passport my father my brother and i with green cards and that obviously gave us a huge privilege that many many immigrants don't necessarily have when they come to this country. I was always very curious about our stories growing up as a child. I always ask my mom from as early as i can. Remember how our first ease here and my mom was very honest with me about our story from the very very beginning when i was five years old. She explained to me that she came to the united states because her marriage to my father was in a really bad place and she thought that starting fresh in a new country would give them a new start as a couple as a family. It didn't work one night just a few months. After they moved palace dad went to work and he never came back he had left his wife and his kids so he abandoned us with my mom who spoke absolutely no english. She was a young mom at that time she was twenty four with two kids know english. No family no education no job and like to three hundred dollars in her pocket. It was maybe for a couple of days. We slept in the car. We slept in a park while my mother figured out how she could find a health. But i will say that what that created for. My mother isn't my mother was so focused on our education. That was the thing that we had to do that. We had to go to school and yes by and large we hear the story often the immigrants. They want their children to go to college and so often they're the children are the first generations to go to college. That was the case with my mom but it also felt that you know my mother had gone to the precipice of losing absolutely everything and she was able to stave off losing everything by amir inch but because she had been at that precipice she she desperately knew that she didn't want her children to get anywhere near that and so she created all these mac nations in and ways and life skills to make sure that we didn't have the uncertainty that we had growing up. I think she probably still feels really guilty about that.

United States Paolo Mendoza Parliament Columbia Bogota Colombia Paolo Los Angeles Miami New York Palace Amir Inch
Riverdale Road

Haunted Places

04:50 min | 2 months ago

Riverdale Road

"Riverdale road is an eleven mile stretch of narrow highway between the denver suburbs of thornton and brighton. colorado like much of the denver area. The road is the very definition of wide open. Space greenfield's dusty farms bisected by two lane highway though farm houses dot the landscape every now and then. You likely won't see another living soul as you travel down the pavement. Even under a blue sky the road makes realize how very alone you are but at night riverdale road comes alive. It's known for being a place of shadows. Ghosts and demons rumors include to ghost cars at a spectral jogger who was killed in a collision. But it isn't these small spirits that gave riverdale road that title of the most haunted road in america. It's something far bigger and a bit more flammable. Sophie didn't know how long she'd been driving at some point during her cruise down riverdale road time had lost all sense of meaning. Her body was going through the motions of driving but her brain was quiet. She liked the isolation of at all. Sometimes imagining she was in a completely different world. There were no other cars in sight. Fields of weeds sprouted on the side of the highway. The sun dip down just below the horizon and the crooning of ella fitzgerald drown out the sound of her. Tires churning on the pavement. The route started to move from straight to curving. She's slowly let her attention come back to her driving not fully ready to let go of the beautiful emptiness in her mind. She held onto the steering wheel loosely and subject sunglasses onto the top of her head. It was nearing dusk. Sophie flicked on the headlights and her breath immediately caught. There was a victorian manor sitting in the middle of the street. Her mind struggled to make sense of what she was seeing but her foot slammed on the brake hard. The car halted hundred body jerk forward but the seat belt held her back some of the pulled up the parking brake with their heart pounding her chest. She closed her eyes and breathed deeply forcing her heart rate to slow down when she felt that she was under control. She opened her eyes again. Slowly soapy couldn't understand what she was seeing. The highway just stopped right at the house. A small porch. She knew she wasn't lost her. Gps said so. She was just heading to a friend's house just off the route but the old house looked like it had been standing there for at least one hundred years. It didn't make any sense. She knew she should probably stay in the car and find another route. Turning around would have been past. There wasn't enough space for her to go around the manor but the site was so strange some improbable that she couldn't help herself. She had to know if she was dreaming. Sophie got out of the car and approach the house. The white would of the door and window. Frames was split and fading cracks in the glass. Bread like spider webs. A small porch around the structure had several missing floorboards as she walked closer. Her brain told you to let alone to go back to the car but her body felt differently. She climbed up the steps. The house groaned as though it didn't want company but so knocked on the door anyway and waited for a response. She didn't expect one much he also didn't want scare anyone. She just wanted to peer inside eight only for a moment but nobody responded she gently push the door open. It moved to jar with a sigh. Is it the whole house was breathing. This made her more nervous as much as the space call to her. She didn't like how alive it felt. Houses didn't have souls. She shook off the thought she was making too much of things she should just go in so be placed her hand and the cracked white paint of the door that nudged it open the rest of the way based on the outsides condition she expected dust mold and maybe pieces of the seeming hanging by a thread but the inside was completely different

Sophie Denver Thornton Brighton Ella Fitzgerald Colorado America
Kamala Harris Makes History as First Woman and Woman of Color as Vice President

Democracy Now! Audio

01:26 min | 2 months ago

Kamala Harris Makes History as First Woman and Woman of Color as Vice President

"Kamala harris makes history many times over. She's the first ever woman vice president. She'll also be the first african-american for south asian. I indian tamil american. The first caribbean american to hold the office harris is the daughter of immigrants indian mother and jamaican father. The junior senator from california previously served as california's attorney general and before that. A san francisco's district attorney in her victory speech saturday night harris pay tribute to black women and the generations of women who fought for equal rights. Women who fought and sacrificed to so much for equality and liberty and justice for all including the black women who are often too often overlooked but so often proved they are the backbone of our democracy all the women who have worked to secure and protect the right to vote for over a century one hundred years ago with the nineteenth amendment fifty five years ago with the voting rights act and now in twenty twenty with a new generation of women in our country who cast their ballots and continued the fight for their fundamental right to vote and be heard.

Kamala Harris Harris South Asian California Caribbean San Francisco
Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity for Nintendo Switch review

This Week In Video Games

03:31 min | 2 months ago

Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity for Nintendo Switch review

"Hara warriors. Age of calamity is a demo out. Intendo switch which is free to download ahead of the launch on november the twentieth much more breath the wild and it's predecessor hyrule warriors nintendo of done a great job of marketing this one as a breath prequel and it's got fans hardtop and are really really look forward to the release. The visuals and mechanics of the game are very breath. The walled with curry tecmo bringing in the sheikha slight abilities like bombs ice magnetism the bio mechanics of horror. Warriors have been mixed in really well here with link and other party members feeling really powerful when you run into battle to mogens and the other enemies are flying in the absolute hundreds really really cold. Seen the game has been sapped as a prequel and as such age of calamity is set one hundred years before breath of the world and we saw games is of this battle in breath of the wild itself with the champions falling battle against calamity. Gannon the snippets. We saw wearing cut scenes and memories and age of calamity looks to finally fill in the blanks for us the various playable heroes in the game including link impo zelda and the champions themselves. I don't play tara warriors previously but the bow system is super fun. Actually i had a lot more fun than i thought. I was going to. If i self against waves of enemies in the hundreds much more than freshness standards zelda game battles take place in a math around haro with a at filled with friendly and enemy does to as pockets of enemies but there's also objectives marked on the map we have to either secure location or takeout big enemy or this some kind of objective in the demo. Batum with guardian. We have to enable these sleeping guards help. Impact and a mini time travelling guardian to there's a variety of attacks including a light attack has a heavy attack and various special attacks. Which also have a cool down as mentioned before you got access to these chic as lite which allows you to use bombs crisis as stacy's too so bombs are really good for destroying a bunch of enemies and also freeze enemies with stasis because smash enemies off into the distance which as as it was in breath awad age of calamity battles film and the characters. You play already different to his easy to switch between characters during batteries in the deep end so impo in particular is very powerful as she can make duplicates of 'self and seldom makes creative use of the sheiks like but she doesn't feel quite as powerful as the other two characters. I played infamy is the most fun definitely. Give her a try. I'm looking forward to playing as the champions in particular dirac so related to the narrative. The game there's a mini guardian. The can travel through time and he appears to be in. Jairo costs sometime in the future and hops into a wormhole to escape a big guardian. The narrative is super interesting as you pretty much the fate the champions link and zelda similar to star wars rogue one tragedy does a white the how we get there is going to be full of twists and turns at first. I wasn't really sure about this. Release not having played the other titles dynasty warriors or hira warriors. I wasn't ready tissue about this. Zelda spinoff but the fact that nintendo has given arguably the talk name to a third party says a lot which know downton. We'll be across much more than ever before and the great thing about the demo is you can jumping without having to make expensive commitment science clemency job in its hands command in november with loads of behaviors around it plus new consoles. But this is definitely something. Nintendo fans are gonna be checking out over the holiday season. So i'd say if you're on the fence pick up the demo and give it a try. I for one have been persuaded a can't wait to jump in come november the twentieth.

Hara Warriors Curry Tecmo Mogens Tara Warriors Nintendo Gannon Warriors Batum Zelda Jairo Guardian Stacy Zelda Spinoff
Professional Albums and Cinematic Slideshows

This Week in Photo

05:57 min | 2 months ago

Professional Albums and Cinematic Slideshows

"Hey welcome back to another episode of this week in photo. I'm your host frederik van johnson. Daniel you cinco is on the hot seat today. And he agreed to come on to quickly show some of the new features in their product. Smart albums if you're a wedding photographer or anybody who makes albums this software is let him say it. But this offer here is designed to make your life a little bit easier daniel. Welcome to the show man. How's it going. Hey let's see us. I'm doing good. I'm doing well i'm excited. I saw your email a couple of weeks ago. Come through about the impending release of this of the new features. So i wanted to you. Come on and you you were. You were when you mentioned and we sort of dialogue. I thought the best way to share what the features are would be to. Have you come on for a couple of minutes and just show us you know. Exactly what the new features are so the before we do that for the people who may not know about picks lou or the smart albums product this give us a quick overview of what this what the software is and who it was designed for. Our software is all about saving time and For professional photographers album design processes a very time consuming process and we found a way to make it not days of work but the minutes of work and we released our first version of smart albums in two thousand thirteen. So it's been seven years We've included a lot of updates and the latest one is all about making it faster the whole process with the design. That's great congratulations man. That's a that's a. That's that's like one hundred years in software. That's true it's like it's like when you see news recordings from ten years ago click. I was fifty years ago there the quality of just last year rights. Yeah cool well. Let's let's dive right in. I wanna i wanna see with the with the new features are so. I'll go ahead and bring your screen up here okay. So i'm sharing your screen now so this is it right to walk out. The nuances are so for those. That don't now. The album process Before you can find the book too late the photos out and the traditional lane thought of shop you know you take hours or days usually to line among to decide which photos go where and all that kind of stuff and the original idea behind smart albums is that you can choose images that you want to include on the page old say the the news any simply drag them onto the blank canvas and while up you got yourself a design and you can click next to see what other designer able now. The latest update is for people. Who don't even want to do that. Like this dragging is taking too long. I need to make an faster. So we Included something called auto bill. And i'm gonna do is just gonna select all of the images that are imported. I'm gonna assume that these images are the ones that the Couple of from this wedding decided they want to include an album and then click on auto. Bild i'm going to be asked the most important question. Which is how big should album be in terms of pages. So two pages equals one spread and whenever photographer selling album limited the album to a certain number of spread because the cost of printing album is based on. How many spreads are typical album. That i build is about. Twenty spreads pages. So that's literally all. I need to choose. I can't have some more control over. How smart album's distributor damages. But i'm gonna leave those Options as is mild was going to use the time codes. It's gonna re arrange photos. Based on the time they were taken whether images are color a black and white and other major data so i was like like Bild i will wait. Just a few seconds and smart albums will be done just like that. So i can quickly preview what i have so far by clicking the right and left keys on keyboard so remember that we're gonna be able to make changes to dis but as you can see smart albums without us doing really anything has already damages together in such a way that it makes sense for instance here. We have the group photos and here. We have a couple portrait's now based on a time. Call new that these photos were taking around the same time and this was later so it place those images in separate spreads which obviously tells a better story comparative we had all these images mixed together and so yeah we have literally at album done and then seconds and there are twenty twenty spreads there and the next step that i would That are i would do. Is i would go back. And if i don't like certain design for example maybe here i feel like the images are too small. Click next On my bar here the top and i can see what other options Have available for me. And let's say this is something. I want you knocking. Make further changes such as maybe Switching the images around on the design and Yeah so i will just go back. Make some changes and within a few more minutes. I will be completely done with my design.

Frederik Van Johnson LOU Daniel
Amazons future

The 3:59

06:42 min | 2 months ago

Amazons future

"Didn't WanNa, tap into your Amazon expertise one last time, and so get your thoughts on what Amazon's GonNa look like in twenty twenty, one, 'cause you know last night obviously posted huge profits and. You know the coronavirus Say It's bent was benefiting from the lockdown environment has benefit. So. What you see happening with with Amazon next year especially as hopefully. We get out of this lockdown that we finally figured out a way to. Safely. Go Out and about and and social distancing is hopefully past me mean I can't even imagine hopefully that's that's crazy to think it's hard to imagine it's hard for me to Badgen to yeah. So so related related specifically to Amazon, a lot of these trends that you discussing that we saw in the three q earnings were trends that already existed, but then got accelerated and pushed into hyper speed during the quarantine during a pandemic. So you know people had already been migrating more toward online. Now doing a hell of a lot more than they used to specially older shoppers that maybe were more set into specific habits that. Were willing to try online grocery more for the first time and then said, Hey, this is actually pretty great plus I feel a lot safer are doing this. So why don't you just keep doing this even post quarantine? That's that's what a lot of expectations are. Is that online grocery online shopping they they were already getting millions more customers. Now, that's going to happen more often with that means traditional retailers is that dozens of them even more went into bankruptcy protection this year they were already hurting malls were already seeing less foot traffic again that accelerated. So what are we gonNa see in twenty, twenty one and beyond are. Fewer stores my expectation is, is that the stores that are going to be available are going to be much more experienced, really focused and you know there's going to be like more more focus on restaurants or like think of like the CRAYOLA. Place that you take your kids to. That's what more malls are GonNa look like where you're going to go there because it's more like sesame place or you know. Disneyland or something you know what I mean as opposed to. A clothing store we've seen it on our main streets a lot of time where like a bookstore or clothing store or a frame shop or hardware store really struggles to survive but hey, there's a really great pizzeria is a really great Barr. Those are going to do much better because Amazon doesn't really directly online also doesn't really directly compete with them as much. So it's been really amazing to see a lot of small businesses a lot of mom and POPs really kind a transition and adapt to the quarantine. They're going to have to take a of those lessons that they've learned and and try to try to make make like going out again really worthwhile people I would say. They're GONNA get a huge bomb, baxter the quarantines end by how are you going to get people to keep going years and years decades and decades afterwards is going to keep getting more difficult. He has I mean what you're seeing saying is essentially that this crowbar this isn't this isn't just a one time phenomenon. This will have fundamental structural changes to how a shop, right? How could at nine you don't have something like you. Know. This is a once in one hundred year type of situation and it's existed for most of the year. You do not go back to normal afterwards whatever you consider to be normal beforehand will no longer exists and that is a little scary. That's a little frightening but that's also the truth and some of it's GonNa be a good thing. But to assume that you know office environments are going to be exact same way that. They used to be or public interactions. I was curious to find out if in future see, obviously see es in twenty twenty one is going to be virtual but see twenty twenty two are people going to shake hands are they like because if I go to see twenty, twenty, two in my new life with mastercard, I don't really want to shake people's hands. It's really like a social construct that I was you know all. Four in the first place and I didn't want to insult people. So I did it but you know small things. Big Things are really going to impact people irate about it from the retail perspective because everybody's shops everybody spends money but you're going to see really echo in a lot of different places. A lot of places that people might not realize right now what what about with with grocery stores you talked about online grocers? Doing really well during the. There obviously their premium like I've noticed, my my budget has for food has gone up. Quite a bit as I've used lobbies online services. Greg I'm not spending on anything else. So there's there's that trade off but. As we go back to normal specifically with Amazon, because they've invested whole foods. Is. That do you see that trend sticking with with more online orders or a or will people go back to the grocery stores to shop and what what does that? What does that mean for Amazon? Okay. So I wrote a story about this a couple of months ago using All data company called Ernest and a grocery online grocery huge bump up this year but you still wouldn't even like you hardly even notice compared to overall grocery because grocery in the united. States. is like something like a trillion dollar annual business so it's still gonNA take a long time for online grocery really take off and become significantly mainstream but this year push them. Several years into the future. So I go to the Grocery Store I'm sure you know most people most people the data shows still go to the grocery store buy online grocery will become much more critical in the future it's going to be much less of a niche than it has been where it was like one percent three percent it's GonNa, keep ticking up there. Related to Amazon Day are looking in my opinion to be pretty savvy having purchased whole foods when they did before the antitrust like hammer started to come down because they'll be able to utilize whole foods and their new Amazon grocery brand the Amazon fresh As a way to really push into grocery because it's such a huge business so whether that's going to be in store or online, it's just going to help them continue to grow their business and also fight against Walmart who's one of their biggest competitors.

Amazon Grocery Store Twenty Twenty Badgen Mastercard Barr Ernest Baxter Walmart Greg Hammer
Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity comes to Nintendo Switch on November 20

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:17 min | 2 months ago

Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity comes to Nintendo Switch on November 20

"Nintendo direct mini partner showcase also announced that the adorable and out of this World Puzzle part-time Ufo from Hal Laboratory, the developers of the Kirby series as well as a free demo for the hot for Hiroo warriors age of calamity are. Both available on the Nintendo e Shop Right. Now for Nintendo, I'm going to get that high ruled Demo my wife, you know she's a very, very big breath of the world fan my kids who they're going to want to get in on that high roll business. Of course, that four game comes out November twentieth I know people are looking forward to its and Musso like dynasty warriors wherever if you want to go in there. beat up it'll be very interesting to see. I WanNa read the actually description for it though because they talk a little tidbits in there, I didn't know maybe you whatever before the Jairo warriors age of climate, a game launches four, hundred, ten switch on November. Twentieth, we'll try the freedom of the game available. Now, the action packed stories set in high Ra one hundred years before the events of the legend of Zelda breath. Wild game. The Demo will let players experience the fast paced action and dramatic cut scenes which shed light on the events that led to the great calamity. During the Nintendo direct mini partner showcase it was revealed that the massive screen filling divine beasts will also be playable in the game using the movement. The top powers of divine beasts will surely help players find victory when used in their respective stages there's for you. Yeah, right. Go, get the after the after the

Nintendo Partner Hal Laboratory Hiroo Musso
"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:37 min | 5 months ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"That don't have anything to do with the technology of when they were photographed or when they were published but have to do with something else by the same token poets can have their work appreciated one hundred years after they've written their poem and gone into that Great Poetry Library in the sky, the same thing can happen with photography. It points out that. Every artist I think is living at the cutting edge of whatever their technology is. If if you were a novelist one, hundred years ago, the cutting edge might have been the typewriter I don't know when the typewriter was invented but let's say it was a hundred years ago and before that it was the cutting edge was the quill and ink, and maybe the cutting edge fifty years ago was the typewriter. Every artist lives at the cutting edge in history of whatever technology is used in their particular art medium. But If we're careful if we're sensitive if we pay attention as artists, what we also realize. Is that in. To being at the cutting edge of whatever our medium is we are also simultaneously. coterminous with all artists throughout all history be they photographers or painters or sculptors, or poets, or novelist, or dancers, or singers, or whatever. And this brings me to one of the reasons why I think we're not only connected to all of history. But we do live in a time that's going to be very interesting in photography's history for reasons that don't have anything to do with the technology of making photographs and it's this. Up until now primarily because of stieglitz I've mentioned this and other contexts but primarily, because of stieglitz fine art photography has been presented to the world more or less. The same way that painting has been presented to the world. In a frame on the wall in a gallery. But we're in the midst of time when that is radically changing. When a lot of photography is starting to be seen off the wall out of the frame..

stieglitz Great Poetry Library
"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"At the cutting edge of technology, the cutting edge of the thought process of what were engaged with with photographic art. It's attribute he thought he was at the cutting edge. In fact, he was at the cutting edge of technology with his photograph Viewer Magazine Camera Work and with his creative thinking about what photography could be in terms of an art medium. He could have no more imagined the future of. Football Books and dual tone printing and galleries all across America and huge events like photo plus Houston photo festival that would have been. Literally inconceivable to him. But yet, it all came to pass. I would propose that it is equally difficult for us to imagine. What photography will be a hundred years from now in twenty one twenty what the technology will be in twenty one twenty, what the means of distribution will be in twenty one twenty. But isn't it interesting that when we look at Alfred? stieglitz photographs. We can still relate to them. The technology has changed the Zeitgeist has changed. The method of presentation has changed everything about photography has changed except. The content. Content is the one thing that hasn't changed. It's evolved sure and there are things being photographed today that Stieglitz can only imagine photographing. But when you look at Stieglitz work in general. And the other photographers of his generation. We can see the content threads that are still alive today. There are photographers today who doing. Essentially. The same kind of thing or an outgrowth of the kind of thing that Stieglitz did. I would propose the same thing will happen one hundred years from now our technology will seem so primitive our methods of distribution will seem so quaint. All of the things that we're worrying about now in terms of gear and process and methods of distribution will seem. The product of our times. But in fact, the content that we produce. Will. Possibly maybe. We hope. Still be of interest. Because whatever we do in terms of. Addressing, the issues of being human being the nature of being alive the nature of observing. What, goes on around us and capturing something in our artwork will be just as valid. It'll be hundred years old, but it'll be just as valid then. As it is today. By the same token, we read novels that are a hundred years old and we can relate to that they may be the language may be a little different than what we use today and all of that but. But. Nonetheless when they touch the human heart and they address the content of what it is to be alive. They still carry forward and they're still valuable even. Novelists who aren't famous and well remembered. There's something to be gained by reading their books. There will be something to be gained by looking at our photographs. One Hundred Years from now just light. There is something to be gained by looking at photographs from a hundred years ago. Now I mentioned Stieglitz Stieglitz is famous and he's still. Appreciated, today. But if you have the opportunity, go back and look at other publications from. Well, it's hard to find them from one hundred years ago 'cause Stieglitz was sort of unique but you can get a hold of a book that has all of the camera work photographs in it. That's well worth getting not too. Surprisingly the book is called camera work the complete photographs it's published by. It's really interesting little book kind of small but very thick and supposedly contains every photograph that was published in camera work and a lot of them seem. Somewhat dated but still interesting. But..

Stieglitz Stieglitz Viewer Magazine Football Houston America Alfred
"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:57 min | 5 months ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing. Bruce. Jensen I had a truly weird and strange experience this morning that I wanNA share with you I had to dry for about an hour this morning down to Anna Cordis and as I almost always do when I have that kind of drive I use that time to do some dictation to make nodes to. Possibly, put together ideas for an editor's comment for Lens Work and sometimes actually do the dictation and I happen to be doing a dictation about Alfred. stieglitz. And this particular dictation was sort of a bit of a test if you will because I had purchased a new Bluetooth headphone and I wanted to test how the quality of the audience would be while I was dictating in the car with the car noise driving down the freeway at seventy miles an hour. That's oftentimes a problem when it comes to try to transcribe those dictation because the car noise is so loud that it sometimes gets difficult to. Understand the words and for the dictation software to translate correctly. So I was really hoping that this new Bluetooth headphone would work. Fine. So there, I am I'm driving down the freeway I'm dictating an article about Alfred Stieglitz, and it dawns on me that Alfred Stieglitz was doing his thing. Almost, exactly a hundred years ago. and think about what Alfred Stieglitz was doing a hundred years ago. He was trying to make a place for photography in the art world he'd. Published Camera Work for a number of years, and then there was a to ninety one, the gallery in New York and he was essentially promoting photography as an art medium. When up to this point, it hadn't been promoted much as an art medium. And let's look ahead of Stieglitz for a few years. What was yet to come well yet to come in. Roughly Nineteen nineteen or nineteen twenty were gelatin silver paper and certainly things like enlargements were yet in the future and most photographers in his day were probably printing on. Platinum palladium prints or something like that. So Pretty primitive in terms of the technology that we think about today I forward today here. I am in the car driving seventy miles an hour down the freeway using my Bluetooth headphone to dictate an article about his time in photography onto my smartphone, which I'll have transcribed by the computer later so that it can appear in the digital version and print version of Lens work so that all of you can see it. That's what happened in a hundred years of technological advancement. Can you imagine what Alfred Stieglitz would say if he had been sitting next to me in the car listening to me describe in my thoughts what I think his point of view about photography was and where his place in photographic history was it it would be beyond his comprehension. To think about what I was doing. In the period of a short one, hundred years after he was. Publishing Camera Work and doing to ninety one. Now, obviously, the point of this is to project forward. Can we possibly imagine where photography is going to be a hundred years from now we like to think that we're.

Alfred. stieglitz Jensen editor Bruce Anna Cordis New York
"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Well. It's like there's all these unique advances and technology but we're just not a neighbor with like we were in the past because they're not speed records. <hes> that's interesting rick kennedy. Wanna thank you for joining joining us for <hes> a great conversation. <hes> i'd really encourage people to take a look at this book one hundred years of reimagining flight and and even if you're not just purely an engine nut like some of us. Maybe i think you'll find it really really fascinating because i mean you can't talk about the the engines you can't describe the history you can't talk about the people involved and the decisions that were made in not talk about the airplanes as well obviously <hes> one is no good without the other so <hes> if you're interested in aviation in general in the in the history of both commercial and military <hes> we we haven't really talked much of the military aspects of this but there's a lot of that in the book as well so check it out really encourage it encourage. You take a look at it then rick thanks again. Well dave maximum max. I appreciate the chance to talk with you guys about. I mean just we're. We're all very blessed to be engaged in. A fascinating inch in this industry is so fantastic and it's booming. It's just booming. I mean it really is. It's just a continuous. It really is booming so thank first time. I really appreciate this. Are you a bit of a musician yeah as a music major in college. I played jazz. I've written a couple of books on early jazz music so yeah ah i thought i saw something about that. What what do you play yeah. I play piano <hes> which basically consist of walking the base an four four line the base. I play a lot of like monk and you know nineteen fifties and sixties jazz but my <hes> my study of it in terms of book riding is nineteen twenties and thirties jazz labels <hes> living in cincinnati. I live an hour away from richmond. Indiana where the first great jazz record label able was. I mean the twenty so i like interest on that stuff so yeah that was a journalist and i covered entertainment music and so i had a chance to hang out with all the great jazz players great <hes>. That's amazing but i i wanted. I just went in with one thing just to say and i think you'll see that in the book i i liked. I made a very big point to the site accomplishments from rolls royce and pratt and the book because yes the three of us just absolutely hate each other but respect respect each other because the big three are killing each other and just have done some great things in the aviation world so we all have the grizzly like each on a little a little bit well and i'm guessing you wouldn't have as many accomplishments if there weren't one or two competitors right i mean hasn't that really driven the the industry too far greater accomplishments schwantz than you could have if there were just you know one company out there doing this and that's why worry about consolidation sometimes because when it there i mean i really do. I mean you you know. Roles came along with a wide chord fan where he once. We got to do that and we came composite. Not roles is working on a composite and we're don't seem sees prescott this weird good system and so we're always trying to leapfrog each other and i think has made a huge difference in the quality aviation for travelers and in the military world have three guys just cotton each other up and i hope that always remains that way because the consolidation at least makes me nervous especially because they can play you guys off against each other. Oh if you look at u._t. C. a. g. guy look at u._t..

rick kennedy Indiana richmond dave prescott cincinnati pratt one hundred years
"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"From inside the engine to cool parts parts so you lose about thirty percent of the air that comes to that from san the cool parts and the rest goes to the engine well with ceramic matrix composites. Is you have to do that so when we opened that plant in alabama a year ago the agreement was with the government they gave us a nice grant for that thing and they you said you will make that raw material available to defense company and the united states but guess what you press gonna be buying that stuff. They're not stupid you know they're they're good company. There are on c._m._c.'s already and so i think at some point she will probably be a provider of the material to pratt and other aerospace companies in the united states. Pratt has its own operation was c._m._c.'s g has its own r._n._d. Research in gear turbofans by the way the gear your turbofan is a company owned by g._e. In italy yeah i know i was when i i know i know i know my. Oh my goodness 'cause i remember i remember before i it was called fiatavio but maybe it's just obvio- now. I'm not sure yeah i i used to <hes> visit naples <hes> several times a year to see them and then when when i remember when g. e. bought them and i'm on thinking oh no oh my goodness so it's really interesting. Is i look in the future. I think you're the question you're exactly right. I think if you're gonna see a marrying of geared systems you're marrying a obviously ceramic matrix composites on the geared system. It really comes down to the thrust class and works the best there <hes> that can becoming yeah so. I think that's gonna come. I said the beginning to show the real challenges for all of us is going to be any new technology introduction financially. You have to be able to meet the same reliability of the predecessor engine and that is not easy easy to do at all tough. I mean look at pratt right now. I mean you know they are paying some serious money right now to get this engine gone and it's gonna work. I mean i'm a g._i. I'm just telling you and within the halls of general electric they know the press. They're good and they're gonna make that thing work. It's going to be painful foolish l. but they're gonna make it work because that's the world we live in today. These engines have to be so reliable and that's a financial arrangement when you sell them. Yes absolutely you have you have guarantees and you have remedies. It's crazy yeah yeah. Thank god for the spare parts yeah. That's a a a model. I know <hes> because i was involved. I'm that pratt and whitney struggled with as the the o._j._t. A dis the seventy seven and others was starting to wind down in that spare parts sales stream was starting to starting to dry up. That's when pregnant. He decided to engage a lot more in the side of the business. <hes> gee did as well but but i think gee strategy now is is somewhat different and in that <hes> g._e. I guess is not owning <hes> maintenance shops overhaul shops part repair businesses <hes> but <hes> i guess licensing <hes> to others to third parties that kind of the strategy for tomorrow for g._e. Aviation he's now. That's exactly right. There was twenty years of stumbling. Oh boy in trouble for saying that but really the night in the nineteen nineties the theory was was a general electric corporation was just this just.

pratt united states Pratt alabama c._m._c. naples italy g. e. whitney thirty percent twenty years
"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The trump doing i'm not unheard of course but i think we know pretty much what he's going to do i don't think it's on the same level of importance as the bell for their curriculum you not comparing like lichen like the the situation that exists today exist for a very very long time is very complicated trump is being making it worse in my voting for his own reasons whether it's nobody really knows do they resentment among needs thirty responsible given the role the key is playing that on the allow new there had paroda worries about what he's doing with regard to new climate change will north korea role promoting islamophobia i think this is an unhelpful intervention that will doubtless does have some kind of negative consequences but i do agree with you the to the speed and magnifico version of things because of the mud media is a hugely important element of this year when the both the declaration on we just made the comparison with century precisely a century ago the buffer at rationing was revealed in private initially by the british cabinet to designers leadership the existence of it wasn't published until a week later in the jewish chronicle that the time it was never published in palestine they itself because the british who buy them routing the country will wind about its implications and it took a long time for the news and its implications two feeds through so speed and intensity of media coverage that they really really does matter advice for journalists on the bit stumped beyond the general advice that i give to anybody who is contemplating a career in journalism he wind principle should be different for this admittedly divisive and contentious issue you need to be an infusion asked you need to one to communicate inflammation you need to be prepared to book quite hard and sometimes difficult circumstances you need to understand that however little you know you probably know moles and most of your readership the lessons of universal ones anew you apply them in the in the certainly difficult circumstances of this the inevitably controversial issue rich people on both sides are angry for different reasons that can be very challenger but the fundamentals of under different from reporting on the vote.

climate change jewish chronicle palestine media coverage north korea
"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Sure media about emotion oversee the israeli palestinian conflict provokes a huge amounts of emotion but there's any place for that to motion in the reporting of it yes i think there has to be how can you you know we're all human beings we will have emotions out can you convey what people are experiencing without giving some sense of how they feel i think the again the age of social media were more intensely aware of the power of images that have always been images of course they went invented yesterday that the proliferation of the accessibility images i mean i'm israelpalestine i i'm not sure that i can think of anything memorably vivid that if you look elsewhere in recent years across the wasteland of the middle east think of the pictures of six children in yemen people suffering in syria but of course your emotions also have to become texture legs time for the report should correspondents show emotion because obviously it does they are human beings you say is they're place for emotion in the reporting miles evacuation is linked to what i said earlier about the first person journalism is a famous raw wasn't of the bbc with barbara plitt osher as i recall who with bbc correspondent in jerusalem or ramallah whatever of and yasser arafat died in two thousand to the full she was overcome by emotion and whipped on that was a great idea to be honest but unite she's human being perhaps as a journalist you need to put your humanity and these theater to one side or in abeyance will save it for drinks at the bar of two new i think verge your role is to describe what other people are experiencing a not to thrust yourself to be at the center the store.

social media yemen syria bbc jerusalem yasser arafat ramallah
"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Palestinians moved falbo frequently and never easily but more easily inside israel and they did again after the second intifada one of the tragedies i think of recent years is that even under the conditions of military occupation palestinian economic dependence on israel and israeli dependence on palestinian labour for that matter there was a degree of human interaction that was drastically reduced after the second intifada in two thousand after sharon's visit to the temple mount in the ill judged palestinian decision to have an armed uprising against the israelis the human consequences that never mind the people who lost their lives and horrific acts of violence but the human consequences of it but there was very little interaction young palestinians and israelis today very rarely see each other the palestinians meet israeli soldiers settlers sometimes secret policeman and that's about it i remember being a the sacraments fraud when was based there i was done in my midthirties most gazans of my age should have casual jobs in israel some of course have been in prison but they had had some kind of interaction with israelis which was almost entirely absent amongst the younger generation people under thirty on a building on that subject to a new writes about the politics of language who learns walked who speaks whose languages now you speak hebrew and arabic most western correspondents don't how important you think is that to your insights language matters wherever you are the main language enables you to better understand people you know talking to and society you they're covering and it gives you insight somebody did the does you know technical things that you can read what it says that slogan on the wall you can hear the order saying a dispersal we will opened fire it's obviously quite useful to be able to have that ability i'm and i'm struck actually by took him a journalist and.

israel sharon fraud
"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"A sense of why this was sandra hypersensitive issue now as then near i mean i think history is key to understanding it for a for a foreign correspondent very difficult things sometimes to bring in state news coverage i was very interested in very struck by what you wrote about this situation often nineteen 48 when the city was completely divided knows and that one crossing point demand obam gates knee say foreign diplomats clergymen and pilgrims were able to cross but ordinary arabs and israelis would could not summing there were similar turns on pepsi even now we're moving towards a similar common one thinks of the way that the palestinian territories of not accessible to many israelis and vice versa i mean that how important a factory in your perspective was the fact that you as a foreign possible holder could go to places that many palestinians and israelis couldn't play with it was absolutely crucial i mean i could live in west jerusalem or i did or who get in my car i could drive this is before the whole even joined even during the intifada but certain before the first intifada i'm sure many of you will know many of you will be nice if very small place you can get up in the morning have breakfast in west jerusalem and you'd be having kofi in ramallah half an hour later in an hour later you can be eating wonderful cannot fail homeless in a nablus officie go farm possible it straight who is held to have a foreign passport or foreign idea what other of course things have changed on that front too not hasn't remain the same they used to be is ratings romeo all over the west bank far more easily than there are today today's you go into the areas of the west bank deemed to be under the control of the wound carefully but the palestinian authority there are big science israelis in hebrew and english and arabic saying you know you may not enter this your life is at risk you're not allowed to do that wasn't doors the case that was in the after the second intifada i think.

pepsi west jerusalem kofi sandra ramallah nablus
"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred year" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Hewlett misunderstands that i think there is wide understanding today certainly whiter than ever before of that the only way to resolve this conflict with its long history and complex routes and a symmetry between the two sides is a watch lord beal and his wisdom came up with all those years ago 1937 that you have in this one small country with liz resonances and appeal to so many different people than conflict that you have irreconcileable national aspirations i don't think there's any doubt about that i think the only way to deal with them is in that conventional prescription for giving them each state there is of course this huge imbalance between the sides and has been a failure of the international community which again we're seeing another dramatic manifestation of that as we speak to deal with it as required for reasons that in a world quite aware of but i think the fundamental truth is understood i think that the problem now is really the first person to say this no the last that the prospects of that happening appear to be receding and that is a tragedy for both peoples more so for the palestinians because they're suffering a lot more is the result of an absence of that solution but for israel as well as you know only too well all right on this optimistic note i say let's head over to the james rojas of the jettison department here at city let's swapped seats for the for the good cop bad go.

Hewlett lord beal israel james rojas liz