28 Burst results for "One Hundred Thousand Years"

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

Environment: NPR

05:16 min | Last month

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

"It's chilly across the country today. Highs of just fifty eight in miami and sixteen in minneapolis which makes minnesota colder than an arctic as mcmurdo station but the cold weather doesn't last forever in the twin cities and in antarctica. It does ice their last hundreds of thousands even millions of years and as npr's nell greenfieldboyce reports that makes an arctic the perfect place to find some of the oldest ice in the world. Just how old is the oldest ice. On earth john higgins says. Nobody really knows you know. Would i be surprised at this point. We had five million-year-old is i mean. I'd be surprised. But not it's not unfathomable i think he and some colleagues recently collected ice samples in antarctica. That were later analyzed and shown to be as old as two point six million years. It's beautiful stuff when you pull out. The is it. Essentially as crystal clear accepted filled with tiny bubbles the bubbles contain air from when the ice formed and this trapped air is what scientists are really after higgins says if you want to understand how gases like carbon dioxide have affected the climate throughout history. You know you can't really do better other than getting a time machine and going back in time and taking an air sample then using these ice cores which physically just trap samples of ancient air to release that ancient air. All you have to do is melt the ice. That's the sound of a research camp manager in antarctica making drinking water by melting scraps of two hundred thousand year old ice in a metal pot to actually collect an analyze the release gases however ancient is has to melt in a lab. Sarah shackleton studies old princeton where she gets to watch the trapped air bubble out and that is something that i don't know if i'll ever get sick of watching. It's actually like pretty mesmerizing and one thing. That's released surprising every time to muse. Just how much gas is actually in the ice. She says it's a lot and samples from time. Periods undergoing past climate changes could be used to help make predictions about the future. One of the biggest questions in terms of kind of the modern warming and look anthropogenic. Climate changes helmich warming. Do should we expect with the amount of co two that we have in the atmosphere now. Antarctica has been covered by an ice sheet for at least thirty million years. But it's actually pretty hard to find really old ice. John gooch is a geologist. At the university of minnesota he says while snowfalls constantly add new layers of ice to the top of the ice sheet the oldest layers at the bottom can disappear. That's because of geothermal heat coming up from the ground so the rocks are giving off heat of slowly over time and so that has the potential to melt ice at the bomb. Still bits of super old ice like that two point six million year old sample can sometimes be preserved at the ice sheets edges the older snippets of ice. That we've been able to find come from places where the ice has flowed up against a mountain range and been exposed at the surface in those spots though. The ice can be all jumbled up and messy. It's not nice layers that have been laid down sequentially over a long continuous stretch of earth's history to get a neatly layered ice sample like that. Scientists need to drill straight down through the thick icesheet so far the oldest ice collected that way goes back eight hundred thousand years. Gooch says the goal now is to drill down a couple of miles to reach ice. That's older a million to two million years old whether or not we'll be able to find it at the bottom of the ice sheet where we can recover a relatively simple continuous record. Is i guess. That's the sixty four thousand dollar question at team from china has drilling underway a group from europe. We'll start in november. What everyone wants is i-i samples that cover a key time period about a million years ago. When there was a dramatic shift in the planet cycle of ice ages. Those had been coming every forty thousand years or so but for some reason that pattern ended and it changed to every one hundred thousand years instead unto us working on climate. That's a really big deal. Eric wolf is a climatologist with the university of cambridge in the united kingdom. It's a really big question as to why that change is fundamental tower climates. Work in a way you could say. We don't really understand today's climate. If we don't understand why we live in one hundred thousand year will draw the forty thousand year world. The coronavirus pandemic basically ruins the arctic research season. That would've been happening now but starting next fall researchers will be backed down there searching for really old ice nell greenfieldboyce npr news.

Antarctica Nell Greenfieldboyce Arctic Sarah Shackleton Mcmurdo Station John Higgins John Gooch NPR Minneapolis Higgins Minnesota Miami Princeton University Of Minnesota Gooch Eric Wolf China Europe
The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

60-Second Science

02:01 min | Last month

The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

"Like modern humans than neanderthals roamed widely throughout europe. We know this because they left behind. Extensive evidence usually bones or tools but their cousins. The denisovans our more mysterious until recently they were conclusively linked only to a single cave in southern siberia called denisova cave which lies between kazakhstan and mongolia in that cave. Scientists had found a finger bone three teeth and piece of skull which tip them off to the existence of a whole new lineage of ancient human now scientists have uncovered more of the range for the denisovans says de endo mossy lonnie of the max planck institute in germany. His team turned up evidence. The ancient humans occupied a high mountain cave on the tibetan plateau. Called by shia cave belongs to monks and -mongst things that it's a very holy place in fact among found a piece of jawbone there in nineteen eighty which has been tenuously linked to the denisovans salani and his team have now unearthed more conclusive evidence by sifting through cave sediments and sequencing the genetic evidence. The denisovans left behind. Buddy decay of people chests. Gabbing down the side like bleeding. There are coping ping could left their dna. The dna appears in layers suggesting the denisovans inhabited the cave as far back as one hundred thousand years ago as well as at sixty thousand years ago and perhaps even as recently as forty five thousand years ago meaning. The denisovans might overlapped in this region with modern humans. The results appear in the journal. Science mossy lonnie says. This method could enable more denise in detective work to this like so many caves when we have evidence of human activity but we don't have opening remain so if he can exploit to sediment can actually start to track down in segment. The denisova dini denise evans live on today in the genomes of some modern day humans from the south pacific further. Genetic work like this might give scientists more clues where early homo sapiens. I met and mixed with the elusive denisovans.

Max Planck Institute Siberia Kazakhstan Mongolia Tibetan Plateau Europe Germany Lonnie Denise Evans Denise South Pacific
What crows teach us about death with Kaeli Swift

TED Talks Daily

04:12 min | 3 months ago

What crows teach us about death with Kaeli Swift

"Whether we want to or not human spend a great deal of time considering death. And it's possible we've been doing. So since shortly after Homo Sapiens, I began roaming the landscape. After all the first intentional human burial is thought to have occurred around one hundred thousand years ago. What might those early people have been thinking? As they took the time to dig into the earth deposit, the body and carefully covered up again. Were they trying to protect it from scavengers or stymie spread of disease? Were they trying to honor the deceased or did they just not want to have to look at a dead body? Without the advent of a time machine. We may never know for sure what those early people were thanking. But one thing we do know is that humans are far from alone in our attention towards the dead. Like people some animals including the corvettes, the family of birds that houses the crows. Ravens Magpies Jays also seemed to pay special attention to their dead. In fact, the rituals of corvettes made acted as the inspiration for own. After all, it was the raven that God sent down to teach Kane how to bury his slain brother able. But despite the clear recognition by early people that other animals attend to their dead, it's only fairly recently that science has really turned its attention towards this phenomenon. In fact, formal name for this field comparative Anthology. First introduced until twenty sixteen. In this growing field, we are beginning to appreciate what a rich place the natural world is with respect to how other animals interact with their dead, and it's in this growing body of knowledge at that time machine to our early ancestors might be possible. So what are we learning in this growing field? Well right now, we can split our understanding into two main groups. In the first, we have animals that display stereotyped predictable behaviors towards their dead and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from experimental studies. This group includes things like social insects, bees, ants, and termites, and for all of these animals colony hygiene is of critical importance and so as a result, these animals display rigorous undertaking behaviors in response to corpses. For example, they may physically remove carcasses from the colony they may consume them. They may even construct tombs. We see similar hygiene driven responses in some colony living mammals rats, for example, will reliably Berry cage mates that have been dead for forty eight hours. In our other group, we have animals that display more variable, perhaps more charismatic behaviors and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from anecdotes by scientists or other observers. This is the animals whose death behaviors I suspect might be more familiar to folks. It includes organisms like elephants which are well known for their attendance to their dead even in popular culture. In fact, they're even known to be attracted to the bones of their deceased. It also includes animals like primates which display a wide variety of behaviors around their dead from grooming them to. Prolonged attention towards them guarding them even the transportation of dead infants and that's actually behavior we've seen in the number of animals like the dolphins. For example, you may remember the story of Taleh, the ORCA in the resident J. pod in the puget sound who during the summer of two thousand eighteen carried her dead calf for an unprecedented seventeen days. Now a story like that is both heartbreaking and fascinating, but it offers far more questions than it does answers for example, why did Kerry her calf for such a long period of time. who she just that stricken with grief. Wishy more confused by her unresponsive infant. Or is this behavior just less rare in orcas than we currently understand it to be

Magpies Jays Ravens Kane Taleh Dolphins Kerry
Neanderthals Used Glue

BrainStuff

03:59 min | 4 months ago

Neanderthals Used Glue

"There was a time when neanderthal was used as an insult with the implication that this extinct species or perhaps sub species of hominids was unintelligent and unsophisticated. But the more research that goes into how neanderthals lived the more we learn that they were quite clever. For example, they made an used glue millennia before we humans figured it out. Pay. Bring stuff is Christian. Sager here. There are some things people just can't live without. So we invented them way before we ever invented writing coats, knives, roofs, fire turns out. Another thing are prehistoric precursors needed that we still need today is the ability to stick one thing to another thing, and then you know have them stay that way which is why neanderthals had glue they might have been caveman, but they weren't savages now. Hormone neanderthalensis used their glue a viscous tar distilled from Birchbark to fix weapons on the heads of a tool onto a half or maybe a handle and neanderthals were actually the leaders in glue technology beating US Homo Sapiens to the punch by more than a hundred thousand years they began brewing tar two, hundred thousand years ago whereas the earliest evidence of modern humans using tree resin as adhesive appears less than one hundred, thousand years ago. Research published in twenty eleven shows that neanderthals had the ability to create in control fire. So does the fact neanderthals could manipulate fire to produce tar proved they weren't as dimwitted as we'd like to assume scientists have been curious about the process neanderthals used to make their glue a new study published in the journal Nature Scientific reports suggest three different ways neanderthal tar could have been manufactured after all it had to be produced. This stuff wasn't just secreted from trees growing in the forest, but how difficult was making tar? Tar Making is definitely a process. No matter which way you go about the research team figured that out through a fancy bit of experimental archaeology, they devised three different potential methods of extracting sticky stuff from birchbark the ash mound method where tightly rolled layers of birchbark are covered in ash and embers the pit role cigar roll method where one end of Bertril is lit emplaced burning side down into a small collection pit and the raised structure method where a birch bark container was placed in a pit beneath an organic Mesh, which holds loosely rolled bark that is then covered with earth and fire. After recreating the three tar production methods, the scientists assess each according to three criteria the yield temperature in complexity the team found that though the simplest fastest method, the ash mound method yield digest a pea sized amount of tar the most complicated time consuming method that's the race structure method produced fifteen to twenty times more and was also the most efficient. They also observed that regulating the temperature of the fire didn't make much of a difference to the product even though they have no evidence that the neanderthal way. Of Making Tar. was similar to any of their experimental methods making the connection between the Birchbark the fire and the tar would have required that neanderthals possess a proclivity for abstract thought. So whether they were making easy inefficient tar instead of something like the high yield method requiring a folded cup and a little grill made of sticks neanderthals had something going for them. They were seriously using their

Birchbark Ash Mound Sager Nature Scientific Bertril
What are the origins of English

Tai Asks Why

02:40 min | 4 months ago

What are the origins of English

"Think if it is a bunch of. It is probably a bunch of women, MOMS and aunts on the island of England. That's probably the people who invented the English language and they were called angles. So they didn't even call English. They called it anguish. My Name's Tom Howell and I used to write the Oxford Dictionary encounter and I wrote a book called the Rude Story of English and it is a history of some dudes and some woman thousand five hundred years ago trying to invent the language. So in a sense when you learned English. From the older people in your family. They are inventing English in a way because that is going to be a bit different. From the English that their grandparents spoke and then their great grandparents spoke and so on and so on and so on. Until when you go back far enough, it would be very difficult for us now to understand like great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great great grandparents, saints which other think of how friend and neighbor are spell differently neighbors eat before I, friend is I before e friend came from one place where they said free owned once upon a time and neighbor came from another place where they were saying. It was actually called a near Ghabbour. You know has GM neighbor Mrs Weird thing we don't pronounce it now. It's just people stop pronouncing it properly but. Once upon a time, they would've been like, no, it's wrong to say neighbor without Jeanette they would have been like the correct way to say that is Nia Gabor because it was a boor who lived near you. So generations go by people make mistakes people say things a bit differently. People put on funny voices. Things Change. Now we say neighbor instead of new? Kabar I guess it is. The English is so complicated because it comes from all around the world. Yeah. What recalled English today like if you look up a word on the Internet to find out where it came from could come from anywhere. Like bungalow comes from India but you know even if you went back all the way to what the angles were saying, their language also came from all around the world like their language came from. Iraq and India and Russia and all kinds of weird places like people have been talking to each other for at least one, hundred, thousand years. So all of us, any point in history might say who invented our language and the odds would almost be some not dudes some arts and mother's thousand, five, hundred years ago. kind of doesn't matter where you are. That's always kind of be the answer.

England Tom Howell Mrs Weird Nia Gabor Oxford Dictionary GM India Jeanette Ghabbour Iraq Russia
Neandertals Tooled Around with Clams

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Neandertals Tooled Around with Clams

"Around one hundred thousand years ago in what what is now. Italy are nandor tall cousins. Wait it out into the shallow. Coastal waters of the Mediterranean Sea in search of clams. Big Grant the the molluscs from the sea floor and perhaps even died for them in deeper water and they also simply collect clams from the beach but the creatures weren't just food in a recent Study University of Colorado Boulder archaeologist Paolo Villa inner team report that neanderthals modified the clams hard shells into tools for cutting and scraping. The clam derived implements were found inside the grow today. Motion rainy a coastal cave. That was first rediscovered around eighty five years ago by examining wear and tear on the shells the researchers determined that about seventy five percent of the tool source material had been found found dead on the beach. These shows had been worn down from being battered by waves and sand but the remaining shells were smooth and shiny indicating that the clams lambs were still alive on the sea floor when they were gathered. These shells were also thicker and therefore might have made more durable tools so even though gathering clams underwater took more work than picking them up on the beach. The effort may have been worth it also found in the growth at any pumice stones volcanic eruptions that occurred to to the south of the site. Those stones may have been used by neanderthals as abrasive tools. The study is in the journal loss. One neanderthals else were making these tools than fifty thousand years before modern. Humans first arrived in Western Europe but neanderthal intelligence was dismissed by the scientific community. Munity during much of the twentieth century in recent years however evidence of their tool use and even artistic abilities has grown neanderthals hunted. That'd made cave art cooked with fire us boats and when fishing just last year for example research by villa and others found that neanderthals tolls living not far from the grocery knee. Site used resonant. He serves to attach handles to stone tools. They may have gone extinct some forty thousand years ago but it's becoming ever more clear that neanderthals were intelligent creative. People who lead fully human lives.

Mediterranean Sea Paolo Villa Study University Of Colorado B Italy Western Europe
How Do You Compare to the Average American?

Motley Fool Answers

09:15 min | 1 year ago

How Do You Compare to the Average American?

"The financial profile all of the average American or more accurately profiles of many average Americans since a proper apples to apples? Comparison takes into account several factors. So we're GONNA approach this this by looking at the financial life cycle of somebody which of course starts with birth. Fortunately you don't have to pay for your own birth. That's good because because the average cost of a birth in America these days ten thousand dollars and that's if there are no complications whatsoever So let's jump ahead to one of the first experiences people have have with actually earning money and that is an allowance. How many kids get an allowance? And how much do they get law. According to a recent survey from the American Institute of CPA's as two thirds of parents get allowance and the average is thirty dollars a week. It's pretty nice. Isn't ages they say what ages they start giving they broke it down a little bit. Okay but what was interesting to me was far too five. Parents expect the children to do work. Some people feel like you should just allowance because that's how you learn how to be responsible And they expect at least one hour week of chores but on average children are spending five point one hours a week doing chores for their allowance. So let me just say that my kids are below average with my kids are not doing five hours. Where the tour? I don't even do five hours worth of chores in our house and I do a lot of chores in our. What are these are? Are these kids living on a farm like that's a very good question. Chores chores could be clean your room for us. It is dishes this. This is the number one joy that kids do and we're not even very good of making them. Do it. Put your own shoes on in the morning to dress yourself. Live at Downton Abbey. Everyone everyone here anyway. So there you go. That's allowance so that's money from your parents but you'll eventually reach the point where you can start earning money from other people and here we are talking about being a teenager but the emphasis is can because most teenagers don't according to a study by the Hamilton project. And the Brookings Institute back in Nineteen nineteen seventy nine fifty eight percent of teenagers. Were doing some sort of work. But today it's only thirty five percent most teenagers don't have a job which not even like babysitting reasoning or I I guess not then the factors for why this has gone down as number one. They say that teenagers just have more things to do. Like like more kids are doing More kids are taking classes over the summer. Also there's less low wage work more competition from older folks and immigrants. That said I have three teenagers and I'm not sure I quite vile this Mike. Especially in the summer my kids have managed to find jobs but regardless the majority of teenagers not working. What was your first job while so I used to cut before I was of age to be doing? I cut lawns in the neighborhood and Dan. I watered flowers at a local flower shop. Then sure I've told you this story F.. I faked my birth certificate so I could work in McDonalds when I was age. Fifteen instead instead of sixteen so I did that ric have I to you. It was your first job horrible paper route once where you have to go door to door and collect the money which I always hated to do you so I never did it so I never really got paid for thing. What about you so my first job? I I went to high school where you are expected to work like four hours a day so you go to class in either the morning or the afternoon and then you would then so what kind of like work at the school. Yeah you'd work in the school or you'd lurk working in nearby bakery or you'd work farm too so you could work on the farm. Some people had farm jobs or work on maintenance and the school So I worked for the principal symbol. Of course I was responding. I did a lot of you. Know entering in people's grades and typing let transcribing letters and just the office work so as like fifteen. I think started. Did you like that because I've often thought especially as a former elementary school teacher junior high teacher. I thought a lot of this education is wasted in the dish. It's been half the day like working out in the basically interning at different types of jobs because they're not learning so much in school. Yeah no I mean it was is one of the better jobs to have on campus. That's for sure. So did you. And your friends. I'll get straight a's no but we I mean we could. We could have definitely changed. All of our grades were honest asked by it was a religious school so God would have smoked in us we. We were well aware of the consequences for changing our grades. So we didn't do it got got it. At least I didn't what's next in life. maxine life is well. We're going real job hitting their well even before. Then you finish high school and and then what college you go to college. I should first of all point out that it's nice if you want to write so point out. First of all. The graduation rate from public high schools is now eighty five percent near an all time high. So let's go so how many people then go onto college sixty nine point seven percent according to the Department of Labor not everyone gets four year degree as some people go to college and they don't get a degree. People get the associates so when you look at four year bachelor's degrees and graduate degrees. It's it's between thirty five and forty percent of people who actually end up with a degree but almost seventy percent do end up going to college which of course brings us to one of the first major financial decisions. A kid has to make depending on how much their family is willing and able to pay and that is the cost of college so according to the College Board. Let's go over the numbers here for the two thousand nineteen thousand twenty year a four year your public in State Education Room Board Fees Tuition Twenty one thousand nine hundred and fifty for your public out of state thirty eight thousand three hundred and thirty four year private school forty nine thousand four hundred ninety dollars ice now. The College Board is quick to point out at those are the published sticker prices and that most people don't pay those they say that about three quarters of students receive grants that reduce the actual price that people pay and just just about every college these days has something called net price calculator. You go onto their website. You put in some basic financial information. It gives you a general idea of how much you would pay. It's not binding or anything but if you're thinking of a college go to the net price calculator and you get an idea of how much aid you might receive. That said. We all know that grants. It's an aren't enough. which brings us to the topic of educational loan so approximately two thirds of kids graduate with debt with the average being between thirty thousand and forty thousand dollars depending on which source? You're looking at repayment. Can Take Ten to twenty years. And according to the Federal Reserve one fifth of ours were behind in their payments in two thousand in seventeen. So you have to wonder is a college degree worth the cost well for most people. The answer's probably yes. College grads on average earn seventy I five percent more than high school grads but that said the Fed did find that college is not a good investment for about twenty five percent of graduates and several studies of people who have loans at found that the majority of people regret the debt and they wish they would have found some other way to pay for college either going to community college allege not going to the private school something like that but regardless of how you pay for it you do graduate head out of college time for that first job. How much can you expect to make while starting salaries these days around fifty three thousand dollars? But who's paying you the most well engineering degrees computer. Peter Science and math those starting salaries are between sixty five thousand and seventy thousand math math. Now that's crazy math data that everyone is so hot with the data. One loves the data exactly so since we just brought up salaries. Let's expand this beyond starting income income in general in the United States. What is the average or the median household income and the United States and the answer is whereas the sixty three thousand one hundred seventy nine dollars? that's what you said family or average average average household household income but there are a lot of factors that would tournament starting with where you live. So the highest incomes are in the northeast. Meeting is around. Seventy thousand thousand filed by the West Midwest and the South South is lowest at fifty seven thousand. Being married helps. The median income for a household with a married couple earns. Ninety three thousand six hundred dollars Also age is a factor the households will make the most are in the forty five to fifty four age range with a median income of eighty. Four thousand four hundred dollars. We've talked about this before. Where income generally peaks at some point in your late forties or early fifties? Finally just just give me an idea of where your income puts you in relation to the rest of America. Here's how the income dispersion breaks down so if you make thirty seven thousand dollars you're in the bottom thirty thirty percent again. Median sixty three thousand. If you make one hundred thousand year in the top thirty percent hundred eighty four year in the top ten percent and to be in the top five five percent you make two hundred and forty eight thousand dollars. That's generally how income breaks down.

College Board America United States Federal Reserve American Institute Of Cpa Mcdonalds Brookings Institute School Teacher Downton Abbey Mike DAN Principal Department Of Labor West Midwest Peter Science South South
A Star In Orion Is Dimming. Is It About To Explode?

Short Wave

10:16 min | 1 year ago

A Star In Orion Is Dimming. Is It About To Explode?

"One of the brightest stars in the night sky is named beetlejuice is about six hundred fifty light years away which is pretty close in outer space terms and if you've gazed eased up into the night sky and seen the Constellation Orion. You've seen beetlejuice before. So if you were to look up at it you would want to start by finding the three stars that make a nice little line that we call a Ryan's belts and then beetlejuice is as you're looking at it. The shoulder of Orion on the left. Emily Leveque is an astronomer at the University University of Washington who studies stars like beetlejuice which is known as a red supergiant supergiant because this star is enormous much bigger than our sun. If if you were to put beetlejuice where our son is it would swallow up all of the planets out past Mars and because it's so massive it means that it goes through a very different sort of life experience than our Sun will which brings us to why we're talking about beetlejuice right now. In recent weeks astronomers have noticed that beetlejuice. It's no longer appears to be one of the brightest stars. In the night sky there were sort of quick reports put out from people who monitor and observe beetlejuice very frequently. Saying you know it's getting dimmer and dimmer it's starting to get closest to the dentist we've seen there's also big dedicated networks of amateur astronomers that keep very close track of the brightness of stars like beetlejuice and they started noticing the same thing when we called Emily. She was preparing for this big astronomy conference in Hawaii Hawaii and she thought there would be a lot of buzz there about the dimming of beetlejuice beetlejuice is going to be a big topic. I'm sure especially family. She told us a Ryan is her. Favourite Constellation Constellation. But actually you don't have to be a pro astronomer to see what's happening with beetlejuice you can look for yourself at one point. beetlejuice was one of the brightest rytas stars in Orion. But now not so much so if you were to go up and look at it tonight it's dimmer than the star in Iran's right knee which is Ri- Joel and it's about equal in brightness to Ryan's other shoulder which is a star named Bella tricks so the fact that we can see with our eyes. That got noticeably dimmer really caught a lot of people's attention and then spiralled as just a wow. This is a really interesting and compelling thing changing sort of on our timescale in the night sky. So what's going on as we'll explain with help from Emily Leveque. Scientists have a few theories for why BETA disappear so dim and in the most dramatic explanation. Is that this star could be about to die. What's known as going SUPERNOVA? It would look pretty epic. I'm Emily Kwong filling informatics format today. This is short wave the daily science podcast from NPR. So here's the thing there's been quite a bit of speculation that the reason beetlejuice getting dimmer is that it's about to go Supernova. That's the big explode e end to the lifespan of a massive star and while dimming can mean that's about to happen for reasons that will get into it's not the most likely scenario for beetlejuice but first we had to clear up something with astronomer. Emily Leveque is this very cool star named after the tenth highest biased grossing film of One thousand nine hundred eighty eight. I'm pretty sure that it's the other way around. The spelling is different and sometimes here astronomers pronounce a little bit differently. Bentley will say beetlejuice instead of beetlejuice. Three times But it's actually derived from a Arabic name and there's I think some disagreement on what exactly it means but either means the arm of Orion or the hand of Orion or the hand of the hunter because the total constellation is looks like a person hunting. It's the only can I be honest. The only constellation I can ever successfully identify. Isn't that belt. It's very telling so I'll admit it's the easiest constellation and for me to identify to This is one of those. Well kept secrets of astronomy. A lot of us are embarrassingly bad at finding things in the night sky because we're used to looking at things that are so so dim that you can't see them with their own eyes and our telescopes have amazing computers. That can help us find things so we'll occasionally go out and look up and do just what a lot of people doing fine like that familiar. Little Line of three or another easy constellation to get our bearings A.. Let's talk about how astronomers such as yourself people who really study V. Stars have noticed something different about how beetlejuice looks in the night sky. How does it look different? So I will say we've been monitoring the brightness of beetlejuice for decades its and we've been measuring its brightness very frequently and we've seen its brightness change with times we've watched it get brighter and dimmer. This just caught people's attention because it was close close to the dentist that beetlejuice has ever been and what could dimming like this indicate so our guest right now is that what we're seeing is a combination of a few behaviors that we see in red super giants and that we've seen before in beetlejuice. The just happened to be coinciding. So we know that stars like beetlejuice. Have big support of boiling convective cells near their surfaces seal sort of get a bright hot spot and a slightly dimmer cool spot and it's entirely possible that this dimming is due in part to those convective cells we also know that stars like beetlejuice will actually shed off some mass from their outer layer. sobel sort popoff. The outermost layers of the star when that mass hits the Interstellar medium. It'll condense into what we call dust and dust dust in space kind of does. What does here it blocks light and gets in the way and can be a little bit of a nuisance but it would make star look a little bit dimmer if it then had a little veil of dust around it we also know that stars like this can pulse eight a little bit so their outer layers will sort of squeeze in puff out just due to instabilities in those layers and that'll also affect how bright the star looks so? I think the current guests is that we're seeing a couple different behaviors in beetlejuice. That on their own aren't too to strange. That just happened to be coinciding to make the star look especially dim so just as a thought experiment say beetlejuice is going to go Supernova. Br Nova how would we know. And what would it look like. So first of all the light that we're seeing from beetlejuice was emitted by the star about six hundred and fifty years ago. beetlejuice is a six hundred and fifty light years from Earth so when the light emerges it comes toward us as fast as it can but it's moving at the speed of light so looking at Beta Jesus a little bit like looking back in time to what the Star was actually doing six hundred and fifty years ago in terms of whether we will see beetlejuice go Supernova in our lifetimes beetlejuice and other massive stars like this kind of follow a live fast die young philosophy so they live about ten million with an m years beetlejuice in particular we know is moving into a later stage of its life because it is so big and so red but that could mean that we still have one hundred thousand years before it dies and produces a Supernova If it did though say we all went outside tomorrow and we we were seeing the light arrive from babies dying as a Supernova six hundred and fifty years minus day sometime in the Middle Ages. Let's say okay it. It would look pretty epic we have some records of other SUPERNOVA. That happened in the Milky Way and their appearance parents is incredibly dramatic. What we would see is Bagel juice getting brighter and brighter? Because we'd be seeing the incredibly bright signature of the SUPERNOVA explosion explosion. It would actually get so bright that if beetlejuice was up during the day we'd be able to see it during the daytime alongside the sun and it would last for for weeks and I think that if beetlejuice were to go supernova tomorrow and we saw it at night it would be comparable in brightness. I think to the full moon. ooh Wow we'd be able to see are shadows based on the light from the SUPERNOVA. Okay so what would it look like for beetlejuice more of a going collapsing inward on itself. I I am more of them. Exploding outward with star debris scattering across the universe. What what does it look like for Adl juice? It's a good question in it. We think that it's a bit of both both okay initial disruption comes when the core of the star collapses and depending on the type of star. And how much mass is in that core. It'll collapse into to a neutron star or a black hole after that collapse all the outer layers of the star come falling in toward the core and then bounce back off in a sort of rebound shock and that shock is what we see as a Supernova and what we would call a supernova because we see this outward blast of material you know new gas slamming into the interstellar medium and getting really bright and it looks to us like an explosion but it originally did start as a collapse. It's why I try to avoid saying that a star exploded as a SUPERNOVA. Because it's not to be the pedantic scientist it's not quite the first thing that happened in the star. But it's a bit Moroccan role as a turn of phrase. Oh yeah how would you so. This star is a part of your favorite constellation or Ryan and how would you feel if if indeed it we're we're going SUPERNOVA. I would be psyched. And I think some people expect that we would be very sad but it's a very exciting citing transition to watch and this would be one of the best studied stars we have available to US producing a Supernova. which right now is a process that we're you're still trying to understand we'd still be able to see the Supernova as it happened and then faded away these stars also leave behind what we call supernova remnants? So they're these these beautiful multicolored gas clouds that show us the dissipating material from the star. So it would be this amazing font of data and new ways to understand stars so I think it would be incredibly exciting.

Beetlejuice Emily Leveque Ryan Orion V. Stars Emily Kwong University University Of Washi Hawaii Hawaii United States Scientist NPR RI Bentley Iran Bella Joel Middle Ages
Black hole breakthrough: NASA captures its first-ever black hole tearing a star to shreds

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Black hole breakthrough: NASA captures its first-ever black hole tearing a star to shreds

"It's a space show like no other NASA satellites of spotted one of the most rare and violent events in the universe a black cold gobbling up a star shredding it to pieces it's an event that scientists believe happens every ten to one hundred thousand years a black hole is shredding a star bit by bit NASA satellite telescopes are giving space researchers and fans a chance to watch as it unfolds NASA scientist nickel Colin explains just how far away this is white it traveled three hundred seventy five million years to get to us because that's how far away the galaxy is that the black hole lives in this event called a title disruption was first discovered occurring in

Colin Nasa Scientist Three Hundred Seventy Five Mil One Hundred Thousand Years
How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:35 min | 1 year ago

How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

"An asteroid as large as a football field is just flying past the earth with astronomers not detecting acting it until literally just a day before its closest approach. The giants space rock thought to be up to one hundred and thirty meters wide came within sixty five thousand kilometers of earth on july the twenty fifth in nominal terms. That's about as close as it gets. The asteroids being catalogued as twenty nine. Okay the european paint space agency says this near earth objects close approach illustrates the need for more eyes on the sky was able to observe the asteroid just before its fly by requesting requesting to separate telescopes in the international scientific optical network is on to take images of space rock the observations allow strana missed the determine the asteroids exact back position and trajectory yesterday it was i the technical the day before its closest approach by the southern observatory veneer of asteroids research observations of twenty nine thousand nine okay with an independently confirmed by other observatories including the chiba radio telescope in puerto rico and third telescope in the ice on network following following its discovery with knowledge of the astros would have been in the past based on its current course and by manually searching for it by existing images were found in the past is is an atlas skysurfer archives it turns out birth said they had in fact captured the asteroid in the weeks before it's ultra close encounter with earth but the space space rock was moving so slowly it appears to move just a tiny amount between the images and was therefore not recognized as a near earth object neo and hence the seriousness of the threat <unk>. It wasn't appreciated of course astronomers now of an attracting thousands of asteroids across the solar system so why was this one discovered so late will unfortunately originally currently there's no single obvious reason apart from its slow apparent motion across the sky before it's close approach twenty nineteen okay travels in highly elliptical orbit taking it from within the open of venus out too well beyond that of mas this means the time it spends near earth and therefore time it's detectable both current telescope capabilities is relatively short modules towards the size of twenty nine. Okay i relatively common throughout the solar system but they impact on average only about once every one hundred thousand years or so still an asteroid like that hitting a major city or urban area would cause major devastation destruction based from its current orbital path through the solar system the asteroid one come close to the game for at least the next two hundred years. I'm stewart gary. You're listening space

Giants Astros Stewart Gary Southern Observatory Strana Chiba Puerto Rico Sixty Five Thousand Kilometers One Hundred Thousand Years Two Hundred Years Thirty Meters Twenty Fifth
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Please fuck and feeble with her takes the photo, and it's game over you got all of Europe. Got it. Josie. L. I was fucking DM. The fuck out of him and be like, yo. I'm sure he does diem and be like, yo. Let's fuck in play fief. Let's play twitch people because people flee for that's my strategy Brickley. Draymond green leaves done with the NBA finals. He's come into the office. Wouldn't play MBA jams. I'm gonna play people in like the sport that they do onto which old school because I don't play the shit's fucking double dribble from intendo. I played it today, but it's a new control and I'm like, oh, you know. That's cool. Tony Hawkes fucking skateboard with Tony hawk. It's so much coming for you. You just need to fuck it strike. One song away. I believe that. I mean you guys like I have I'm always very careful with my overly aggressive like one song way, because I've empathy. Like some people like, you know, the way they think of like, like it's tough like I feel like I'm on artist as a businessman, so I get like somebody who carefully curates fifteen songs in their head. It makes this perfect fucking story. I just know that ninety nine point nine percent of the time it doesn't for the end user, it does when they tell them what it was about. Contest. Yeah. If you could just live on, it's like human album, and, you know, it's a great album, then she goes on fucking BT or fucking like you know, a documentary or like fucking on the internet. And it's like, oh, this the whole part of this album was like, what I was going through during this week, and you're like, oh, but, like, not really like he was like you see where I'm going, it's like Monday morning quarterbacking. Whereas like if you just put out like. Like one song away. I just don't. I can I will never waver from this because I know him, right? It's what the internet's about in the same way that you should have made music videos in one thousand nine hundred forty four thousand nine hundred eighty seven and a lot of people didn't because they thought it was giving away free music, and it was taken away from sales. I think you should make as many songs you've got in your heart for Spotify, and apple music in as many different ways as possible the. People won't use it again. Not play the game like also washed lessons at Cowan bell was like build such demand by still not like listen. Adele, does that one hundred thousand years ago. Would Adele would Adele do that in twenty eighteen? Ios they'll get overnights. Who single day from an impossible to get it for this is the end. Finally got the one says says push. Everything gets it. So he's still one song meet to get one hundred percent people trying to get fancy before their fancy. Raises right. Does spark. Let's get a little bit of this. A decision comes with Mongol Madison. Yep. Was for just to break out of that macro. You think it's. If she trusts you based on that question, she's got let you do one thing that looks like micromanage, and then she's got a see stop that scary. I just got an like tell us they shut up with this was like this is Florida's Turner presence, but no time to waste and wasted toward when a few, by the way, it's also like it's a lot easier to trust when you're not the product that you. So it's harder. I get it like don't fucking like let my like it's hard. I do like like I won't even edit this, this whole blog. I wouldn't even look at it. Really? But, but, you know, when you're the product, it's harder than like anything else..

Adele Tony hawk Europe NBA Josie Tony Hawkes Cowan bell Spotify Florida Turner apple one hundred thousand years one hundred percent nine percent
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 1 year ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WLAC

"Constitution of man. I say man, I mean woman also the constitution of the human being what makes up human being? With. The we know we have a physical body. We have an emotional nature. We have a mental equipment, and but. Three fold human being that we know. Is really only a vehicle for a high aspect which will. Coli the truth sales higher. So full. Missile. And and then the so itself is a vehicle for yet. High aspects Michael spirit and through a process of reincarnation life after life to live the soul, gradually, perfected vehicle. So that they can express its food define quality through the personality. And then there's a higher one month where the the spirit can eventually expected so fully through the now sold infused personality. And so the aim is to bring these three aspects into complete at one month. Now, a muster is one who has achieved that. One who has achieved mastery of himself in Mojo, self and. So the mice is up old new human beings have been through the whole human experience. Themselves, and there's a group of them who who stay behind to help the rest of us to that same achievement. Where are they are they scattered throughout the planet? Well, up to about one hundred thousand years ago, they lived outwardly among among men the masses of time. But since then.

Michael one month one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Every Little Thing

Every Little Thing

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Every Little Thing

"Hey it's floor up we have something different for you today and i hope you'll like it i was on the road last week at the aspen ideas festival moderating conversation about the brilliance of birds and i have to say the facts i learned kind of blew my mind so the conversation was with jennifer ackerman the author of the new york times bestseller the genius of birds and alex taylor biologist who studies new caledonian crows these are the toolmakers of the world and after talking with them i cannot look at birds in the same way and i think after listening to this chat you will feel the same or i hope so okay so here's some highlights from that conversation which by the way took place outside so you might hear the wind chiming in occasionally jennifer i wanna start with you when people use the term bird brain it's not a compliment so has our perspective on bird cleverness is it shifting yes so the misperception of birds is stupid really is rooted in a misunderstanding of the nature and anatomy of the bird brain so we used to think that bird brains were so small and primitive they were really capable of only the simplest mental processes and most of them instinctive birds basically thought of as pecking autumn atanas well now we know that that is not true birds can think logically and reason on par with young children they can solve complex problems they can make an use their own tools they can count they can understand basic principles of physics cause and effect they can communicate in ways that resemble language and they can pass along cultural traditions whether it's modes of song or styles toolmaking and birds do all of this with the brain rain so small it could fit inside not so burs in fact have cognitive skills that are in many ways comparable to our primate relatives and less so to their reps billion ones lx us study like i feel like they're like the brainiacs of the bird world they're often trotted out as the really smart birds getting introduces to the to the new caledonian crows so until recently they were the only species of that we knew that both used and may tools we've just discovered in the last couple of years that wyan quote also does as well this is just really where we don't see any other species of doing it in general toll use into a manufacturer pretty rare across the animal kingdom on it's not just the crows us makes tools when my colleagues govern hunts thought i really paying attention to these clothes back in the early nineteen ninety s it keeps them seeing them flounder color dona won't just holding sticks they will holding what looked like sticks with little hooks on the thing that is really surprising about that is the hooks a kind of a human invention they might seem quite simple to malta minds but not even chimpanzees invented hoax and when you look at the record you see the hooks up around one hundred thousand years ago and yet for some reason hey we have this kind of small quo and a couple of ireland's of the pacific carving wouldn't hooks aren't they bent but what they do is if you imagine junction between two branches so the crows will chop off one under the brunch here and then they will call that junction dell they'll take bach they'll take a bit of the wood and they'll turn the the junction into a functioning coke and the only species that show any type of tool crafting around tongues and chimpanzees but it's only the new caledonian crows go safaa us to make hooks so these these grubs they called vertebral cool in new caledonia they're about the size of your your finger not particularly tasty if you eat them yourself but the crows the loved him doing is making little holes and big wad and logs and then they're essentially fishing for these these groups that trying to hook the sides of the body with with the hook and and get the food out one thing to mention about those grabs i think is that there are super super bitch food source so they're really worth inventing for yeah the super behind right so what are you looking at in your aviary what are what are you testing for so we've been really focused on china understand how the crows think in particular if they have any kind of specialized intelligence because of these really read tool making abilities.

one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In the fifties and sixties june gloom again in the morning in sunny and warm tomorrow attempts in the eighties and nineties right now seventy one in dana point to seventy five and aliso viejo eighty four diamond bar and eightyseven in van is we lead local live from the kfi twenty four hour newsroom i'm debra mark john and ken show john kobylt ken chiampou kfi am six perfume on tonight do but you can smell it all the way over there the mood to come in and how come hang with me i'm lonely to me too me too me too i mean to get in there we do not go round sniffing each other if i asked for permission she gave me permission not appropriate okay maxine waters that as you may not know she's running for reelection i mean there is a chance to have it removed of course she's been in congress since the beginning of time is that right yes she's been over ten over one hundred thousand years she has been in congress and she wins every year she won the june fifth primaries seventy one percent of the vote number two in the primary is a republican omar navarro and he's got to have a rematch with her because they were the top two yeah now she's in the news this week for what happened over the weekend at a rally at the federal building in westwood with a small crowd cheering her on she decided to follow up at the stories concerning the president's press secretary sarah sanders who said she got thrown out of a restaurant in virginia because the owner of that restaurant done like trump's policies and then of course we had the head of homeland security kirsten nielsen who got arrested eventually to leave a mexican restaurant because protesters came in heckled oh they've shown up at our home too so you know waters thought this is a great thing basically she didn't cite those two examples we know that's where she was coming from she said you have to you have to get out there you have to make it your voice known you have to basically confront these people throw them out of places you get out and you create a crowd and you push back on them and you tell them they're not welcome anymore anywhere which is very close to inciting violence and asking the crowd commit felonies because when you create a crowd and push back you were creating an intimidation atmosphere she said on msn they're gonna absolutely harass them until they decide that they're going to tell the president no i can't hang with you she wants us wrong this is unconscionable can't keep doing this to children by the way this led a number of top democrats including the leaders of the senate and house pelosi consumer to distance themselves from nutty maxine waving their arms at maxine it's like no no no no we must remain civil we'll because they're gonna get it oh cory booker to distance himself from the tactics water is endorsed he said he supports confronting members of the trump administration but it should be done in wasted recognize the dignity of even those you oppose some trump supporters on social media called maxine waters a domestic terrorist paul ryan is asking for her to apologize and retract her comments he's a speaker biology is by the way she's been an issue a fake apology please she's been in politics is nineteen seventy seven fourteen years in the california assembly you know what year she was elected to congress nineteen ninety although rohrabacher's longer i guess by a couple of years but that's how long she's been he's he's still makes sense the omar navarro he is running as a republican in maxine waters congressional district omar navarro welcome to the john.

nineteen seventy seven fourtee one hundred thousand years seventy one percent twenty four hour
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Oh no once you will want you bulls floreal by lunch troubles you got so excited when i said jason nathanson andy i gotcha i i haven't stumped all of you in a really long time lunch here's the best thing about this lunch of fact lunch ables the what gave me the idea was it was part of an uber fact but it was this the guy who invented lunch ables won't let his own kids eat the lunch avowals and when they asked one of his kids about it she goes no he won't let us we eat healthy right roles are still a top seller of craft gene a whole time all right fooled all the yam fast jetta last one all right guys due to the activities of human beings in our rate of making animals extinct scientists project in one hundred about one hundred thousand years the largest animal on earth land manam land mammal rabi what's i take a guess what will be the largest land mammals like a whale doesn't can whales don't count the largest land mammal after humans or done doing our thing what do you think craig i don't think it'll could would it be bigger than a jury would it draft will be around probably not in this context right i gorilla maybe a monkey what what do you hippos rhino i l it's almost thing elephant elements almost stick now i don't think it's an elephant bear grizzly bear.

jason nathanson craig one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

AM 590 The Answer

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

"Hi there hi my question is after death there's a couple of passages one says with the body present with the lord and another one says that the dead show rise in the air and we'll all meet him in in the cloud come true yes my question is really where do you go once you die okay automatically present with the lord or all right you raise a good question why does the bible say that the dating christ will be raised second coming if when a person dies they immediately go to heaven and then another question comes up while if somebody dies and they on saved do they go to hell even before the judgment takes place because the judgment takes place at the end of the world so how does this all work well if you look at the bible death is the reverse of life and if you go back to genesis and you read about how god created mankind in the beginning it says god formed man speaking of adam out of the dust of the earth and god breathed into him the breath of life and man became a living soul that's the king james version so what makes life it is the physical body made from the dust plus the spirit of god the breath of life that gives us life when a person dies the body returns to the earth as it was and the breath of life that spark of life that comes from god returns to god but that's not the conscious thinking being that returns to god the person just simply sleeps as the bible speaks of death is being asleep unconscious sleep jesus comes and you have the resurrection now what about the verse that says absent from the body praise the lord well when somebody dies the very last thought that they have before they closed their eyes in death if that person is thinking about jesus and they surrendered their life to christ when they closed their eyes in death the very next thing they see is jesus coming in the clouds of glory now resurrected they don't even realize that one hundred thousand years might have passed from death to the resurrection to them it's immediate jesus is there they coming so for a person who dies the.

adam one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WTMA

"He was sort of like a lord jim type conrad novel fearless pirate like within three minutes he says to me he's not feeling well as foot hurts he stepped on something on the beach within five minutes he couldn't walk within ten minutes we had to carry him back to the boat luckily i had antibiotics with me because i always carry out the bionics powerful ones with me on those trips and gave them to turn out daddy had stepped on a poisonous carl that is right under the sand now he he was a poet he said i stepped on a ghost to bit me now they were you know they buried their dead there in the sand near the shore i don't know if you know that they're islands now what does it have to do a different nation well here's what has to do with definition the day before we went on that boat and landed on the acela islands i went and saw a card reader in fiji because i did it every every time before a trip i wanted to see what she would say it was just a tradition the fijians is very strong believers in which craft if you wanna put it that way i mean they have lived in those islands for what one hundred thousand years before white man came they kind of know how to live off the land it's not like naked and afraid the naked and not afraid they built a whole civilization in those islands they'll sit and cry about the rain coming down so they built a whole civilization part of their civilization is their material culture parliament's a physical culture part of it's a spiritual culture as anthropologists understand and so part of their culture was believing in spirits so what does that have to do with you listening to me on this rainy day in san francisco around america i after all i'm not talking about gee i'm not talking about hillary clinton then you're not hearing about uranium one you're not hearing about bill clinton senate selling us out to the chinese selling all of our rare metals and the manufacturing ability to the chinese you're not hearing about his ex secretary of defense william cohen who was acting as a traitor right now working deals in china along with madeleine half bright and so many others who sold us down the river which is why of course america i is so.

fiji parliament san francisco america gee hillary clinton senate secretary william cohen china conrad bill clinton madeleine one hundred thousand years three minutes five minutes ten minutes
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WJR 760

"He was sort of like a lord jim type a conrad novel fearless pirate like within three minutes he says to me he's not feeling well as foot hurts he stepped on something on the beach within five minutes he couldn't walk within ten minutes we had to carry him back to the boat luckily i had antibiotic with me because i always carry a powerful ones be on on those trips and gave them to turn out daddy had stepped on a poisonous carl that is right under the sand now he was a poet he said i stepped on a ghost to bit me now they weren't you know they buried their dead there in the sand near the shore i don't know if you know that they're islands now what does that have to do with deviation well here's what it has to do with nation the day before we went on that boat and landed on the acela islands i went and saw a card reader in fiji because i did it every every time before a trip i wanted to see what she would say it was just a tradition the fijians is very strong believers in witchcraft if you wanna put it that way i mean they have lived in those islands for what one hundred thousand years before white man came they kind of know how to live off the land it's not like naked and afraid the naked and not afraid they built a whole civilization in those islands they'll sit and cry about the rain coming down so they built a whole civilization but part of their civilization is their material culture parliament's a physical culture parliament's a spiritual culture as anthropologists understand and so part of their culture was believing in spirits so what does that have to do with you.

fiji parliament conrad one hundred thousand years three minutes five minutes ten minutes
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Important If True

Important If True

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on Important If True

"Oh god damnit well fortunately i'll have infinite children's we'll be able to spread the glitter out among all of them and eventually it'll be gone sorry sorry can you tell the marbled crayfish known for its notable glitter pattern which reduces with its offspring but they always seem to have at least one glitter on there and that's how you can tell the marble in differentiating yeah they're all clones but they fascinating ly have these unique glitter patterns from when they rolled around in one man's apartment so the thing that saved this from being completely from leaving me totally at terrified in sort of fatalistic about the whole thing was an observation site scientific observation made in the article that actually completely makes sense but i would not have occurred to me as a you know non biologist which is that because every single instance of this entire species is a clone and thus identical without sexual reproduction they don't adapt they don't evolve gene pool is literally doing no diverse station yeah yeah and so when if a meanwhile sort of you know viruses bacteria any kind of foreign agent those of course do adapt an evolved and so if a you know parasite or disease or something ends up adopting to target the marble crayfish the mobile crave is will not that species will not be able to do anything to combat it because they can't genetically volve over time so presumably eventually but i mean we might find a way though right we'll the things in the one of the things in the article signed was like i mean you know they might only last one hundred thousand years or so which inevitably terms is not long that's you know i mean millions and millions and millions of years that life is existed on earth that's not a big deal but like for us humans don't even know if.

one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Dr have there been other epochs in the life of humankind where there have been challenges insults calamities that rewarded elasticity have we already had winnowing out earlier in our life is a species where we faced maybe the kind of sudden change in in the nature of the challenge so that we as a species of already had some experience with this well that's a good question the one can ask why why do we have this ability of loosened early what what would have brought it on and actually human beings are not the most physically fit animals every animal has its own ecological niche and it's good at something and our our strength is not our strength that's not our physical strength it's not our speed it's our mind and in particular it's our exploratory and inventive and innovative qualities that allowed us to make tools that allowed us to find new sources of water or be aware of new sources of water and food because we explored rather than sitting and depending on the sources at always worked and what happened was about one hundred thousand years ago there was a great come active catastrophe climate change that that cause big problems for the human species and our numbers dwindled from dreno down to almost nothing some say there may be a thousand left some say hundred some say dozens and humans at live than they were in africa had trouble finding food and water to the climate change and only certain groups survived and they were the ones that had a certain variation of a certain gene that we now knows called dr deform which controls a dopamine regulation you're the reward system in your brain and those people who are more exploratory in love new things and and and life change or more apt to go around and find other places to live and other environments and they they were.

africa dopamine one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dream up and build new observatories a whole new generation observatories on the ground in space i mean what could be more glorious than listening to the big bang itself wait wait gravitational waves could show us the big bang uh yes yeah can happen he could absolutely the early universe started with a big bang we've all heard the and in that big bang lots and lots of the elements were produced hydrogen and helium filling up the universe and hot hydrogen glos and absorbs light so what that means is will never see the big bang itself because he lowers was so hot that it was glowing like a candle and as a result we can't see passive can't he threw it so the universes opaque to us from one hundred thousand years back to beginning but gravitational waves go through everything they go straight through the glowing hot gas of the early universe allow yeah and so what they let us do is see back way past that barrier in time and let us in principle touch back to the very earliest moments of everything around us e you know al unser people here gravitational waves they're like yeah know what like what's the big deal because it's it doesn't feel real to all of us right so what does this even tell us about where where we come from or or where we're going oh my god it tells you all of the most important things in the world so to start it tells you wear the universes going it's going to span and expanding expand and get really cold and lonely and big and empty yeah that's really horrible it also tells you that that's not going to happen for extraordinarily long time so don't worry about it too shots that's a good thing it tells you that everything around you came from a big bang and then stars cooking up lots of stuff like carbon and oxygen nitrogen and all the things that make up the.

one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

The Infinite Monkey Cage

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

"Perfect styled show some people would like to feel powerful but first what we can't shut the volcanoes down said that's off the table are we can do something about what we're doing to the planet actually carbadox has a really interesting one from a volkan logicoop perspective of the knu perspective is because it comes out really really deep in the earth's crust compared to the other gases that we have in magma's so it's much more difficult for us as vulcanologist to measure but we're doing a better a better job at accounting for if you like all the carbon dioxide coming out of the world's volcanoes i was still nowhere near the amount of carbon dioxide that humans activities a pretty out into the atmosphere said we knocked off the hook i'm afraid and how big it shifts five did these the big volcanic eruptions calls in the climate temporarily if we look at the last one hundred thousand years or so there are a number of volcanic eruptions of being considerably larger than than things that we've seen in in modern times and these are up shins can change change the climate not not from the carbon dioxide emissions but from the sulfur dioxide emissions which end up oxidizing in the stratosphere and forming minute particles of sulfuric acid that can into sat some of the incoming sunlight so there's a cool a net cooling at the earth surface and a so this is something we see with very large events like krakatau owing 1883 eruption of tumbler in 1815 but if we go we look on a on geological timescales.

carbadox one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Secrets of and marine world that was locked away for more than one hundred thousand years take katrin linzer who is leading the mission says the creatures they might find we'll have to adapt to new conditions for the first time in a long long time it's able to get some light it's able to get fighter plankton the start of the chain coming down and let fill all change the system the animals that live underneath need to change how they take their feet up what they are able to feet on new species swelled me fame that i love to process the green food the fight plankton and that might out competely animals set will giving underneath sea ice before the makers of a new movie identification of the peter rapid books have apologized over the treatment of a character and the phone with food allergies in one seeing the character who has a black pre allergy is pelted with him by a gang of abates he has to inject himself with madson campaigners representing children with alledges have called for a boycott of sony pictures bbc news welcome too hard talk on the bbc world service with me steven saka my guest today is a loyal minister in the government of a leader turkey's prime minister red chip tie it at one who demands total loyalty mehmet chimp shakes is a remarkable story of success against the odds his parents were poor and illiterate kurds from southeast turkey he's shown at school won a scholarship to study in the uk and then built a successful career in economics and international finance in his thirties who began to build a political career in a country where kurds have long struggled to have the rights recognised his loyalty to miss the other one and his akp islamists party proved to be a savvy career move mimic chinshek served as an economy minister then minister of finance before being named as deputy prime minister in turkey's current government he is a highprofile englishspeaking defender of policies which have roused allom and condemnation in the west namely systematic repression of dissent in the wake of a failed coup attempt in 2016 and an assertive military stands in the region which is seen turkish forces mount a.

katrin linzer turkey prime minister uk akp islamists party chinshek allom madson sony bbc one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Wait wait gravitational waves could show us the big dang oh yes yet can happen he could absolutely out of the early universe started with a big bang we've all heard the and even that big bang lots and lots of the elements were produced hydrogen and helium filling up the universe and hot hydrogen glows and absorbs light so what that means is will never see the big bang itself because he literally was so hot that it was glowing like a candle and as a result we can't see passive can't see through it so the universes opaque to us from one hundred thousand years back to beginning but gravitational waves go through everything they go straight through the glowing hot gas of the early universe allow yeah and so what they let us do is see back way past that barrier in time and let us in principle touch back to the very earliest moments of everything around us you know alan some people here a gravitational waves near like you know you know what like what's the big deal because it's it doesn't feel real to all of us right so what does this even tell us about where where we come from or or where we're going oh my god it tells you all of the most important things in the world so to start it tells you wear the universes going it's going to span and expand and expand and get really cold and lonely and big an empty yeah that's really horrible it also tells you that that's not going to happen for extraordinarily long time so don't worry about it to shuts that's a good thing it tells you that everything around you came from a big bang and then stars cooking up lots of stuff like carbon and oxygen nitrogen and all the things that make up the food you eat except for all the metals in the tree stuff which came from the collision of two neutrons stars which is completely insane because think about this where you came from.

alan one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"The world so if you're a man it means you had the y chromosome of your father you're grandfathered greatgrandfather but mutations occur along if you go back far enough and i guess by tracing the sequence of mutations you could then trace the family tree right that's right that's right dna is a very very long molecule and although ours cellular machinery is very good at coughing it when we have children occasionally we make a mistake a little spelling errors single letter change typically um in the dna sequence and win those changes are passed on to create a lineup to said if you share a changed with someone you must share an ancestry at some point in the past and so it's these changes that have accumulated over time that we use of the tools for studying the past with dna okay now let's go back chronologically uh concerning the evolution of modern in humans and migration patterns many anthropologists believed that about one hundred thousand years ago plus or minus tens of thousands of years but about one hundred thousand years ago modern humans who look pretty much like us you give them a haircut a threepiece suit and put them on wall street and they look like pretty much all the other barbarians on a monitoring so let's say you now trace the lineage because at that point an out of africa thing happened migrations took place out of africa of modern humans so now trace for us what happens one hundred thousand years ago as humans began to leave africa well it really you've got it the history of migration out of africa is actually much more complicated than that uh you've got to distinguish in this case between anatomically modern humans people who look pretty much like us and people who act like us people who are behaviorally modern uh and given that our species is kind of created by our brains we are homeless sapiens wisemen it's really the behaviorally modern humans that were interested in so with one hundred thousand years ago you're absolutely right there individuals in africa and shortly thereafter just outside of africa and the middle east who look pretty much like us but they're not acting like us they haven't gone through the change in behaviour which led to something we call the upper paleolithic and archaeology a change in the way we interacted with the world.

africa one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Bizarre about what you're saying is that space is making more space accelerated by this notional thing dark energy and when it makes more space the space it makes has more dark energy to make more space to make more space expand more quickly so it's like it's getting energy from no within well yeah the energies can of hidden in the from the word go space itself this is saying has an energy as a negative energy right so you in fact you know you go be careful about whether you take the energy way o giving it to the system so you're taking energy away by producing more space but then nuts pumped into the acceleration of planets than you know whatever verse galaxies on the edge edges of the universe he gives the suggestion as to how we might be able to find dark matter how all scientists trying to interrogate dark energy to discoveries nature we look at the afterglow of the big bang as cool the cosmic microwave background it's all allrounders in the sky and small variations in its temperature tell you about what was happening in the very early universe because that lights travelled since june one hundred thousand years after the big banks since a long time ago that light encodes some of the secrets of the universe there's a technical thing you can look at very particular bits of the light they've gone through a gravitational potential and then come out you can do very precise measurements to see whether actually this acceleration was just to check whether it was happening but actually getting to the nub of really what's causing it i don't think we're very close to that yet the works will theoretical and there aren't very many observational ways of telling the different theories upon has one theoritical physicists said you have to be very cautious of maths and theoretical physics because you can prove anything you like on paper actually tsa whether or not israeli manifest up there in the sky this is a different matter when you agree katie i certainly rigged yeah because few quick fat questions for you mean in ecocide.

ecocide katie i one hundred thousand years
"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred thousand years" Discussed on All In The Mind

"For this toys you cannot just shares institution because then becomes either a totalitarian system nor we know what you should daunting and behave and there and if you don't like it have to eliminate you that doesn't work we went through that so you have to begin at the level of the defeated india has to desires changing and spend the time to change for that's exactly what mine training is about and brent gusty city as well as caught up latif size now you can change if you train you can lead to play bag mean don't you can learn to be more compassionate and our touristic is the same process is training and your brain will change your will change it will change functionality structurally you'll be a different person that's all so that's possible now when a critical mass of individuals change their behaviour their gore their intention their outlook their way of being there where this each other and not as a everyone for themselves but we are together on the same bald critical mass dan tips over a change of cultures and culture evolution of cultures dowling in process but this much faster than gene says some researchers have shown so instead of having to wait for one hundred thousand years for avenue more twisted gene you can have an while twisty culture spee selected by british and why is quite simple now if you have a group of arteries people they really liked work together by nature they are still there corporative the love what really working with each other so as a group devil use advantage of a i won't save in a group of what the collection of selfish people that actually kicks each other's leg all the time so has the community wishes not real communities a bunch of selfish individuals if the altruistic get their act together they have a strong advantage so in fact.

india brent gusty one hundred thousand years