35 Burst results for "One Hundred Fifty Years"

Unpacking Israeli History

Israel Story

03:23 min | Last month

Unpacking Israeli History

"Back in twenty seventeen, the New York Times published an article about Amadeo Garcia Garcia. The. Last Living Speaker of the top story. Once, spoken for centuries by thousands of members of an Amazon tribe Madeo, the sole survivor, and the last person on earth to know the language his tried which had lived uncontactable for centuries along Amazon River in Peru slowly died out due to the weapons diseases brought to them from intruders when Avodados brother passed away his last remaining relative the missionary asked Amodio how he felt. Adele responded in the broken Spanish that he had. The only way he had to communicate with outside world he said. It's now over for us. Why? Dale no longer has some to speak to and when you have no one else to speak to, you will lose your language. That's why was over for Amodio. Losing a language is like losing an identity, a culture history. I don't mean to sound over dramatic here but losing a language is really losing oneself. Looking back at the history of the Jewish people that Jews faced a very similar problem. And the reality today is that over the last one, hundred, fifty years, a modern miracle took place for almost two thousand years Hebrew the language of the Torah the Bible and so much Jewish literature you know the prayers was mostly reserved for the ritual. And now. Jews. Over the world's beekeeper, a language that was essentially dead as a spoken language. Something like this has never happened in history of language. The. Fact that the majority of Jews around the world speak Hebrew today is not something to take for granted. There are approximately fourteen point, seven, million Jews in the world and six point seven, million of them live in Israel where Hebrew is the national language. And many hundreds of thousands outside of Israel, speak language as well learning it in. Jewish. Day schools and summer camps or at home. Short. The Bible prayers and religious texts were written and read in Hebrew. Literally nobody spoke in daily life for like almost two thousand years. So How'd an almost extinct biblical language reemerge as spoken language in the span of only a few decades? Was Zionism that deserves the credit Certain. Figure named Elliot's Ben Yehuda. And what is it always obvious that Hebrew would be the national language of the Jewish state. Let's jump back in time to learn about the history of the Hebrew language details about the spoken language of Hebrew in ancient times are not perfect. Here's what we know. In the Bible the Jews otherwise as Hebrews spoken ancient Biblical version of. Biblical Hebrew was the spoken language of the Jews for over a thousand years. But one of the Romans destroyed the second Jewish Temple in seventy CE HEBREW AGAIN. To die. Out.

Amodio Amadeo Garcia Garcia Israel Amazon River New York Times Living Speaker Peru Adele Dale Ben Yehuda Elliot
Protesters in England topple statue of slave trader into harbor

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Protesters in England topple statue of slave trader into harbor

"In the UK a statue of slave trader Edward Colston was torn down and thrown into Bristol harbour by protesters the bronze statue was erected in eighteen ninety five more than one hundred fifty years after Colson's death in eighty eight years after Britain abolished the slave trade Colson played a key role in the royal African company of seventeenth century slave trader responsible for transporting around eighty thousand indentured people to the

UK Edward Colston Bristol Harbour Colson Britain
Houston - Former president of TSU named chancellor of Southern Illinois University

WBBM Late Morning News

00:17 sec | 5 months ago

Houston - Former president of TSU named chancellor of Southern Illinois University

"Southern Illinois University says he wants former Texas Southern University president Austin lane as the school's next chancellor Dan Mahoney recommended lane to the S. R. U. board of trustees if the board agrees lane will be the first African American chancellor in southern Illinois is one hundred fifty year

Southern Illinois University Austin Lane Dan Mahoney Illinois Texas Southern University President Trump Chancellor R. U.
Byte The Elder Sign Podcast

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

04:00 min | 5 months ago

Byte The Elder Sign Podcast

"Glenn Written Brandon Buddha host. The elder signed podcast. Who came up with the idea of doing this type of podcast? Well that's a fantastic question. And I. I think that answer might change depending on on on the setting but I think like like so many good ideas this one was was born in a bar and I think we dared to to do it and and no one blinked and so so the show is show is now happening and I urge everybody to listen to the first introductory episodes really explains what you guys. You're going to be covering and you talk about the new weird Gr- you guys talk about it at length and have a great definition and I just hope people listened to that but what I really found interesting was talking about the twenties and thirties and HP lovecraft and so many great authors Robert Howard got their start writing for essentially what was called. I guess the old pulp magazines talk about that. That was probably the beginnings of of horror and science fiction. Maybe starting to get a foothold. The little bit yeah. A lot of these guys were just writing for money. They wrote a draft and mailed it out and hope to cop published then could buy can a can of meat in love grass case or whenever they needed to live on they were writing to live and they invented a lot of tropes that we now associate with weird fiction and horror and science fiction and it was all kind of one thing. It was just coming out of these magazines. That were that. Were just on racks. That people bought read on the train and so many of these writers. Just that's what they had. That's what they did. Lovecraft is notorious for kind of living a poppers life and mailing out these stories one after the other just writing prolifically and it was a kind of lifestyle and it was the big form of entertainment for a lot of people in the in the nineteen twenties and Nineteen Thirties. He I mean what lovecraft did you know really inspired so many authors after them and even screenwriters and directors frankly they they just took up the mantle that he started came up with so much interesting stuff and developed his own mythology to that we all know in love so yeah he was he was great. I gotta ask you guys about the The selection of the different stories that you cover and we'll go into some details but you have you know stories from Robert Block where it is or the moon remorse of course lovecraft and even a know Howard of course and and even some Some more recent writers as well talk about the selection process. Because there's a lot to choose from. Yeah we're really intent on covering the whole gamut of of Weird Fiction really broadly conceived of really from the beginning of modern literature modern publishing around the eighteen hundred or so up until today and one of our real interests is in charting the way that a different people in different societies and different ages and also around the globe have responded to the the tensions and even the the traumas of their historical contexts by writing weird fiction or horror fiction or science fiction to to be airing out the things about their own world their rapidly changing world many cases that they find unsettling and to do this as kind of a real comparison that I think will will really shed a lot of light on the way that this fiction can actually be used to tell us things about their societies and by contrast in people from one hundred fifty years ago with people who are writing today and the interim period and all the way in between I think will really shed some light on that.

Lovecraft Robert Howard Glenn Robert Block Brandon Buddha HP
Giant trench being dug on New York's Hart Island to bury coronavirus victims

WBBM Afternoon News Update

01:44 min | 7 months ago

Giant trench being dug on New York's Hart Island to bury coronavirus victims

"This Good Friday has been another harrowing Friday on the front lines of the pandemic and the end to one of the deadliest weeks in modern American history tonight the death toll here in the U. S. now tops eighteen thousand with nearly half a million total confirmed cases there are encouraging signs in New York state the epicentre of the crisis with a number of new infections each day seems to be leveling off but the president's coronavirus task force is warning we have still not reached the peak of infections nationwide tonight we're also learning about a new government forecasting by The New York Times that warns hundreds of thousands more could die he stayed home guidelines are lifted at the end of this month and as we begin this Easter weekend it will be unlike any we've known instead of crowding into churches many Christians we forced to worship alone there is a lot to get to tonight and our team is standing by to cover it all we begin with molding D. in Long Island New York Mellon or as you mention other alarmingly high day of deaths across the state of New York as this virus spreads outside New York City to places like Long Island here hospitals in towns are scrambling to do just this put up field hospitals and expand their ability to treat COPD patients a chilling view from above freshly dug trenches on Hart island New York city's one hundred fifty year old public cemetery where once a week burials have turned into a five day operation among them unclaimed victims of coronavirus as the death toll soars more space is running low forcing city officials to reduce the number of days bodies will be stored we are cautiously optimistic that we are slowing the infection rate

President Trump The New York Times New York City Long Island Hart Island Long Island New York Copd
Introducing Season 2: The NRA

Gangster Capitalism

03:06 min | 7 months ago

Introducing Season 2: The NRA

"I'm standing in a crowd of twenty thousand people at a gun rally some dressed in camouflage wearing tactical gear and carrying very big guns and a lot of them are talking to me about the NRA. It's the same everywhere I go. I've been to rallies like this one gun shows and even board meetings and it's not surprising that people are talking about the NRA but what is surprising is what they're saying. The money is not being used very well. There's a lot of overspending and they're taking money from gun owners and using that kind of wind their own pockets. I am a member but I'm second guessing that at this point. I'm definitely disappointed in you. Know at some point it'll be exposed now more than ever. The future of the nation's most powerful special interest group is uncertain but one thing is clear the NRA has big problems. I am tired of dancing around this you would you please get to a microphone. Please tell us what the allegations their Hubris made them think that it was never gonNA be uncovered because they've been doing it for so long and it's all right there in black and white. It was just like this. Incestuous gangster trainwreck dumpster fire. I fled the cult before they put us in line to drink the KOOL aid. The NRA will soon have its one hundred fifty year anniversary. But this past year has rocked. The organization like none other members and employees alike are defecting and they're ready to talk. I'm driving down interstate. Sixty six and I see the building and I feel like some kind of spirit inside spoke to me and I said this is where you're going to work every cell within you feels as if you are fighting a mission. That is God's mission that you are fighting for the heart soul of America. We do one thing and we do it better than anyone else we stand we fight and by. God we win but in this big game the a lot of people getting rich on is it legal. Is it not as ethical as it not it just stirs in sodomy that this is not right for America? It was one of the things that prompted me to go

NRA America
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:57 min | 8 months ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"A one hundred fifty year sentence to the house overwhelmingly passed an eight billion dollar emergency spending bill to battle the corona virus outbreak the Senate is expected to do the same perhaps as early as today at three the number of coronavirus cases in New York continues to grow most of those infected live in Westchester WCBS says Kevin Rincon spoke with Michael Wallace and Steve Scott on the afternoon roundup Kevin you heard from both the governor and the county executives were they expecting more cases Steven many ways they were governor Cuomo kind of walked us through the process they're trying to find anyone who may have been exposed to the corona virus and then testing them he says the more people get tested the more confirmed cases will end up getting he preached containment saying right now it's about working to stop the spread by both finding out who's sick and then making sure anyone who might be sick stays home part of the self quarantine process we've been hearing a lot about given what we know so far about the people who have gotten sick also the first person got sick with a health care worker who had come back from a raunchy self quarantined at the moment inside a home test on her husband came back negative so that's a sign that whatever she's been doing is working the other person who got six is sick as the a fifty year old attorney from new Rochelle yes several people have gotten sick in and around his orbit his wife and two kids they are sick his neighbor who drove him to the hospital got sick and this afternoon we learned from governor Cuomo a friend of that attorney also tested positive for covert nineteen he in turn got his wife and three kids sick it is worth mentioning as far as we know only the attorney was hospitalized he is stable and recovering he had a a pre existing respiratory issue which was made worse by the virus what are state officials doing to try and prevent the spread of the virus right now they're trying to do a couple of things they're trying to inform the public make sure people know exactly what to do they've set up hotlines to call for basic information they've also set up a number that people can call if they think they might be sick that outlines what they should do the state also freed up tens of millions of dollars that will help not only get the word out in terms of what to expect making sure that people know exactly what's going on with the corona virus but it also allows health officials at the local level to do things like checking on patients at home as they try to get better the governor was asked if this the self quarantine process was the honor system essentially he said no health officials are going out there not only calling there knocking on doors making sure people are there but they're not leaving so part of the money that was freed up by lawmakers in Albany will go to fund that effort thank you Kevin W. CBS reporter Kevin recon it's two forty eight traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the eighth St can Daniels New Jersey dealing with construction yeah I get a lot of construction in New Jersey and still dealing with an axe to two of the garden state parkway I mention this again because it's been out there for a while so the garden state parkway northbound north of the border get chills in ocean township on the right shoulder blocked as they have an ongoing accident clean up the others garden state parkway construction as well Roger is one of those is southbound between the book deal service area and a good one fifty one of Bloomfield the other two lanes down also south out of the garden state parkway exit one forty one thirty eight the other two lane closure there too and route three has had ongoing construction SO NJ three in both directions between Grove street in Clifton N. U. S. forty six you've got that up to two lanes blocked there also rock in Westchester county on the New York state to it's really not too bad either way into the Tappan Zee bridge we have had some work in Connecticut on the Connecticut turnpike it's north of construction on ninety five at exit thirty three in Stratford on Long Island sack because Parker work into that's highway across the Hudson River the Holland tunnel may block each way look at the two closure shut down of the center to George wants to reach out to a lower level closed envelopes is downstairs to work under the apartments our next topic a day less than ten minutes on.

TripAdvisor suspends comments on Ilkeston's famous 'NatWest hole'

All Things Considered

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

TripAdvisor suspends comments on Ilkeston's famous 'NatWest hole'

"Whole not everyone appreciated the joke this week trip advisor had enough now if you look at the entry for the hole in the wall you'll see this disclaimer quote because of an influx of review submissions that do not describe a first hand experience we have temporarily suspended publishing new reviews for this listing and Paul Miller says that's a shame evidently tripadvisor took exception to the shop the late for what they don't what if a laughing stock and they don't want tripadvisor they made a laughing stock off but Miller says there is a real reason to visit L. custom a one hundred fifty year old railway viaduct he invites visitors to come

Advisor Paul Miller
'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

The Book Review

08:10 min | 8 months ago

'Dark Towers' Chases Scandal-Ridden Institution Deutsche Bank

"David ensor joins us now. His new book is called Dark Towers. Deutsche Bank Donald Trump an epic tale of destruction it debuts this week at number two on the New York Times bestseller list and I also have to disclose that. David is my cousin in law and he eats all the pie Thanksgiving about his nonetheless. Welcome here on the PODCAST. Lobo I didn't know what you're going to get that person quickly. Yeah important. Why people to know Dave? Thanks for being here. That's revenue so we're not GonNa talk about that crime. We're GONNA talk about some other ones. This is a book about deutchebanks. Started off with reporting that you did beginning around two thousand fourteen. I was in London working at the time of the Wall Street Journal and I'd already been kind of obsessing about Deutsche Bank. Ps This is you know. One of the biggest banks in the world one of the most troubled institutions and involved is either at or near the center of just about every financial scandal under the Sun and then in January twenty fourteen one of the most senior executives at the bank and kind of the right hand man to the CEO at the time was found hanging in his apartment in lended. Who is he his name is? Bill Broke Smith and he was a guy who had worked at the bank on and off for almost twenty years and he had he was an expert in risk management in an expert in derivatives and he but more important he was the guy who turned to as kind of the ethical compass of the bank he was. He was known informally as the conscience of the place. He was someone who could say no. He was pretty conservative and he was not quite as hungry for short-term profits as most of his colleagues were and it's something that happened at the bank immediately precede his suicide and did he leave a suicide note like do. We know that this was tied to his work. Well I mean it's really hard and I think probably dangerous to try to make in light statement about why someone does something like this but he did leave a bunch of suicide notes including one to with his longtime colleague onto Jane who at the time was the CO CEO of the Bank. And so one thing that became clear over the years a report and I did and working to talk to his many friends and family members and former colleagues as I could was that. There's no doubt that at the time of his death. Deutsche Bank was very much on his mind in someone he knew his on his mind in a not in a good way he was very upset about some of the things that had transpired while he was there are before we get into some of the things that that he personally saw during the I guess the Early Twenty First Century you say that as of two thousand fourteen it was well established that Deutsche Bank was kind of troubled scandal-ridden institution I mean. How far does that date back? Well the bank is one hundred fifty years old this year. Happy Birthday Deutsche Bank and for the first several decades of its existence. This is just a pretty provincial. German and European lender helping big industrial companies like Siemens spread their wings internationally. But when the Nazis came to power in Germany in the thirties Deutsche Bank became a central part of their attempt to take over the world and this is not attempt to take the Nazi attempted takeover. Was that different from what other German banking institutions did. At the time Deutsche Bank was by far the biggest German bank. A lot of German companies to survive did what it took to arrive in that area which was helping the Nazis. But there's been an attempt by the bank and some historians I think in recent decades to kind of sanitize that basic fact by saying well. Everyone was doing it and that was just the way the world works and we can look back at this period now and say that Deutsche Bank was party to genocide. Wow most people who don't work in finance and don't report on finance look at these banks. They all kind of seem interchangeable and interchangeably bad. That every one of them or many of them have had one terrible scandal or another or many in recent years is a bank especially at I mean. Is there something about its culture? There are a lot of things that make it a specially bad. I mean first of all wallets true that just about every bank under the Sun has been attached to one or more financial scandals over the years. Don't you think really has been involved in a disproportionate number and it's faced disproportionate penalties. As a result of that you can look at that in terms of the number of criminal charges. The bank has faced around the world or the amount in fines that it's racked up the to me. The better measure of its destructive capacity is the havoc wreaked around the world. And you can really look in. Probably almost every continent of the world in see some major in pretty pretty bad scandal to the bank was involved with the cause real harm whether it's destroying companies or really messing up economies or being involved in major bribery or corruption scandals laundering money violating sanctions. Deutsche Bank is blamed by the families of some American soldiers for their deaths in Iraq because the bank was illegally funding Iranian terrorists. So you can say that about some things but you can't say about every bank that every single scandal comes right back to their doorstep in that unfortunately is the case. Allow the time with deutchebanks one of the things that differentiates Deutsche Bank for many other banks is that there is no villain at the top. They have no. Ceo Unlike many other banks is that part of the problem that there isn't one person who has held accountable. Well it actually used to be that way these days for the past fifteen years or so they have had a CEO. In fact you can trace the banks last series of problems going back to the mid two thousand to the decision to place increasing power in this unitary see It's gotten worse when they've had someone. Yeah although it got worse under Joe Ackerman who is the longtime CEO from two thousand to two thousand twelve. And he was the one who converted the organizational structure of the bank from being this kind of collaborative committee led approach to being one where there's an American style. Ceo At the top of the bank and Ackerman very shortly upon arriving as CEO of the bank made a very fateful decision which was that he decided that within a very short period of time a couple of years deutchebanks prophets needed to go up about five hundred percent and looking backwards. It doesn't seem that surprise and the consequences that followed that at the time. This marked a really transformational change within the bank. And it went from being an institution that looked around and kind of saw itself as serving multiple constituencies whether shareholders or customers employees or the communities. In which an operator and it went from doing that to having a single minded focus and obsession on maximising short-term profits basically consequences. Be Damned and when you talk about the recent crimes of DEUTCHEBANKS and we're not even getting to Donald Trump who is in your subtitle him later. Did most of those things manipulating markets helping terrorists regimes defrauding regulators. Did most of this take place during that two thousand and two to two thousand twelve period when he was the CEO will the got started. Then and that was Ackerman's decision to prioritize short-term profits above all else was the catalyst for all sorts of bad behavior within the bank and it wasn't just the people were rushing to make money at any cost and although they were doing that it was also that the bank at that moment because it was so obsessed with meeting quarterly profit targets. It stopped investing in things that cost money. For example they stop investing in technology. And so the banks internal computer systems became just this. Archaic jumbled mess and that sounds kind of technical and maybe not that important but the reality is immense that Deutsche Bank. If you if you were asked to say Deutsche Bank what how much money have you lent to say Russia? There's no easy way to answer that you can just type it into a computer. None of these computer systems are talking to each other. And that's a pretty scary thing for bank. And they also completely failed to invest in compliance an anti money laundering staff. And because those are things that cost money they're not going to produce revenue and in fact they they do the opposite prison revenue. They take away revenue as their job. If they're doing it properly is to say no to potentially problematic and potentially very lucrative transactions this focus on quarterly profits and profit above all else. Is that very different from what other banks were doing. During this period Deutsche Bank went from

Deutsche Bank CEO Birthday Deutsche Bank Donald Trump Joe Ackerman Nazis David Ensor Co Ceo Dark Towers Lobo New York Times Dave Siemens London Bill Broke Smith Wall Street Journal Bribery
The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

The Practical Futurist Podcast

10:42 min | 8 months ago

The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

"Welcome Paul thanks very much under now. I've just been very fortunate to sit around a round table with a bunch of influences. And you're quite candid about you know the challenges that you face in the industry but this podcast is about the future of and I wanted to talk about the future of Five G. Sofa my listeners out there that may be in markets where five gs and live or just been launch. How WOULD YOU DESCRIBE FIVE G? And why's it better than four g you know Andrew it's This is probably the most misunderstood technology. It's been bandied around as being everything from the you know the evil of the world to To the savior of the world right and I think the answer probably leaning towards the latter. Which is you know. It's something that really will transfer so I like to think of I five as a platform for transformation. Went talk about it as a speed thing or this thing or that thing. I'll just terrific platform for transformation. Everybody says you know five G. It's faster it's this that and everything else when we talk about them. Do you operate four G. And how do you operate five G? When we operate forgery generally we designed it for this thing called twenty megahertz of spectrum because in three G it was five Megahertz Chunks of spectrum. And therefore more megahertz means you get more spectrum. Generally you get more bang for your buck when we talk about five Jay. We're talking with starting with one. Hundred doesn't mean account. Wigan Eighty or seventy six fifty or ten yep but it was originally thought of. Let's try it for for for one hundred MiG. One hundred twenty two one mistake now. Of course you've got the up link in the downlink say have maybe it's about two or three to one put it in called a spider spider. So you have about two times or three times more spectrum so you're really not comparing for and five Jay in like for like we learnt Andrew many years ago five years ago in doing you think Oh. Wtt X. Wireless to the something. We learnt that we could provide wireless communication as a sort of an alternative center. A Better Time. To market than fiber by deploying wireless buys technologies to provide home-based broadband solutions. Because you build an anti put an antenna and you can sell it so cash and carry you. Get Five Mega. Hit megabits per second team. Maybe one hundred right now. This fixed product is competing with the mobile product. The second one is the bane with these not there so you don't really have enough resources but we learned very quickly that if we were able to put more antennas in we call the massive. Mimo. Then you end up with a better better result. Suddenly you can offer not three hundred customers. Ten makes you could offer three thousand customers teen makes and the more customers more Abu more money simple. It's all about money so now comes five G. so five G. The first thing we do so we've already got some empirical evidence about how much more efficient having one hundred megahertz of spectrum is in this. Wimax area. We're using two point. Three two point five. We've picked a different spectrum. Three point five GIG which means three point two to three point. Six three point eight. Maybe four point two to four point six just relishes the higher the frequency the more efficient it can be she can get more bandwidth through the high frequencies. Would you get you get larger amount of contiguous ECKSTROM? Yes and understand a little bit about how breaking spectrum up into blocks become very inefficient but if you have a big block of spectrum absolutely right and that's why the millimeter wave even higher stuff is even far more beneficial because you have a clear one gigahertz and suddenly war instead of five megs of got one GIG. Simple physics tells you you're GonNa get more bang for your buck. Yeah so five. G. Comes along with starting the premises. One Hundred Megahertz Huge leap ahead of four G and we've got these improvements inefficiencies. So that's what Linda lend lend itself to the high throughput but wait. There's more right and the more big comes to about things like lighten city and massive connections. So we could already see that the challenge is always the always the latency at the air interface and the reason for that is because you could imagine from a base station probably in developed countries. You can have five back to the cornet work for the back to the corner. Work five milliseconds into into the top rate Japan. Top to bottom ten roughly these sort of rough guidances of how how much delay you have across these areas. But if you want to do things that are more interesting like connected car. You don't need five Jay for car but You know if you want autonomous driving. It's one of the options. Yes you could use other methods. But that's not the the most important but if you take a robot right if you've ever shook the hand of a of a rebel with articulated digits but the first thing is if you want one hundred kilos of metalwork comes toward you put something out the first step back of course when you put your hand out and you grab it if the latency is not really shop. Then by the time it gets feedback in squeezing your hand it's probably to light my crusher hand. You got it so we need latency so there's a practical example. Yes but you have more certainly connected car within a couple of meters. The shorter duration robotics interaction. Let's talk about the medical profession if you wanted to do telemedicine remote medicine. Yes so between a practitioner. Highly capable person. Let's take a simple like it's not really simple. Let's take ultra ultrasounds. So you have an expert a technician. The journey woman sitting there with a couple of hundred grants with equipment. What about the village? That's you know two hundred dollars or three hundred kilometers wide. So we just discussed about this thing called latency. What about if I wanted this person to do some remote monitoring of a man or a woman or somebody on the on the I and we've got these tactile feedback devices now? Yes but the person is a couple of hundred Roy. So you imagine. There's a basic person. Triage a stripping. His thing to your body for a couple of thousand dollars which is cost effective. And you got the expert with brain paranoid analytics copy with scopes and everything and now. He presses and two hundred kilometers lighter. It's pressing on you. And then by the time he gets the feedback. He's got to realize that I shouldn't push too far because it's the robot prom you don't want to crush the got it so this this problem. So this is lighten savings on. He's a couple of industries and a couple of sectors that where you can feel that latency. We important robots inside the factory today factory in factories. Andrew haven't changed in one hundred fifty years. Everything is serial from the day we industrialized in the UK. Right I give you the material you do your bit. You Pass it to him. He passes it to her. She personally what happens today? Robotic PLANT ROAD. I does this positive robot. By-pass Robert C. So let's suppose this boardroom. Were nail which vacant and a couple of hours is the Knicks factory from twelve six income the robots willing themselves around connected with five G. They're from different companies. Kawasaki. Ibb ETC. And they're all connected to the cloud by five. G. So the latency is really small. And of course if you take beyond this. This is not thing of few connections to multiple connections per person to devices everywhere. Lamppost ties dresses salt pepper. Shakers everything the cup of tea bags or connected and they will be. You might think it's stupid but you know today it'll get down to something you know a third the size you now. Then everything's connected. If you have that competition of connectivity things in a cell a mobile cell with people you have come back to the first. Problem fixed wireless existing and with mobile paging competing for resources. And it's signaling resources. Yeah and you won't have a few thousand people per sale. You might have hundreds of thousands but the thing with it is. You don't need the speed because some of these things are transmit low data rate but if you've got millions of them in the same spot they all want to compete for radio spectrum to say. Hey I want you to get your data you got it and so you're quite right after that. The data rates are pretty small and listen to a couple of K. kilobytes. But you have a lot of them and it's a signal you know. I've got to wake up not communicate to the end so it's a bit like ceiling overhead traffic. It's it's competing for this. Some of the data so there's a lot of optimization bottomline so affected that in so that's why you have speed latency and throughput as the three key components of five G. But what nobody ever talks about is the social impact five g. and the social impact directly about energy. So you know. Today we're at the product and solution launch of lawyer and we announced that we have a five G. product. That is now. It went one year ago. Forty kilos to twenty five. From two hundred Megahertz bandwith to four hundred megahertz bandwidth but also consumes about the same amount of energy as four J. site. So you've just gone for something that's twenty to one hundred times better for the same amount of energy so some of the analysis that's been boy very specifically by a company called steel partners a consulting company here in the UK. And they've done some analysis based on you know while always products in an older competitor's products looking at all the networks around the world and their energy consumption and a very simple tagline is if you keep building four g networks you double the carbon footprint the planet but if he's five g. It flattens out and it starts to reduce in five years. That's not a bad reason for deploying five G. above the other I think you're great storytellers. It'll just had the opportunity to spend an hour and a half in the room and you. You mentioned the point about your station equipment. Going down in White told a great story about why wife now people know about while we for all different reasons but I love the story about how the thing dropped in. Share that story so I was at a meeting in headquarters and the CEO is sitting at a table with with a number of US including the product and they director in the product. Our Day director was showing the new version of the first five G. Base station that we're going to be launching in a few months and the white was forty five kilos Andrea and he said left on the table. What do you mean forty five kilos? Don't you understand occupational all health and Safety in Europe? It's forty kilos. Everybody looked at him. What does that mean and he said you need a crane. If you need a crane to install this. Do you know how expensive it'll be for our customers? They want. And how the time delay plus the expense and everything. Everything's the wrong wrong targets. You know the capital equipment costs too high. Three months later are endangered. Came back in forty kilos right. Thank you very much forty kilos. We launched now with twenty five kilos and he just on stage and said. Do you know why it's twenty kilos because a person is allowed to carry a twenty kilo product and install it and you know so we're always thinking about how do we improve person the customer's business. It's not about. We've got a great product you want to buy it or you buy this product because it's got these features we're always thinking about from the customer's perspective and generally everybody has the same. Kpi therefore KPI's it's called Revenue Prophet brand market share. You want all of those things. That's what you want right. That's the key metrics so we always think about those components whenever we building products or solutions or focusing on customers. And things like

JAY Andrew UK Forgery Paul Director IBB Knicks Wigan Europe ABU Linda Kawasaki Japan Technician Robert C.
Madoff seeks prison release, citing terminal kidney failure

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 9 months ago

Madoff seeks prison release, citing terminal kidney failure

"Hi Mike Rossio reporting Bernie made off is seeking a release from prison for medical reasons Bernard made off the disgraced investment adviser serving a one hundred fifty year prison sentence for orchestrating an epic Ponzi scheme is asking to be released from prison due to serious medical conditions and attorney filed court papers Wednesday saying the eighty one year old made off has end stage kidney disease and other chronic serious medical conditions and has less than eighteen months to live prosecutors are expected to file a motion in response to the request made off pleaded guilty in two thousand nine to eleven federal counts for defrauding thousands of clients of billions of dollars over decades

Mike Rossio Bernie Bernard Ponzi Scheme Attorney
Proposed federal law seeks to limit skyrocketing salaries of college coaches

The Paul Finebaum Show

10:06 min | 9 months ago

Proposed federal law seeks to limit skyrocketing salaries of college coaches

"Well anyway. I I call one of your stories. He's just week. We're talking about salaries and congress trying to put a cap on things and you. Did I think a an amazing. I don't know how you doug all this up. A deep dive live into the evolution of coaching salaries. Take us through that process. Yeah I one of the one of the most interesting thing about college. Football is how in twenty twenty I guess in our in our myopic nature point twenty we think that we all have these like little arguments novel discussion Russia. We've been doing this thing for one hundred fifty years at this point in time there are quite a bit of things that just are not new and some of that is complaining about too many bowl games but another one of those things is talking about how coaching salaries are way too high. I mean it's it's it has quite literally almost almost always been like this. I mean Amos Alonzo Stagg at Chicago making six thousand dollars in eighteen eighteen ninety two now I went back and use the consumer price report and price some of these salaries out in you know twenty eighteen at the time buying power. And you know. That's six thousand dollars. Amazon does stag was making then was worth like a hundred and sixty thousand dollars back in eighteen. Ninety two there has always been this separation between what highly paid college. Football coaches made Versus what the Common Man Colombian mix. You know I'll I'll bring it to your audience and hit them home like bear Bryant when he's doing. Brian show that that famous Sunday highlight show That that became formative so formative for a lot of Alabama fans. He wasn't doing that just out of the good report he was because he was getting paid there Bryan getting in pay. That's why I thought he. I thought you said he was a benevolent. So I believe you remember this because you weren't born but he also had to Eat the potato chips and drink cocoa which by the way had bourbon in it. Yes absolutely I mean like bear. Bryant was Bear Bryant was cheering the back right now. Yeah so I find it amazing we we. We had a professor on earlier who who was very much a part of the Donna? Shalala Team Wanting to limit coaching Ching salaries so When did they make the big turn? When did they start going? I mean as as some of the critics say out of control to me. It really doesn't matter what any of these guys make but TAKE A. When was the big turn? I think they really and truly exploded in the nineteen eighties because in the nineteen eighties. That's when that Supreme Court hate happened with like Georgia Oklahoma and you know they got. TV rights You know they divorced the TV rights from the NCAA and schools colleges then became able to go. She ate television rights As entertaining defended themselves. Obviously than we get into the CFO era and BCS. And what we have now where the SEC. Disperse what was it. Six hundred and fifty some odd the million dollars yesterday give or take a few million yeah To all fourteen member schools. I mean look. The bedrock of this cannot be overstated. The bedrock bedrock of this is this when you as an Athletic Department at Florida Alabama at Lsu is Florida state when you do not have to pay your labor force when you do not have to compensate you or athletes. That money has to go somewhere now. That money goes to beyond coaching salaries. I mean that's the facilities race that is everything. Everything that makes these college will programs at opulent as they can be obviously a really really big part of the PIE now. Is Coaching salaries. Now Coaching coaching salaries the early eighties. That's stuff starts to get reported. That's my really really starts coming into Coming into the sport in a way that it had really really before that By the time you get through the mid nineties Florida's paying Steve Spurrier the one of the first billion dollar contracts so that he doesn't jump to the NFL at that time honestly the NFL itself explodes. You've got that competition. So it's it's the competition that that spurs in any industry the street Salaries and money and will lose those things but the early eighties. I think is where we can really pinpoint when college athletics kind of started growing up from a from a fiscal standpoint talking to Richard Johnson from a better society in now we all know what is going on. I'm interested where were you. Were you sit on this. Because the the so called Donna. Shalala proposal We heard Professor Ridpath on this would would curtail a lot of things I find find. It somewhat amusing chancellors and presidents at Private Schools More so than public schools making. I'm five six million dollars a year We have an offensive and defensive coordinator is making major seven figure salaries I know is a highly paid journalists. Where we're we're are you on what Shola is is attempting to to do at least down one lane in Congress right. I think you have a good point. the the facilities boom and the salary boom of coaches collect directors and the things that we coach Sports Mirror. That of what we see on the institutional side at a lot of these verses and I think that is one thing thing that really gets lost you know like you said like g Foreign President of like West Virginia. Like these guys make guys and girls make six figures seven figures. There is a lot of money in higher education in the United States at the highest levels. college athletics is it is not an outlander But like studies have shown time and time again going back thirty forty fifty years that when your football all team is good when your basketball team is good It becomes you know they always say that is the front porch of the university. Admissions skyrocket when athletics. Do well and that is. Why a lot of these University of course than anything else I think? Put Up with and we'll pay out the nose for Nick Sabin or Jim Harbaugh or a Davos. We or whatever I think the dirty secret is is the weight from Ro a lot of these endowments in some of these very popular. Schools would shrink a lot more than people wanNA realize. No I mean just look around. I mean boone pickens. She died recently. I mean the the amount of money that he put into Oklahoma state and I don't I don't mean to disparage Oklahoma state in stillwater Oklahoma. Oh my been there. And if you haven't Richard Make sure that you put that on your bucket list. Wouldn't it wouldn't have had that type of money And and a lot of these Jerry Jones. He's given to the University of Arkansas. You can go down the list And I mean and it's because of one thing we're trying to win in in in college football or basketball depending on on on where you live and what part of the country you're in. Yeah absolutely I saw a stew. MANDL's works in the for pretty athletic. He He has a college pat column and somebody asked him Ten million dollars. What would you do with it to build a staff? And I look the question and I was like look man if you WANNA compete with Alabama Lsu Clemson Oklahoma Ohio state. You need more your salary. You Pool has to be bigger than ten million dollars. I mean on on its face. You'RE GONNA have to pay a coach at that level. Five five and a half six six billion dollars. You'RE GONNA have to pay your coordinators eight hundred nine hundred thousand dollars because Dave Aranda was was pulling such a salaried Lsu a few atmosphere necessarily because he was such town defensive coordinator which he is but it was because one opinions coordinator so that the only job job they'll leave for is a G. Five or or power five kids coaching job. It's got bulletproof coordinators. I WANNA lose them. I don't want to take collateral. If they leave me they gotta take step up so okay. You're paying both your coordinators Like one point eight billion dollars between the two. That's like eight million dollars. Just gone to the head coach in coordinators. Now you're in another like five million dollars higher director staff your eight assistant coaches which is all right. That's your ten assistant coaches You want to compete with Georgia Alabama. All right we'll have a party because you have to fill out the rest of those staffs with analysts. We assist tense You know you gotTa have a staff of three saw guys kind of the shadow. Coaching staff that that Alabama kind of those famous or infamous. No matter how how are depending on which by the fence you went on but You know it takes money to keep up with the Joneses and it takes a lot of line really want we national championship. Always great to have you on Richard other than chicken. What's the what's the second most favorite food that you'll be serving the super bowl party Sunday lady a friend is bringing some guacamole? She'll be homemade guacamole. I'm not a big block fan but you know you know how this you gotta try say like it. So that'll that'll it'll be my My side dish. I cannot wait I if I'm in the neighborhood I'll just drop Bil- bring some bring bring a some some fruit cake leftover from Christmas. I couldn't give away Gringa fruitcake. Brings some cold ones man. I'll have seat for you right on the couch next to meatball. Thank you great. Great to talk to you again come back soon. Have you

Oklahoma Bear Bryant Alabama Football Florida Street Salaries LSU Defensive Coordinator Richard Johnson Donna Congress Doug Private Schools SEC Ncaa PIE Alonzo Stagg Boone Pickens
Average normal body temperature isn't 98.6 anymore, and it's getting lower, research shows

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 10 months ago

Average normal body temperature isn't 98.6 anymore, and it's getting lower, research shows

"For centuries ninety eight point six degrees Fahrenheit was said to be the average normal body temperature turns out though that number is too high the ninety eight point six number was arrived at one hundred fifty years ago in a new study researchers from Stanford University argued the number was correct at the time but is no longer accurate because the human body has changed a person's normal body temperature can vary by gender size age even time of day and how it's taken so what the new magic number researchers say the average normal human body temperature is now closer to ninety seven point five degrees so that's scientifically proves that we

Stanford University
Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

The Frame

10:25 min | 11 months ago

Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

"Start with a new film that opens this Christmas Day. It's an adaptation of Louisa May alcott novel Little Women and it is a lovely little gift of a movie yourself theory someday. So you'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved better. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses I intend to make my own way in the world. No no one makes their own way. Not really we civil woman. You'll need to marry. Well you are not married. Because I'm rich wjr. The film is from writer director. Greta GERWIG stars. Sir Sha Ronin. She played the lead in Greenwich Direct. To`real debut lady bird and the rest of the march sisters are played played by Emma Watson Elisa scanlon and Florence pugh Laura dern plays their mom and Meryl Streep is they're wealthy aunt March gerwig has been thinking about little the women for a very long time well before she even found out that producer Amy Pascal was developing a new adaptation of the novel. Here's Greta Gerwig little women and has been a book that I have loved my whole life in a very deep way to the point. Where my memories? And the memories of the March sisters were intertwined in that way that I think books of your youth can means something even beyond being books because th- they they're the they become part of your family I think that's that's the magic of Reading when you're a child is the the distinction between fiction and reality is thin for you or it. It was for me anyway But I hadn't read it since I was about fourteen or fifteen and then I read it in my early thirties when I turned thirty and I All this stuff came out at me in the book that I it not. When I was a child I can passion get so savage could hurt anyone and I enjoyed it? You remind me of myself never angry. I'm angry nearly every damn I li- reading as an adult. I heard all of these different things. I saw it as much touch spike easier and sadder and stranger and almost more triumphant in a certain way and also just is this kind of being aware of an author was another layer of it for me that Joe both wants to be an author but then Louisa as author and so even though Joe March march by the end of the book says she stops her ink well and stops writing and gets married and has children opens a school Louisa though wrote and she wrote that book and we know what. Because there's the book you know. I just sort of had an idol saw about well if I made this. I'd want to center center on this. I'd WanNa Center on all these themes that I felt I hadn't really seen yet about it which was ambition and money money and women an art and I heard in passing my agent said at a dinner. Oh they're interested making little women again again and I was like what I have to go. I have to talk to them. I have an idea and I hadn't made anything at that point. But he got me a meaning and I I went and I talked talk to them and I told them some version of what I wanted to do and And I said I want to direct it and they wanNA write in Iraq and I hadn't had nothing to really show that I could do that so but they very luckily hired me to write it. And then I wrote my draft in in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then I went away and I may lady bird and then by the time I was finishing that up they said well what what do you think about making little women and I thought I said well I knew you'd ask. I'm ready but it was a it was one one of those for two. It's turns events. I want to ask about that perspective that you had a reading the book as an adult versus as a young woman woman sure and the perspective you have as somebody who is a creative person gas writing movies and making movies because so much of the movie and certainly in the book as well is about the challenges of being a creative person and how you value your own art how you compromise with people who are financing it and how you find your voice even in those parameters that's right now there's a you you picked up all the cards I put down. No it's a it's funny. It's that the opening scene between Joe March and her publisher Mr Dash would which the majority of it is actually word for word from the book when she says took care to have a few of my sinners repent and he says people want to be amused not preach that morals. Don't sell nowadays. That could be me talking to a studio head about something. I WANNA do But it was. It was all there for me to be discovered. I didn't invent it like like I said that. That scene is a scene from the book but it felt too so relevant to right now and then beyond that when when I was researching Louisa Mail Cart and it became clear that that who Lewis male caught was was equally the subjects that I was interested in and then you learn about her life. Is You know unlike Joe. She never got married. She never had children and but she kept writing and she did keep her copyright copyright of little women which is a you know huge thing that she did and I mean there are so many things about her life and what she did. It felt eerily familiar and I think even even in the fact that Her publisher sure and even herself but her publisher truly didn't know what a hit he had. And I find that happens all the time that there's a constant underestimating of audiences that are not the same audience of the people who are in charge of publishing or whatever that may be the the first half of little win because it is really to books as written ends so group. The curtain falls upon big. Joe Beth and amy whether it ever arises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called little women death. It's almost like she's saying I've got a a sequel but I hope people by the I know she's She's a business lady no she and and and it it. It's worth saying that the the initial printing sold out in two weeks and it has not been out of print for one hundred fifty years in one thousand nine hundred four. There was a story. Little women leads poll novel level rated ahead of Bible for influence on high school pupils. Yeah that's nice. I mean I mean it's just nice for her and it raises his other question like what people take away from the book because you can interpret it in very different ways. I'm going to give you two prominent women who have thoughts. That's about it. The first is Gloria Steinem. WHO said in Nineteen ninety-two? Where else could we read about an all female group who discussed work art and all the great questions or found girls who wanted to be women and not vice versa? Oh that's beautiful found girls that wanted to be women not the versa. And here's the author meal Paalea who says the whole thing is like a horror movie. I know I think if you have an idea in your head of the it can be of little women. It's usually from the first book. It's the kind of Christmas to Christmas structure. And the you know the second half of the book Louis Male jokes. She should've called the wedding marches. Because they all got married and truly British version is called good wise exactly zoo you know. It was in this to book structure which is part of why I is structured the film I did starting with them as adults Because I wanted to start with the second half but I also think there's two books embedded in it because if you you just read the book on its face value with this. Kind of pre Victorian morality of Domesticity in virtue tied to femininity communitty. And all of these kind of tidy bows put on each chapter. Then I think you miss what's really roiling roiling underneath and if you read it that way of course Camille Paglia is completely right. It is something that would be a horror show if that is all you're seeing but I'd the way I look at it is if you can take the ending of the book where she felt she must marry Joe off to someone because that's what the readers demanded and she made this economic decision. That's what she would do Because she had so books then if you if you read everything through the Lens of will she had to make it all kind of tidy for the time time then if you take away the tidiness what's left is a whole bunch of am Bishen and mess and anger and lust and craziness and things things that don't fit neatly into any box. And so what I wanted to do was not update the text. The text doesn't need updating. I wanted to take away the constraints constraints of the time in some ways. Because that's what was interesting to me and even in those constraints. Louisa really did do her best to try. I to imagine what what would in a gala -tarian marriage look like. What would something that was? Not Essentially INDENTURED SERVITUDE BE As a marriage and I feel that you know Gloria Steinem being one of them with a Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith Orlando Toronto or J. K. Rowling rallying. There's a long list of women for whom this book meant very specific freedom an ambition and what I wanted to do was make a film film that was in the tradition of why that inspired them. Because it's there's gotta be a reason more than she got married to Professor Bear Sogo to see you. Thanks for coming as really

Louisa JOE Gloria Steinem Joe March Publisher Greta Gerwig Amy Pascal Wanna Center Greenwich Direct Sir Sha Ronin Meryl Streep Camille Paglia Iraq Professor Bear Sogo Emma Watson Elisa Scanlon Joe Beth Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith J. K. Rowling Writer
Twins, with 307 home runs, narrowly beat Yankees for single-season team record

The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Twins, with 307 home runs, narrowly beat Yankees for single-season team record

"Well the twins wrapped up the regular season in Kansas city with a loss yesterday but also a record after hitting three home runs in the game the twenty three hundred seven home runs during the regular season that's the most by one team in the one hundred fifty year history of Major League Baseball twins manager Rocco Baldelli talked about his players in this season it's been pretty amazing goes beyond the wins and losses it goes all the way to every single individual in that clubhouse who you know I I I and everyone here spent we spent a lot of time together we get to know each other really well and and truthfully watching our guys go out there and succeed and and be happy and enjoy themselves on the field off the field and just enjoy the the experience of of playing here that's what means the most to me more so than the ones in the losses the twenty nineteen American League central division champion twins are off today that an old work outs tomorrow Wednesday at target field their first game of the post season is Friday against the Yankees in the

Kansas City Baseball Rocco Baldelli Yankees Major League American League One Hundred Fifty Year
Military pursuing new eligibility rules for burial at Arlington National Cemetery

Glenn Beck

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Military pursuing new eligibility rules for burial at Arlington National Cemetery

"The army proposing new rules to significantly restrict eligibility for burial at Arlington National Cemetery seeking to preserve a dwindling number of grave sites well into the future the army said the proposed restrictions would preserve the lifespan of the cemetery for another one hundred fifty years without such changes it said the senator is cemetery would run out of space by the mid twenty fifty under the proposals veterans who retired from active duty and were eligible for retirement pay would no longer be automatically eligible for in ground burial they be eligible though for above ground inurnment or cremated

Army Arlington National Cemetery Senator One Hundred Fifty Years
Pigeon Point Lighthouse to be restored in $9 million upgrade

Ethan Bearman

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Pigeon Point Lighthouse to be restored in $9 million upgrade

"A historical light house in San Mateo county is set to get much needed repairs now that the state of California has pledged more than nine million dollars to help renovate the pigeon point light house repairs are slated to begin next spring or summer and last roughly a year the light house has been guiding ships along the San Matteo coastline between Santa Cruz and half moon bay for nearly one hundred fifty years but for almost twenty years the tower has been closed to the public after falling into disrepair construction is slated to begin next year and last about a year but more work remains to be done there is roughly another seven million dollars needed to repair the bottom of the White House and other improvements not part of this

California Santa Cruz White House San Mateo San Matteo Half Moon Bay One Hundred Fifty Years Seven Million Dollars Nine Million Dollars Twenty Years
Europe, Scientist And France discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Europe, Scientist And France discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The heat wave that smashed temperature records in western Europe was intensified by man made climate change according to a study published Friday the rapid study by respected team of European scientist should be a warning of things to come the report's lead author said in countries where millions of people swell to through the heat wave temperatures would have been one point five to three degrees Celsius lower in a world without human induced climate change the scientists also said that the record temperatures recorded in France and the Netherlands could happen every fifty to one hundred fifty years in the world's current climate without human influence the temperatures would likely happened less than once in a thousand

Europe Scientist France Netherlands One Hundred Fifty Years Three Degrees Celsius
Bernie Madoff asks Donald Trump to reduce 150-year sentence

WBZ Morning News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Bernie Madoff asks Donald Trump to reduce 150-year sentence

"Bernie made off currently serving a one hundred fifty year sentence after pleading guilty to one of the largest Ponzi schemes is asking president trump to commute his sentence ABC's Michelle Franzen has more it's been a decade since Bernie made off began serving his sentence at a federal prison in North Carolina now the eighty one year old is asking the trump administration to reduce his one hundred and fifty year sentence the justice department confirming made off request made off pleaded guilty to eleven federal crimes including fraud the former hedge fund manager bilking clients out of billions of dollars of investment funds his case is considered one of the largest Ponzi schemes in history made off is not asking the president for a pardon instead hoping that the president will commute the remainder of his prison

Bernie ABC Michelle Franzen North Carolina Fraud Fund Manager President Trump One Hundred Fifty Year Eighty One Year Fifty Year
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"For one hundred fifty years gray bars help customers build maintain and renovate the places where you live work and play from construction sites to industrial plants to schools and hospitals. Gray bar is powering progress in your community through our personal service. Proven logistics and best in class products, grey, bars technical specialists can find and deliver the electrical and Datacom solutions that work for you. No matter the job, call one eight hundred gray bar or visit gray bar dot com. To learn more. Twenty nineteen to too late to eighty two up in Virginia, though, valid Illinois put your trust in the author honesty policy the price. You see is the price you pay Burkey cofounded a little online all. Tonton tour more this offer number Casey wants sixty six hundred selling price twenty thousand five thirty six twelve thousand mile ninety down zero security deposit plus connects time when license credit offer it's five thirty one nineteen. Sunday may twenty six Bush stadium will be filled with the sounds of south hip, hop and more. It's Zuma fitness night at the ballpark with the purchase of a special theme ticket you'll receive access to a pre game Zuma fitness a ticket to the cards pre game and an exclusive cardinals tank so brings together your love of dance, fitness and cardinals baseball, get yours. Zoom benign tickets today at cardinal sat com slash steam. Is today's train unstoppable player of the game. Now, let's get back to the URI lottery. Cardinals clubhouse and find out Khuda train info dot com to find your local independent train dealer. This is KOMO ex. Fourteen three cardinals the win of the Braves tonight in Atlanta..

Cardinals Datacom KOMO Bush stadium Burkey Braves Casey Virginia Khuda Illinois Atlanta baseball one hundred fifty years one eight hundred gray
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Class of the Basketball Hall of fame announced the NBA story has the nets taking advantage of no Jaanus. We explain when sportscenter allnight returns. ESPN? Plus the new sports streaming service powered by ESPN provides fans exclusive access to live events and original programming for only four ninety nine a month. Download the ESPN app or visit ESPN dot com today. If you own a pair of sketchers this ad is not for you. Because you already know the most comfortable shoes on the planet. This ad is for those who've never tried sketchers for the few of never experienced the other worldly comfort of sketchers air-cooled memory foam for flowed across the ground on comfort pods or experience. Get your seamlessness you're missing out that's like never pending pumping. So we've made this ad for you sketchers live comfortably available at a sketchers store near you or wherever stylish shoes or sold car guys. No, not all motor oils are created equal because your engine hit seventy five thousand miles cheaper Motorola's won't do. That's why valvoline created full synthetic high mileage with max technology designed to fight sludge condition seals and better. Protect critical engine components as your engine ages. Keep your high mileage ride driving well into the future valvoline trusted for one hundred fifty years. Now it will rally auto parts by five quarts valvoline full synthetic high mileage in a filter for just thirty four ninety nine terms and conditions. May apply. Terry, this isn't working. Is it because I still be living with me mutter? Is it because we made be Scully wax? No. I like your friends is it. It's the pirate. Tuck Terry Yar..

ESPN Terry Yar valvoline Basketball Hall NBA Jaanus Motorola one hundred fifty years five quarts
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"No, not all motor oils are created equal because we're country hits seventy thousand miles cheaper motor oils won't deal. That's why valvoline created full synthetic high mileage with max technology designed to fight sludge condition seals and better. Protect critical engine components. As your engine ages took your. Mileage ride driving well into the future. Trusted for one hundred fifty years now at advance auto parts by five quarts, valvoline full synthetic high mileage in a filter for just thirty three ninety nine. Terms and conditions may apply. I'm Mark Billick senior director of communications and technology for the Chicago auto show, the nation's largest oldest and best attended auto show. We turn to American Eagle dot com. Fifteen years ago to not only develop a best in class website, Chicago auto show dot com, but also to have a partner that could grow with us as technology changes American Eagle dot com can do it. All they have the experience and expertise to handle a website that supports the nation's largest auto show. They built a state of the art website, featuring responsive design, easy, online, ticketing, social media integration. And dedicated exhibitor micro sites. Having event information available to our consumers through cutting edge, Android apps. Only enhances the great experience we offer as part of the auto show and was a big part of. Why we chose American Eagle dot com. Paul American Eagle dot com at seven seven three network that seven seven three network or visit American Eagle dot com. The only name you need to know, if a website development s this is Michael Golic and wingo. Weekday morning at five on.

American Eagle dot valvoline Chicago Mark Billick Michael Golic senior director partner one hundred fifty years Fifteen years five quarts
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"That's probably why football is America's favorite sport. So grab a handful of California almonds and own every day of the season car guys. No, not on motor oils are created equal because when your engine hit seventy five thousand miles cheaper motor oils won't deal. That's why valvoline created full synthetic high mileage with max technology designed to fight sludge condition seals and better. Protect critical. Engine components is your engine ages. Keep your high mileage driving well into the future valvoline trusted for one hundred fifty years. Now it o Reilly auto parts by five quarts of valvoline full. Synthetic high mileage in the filter for just thirty four ninety nine terms and conditions may apply. Guys. You've probably heard me talk about this before. But you need to change the way you're experienced television. Xfinity X one is the simplest fastest most complete way to access all of your entertainment on all your screens. Xfinity X one to provide you the most seamless way to enjoy all of your favorite sporting events through the x one sports app. This app is genius. This gets a lot of use in the wattle household as well. All I do is grab my voice remote and say sports or just press the c button, a sidebar appears and gives me access to all the current games in progress. You can even sit up your favorite team. So those are the first games to appear a great way to make navigating easy and never miss a minute of the action. Believe me the sports apple change the way you follow sports and your favorite teams. Get started and call one eight hundred xfinity visit extending dot com or drop into an extended store today for more details. Hi, I'm Ryan Kelly. If you're. Considering buying a home and twenty nineteen. It's time to get serious. You never know when that perfect house is going to hit the market inventory is still low and the competition.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Motor oils won't do. That's why valvoline created full synthetic high mileage with max led technology designed to fight lunch condition fields and better protect critical. Engine components is your engine ages. Keep your high mileage ri- driving well into the future trusted for one hundred fifty years. Now it'll Reilly auto parts by five quarts of valvoline full synthetic mileage in a filter for just thirty four ninety nine. Trims and conditions may apply. You're listening to the military bowl presented by Northrop Grumman on ESPN radio and on the ESPN app. In the country and the rest of the big ten had to make a decision. Are they going to just let him run away with that conference or they going to start spending money in order to try to keep up with the buckeyes and you've.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Chico is our name. Oh, remember all men are created equal. And then they get dressed experienced John Chico's difference. Call us at two one nine seven six nine one seven four four if your IRS tax debt is out of control if you're over your head in monthly payments. There's a secret the IRS doesn't want you to know if you have more than five thousand dollars in tax debt, you have the right to settle that debt for a fraction of what you owe. The IRS is now accepting reduced settlements from individuals who owe back taxes participation and special initiatives by the IRS can reduce your payments by thousands of dollars. Republican tax relief is now offering free information on how to virtually eliminate and settle your tax debt once and for all to see how much you could save call the special service hotline before the program expires, simply call this number eight hundred six three nine four four zero two. Don't miss your chance to reduce your IRS tax debt by thousands of dollars. Be protected and never contact the IRS without speaking to us. I in just ten minutes. We could save you thousands eight hundred six three nine four four zero two eight hundred six three nine four four zero two eight hundred six three nine four four zero to car guys. Now, not all motor oil is created equal because your engine hit seventy five thousand miles cheaper motor oils won't do. That's why valvoline created full synthetic high mileage with max life technology designed to fight sludge condition seals and better. Protect critical. Engine components is your engine agents. Take your high mileage ride driving well into the future. Trusted for one hundred fifty years now at advance auto parts by five quarts of full synthetic high mileage and a filter for just thirty three ninety nine terms and conditions may apply..

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Course and, approved a woman's request for a specialty license plate to honor her wife Amy bright. Had requested a string of initials ls s. n. l. v. signifying, lesbians and love it was I rejected, with officials saying, they could, deny any play deemed offensive to. Good taste and decency but. DMV Commissioner Tori Jessop overruled. Them calling bright to, apologize she had threatened to sue if an appeal was denied Pam Coulter CBS news. Federal. Prosecutors have charged bottled water company in California with illegally disposing of, arsenic tainted wastewater the charges were announced for the company that. Bottles crystal geyser water and the two companies that transported and dumped the toxic waste prosecutors say the companies failed to disclose the contents on shipping manifests. And it was taken to a facility Not not, permitted to treat, hazardous waste, organizers of a suburban tradition are. Working to answer a critical. Question how do you get. People in an increasingly, urban area to come down to the farm president of the Kane county fair, board Larry. Says one hundred fifty years is quite a milestone at one that, does it come around without adapting and changing with the time. You, try to do that to tragic Walker and trying to find something that is different new and exciting Well and you hope it doesn't run its course before it gets to you and those new offerings at this year's fair include a wine, tasting guarded at indoor exhibit highlighting the history of the dairy industry in the. County that indoor aspect may become crucial brianna says if severe weather strikes the proper. Precautions will, be taken to ensure that crowds can enjoy the fair and, stay dry in.

Commissioner Tori Jessop Amy bright DMV Pam Coulter brianna CBS Walker Kane county president California Larry one hundred fifty years
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Of the reason why it is as powerful in my opinion as our flag is because it's i contact they haven't changed it and they've used it for over fifty years and they've altered the gear and they've altered the things around it but the core identity has stayed the same and that really matters especially for country like canada i mean politically speaking this country's one hundred fifty years old and when you have an icon that is fifty years old that's a third of our history right there you know so that's really powerful and like overtime these things can really become a part of who we are and you do and you do a great job acknowledging that the countries a lot older than that in your film and talk about the impact of indigenous designers which is something we're definitely talking about in the world of architecture and design right now with the fritz you you spent twenty years living in montreal creating a lot of the iconic designs that we see in this film so how do you feel when you watch it how do you feel being able to look back and kind of celebrate your life's work feel well first of all i feel good because stewart dash myself we had the we had the chance to do what we did okay and it goes without saying we were young beaver brash veer enthusiastic and we worked our rear ends off okay and we just did it we had we had the saying between the two of us which was very simple you know if you have a problem gave it to us will low catherine will come up with the proper solution they will just do it and that that is what pleases me when i look back greg this is a film about such specific moment in canadian history a number of moments in canadian history what do you think it.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"You don't see that the drugs are changing and reversing the process they're putting the drug on board to try to change the symptom so when you look at stem cell research goes back one hundred and fifty years some of the first literature that i'd seen published when he actually went on the computer and said okay when was the first published research done on stem cells it seems to be one hundred fifty years ago a doctor and tackle was doing this in germany so and subsequently as more countries and more facilities institutions did research you know it's been ongoing for over one hundred years so the reality is it's only your cells that are being used to help to repair your damaged cells so these cells don't have their own identity can become anything they could become brain that could become heart lung liver kidney pancreas joint cells and there's tons of research that describes that on my website i've put fifteen videos on stem cell patient results for they'll tell their story in some of them have pretty severe diseases like parkinson's and s and you know of rival diseases diabetes and as well there are two thousand articles veteran the bottom of my website and probably half of them if you were to scroll to the most recent backward are on stem cell therapy for all the different diseases that worldwide research has described so i can't even imagine a technique that would be as good as your own cells to repair the damage in your own body so it is it possible is it is it is it fda approved of course of course it's fda approved a doctor can't do something that's not fda approved he can't do anything to you unless fda approved of course that's what these clinical trials are these are protocols approved by the fda eighty to approve the technique of extraction whether it's bone marrow as we use or fat and the approved the use of the technique for those disorders because that's what they've reviewed well before the technique can start so yeah absolutely talked to one more question i have an appointment to come to the doctor over i know the question to ask is a privacy question is it possible that i can that i could leave my phone and wanted to clients call me i'd like to hear what they say we've had a couple of patients what am i stroke patients said he he'd be willing.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Hundred and forty six years you with me so far con is adding the one hundred fifty years to the two forty six to get the four hundred years he's adding the years after the thirteenth amendment to include that there are some people who are still choosing to be think whatever like slaves and the resists movement is made up exactly people like that you can't miss it look at these guys marc lamont hill the black experience in america today is no different than slavery or has its roots they haven't graduated from it they haven't moved on from it reparations movement forebears slavery still defining element of black life in american if isn't unless they wanted to be there isn't any slavery in america today and there hasn't been since eighteen sixty five this isn't complicated unless you have been brainwashed by the civil rights community which wants african americans to believe it slavery essentially never ended the life experience of an african american is essentially no different today than it was fifty years ago one hundred years ago two hundred years ago and they do that and they say that to keep these people under their control and to keep them in victim status and to keep them dependent and therefore to keep them voting democrat it's pure politics where are we headed next on the phones.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCHS

"Was one hundred fifty years ago a peaceful place of history beauty worship at refuge build by pioneer ingenuity the tabernacle was made sacred through sacrifice the strong hands and faithful hearts that raise these walls gave their all to build a place or god might be glorified the salt lake valley was a remote wilderness then not even a railroad graced it's barren landscape so when marble was wanted but not found wooden pillars were carefully painted to look like marble columns hardwood was hard to come by so pine benches were painstakingly painted to look like oak and when it came time to assemble the huge elliptical roof atop the 44 stoned buttresses the lattice work of timbers was held together by wouldn't pegues and rawhide sixty years ago acclaimed architect frank lloyd wright called this national historic landmark one of the architectural masterpieces of the country and perhaps the world today as we celebrate the one hundred fifty of birthday of this one of a kind treasurer our wish is that the tabernacle may enjoy many more decades of stability harmony and happiness and our hope is that all who enter within these walls may find goodwill peace and joy happy birthday dear friend yes one the sean yes two two the xiaomi aw aw knows oh two aw oh boy aw yes nearly no.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Colonies in america were one hundred fifty years old and they weren't used to that they had in fact developed the for us institutions in the world it was unprecedented the way they govern themselves in how was that had been because i think it's important to realize the the ground out of which this next election grows began very ungoverned yeah well it was you know it was critical you have to understand about america that it's an unprecedented thing that also cannot be repeated because uh it's like in the western movies on the one hand there on the frontier and it's wild and there isn't law and on the other hand there connected to a welldeveloped civilisation d civilisation and so everybody knew about law and everybody knew about learning and everybody knew about god but all of the structure was taken away and they got to start over and they developed to a much greater state than anyone ever had the doctrine of religion civil doctrines of civil and religious freedom and of consent of the governed and most colonies were governed by an appointed governor by the king who is not a particularly strong person and then by uh uh legislatures that were popularly elected by nearly everyone every male that is although women's suffrage came to america in new jersey right after.

america us new jersey one hundred fifty years one hand
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Colonies in america were one hundred fifty years old and they were used to that they had in fact developed the freest institutions in the world is unpreced into the way the govern themselves and how was that i mean because i think it's important to realize the ground out of which this next election grows began very ungoverned yeah well it was you know to understand about america that it's an unprecedented thing that also cannot be repeated because uh it's like in the western movies on the one hand there on the frontier and it's wild uh and there isn't law and on the other hand there connected to a welldeveloped civilization be civilisation so everybody knew about law and everybody knew about learning and everybody knew about god but the structure was taken away and they got to start over and they developed too much greater state than anyone ever had the doctrine of religious civil doctrines of civil and religious freedom and of consent of the governed and most colonies were governed by an appointed governor by the king who was not a particularly strong person and then by uh uh legislatures that were popularly elected by nearly everyone every male it is although women's suffrage came to america in new jersey right after the revolution and was there for about twenty years joe and uh and zhou they were a free society and their rights were included were important to them and they thought governor existed to protect it there are british ancestors were not to ran a call in any sense of the modern where they were not tall tearing.

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"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"This is josh lohan and i wanna tell you what i'm doing now that i'm no longer the play by play guy for the chargers to leash is off the shackles are unbound westwood one is given me it's awesome platform to go to town on the nfl games of the week in a very cold podcast paul blitz and giggle see what we did their simple concept we ranked the games of the weekend from least interesting the most interesting and we count on down like it's american top forty where a shadow steve dave anyway lots of great stats an insight snarky commentary and really nothing about access or always just stuff you and your friends can bounce around when you're hanging at the 10day tell eight or watching together in a bar you'll be surprised how much good relevant info we can get you while being snarky and having some fun downloaded ideally subscribe to it can enjoy it blitz and giggles make it a part of your weekend starting this weekend please and thank you on the westwood one podcast network to realize that for more than one hundred fifty years the united states had no social security this is dr knowledge with knowledge in a nutshell it was during the first term of president franklin roosevelt's presidency in 1930 five that the us's first social security act which created the act was largely written by the first woman ever chosen to be in the president's cabinet francis perkins who had been appointed secretary of labor by roosevelt it's kind of hard to realize that nobody in america got a social security jack beginning with the country's founding in seventeen seventy six all through the 1800s and all the way into the mid 1900s those were different times it all those years more stories in our know each and are not joe books call one eight hundred not show or go to knowledge in a nutshell dot gov nike has a new plant for selling its products in many retailers are not going.

josh lohan united states social security franklin roosevelt president secretary america westwood nfl steve dave westwood one francis perkins one hundred fifty years 10day
"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"one hundred fifty years" Discussed on We The People

"Of some presidents sometimes using force without congressional authorization and some residents sometimes seeking congressional authorization for the use of force it has not been oh now the president's can do it they always do it without congress president sometimes go to congress uh even though they may think they have the authority to do with without congress so uh i think it's i think it's a much closer question and law matters much more on the ground and presidential decisionmaking than we might exist rumer through the move is time for closing arguments and i'm going to ask the obvious one to do some up in a few sentences side how does the constitution limit the president's ability to launch unilateral attacks and why should our listeners care about them well i think once again a really depends on what we by the constitution if we're talking about the original constitution the founders did not want to give one person the authority to wage war they demanded that authorities to congress it actually had been in congress his hand prior to the constitution had stayed there um and that was the regime had we have for about one hundred fifty years until the korean war at which point in time president truman took ascend to korea calling it a police action never going to congress beforehand in since then presidents have is debra pointed at occasionally started wars without getting congressional authorization and sometimes presidents and their legal have said oh it's gotta the a limited war other ties presidents have a f claimed think almost carte launched authority to to wage war the first bush president george h w bush before.

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