35 Burst results for "One Generation"

Getting to Know Arizona's Attorney General Mark Brnovich

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | 5 d ago

Getting to Know Arizona's Attorney General Mark Brnovich

"Kircher with us today is the attorney general of the great state of Arizona, Mark brnovich. Welcome. Thanks, Charlie for having me on. So I can't wait to get into what I call the cartel of the colleges because you have some things that you really want to dive into that your office has been working on about corruption and higher education. Those are my words you can be more precise because you diplomatic? Yeah, that's right. But I don't have to be and I also want to kind of talk about some of the new things your office has released in regards to voter registration material and some other things regarding the Arizona audit and the election. But first, I just want you to introduce yourself to our audience. I think that would be really helpful. Tell us your story how you became, you know, attorney general of Arizona, and also I want to say that attorney general Burnham is running for U.S. Senate, which is a very important Senate race. So please introduce yourself. Well, thank you, Charlie. I always tell folks that if you want to know about me, you probably should know about my background in my history. And so I'm a first generation American, my family fled communism. And when your family has not just studied history but live it lived it, you have this great appreciation for how unique freedom is. And, you know, we know that folks like Ronald Reagan used to talk about freedom is never one more than one generation away from extinction. And, you know, my family live that. And that's why I'm so passionate about the constitution and our liberties. And so much of my career has been spent as I was raised that we have to protect freedom and we have an obligation to give back because this is the greatest country in the world. So, you know, I'm a public school kid. I still live in the same neighborhood. Neighborhood I grew up here in Arizona. I was a gang prosecutor at a law school. In fact, I met my wife there and she's now actually on the federal bench. So, you know, anybody was anything about federal judges. There's an old joke that what's the difference between God and a federal judge? God was wrong once I'm kidding. No, no, no, no. Hey, you're gonna get struck by lightning. Don't be saying that. No, no, God doesn't think he's a federal judge. But anyway, no, she's amazing, but then worked at the AG's office, a bit of federal prosecutor. Served our country in the army reserve. I worked at a think tank called the Goldwater institute where I wrote a lot and wrote briefs on the importance of property rights and individual liberty. And so I had never thought I was going to ever run for any office and I was brought up this real strong sense of that when you're the government, when you can take away people's livelihoods, their life, liberty property. You have to have the most highly qualified, but also the most ethical people in those office and people that understand how much power you have when you're the government.

Arizona Kircher Mark Brnovich Attorney General Burnham Charlie U.S. Senate Ronald Reagan Goldwater Institute AG Army
Betsy McCaughey Raises Concern Over Biden's Build Back Better Plan

Mark Levin

01:55 min | Last week

Betsy McCaughey Raises Concern Over Biden's Build Back Better Plan

"There was an excellent piece and there's always an excellent column by Betsy McCall She says never mind the cost just look at the absurd things build back better would buy Now I do concern about the cost but she raises a good point She says the bill is un American as it gets Here are some of its details which Democrats would prefer you not to see judge for yourself First generation down payment assistant Most people work and save for years to buy a home This bill makes them into suckers It gives $6.8 billion to low income first time homebuyers with no conditions It's part of Biden's scheme to increase racial and economic diversity in the suburbs First time homebuyers can get up to $20,000 and never have to pay it back Whether they stay in the home or move for virtually any reason it's free money as long as you're not the taxpayer footing the bill And it's likely a double whammy pushing up home prices for first time buyers who actually saved up themselves Home efficiency rebates the bill offers up to $14,000 to homeowners who lower energy use by installing new heat pumps air conditioning systems insulation and energy efficient appliances It's a pot of gold for homeowners who qualify and tens of billions of dollars in new business for contractors They catch ready Only unionized electrical contractors qualify Only unionized electrical contractors qualified design to twist arms and unionize the workforce Why Because unions bankroll the Democratic Party Racial ethnic minorities also get preferred treatment The bill promises contractors a $200 bonus for each customer served from a community of racial or minority ethnic concentration Whites go to the back of the line and have to hope the money holds

Betsy Mccall UN Biden Democratic Party
U.S. Immigration Used to Be About 'Contribution'

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 3 weeks ago

U.S. Immigration Used to Be About 'Contribution'

"One You know in the heart of some of the most extensive immigration to the United States Over a hundred years ago if anybody ever been interviewed who wanted to come in Americans say I want to use your healthcare system or whatever it was they would not have been allowed to come into the country Because the standards have been completely eviscerated The standards are what can that contribute to this nation Are they going to be a drag or are they going to be contributor Today that question is not asked or even considered Period Immigration was always about what contributions foreigners can make to the United States and how many should come and from where should they come today that again those questions are not asked and they're not to be asked And I would challenge anybody to tell me any nation any nation that can or has survived without borders Name one just one There's not a single nation on the face of the earth that's doing this None Some of the European nations did it but now they're tightening up And they will pay a price and have paid a price But not to the extent of America we have more people coming into this country Than any country in the face the earth year after year after year after year while the American Marxist within our country are teaching propaganda about how often the country is And so you wind up with second generation individuals like joy Reid Or Omar or Talib in Omar's case first generation Who come to the country and then hate the country

United States European Nations Joy Reid Omar Talib
Pastor Johnny Hunt on the New Film 'Nothing but the Truth'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:10 min | Last month

Pastor Johnny Hunt on the New Film 'Nothing but the Truth'

"Exciting a new film. It's called nothing but the truth. And i have my guest pastor. Johnny hunt pastor. Johnny hunt welcomed the program. Thank you delight. Be with you. Tell me what is this film. Nothing but the truth. It's sort of a documentary. On the life of adrian rogers and many speaking into lots of the noble truth that he spoke in his years before the lord called him home sixteen years ago and reminding us that america not just now but is always been just one generation away from paganism take one generation that no longer stands for the moral absolute truth of god's word and we find america and america's churches in a serious dilemma. He predicted it so many years ago that it would be the greatest challenge and today a more people are speaking of my truth as opposed to his truth. And it's a difficult place when it comes to how many americans still believe in absolute truth.

Johnny Hunt Adrian Rogers America
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:20 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The purpose of region farm farming for a farmer is to actually change their life to get out of debt to stop using poisons poisoning their family or themselves and so forth to increase profitability. To be proud of what they're doing to absolutely become more resilient to drought in too much water so that the soil can be a reservoir instead of dirt. I mean you to create to increase the pollinators for your crops which are now dead and gone. I mean it goes on and on and on by the way the outcome is more life in the soil and that life is measured by carbon. Okay but that's an outcome is somebody's paying for it hallelujah. It's another crop you've got gone for you. But that is not the purpose and so the same thing with with climate our purpose is to really take care of each other to improve the well being of humanity on this planet and all living creatures all of life and we do that we reverse global warming. But if you start with reversing. Global warming You've lost most people nine there because you're putting the outcome before the value the value right purpose. The thing that connects that doesn't connect you. You know i mean go to a party and somebody said oh. What do you do Climate active right and they go and good. Everybody has some association with that negative or positive. Right baggage comes into play and everybody's made up their mind how they feel about it before the conversation even began. I like what you said earlier when you were talking about that town hall and just having people raise their hands and identify what their values are right in through that you discover this this commonality this like you know shared sensibility. That we can unite over. You're sitting next to somebody and say i'm a climate activist. I'm trying to save the rainforest going. Oh cool if you say like on trying to save the world was more ineffective but if you say sound like an asshole like i say there's so much hubris in that i'm saving the word. Yes but you can't do anyway but you say you know i discovered this way of Smartphones are being turned away. And what i started to do in this place in peru i started to nail them up to trees and connect them together with little tiny. Solar cells kept them charged. And that way you digits people. There could hear every time you chainsaw started up and go and find exactly where it was and stop it right. You're telling me more. How'd you figure that out in in. I mean it. It opens up the conversation. You know but you. You're doing something and the specifics to and that's what somebody is doing by the way. I'm not saying that and so again you know it's it's a really about reconnecting you know and you can't connect by thinking that somebody should connect to the place where you're ahead. Is we have to connect values a comment. And you're beautiful man. Paul hawkins i love being with you. Thank you so much. You are a gift to humanity. And the planet i i could talk to you for hours and hours and hours and i really appreciate you coming here today and sharing your wisdom and experience. Thank you and i have to say again. Your wisdom and your drying out of wisdom is in the book. I really really. It really is i. Listen i mean you know and It's made a made a really big difference. I'm glad to hear it. And i'm excited for people to check it out. Re-generation and in the climate crisis in one generation comes out september sixteenth fourteenth. Yeah you can get it now there. Yeah you can pre-order it now it's beautiful book and i think it's gonna really inspire a lot of people into the action piece right cool we'll come back and talk to me again sometime all.

Paul hawkins peru
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:27 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And grasslands and farmlands and caused lands In mangroves and wetlands so for those hold three thousand three hundred billion tons of carbon nuncio to see the atmosphere holds one fourth of that is four times as much carbon in the atmosphere. Okay so there's two ways you can look at that. Those systems are being degraded and there was continuing to deforest new into us. Industrial agra continuing to overgrazed continuing to desertify the earth etc to cover up our wetlands cetera. So every time you do that then the life of the on the soil in the soil you know parishes. That's got cnn. When see peres's it. Combines with oxygen produces carbon dioxide okay so in other words it's emitting co two greenhouse gas. All right okay. So if we if we keep doing this right. Another ten percent of loss of our terrestrial systems that will increase ppm from four nineteen what it is today for eighteen to five nineteen like that. Those two hundred people not reduce it. Okay now let's flip this talk about a climate of optimism from okay instead of pessimism. So that means if we add nine percent more see into all those systems you know nine percents not a lot then we sequester all the carbon emitted since eighteen hundred okay and if we go to fourteen thirteen forty percent depends we will also account for all the carbon is planned to be emitted by twenty fifty so if you look at any place you live anyplace you love and he place you've seen say we have a ten to twelve percent. Fourteen percent improvement here like more trees more grasslands or can we change the grazing strategies and technologies. can we change the farming stroz. Can we under certify the two to three billion hectares of land and so forth heck. Yeah so that's just in protection. That's not technology that's not energy. That's there's many other things we can do that solutions that we've talked about this this political on community well. It's it's not asking a lot. If every community could could incrementally improve by ten percent through a variety of measures. It seems highly achievable very cheap. And so it's important that we have you know rather than the big picture that came out today. The ipc about whoa. You know it is here. it's irrevocable. I mean no question and you go I mean at the same time is important to have the opposite. You know which is like yeah and got it. Thank you for sharing. Thanks for such fantastic science. Let's go to work and this is the work that can be done everywhere by everyone and we can absolutely meet the challenge. No question we need both and So it's not that the science or in understandable that the science has been couched in threatened fear and all that sort of stuff i mean. Scientists didn't know how to communicate and activist took the science and used blaming chain in finger-pointing as a way to thought they thought maybe that would make a difference but Both were right. It's not that they didn't conform to narrow science right. It's it's a natural psychological reaction To not being heard right. It's this frustration that builds into anger. And it's well intention but it doesn't actually change minds or hearts now. I think we're seeing that shift across all forms of activism. Because we're you you mean you spoke about the gay rights movement. I mean you see that in the vegan movement like you know all these sort of tried and true methods that have been used for years that just make people angry and divide people. We're now realizing hey. That's not such a good approach exactly and backed another big round ship for my point of view was vegan to plant rich Vegan polarized sure. I mean i mean you know and But plant rich. Like i i. I don't know if i know the first time i used it. I hadn't seen anywhere but that was drawn drawdown which is rich like first of all. That's a great word and plants isn't grinding. Plants is great where people love plants you know and so platt rich diet you know so. That's an invitation come on in the water's fine. Find your way into the world of plants. You know you do decide you figure it out but again it was like a figure ground. Shift away from something that could cause people to resist to something that was invitational. And that's what regeneration is an invitation to participate is not in. It really is fine. You know it works it. And why are you here at this point at this time given what we know. What's your purpose. What gives meaning to your life. You know that's the question. everybody says. Yeah we got to end this a couple of minutes. But i can't let you go without Pulling on this last threat which is and it's related to the psychology piece that we were just discussing How do you. let's say somebody's listening to this. They're super enthusiastic. They're good to go. They want to translate That that that sort of Emotionality into action like we talked about but they're surrounded by a community of people or family members or colleagues etc. That are unreceptive to this. And they're they they wanna be able to communicate effectively their passion for this to be a change agent for others so given what we talked about. What are some strategies for helping people communicate more effectively. Don't use the word. Climate though years global warming dozer macrophages in our conceptual mean almost nothing to everybody. Really i mean we used the term but they have no meaning and most of the jargon acronyms around climate have no meaning the completely conceptual. If you say somebody one five what does that mean to anybody. Nothing i mean somebody could understand it even doing two point seven f making you know figure it out still means nothing and so to move completely away from climate speak because it's meaningless to most people and to speak in ways that are meaningful to the people who surround you and to the thing about carbon sequestration for example. Let's go back to soil farming. Which is the purpose of region is not sequester carbon as an outcome. It's really important to understand the difference..

peres cnn
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:58 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And kept going and so and i i remember nights where i would just go out and then just leaning against a tree all night and sleep wake up and sleep all night just and listen to the creatures birds and In the morning at night and the spurs in night. Of course bet that the and i don't know what they were. I mean there's a sounds you know and You those experiences are Denali paul's and the tree and not until their life changing their life changing and when you hear terms like oh we have to practice nature based solutions you know. Nbs is columbia's now by the climatologists it's like excuse me you know. Nature nature nature. Everything is nature. And you know the idea that there's nature based solutions as if that was what nature is therefore right you know i. It's still that same colonial hierarchy marko way of looking at the world which others the world and others nature makes other nature. Seeing like other again. I said about fixing it. You know what's the climate it will really. Yeah the idea that that We're going to organize the world in accordance to art to meet our needs like. Yeah we'll make sure it's sustainable but the the notion being that that like we're even capable to begin with yeah and solutions exist for the benefit of us and we added indigenous people other than utterly. We've other everything. Yeah everything i guess. Yeah in that sense and and and so that the this idea of regeneration the corvette is to experience the inseparability of everything and each other. You know honor that. And and as i said the most important thing to do is to listen and and nature is well you know And the way we have led and been hot lead. Our lives you know. It's been so Just fractured everything. You know just shattered all the connections. That are actually intrinsically. There and regeneration is that And that's why. I say go go do what is exciting to you. Know that's the thing you're gonna do best. And that's that's what's gonna turn other people on and get them up and so forth and this idea and andrew human you right. I love that. He showed up in the bus. Sure did he showed up because like you pulled that pair. Right out of the podcast. You're in this book your book a lot more than you think you are. Of course. I pulled that out of the pot listening to you. Andrew better you know but the idea that believe chain actions. If that was true we'd be in a very different situation today. With respect to climate the fact that its actions that change beliefs and so people. You know the thing to do is to do go do doom. Whatever it is just got to start doing you. Don't think about it. And for god's sakes don't worry about the numbers you know. I mean we have what i think now in the climate movement and i think dr on is partly responsible is what i call climate voyeurism if we outnumber this. Oh it's eight percent of emissions is this does twice is that food is thirty four percent of but that's actually doing something reading. Everything is actually solving the problem indexing. Yeah indexing exactly as well. I'm glad you know doesn't do anything and watching documentary on netflix. On climate doesn't do anything either. It's like we have to make sure that we are actually doing something. And with all due respect to my colleagues my friends and so forth. And i say this all day long. They're still not doing anything they're not doing anything. And that's why the book have punchless or we have connection to to the website. Which is hey. Makeup priced right. Yeah big piece of this is we. Don't even talked about it. The nonprofit that is associated with the book regeneration dot org where there's this toolkit and all sorts of resources to help people move away from belief into action absolutely one of the things i learned. I did one hundred twenty eight speeches in twenty two months for drawn. You learn nothing when your mouth is open and you learn acuity. 'cause the cues generally are being asked for other people as well maybe one percent brave enough to ask but a lot of other people going hell. Yeah i want to know too and so you learn from the questions. And i can't almost without exception somebody would say what should i do a what what should i do. I don't know what to do is interesting. And there's one hundred solutions and draw down and they're asking that question and jasmine my wife When i started generation said if you don't tell me what to do in this book i'm leaving you got it. You know so. The book doesn't exactly do that by the way what it does is the last eight pages is a wormhole to the website. And there we have what to do. You wanna know what to do. It is the complete almost abbreviated manual of what to do for challenges and solutions. Challenge should be the boreal forest. The biggest stock of carbon on earth is being depleted plush. Toilet paper open pit mining tar. Sands you know etcetera okay. That's a challenge that has to stop. Okay solution is electrifying everything and that would mean putting in the heat pump in your house to replace natural gas or make could be oil and these coast. Whatever for heating for water Could even be cooking using an induction bookstore cooked cooktown. That's a solution but what it does is like okay. This is what you can do as an individual okay. This is all the different levels of the agency. This is what you can do as a neighborhood if there is something you can do. This is what you can do as a school. This is what you can do as a company or ask companies to do as agents and so forth an on words. These are the influencers who are causing problems. Here's the e mail for the chairman of partnering gobble who makes plush the paper. He might want to write to him and say stop taking virgin trees making toilet paper out of it. Bamboo works better anyway. I learned that in the book. Yeah bamboo or recycled paper works a lot better and cheaper and And then here are the ngos that are just kicking but i mean really effective and influencing and making a difference here the first nations who are rising up speaking up talking about these are traditional tribal lands that the first nations are dealing with and debris oriel this. They know land better than anybody. Here's your videos cool videos. It'll teach you hear our books here. The great books on the boreal and so forth here etc so every solution and talent has whatever. You wanna know all your points. We're not saying these are. These are all access to all the ways. You can actually be effective right area. That's what the book is irvine. Neuro transmitter to the website. Yeah i mean that's powerful the level of like practical advice that you give people can plug in wherever they're enthusiastic. Yeah right by hebron yeah sure. Action follows action. How's your mood your moods. Good right yeah. What is the thing that you're most like. I put that question to you. What is the thing that you're most enthusiastic about i. I would say the thing that i'm most enthusiastic about is the The rate at which People rediscovering land in all its myriad forms. You know the. I shouldn't say you know i didn't know research and found out The terrestrial systems that is you know for us..

Denali paul marko spurs columbia netflix andrew Andrew boreal forest irvine hebron
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:23 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"In new mexico and it was during the winter and early spring and nobody was there so i didn't speak to anyone because there was no one to speak to me. It was easy so you weren't setting out to have that experience. It just wasn't an occurrence by dint of. What do you do every right. Yeah so what i did. Every day was. I would take off in a direction and try to get lost. There was just takeoff And and i never got lost. Except one day i was like. I don't know where. I am so interesting because it's in the huge national forest. You know there's no roads. There's no houses there's no telephone poses. No cell phone towers is nothing. The orient you and Pity gave me such a deep appreciation for plays and i remember once In the morning walking along the the stream rivers kind of right in between both and literally a barren. I almost ran into each other. The water is so loud. Who's in the early spring. You know so. It was rushing down snow and i couldn't hear anything and i was looking one way. It was looking other way It was called cinnamon bear his code. And it had It must have been eating termites from deadlock that had stuff all around whiskers so many going. Oh shit it's like. What do i do now. Look at each other then. We turned away because you know both turned away. Because you're not supposed to make contact you know but you can see you turn your head away but you can still see other the presence of the other creature and It was so beautiful. Because it's a being it's not a bear baraboo it's being you're being beings are and it's like okay and we both kind of you know made a circle around each other and kept going and so and i i remember nights where i would just go out and then just leaning against a tree all night and sleep wake up and.

new mexico baraboo
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

09:08 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"I know we don't. We have no idea where food ways came from or whether knowledge of course george washington. Carver got that right. I noticed that him in the book to talk about that a little bit. Because that's i did not know about this either. Well i mean he. He was the one who who observed that the difference between black farmers and the results were getting and why farmers who were mostly cotton farmers because it was the best. Cotton soil have been Where they were alabama and how. They're playing to play out their farms. There were killing a soil killing the phone and so and then on a nourishment level then of course on the pitch looking groundnuts as a source of both restoring soil but also restoring. You know i- inexpensive way to provide a balanced nutrient to people into they weren't getting that time But it wasn't just him. He had a whole bunch of other colleagues to ski. You know the they worked together and again. The roots and the of that in the benefit of that is is throughout america to this day. And we don't recommend right right. I mean when you not to keep bringing it back to this documentary but when you wash the biggest little farm short of john and molly finding some version of that like somebody who's steeped enough in you know in in soil ecology to help guide them they would have never been able to make it work there now and to think that. There's this robust unbelievable cannon. You know a a a a a library of alexandria this kind of wisdom and knowledge based on millennia of observations observing nature. That it's lost is crazy is because anybody who would carry that message would be so valuable in so many ways to anybody who's looking to trade a little bit more lightly on the planet and to do things in a regenerative symbiotic way and again that the other thing that we've lost maybe lost respect for is the language itself because there wasn't written so it's not really or whatever and i remember being patagonia and going to museum and the yarmulke sulk nam people depending on which name you use but and there was like i don't know maybe a few dozen laughed at that time i mean there they'd been extirpated basically by disease and bygones and Bruce chatwin wrote a book in patagonia about the the the amish people and about their language and then i have a friend who's I grew up at the university of california libraries. Where my father worked and my family Marian the librarian was hero. She was really. Summons is spent a lot of time at the library. And so i understood from bruce's book that there was a dictionary that there was a missionary who was down there who had nothing to do. And there was only a hundred or so yamanaka people left and he was a lexicographer so he made a dictionary and worked with the tribal chief but the travel chief was really the killed so many people he was like by default but he wasn't and And so for many years. He made a dictionary of the language into english. Is addiction really amazing dictionary. They got thirty thousand words and the missionary died and the yaman a- Wouldn't talk to them by cosmology about women's issues and self-righteous we don't trust you with this knowledge. But they did talk about you know and if you read this dictionary it's like i said it's metaphor and depression. The word for depression is a crab. That's molting shell. But it hasn't come off yet. We get out of here. I mean it's such an exquisite language thirty thousand words and these are the people that darwin called beasts because when they came around tear though frago which wasn't named then it was like They saw fire and smoke. And the fire and smoke was from the yana. Who carried fire with them everywhere because it was cold but they were naked because they put seal fat all over the body to stay warm and they knew that clothing would actually got wet and actually come die so they're called beasts you're right and they acted in strange ways and so forth you know. Japanese has forty thousand words. This dictionary had thirty thousand words and is incomplete so wild so our understanding of ingenuity of indigenous people is so broken and so well. It's it's it's it's metered in condescension essentially and they're not educated in the manner in which we recognize. So were dismissive of. We don't have the right lens. We don't have the right lens to see it. Understand it and frankly benefit and We were basically. We saw them as base. We use. That were not just darwin and as a subclass comes in a subclass of human beings. I mean when you think of of somebody like paul stam. It's who knows everything about mushrooms and now. We're seeing this resurgence of enthusiasm and interest in in microbiology. And what we can learn from the fungal universe creating foods from them and just appreciating. How much more complex and amazing it is than we ever imagined but in my mind. That's he's he's in furtherance of that indigenous tradition. Because he's so steeped in this one thing right so imagine thousands of paul stam. It's who are experts in a wide variety of different types of fields that have to do with the cycles of the planet. Yes and those people are coming in a does the then there are respectful scientists now and aswa and then you know they're in in service you know in honor of their knowledge and then help also To keep out the miners. The loggers Cova as well for that matter In the amazon in peru inequity So there are some really really wonderful things going on now because of the respect understanding the was never there or was hardly there and now is is is really growing and i think it also relates to a planet on fire and and and so who you gonna turn to you know obviously not chevron exxon policy not the republican party novice people who could care less and these people who are so. I want to be those people people who live in a place and cared for it so long. Have something to teach us about kerry. Yeah about knowing. I know and That we've lost our that. We never had So in posthumous. I mean when you think of his career and thinking i mean you know. He accidentally boiled up a whole bag. Full of silla sivan. Somebody gave it to me is just take a few boiled. The whole bag up drank it and then went up a tree and then thunderstorm came and using that tree all night long blowing around and Is for him to say. But to me i mean post was born at night right. He had a spiritual awakening. Did he absolutely his life path on old and he started up until that moment and make the in a longer stuttered right and so he had a in a very short night or maybe a long night but you have to be out there you have to be in nature you have to turn off everything that's on and turn on everything this off to you. It's not actually and so for and spend. The time has been three months once in silence in the woods. With nobody there you did. Yeah yeah when did you do that. I did that about Fourteen years ago fifty. She had kind of a walden pond. Experience was just a caretaker at a refuge that was in new mexico and it was during the winter and early spring and nobody was there so i didn't speak to anyone because there was no one to speak to me. It was easy so you weren't setting out to have that experience. It just wasn't an occurrence by dint of. What do you do every right. Yeah so what i did. Every.

patagonia paul stam yamanaka frago Bruce chatwin Carver george washington darwin depression molly alexandria alabama Marian university of california bruce america john silla sivan peru chevron
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:58 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Sorry to interrupt like even if we had let's say we've lived here for thousands of years we're not connected to the biosphere in the manner in which those cultures were and are they had to be because that's the only way they could survive is to actually know where they were. And so you see things like Tweet thousand years ago on the east coast and lila june. Who's on our board actually a deny and cherokee Activist poet And scholar wrote a piece called. The forest is farm in which he talked about. Was that if you do core samples in tennessee and around the east coast. You find two thousand years ago a real shift in the pollen and what was being grown in different trees in different plants and annuals pants and like what happened and what happened. Is that native americans in this case and just people transformed the forests into farms There was this where they got all the food. Along with animals. right and I was on a plane To alaska to give a talk at the university and i was sitting next to a woman and we began to talk and she's yupik. And the u pick. People live on the bering strait on both sides of alaska and russia And she was there because her sister died and she became the elder and and we started talking about it. You know how it is to live on the bearing street Come on and she said that to live there. They needed to be able to predict the weather two years in advance as wait a minute. I said two years. She said oh yes. She's very humble quiet. Woman wasn't there was no bragging or nothing. Nothing it was just a matter of fact i said. How'd you do that. And she started to name every single thing that they saw over a course of year observes and whether it was the color of the sea ice when it froze in the fall and then melted in the spring the depth of it the extent of it the type of velvet there was on the cariboo. The fish is they they could tell them the fish how they had changed or subtle differences. I mean she just started naming the clouds they will look at the clouds. They look she just named every single thing in their environment and over obviously hundreds and thousands of years day began to say. Well this you put this and this when you got those things that means that In or in the future or they had the memory of what happened two years ago so they had this type of weather it look back and say yeah. I'll remember warmer awry. And so this. And she said and they did to survive is that there is and we can't predict it six weeks ads here even two weeks in advance. So what's amazing world and so beautiful to be so intricately you involved in immersed in your varmint and to be so present and paying such close attention to the smallest details and to extract meaning out of that. But they're just not just just one call right right. It's true for and to have and have western culture be dismissive of that because it doesn't meet the criteria of quote unquote scientific method right. Exactly and now of course. A lot of scientists are actually turning to indigenous people but a lot of indigenous knowledge has been lost. I mean the elders died in they. Were you saw what happened in canada and have it here too. You know like their children were taken away you know. They were murdered essentially in catholic schools. You know i mean. They were traumatized they were little. They were you know. They're taking away from their native foods. They were fed commodity foods full of sugar fat and starch. You know they got to obese. They got type two diabetes. You know they couldn't get jobs. I mean all of what we did to them. It wasn't them doing it to themselves. And so yet in some way in most places they were able to maintain and keep this knowledge. These oral traditions passed on generation for hundreds and hundreds of years. You know from from being harassed by the colonists you know And so now. I think we're realizing gosh. This is a alexandria library of knowledge. You know there was right there all along. Except we didn't listen no instead. We dislocated marginalized them stole their land and force them into situations where they have to open casinos. Absolutely yeah and so. I mean part of generation people say well. What does that have to deal with. Climate is absolutely to make amends in whatever way we can today not just to indigenous people but actually will not just i mean the planet itself. Because they're were indigenous people who enslaved and brought over. There's three thousand different cultures africa and and when we look at their roots regenerative agriculture in this country. You know i mean. The initial roots came from africa and income from asia. They didn't come from anyplace else. And can you imagine being a woman in ghana and for whatever reason you've been kidnapped her and then herded and then you're put on a boat going to somewhere you don't know the nobody can explain to you. It makes no sense at all and some how these women braided rice and seeds into their hair and brought them to so-called new world. And which is why. The african americans were the best rice farmers and all of southeast america and when i started airline and started to pro organic rice or get a grown actually for us. I work with to black farmers. Arkansas and their knowledge of rice was unbelievable and it went back for almost forty years. Wow and so. It's a wild story. I know we don't. We have no idea where food ways came from or whether knowledge of course george washington. Carver got that right. I noticed that him in the book to.

east coast alaska bering strait tennessee alexandria library of knowledg russia diabetes canada africa southeast america ghana asia Arkansas rice george washington Carver
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:10 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"This isn't i feel like sometimes when you listen to some companies some people so they some politicians that the idea is to fix it so that we can just continue to grow our economy bigger and bigger and bigger bigger and we just have to get rid of this nasty. Little problem called climate and actually just sort of annoyingly getting in the web economic growth. So you'd get all the lyman isn't with nature the lion is with gdp this and that's very much jamie mortga and you know that's very much investment banking way of seeing the world you know which is okay it was. How can make money doing this doing this and doing that. But what's underlying that is like you know the business as usual scenarios that are used by i in the world bank and ipc basically project. A connie is two and a half times bigger by twenty fifty and seven times bigger by twenty one hundred and that is just ridiculous. It's so absurd to think that we can to x seven x five x where we are today in terms of throughput economy economy. I mean and so really part of the innovation has to be. How can we do more with less. How can we fulfil our needs as human beings we have needs you know and In a way that actually lowers our footprint not just our carbon footprint but our hoffer for print and And so i. I don't see that really coming into the conversation yet. Who's a regeneration right. How long can the economy continue to multiply at that level. Like is gonna go on ad. Infinitum is there any conversation about those. The ultimate in unsustainability absolutely every price of every share with some exceptions on stock exchanges is based on assumed in projected rate of growth and there stocks that just pay dividends like pipeline. You know just pay. So there's a few but ninety nine percents based on drum and imagined protected you know based on the past based on you know pipedreams. It is weird. That success is predicated on this this idea of growth. Like why is it not okay to just have a business that does fine and pays its employees and enriches its shareholders without growing because you can't amass capital right and that's that's capitol you could provide good lives for everybody involved. Absolutely it's called steady state is called. There's lots of words for a steady state. Economy steady state economy can take care of the whole world. What a won't do is create multi-billionaire won't create people like you know. Ela must have got six point. Seven billion in compensation. I was his salary This year just announced. I mean just insane insane Amount of capital and what that capitals doing is destroying the world for the rest of people making. I mean houses too expensive real estate real estate too expensive. I mean i mean there's like The rich are pulling away from the rest of. Yeah the the. The the wealth disparity gap just accelerating encino obscene rate and the pandemic just amplified. Yeah and and so. I don't know where that is going to hit the wall but will hit the one again. It can't happen it. It doesn't really pencil out. I mean only in you know. Somebody's you know bankers wet. It doesn't need to pencil out ad. Infinitum only needs to pencil out for my lifetime. Yeah right. I mean that's or before i retired. Yeah take away my. Yeah no no appreciation for this idea of indigene body which is another. Now's subject in the book. Yeah the the. But i think the consumption thing is something. That really isn't being talked about in a now there's so much openness in terms of regenerative egg and energy and more and more you know people are forming around the idea that you know we have to really take care of nature which is kind of a funny revelation point but it's true But what they haven't done is actually think about. How are you using. Total like individually and our cities are our assumptions about what makes a good life and all that sort of stuff. I mean i mean virtually. Every one of my shirts has a patch on the elbow..

jamie mortga lyman
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:14 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The biggest fact The biggest change in the farming community is caused by farmers that farmers talking to farmers. That's what i was thinking like pivoting from that blame and shame you know modus operandi into empowerment and engagement. It's those farmers who have made that transition who are the ones who are going to be able to communicate to the other farmers. They're they're not gonna wanna hear from you. Love me. i mean you know. God forbid so. Yeah like creating community around that. That's supportive empowering to helping people make that transition but also on top of that systems that are conducive to that being an economic viability. But there are there. Are things happening. Where demand for genitally produced seeds grains and obviously made as well but are increasing faster than production sure and so farmers are seeing a premium. They their inputs are going down their cost going down but actually the income is going up. And you see tax differences in profit per acre per region farmers and as gabe brown famously said he said i got tired of busily signing the front of the check now i signed the back of the gym knows it shifted from an expense to income. You know and and you don't go back from that. And so now there's companies and processes and techniques and satellites and there is a lot of support now being created for regina egg In its true form and it's being also done in some dubious forms as well. Yeah and yet you know. I just i was out of town. The other day was in an airplane yesterday. And you look down and you don't see a lot of regenerate far you see giant swabs of you know square round parcel civilization. Yeah yeah so. Where are we in terms of that becoming. Like reaching some kind of inflection. Point with this. I don't know. I don't know i know that. Like a big companies are pivoting on this They have the same questions was his. How do we make the transition. They don't how did their farmers make the transition in house versus rice. General mills is trying to do with oats And so many like the clothing companies now are basically looking for genitive fiber primarily cotton but other pirates as well so you're seeing supply demand dance the consumer demand. I mean i feel like jen. Jen's e the younger generation they. They're they they're up to speed on this stuff and they're much more conscious about their consumer choices than our gen rush. I mean when i started airline mom out all the time about you hippies. The world organically but we industrial egg. How we take care of the children. We have a world of you guys. Are you know like you know. Sort of self-indulgent almost narcissistic you know. And you're wanting things without chemicals pesticides. And now i don't know how big the industry is so big that you can't get enough organic food in the united states but the the same thing is region is not going to go through that. Because you're seeing every major agricultural company in the world syngenta in cotija and monsanto buyer and Adm and cargill moving to generate. Now i mean keep your tongue firmly in cheek on that one because i feel like some co-ops and going on there in terms of the term in the word But as franklin roosevelt. One said that way you start telling you. The truth is by being a hypocrite. I and so who knows. You know that's going to go. But you do see nicaragua. Genitive farming from the gecko and not about chemicals. Kind of like the opposite of monsanto Doing really really well working with not only with regenerative farmers but in terms of metrics in terms of measuring carbon and de commodification that is Connecting farmers directly to The buyers in getting the farmers out of the commodities business where no matter how well you do You're still the price is the same for everybody. And and so that has to happen. So that genita- farmers can get a premium and that the food companies that buy that have a story in a narrative and means something to jazzy and everybody else who cares. Yeah the story narrative piece. I think is big. I think companies. These days needs something they the that has to be a genuine authentic Aspect of of doing business. Oh yeah i mean. I think they recognize that. I mean. we'll see what happens. But i think we're in a period of tumultuous change sarb is threatening for sure you know and and daunting at us i get the sense in the business community that the old ways are over. I really do not praising anybody. I'm not trying to go. Finally business gets it and i'm not saying that either at anybody doesn't get it. I would say it's investors. They still want to put their money where they didn't get the highest return and there doesn't work that way right. Yeah i mean banking's a is a whole section in the book what what is Where do you see the role of hydroponics. All of this. I mean obviously this is. That's growing plants in a manner. That's divorced from the soil conversation altogether. I suspect there's a. There's a great place for that in urban centers or places where there isn't soil. But how does that fit into the idea of regeneration interesting because plants supper that is to say that they suffer because it gets too hot and too much sun insects They suffer for lack of nutrient pr- example. So they put the roots down deeper. The complexity of the taste and fido new trends there and plans are actually due to stress so plants. That are stressed are nutritious right. When you do hydroponics you're actually going back to industrial egg. Which is you're doing ears an iv drip into the roots. It's fine if you just basil for salad of watercress or something you know for for greenery and cities the idea that that's going to produce nutritious food. I think is faulty because we have a nutritious food now everywhere and we have. Food comes from industrial egg. Both whether it's row crops or you know in vegetables or whether it's ingrained seeds and we have measured we can measure the difference and the fighter nutrients and minerals or the lack of minimum. That are in these foods so we haven't bailed him better way to make a really super nutritious food without cell yet right. I don't think we ever. What about the carbon sequestration piece of it of meaning that if you're an urban centers and you don't have soil you have all these hydroponic gardens..

gabe brown cotija monsanto buyer General mills syngenta Adm cargill franklin roosevelt jen Jen monsanto nicaragua united states
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

10:31 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The air fixes nitrogen from the air is so it is It doubles every two and a half days. If it's cold or today's it's warmer three days but proxy it doubles It is richard omega threes which is unusual for a plant and needed by this omega. Six world we live in junk food And it makes oil and It sequester carbon and the reason. We know that not that any plan doesn't do that. Every plant does but there was an event forty nine million years ago and at that time. That ppm of co two was twenty five thousand. It was pretty hot and there was no ice in the arctic and it was a freshwater lens and you had these zola of. It's called the zola event. That has all events were in the summer. It be covered with zola and then in the cooler part in the winter it would die and sink to the bottom And then the happened and within a relatively short geological time. It went down to twenty five six thousand ppm and it is ascribed to resolve presence of as well as zola can still do that. No words they can still sequester things very very rapidly so whether they're in lakes or you know or wetlands or even rivers and so forth or ponds zoellick can sequester carbon. You can harvest it. You can feed it to animals chickens. Rabbits goats right. it's like a pretty nutrient rich rich. You can put in. Your salad is delicious Right so you can make oil out of it. You can have omega three eggs if you're an egg eater and you want your ex to be much more nutritious and the rate of carbon sequestration is quite extraordinary and you could even. Although i'm sure a lot of people wouldn't want to do it. You could even put it in a river and then like the missouri go into the mississippi and and then you know a doubles and gets bigger and bigger bigger than you could take out. You're taking it out all the mississippi and then when it gets to the golf dies and it goes down to the bottom. The oil is being drilled for in the arctic. Today is dude as oliver. Was it really. Yeah oh yeah. Wow and so the interesting about interesting about it or it's in a river is cleaning the river up from both agean and pause. It'll so right now which you have in the missouri. Mississippi is run off and as it gets to the gulp. It creates huge. Algo you all go dead's on feeding albums and sargasso sea for that matter. You're going into mexico and so zola. Clean that up and so the possibilities with as oliver extrordinary. So why aren't we doing that well. Couldn't we create massive reservoirs also harvest this stuff while we're sequestering carbon. Hey you know in edited drawdown. We talked about asparagus this tax forms. Which is this type of seaweed if fed in very small amounts one two percent to ruminants Like cows obviously That would reduce methane emissions from their digestion by eighty nine percent or four plus years ago. And it's happening. There are a dozen companies that did not exist at that time. Have the patents of this to competing there cultivating ed it. Also they're actually selling. It is being used and so forth so it took a very short time. I think a zola is in the same place where we'd in discover it. Obviously that's not what we're saying. But i think it might come to a broader understanding and awareness now so that people will do something that and there's so many imaginative ways that you can use and it has so many positive and beneficial effects in our kind of dualistic way of looking at things though i'm imagining like oh we think this is some panacea and we'd dump it in the mississippi and there's some downstream you know ecological ecosystem implication that. We're not foreseeing and it's invasive but it can invade running water because water keeps going on so But i'm sure there might be but if you do it at your farm joan reservoirs her pond that whatever it is it's yours you know and so there is nothing there is no downside from that. But there's always got to look at these things very carefully we use of ever analogy just to give people a sense of scale of damned rivers if there was an zola What's it called. I don't know it's not a company or whatever that was working with the state or the country or you know hydrologist and everybody here. We're all working together. You could be pulling psalm. Carbon so much food. I mean and you know you'll be replacing the soy and the crap that's being groaned of it's causing the runoff With zola which is really extraordinarily right. Because it's it's it's a bio fertilizer but it's also a great animals. Yeah you can work it into the soil you can work it into. The adult grows like crazy crazy. So what's it's like camp. It's like this is a multipurpose plant that we've overlooked. What's wrong with this picture. It's hard to find out what's wrong with it. Wow yeah the other mind blower was was this idea of rainmakers microbes in the sky. Yeah so walk me through that. Sure will it's been known for some time that not like coastal development like in spain The whole cost bra. The whole course was developed in the last thirty plus years i mean it was co mediterranean coast beaches and then it just got overrun by hotels and condos. Basically you know for northerners wind to common on something in the south in the winter. Okay but what also happened. Is that the rainfall patterns changed completely inland the summer rainfall and they know now why because those structures all on the southern coast to spain. destroyed all the wetlands. And so we have this idea that the long reign cycle is the cycle comes on the ends goes inland drops me short water cycle. Which is the rain comes up on. The land moves and drops. And there's a story our story but scientific study that was done in africa in malawi of tea plantations in a specific valley and the study came about because it had the highest concentration of hale in africa and the question was why i mean it. Just didn't make sense. Why here and not the next valley over or and or in some other country for that matter and One of the scientists Who studied it Was aware that we used to think the water nucleate s- on dust another words. How does a gas like you know. Become a liquid. It tach is attached to something as called nucleate. Water touches the water easily but it doesn't attached to other things so easily and gas. It doesn't become water And so we just assumed. For many years dustin dynamic. There's a lot of dustin atmosphere now. We know this killer bacteria and atmosphere and diverse bacteria so in a lobby he actually took the hail melted and then basically looked at the bacteria that was in there and sequence to and discovered that the bacteria that was predominant in the hill was specific to the tea plants in that bali and all only in that bali either words t and agriculture was creating the precipitation so the atmosphere is literally a microbiome populated by the plant life on the ground absolute and always has been and the diversity of the plant life. The quality of that plant life dictates what that atmospheric microbiome. An intern plays a large role in the rainfall. The extent of the rainfall the quality of the rainfall chest like the the sahara desert which is the opposite completely. Dry dust storms come to sahara. You can see them. I mean from satellites across the atlantic ocean and they go south into the amazon and the rainfall amazon benefits hugely from the dust. From this and so we are just discovering that we but scientists discovering these extraordinary relationships. And what we do know. Is that the temperature that we experience eighty percent of that is caused by the highest fear. Not by the atmosphere and that is to say hydros fears is key. It could be the clouds but it can be the fog but it can be really the transportation of the plants and the soil around us and that could lower surface temperature by one two cents in sometimes more so the the other aspect that is that our deforestation are overgrazing and our agricultural methodology..

zola richard omega mississippi arctic oliver extrordinary missouri zoellick mediterranean coast beaches oliver Mississippi spain mexico golf dustin southern coast africa malawi hale
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:52 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Promoting equity for all. We'll be right back with more awesome. But i were brought to you today by birch living a mattress company that makes the best and most affordable organic sustainable all natural mattresses around most of you know my sleep story but for those that don't i've had my struggles with disrupted sleep. Struggles ameliorated in large part by a supremely crafted mattress by birch sustainably made with organic materials. It is hands down the best mattress i've ever owned. Everybody in my family sleeps on one. And i think they would all wholeheartedly agree. Plus your purchase gives back to the environment. One percent of each purchase is donated to the national force foundation which restores our national. Boris and birch purchases carbon sets for each mattress. Sold good for you in good for your conscience and right now. Birch is offering two hundred dollars off all mattress orders for our listeners. Just birch i. R. h. living dot com slash ritual for two hundred dollars off your mattress. Order it comes with an industry leading twenty five year warranty ship straight to your door completely free and you get to try it out for one hundred nights risk free so go to birch living dot com slash ritual for two hundred dollars off your mattress order and finally were brought to you today by. Woo woo boop boop. Gosh dang it just the best fitness sleep and recovery tracker in the universe at least the known universe who knows what those aliens are up to. But i digress. Okay rich but what is it. What is woop well friends. Let me tell you what it is. Woop is a small device strapped to your wrist. You might have seen mine and photos or videos. Because i never ever take it off and what it does..

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:35 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You know we'll be flooded. We'll be under water by the end of the century or before and so our work has cut out for us. But i do think that the most important thing is that there's one hundred and forget the number of one hundred eighty some odd countries that are participating in this ipc report and it's called consensus science. And there's no such thing as consensus scientists evidentiary and what i meant. Was that you know the vatican or saudi arabia venezuela china russia could actually tamp down the language and the summary report and every country in the world signed on to this report. No dissent notice That's but then it. Then it becomes an issue of translating that into action and going yeah reports that partisan politics has no excuse on this point on every country. Every country is going to suffer. There is no place that will be exempt. I can think of a few american politicians who will find an excuse yesh when they're they're indebted to their constituencies and you know the big corporations that exist in their in their respective territories in the lobbying efforts that go into maintaining a certain status quo and kind of placating the public so that they can continue to push agendas and legislation that our corporate favorable and allow these bad actors to perpetuate their bad actions. No question i think however that at regeneration we're working with A group of Marketing and communications people who by their own words left the dark side and wins the world to work with social justice. Women's issues sex trafficking voting is shoes. You know and they're working with us a. Go article group dot org and what we're looking at is what figure ground shift can be precipitated. That has occurred before one of them was for example. Gatien gay pride. So in two thousand and ten you could run for congress in the united states and basically deprecate. Lgbtq get away with it still go away get elected in two thousand to same party said oh. My daughter happens to be a lesbian. You know i'm all set and it was like. Oh okay. it's okay. I'm okay you know because you couldn't get elected two years later or at least not not reliably put it that way and not saying there isn't tremendous anti lg in the conservative in the evangelistic movement. There is of course you know in other countries but but the the last month was gay pride month and so multicolored flags this everywhere you saw. So what was that shot from. Shamed the pride while created by the community itself okay so the same thing as holds two with climate which is that has been marked by shame by the way guilt. Fear threat blame. That hasn't worked. And it's made people numb Is people tune out It has created Antipathies you know fossil fuel workers. You know who work at chevron or someplace feel like they're being blamed is fourth and so what is the ground shift where people can feel that we are together and we all can make a difference in not just again by your cold. Water washing machine better. I mean by coming together. You know and the ways in which people have always come together. That's we are social beings. We're we're very social and So that's what we're looking at right now is what is it. The will bring us together around climate and what brings us together is when you start to parse the the the distinct solutions even though there's systems they're connected is that they life for everyone they make a better life so that if you look at in. The absence of climate science or extreme weather said good. Not good. We do not. Do you wanna do every one of them every one of them And i think what we generation the pointed tries to make is that we have focused so for so long on on that there is a small select intelligent informed finance group of people who going to solve the problem and we've used the term future existential threat like that. This is the future existential threat over and over and over and over. Like you should do something because you know and That doesn't work And never has worked and what it what generation is saying. Is that the solutions that address global warming actually address meeting current human needs. And what we've got to do is director selves to each other is four point one billion people who wake up every morning and the only thing they can think about is current human needs. There are needs. It could be food. It can be income. Gabby a job. It could be safety. It could be food security back to food getting kids to school getting them a school affording books. I mean it goes on and on This is what the book of humanity wakes up with every morning. They are not going to be active in a climate movement. And we don't need quote people who are really trying to better their own lives to be active in a climate movement but they do need renewable energy. They do need electricity. They do need clean water. They do need better farming techniques they do need cleaner food. They do all these things that are synonymous with actually reverse global warming. Actually be versus human sufferers.

Gatien venezuela vatican saudi arabia russia china lg chevron congress united states Gabby
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:13 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Let's talk about the environment. Okay let's talk about. Should we do that. Yeah it's good to see you first of all thank you so much i feel like i'm in your presence. I appreciate that i am. Yeah we we had all these plans of getting together and doing all kinds of stuff and and obviously the pandemic put that aside But i'm happy to be in your presence today and thank you so much really the occasion of course being this beautiful extraordinary new book. That's about to come out regeneration ending the climate crisis in one generation. You gave me this gorgeous. Folio version of the book only a few exist in the world. Yes that's true as to. I'm very grateful for that. So thanks yeah it. Just just a special people i. It's exciting. It's been a minute since you've got a book out. Yeah april seventeen was the last book. Draw down and this one. is coming out in about six countries almost at the same time actually fifty four countries right now in september right from the get. Go out of the gate. That's unusual very confident. Yeah this time. The the publishers are last time they were kind of waiting and watching looking now johnson. Seventeen languages right That's one starts out well. That book was a groundbreaker for myself. And so many people and i feel like this book is the perfect. Follow up to that in that It strikes perhaps an even more optimistic tone when it comes to solving this great existential crisis that we find ourselves in. But i think the overarching theme of it is inclusion like inclusivity and it's very empowering in the sense that it's it's like letting us into all these amazing things that are occurring and how we can participate in them In so many different ways. Absolutely i i just like everybody else knows. Since i live in a world i look at the world and try to figure it out. You know i mean. I'm no different whether i'm a journalist or not doesn't make any difference. Does that to a certain extent journalists might do a bit more because they tried to share what they see and what i have seen not just sense. Drought was created. But before that but certainly since then is a world is going into crisis around climate and more rapidly them was expected and at the same time even though i would say a majority of the people in the united states and europe are apathetic sympathetic understand the basic hawes and affects They're not doing anything They're not engaged. So how could it be the he is. See the writing on the wall. You see this impending crisis you getting very visceral sense of what's happening on the ground and floods and and and cold and heat and drought and et cetera. And yet there is still this disengagement regeneration was really about looking at that not blaming people for being disengaged but trying to understand why we are lozada's disclu myself but generally but what would engage us. was prohibiting it stopping us. And what would open up humanity to the idea of working together. I think from a psychological perspective. There doesn't seem to be a meaningful on ramp for people in the sense that i think you're correct. There's an overwhelming awareness. Now that didn't exist. Perhaps even a decade ago. And i think most people are good faith actors and wanna do the right thing and recycle or do what they can but it doesn't feel like any of these things amount to very much right like i can take personal responsibility for a certain subset of decisions that i make every day. But is this really moving the needle. So there's a lack of agency or connectivity to the solutions that would really get people emotionally engaged and feeling like they actually are making a difference absolutely absolutely. I think that the so many things you heard right there want some break up. break it. open a little bit of connectivity. Which is that. The root causes of global warming is a massive disconnections between each other between people are between people and nature and nature itself which is caused by humans habitat fragmentation pollution acidification the oceans and onwards and regenerating and reversing climate crisis is really about reconnecting. Those broken strands you know. And that's what the solutions really are. You know as opposed to standalone techniques or technologies. Going to fix it. That word fix doesn't even belong in the conversation because it's not an it and you can't fix it their atmosphere is the biosphere does the same thing and we Are part of it and nature never makes mistake on the we do so. Let's look at what we're doing. And we generation is very much about alignment with the living world with the way it works and always has and so as you said what we've gone. Conversationally and sort of declared almost imperatively is individual the problem. Which is this is what you can do or should do and it's true. Those are good things recycling and use cold water wash machine and you know. Try not driving afford it. It's but i think people understand that even if they do them they know it's not sufficient to the task at hand and so actually makes people more disempowered in money way even though they're actually participating in the kind of token way and And then they look to governments. They look to the conference of the parties the u. n. framework on climate change. They look for these annual meetings. Just wanna glasgow november for something to happen. You know like hoping that politicians will get together and solve the problem if politicians knew what to do We wouldn't be in the situation. We are today. S just not gonna happen to say we say it but you know so then you feel like there's this gulf between these huge meta org institutions corporations governments and then you as an individual and that's again what regeneration it's time to say. Well wait a minute. That's not where not where the solution is gonna come right. Regeneration.

lozada johnson europe united states glasgow
"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:48 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Organic farmers and people who want to reduce meat consumption to benefit planetary health long term amen to that so visit nevada's organics dot com slash ritual for a limited time offer of thirty percent off your entire order of organic superfoods. That's nevada organics nav. I t. a. S. organics dot com slash rich role for a limited time. Offer of thirty percent off your entire order of organic superfoods. Okay paul hawkins. I think part of the problem when it comes to talking about climate change how to address it out to solve it really revolves around agency. It's a problem so huge so existential that it's difficult for individuals everyday people to even engage with it in any kind of meaningful way in part because we feel just kind of powerless to make any kind of significant difference but in truth there really are many on ramps to participate in the solution and paul is a wonderfully gracious charitable experienced and cypher to explore these various paths. So this is a conversation that extends beyond all those statistics beyond fear and anger and blame to confront not only what needs to be done. But what each and every one of us actually can do now to further practical currently available solutions both individual and systemic all of which orient around this idea of regeneration which is essentially a call to action that we've justice climate biodiversity equity and importantly human dignity into this beautiful seamless tapestry of action policy and transformation to live more symbiotically with the planet that supports us. So today we cover it all including perhaps most importantly the state of mind we all need to maintain to heal our earth and secure the future of humankind policy friend. He's a mentor. he's a lighthouse and truly a man who has indelibly shaped my perspective. My philosophy and my actions when it comes to ecological responsibility. It's an honor to host him today. I think this is a remarkable exchange and my intention and my hope is that his message will do for you. What had has and continues to do for me so without further. Ado this is me and paul hawkins..

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:56 min | Last month

"one generation" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"That's what the solutions really are. You know as opposed to standalone techniques or technologies. You know this going to fix it. That word fix doesn't even belong in the conversation because it's not an it and you can't fix it the atmosphere is the biosphere does the same thing and we are part of it and nature. Never make mistake on the we do. I mean if we want to turn the death of there is in the capital ordering a good job and then what do you do with that capital. What meaning does money have. If it's an unlivable planet rich role. Podcast greetings dwellers of the biosphere. We call earth it. Is i rich roll. This is my show. Welcome aboard returning today for his second. Drop on the podcast. The first being our live. Big event in los angeles a couple of years ago with q. is an icon. A true legend one of the environmental movements leading voices paul hawk in in addition to paul's profound work as a planetary change agent. Paul is also an entrepreneur. He founded both erawan markets and smith and hawkin and author of eight books including the groundbreaking new york times bestseller draw down. Paul is now back with an astonishing beautiful new book called regeneration and the climate crisis in one generation as well as a corresponding nonprofit by the same name regeneration dot org which together constitutes collective work that aims to guide and inspire the burgeoning climate movement. Few more things. About paul and the powerful and empowering conversation to come. But i if.

paul hawk erawan markets hawkin Paul los angeles paul new york times smith
TCL’s Foldable Phone Now on Indefinite Hold

Android Central Podcast

01:44 min | Last month

TCL’s Foldable Phone Now on Indefinite Hold

"What if a company came along with a phone that looked an awful lot like the galaxy flip but cost hundreds of dollars less. Would that lee that he'll do for you well. You won't because it. It's not going on sale for all of this year. We have been. I have been repeating. Tcl's promised to itself into the rest of us that tcl mobile would ship a foldable and affordable foldable by the end of twenty twenty one Thanks to what. I take to be as a combination of what i know. And what speculating Component shortages Perhaps a lack of enthusiasm On the carriers part to push foldable 's and This part is for sure. Tcl's own admission that they couldn't deliver the experience they want at the price. They wanted to hit quite with this generation. They have decided that the time is not right. They're going to eat eat crow or whatever expression you wanna use. They're going to say sorry. We can't deliver this like we said in the time we said but we have a couple of samples. We'd like to send it to you to a couple of you to show you that. We are working on this. It's not vaporware we haven't brought you to these trade shows for three years and showed you samples just to get our name in the headlines we are. We are making a good faith effort to break into the foldable space. And here's what it would have looked like so they sent a mostly finished version of what they are. They're code name is chicago and it is very much like a first generation flip with some aesthetic spec and functionality differences. Some better some worse.

Tcl Mobile TCL LEE Chicago
We Can’t Trust American Institutions To Protect Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:14 min | Last month

We Can’t Trust American Institutions To Protect Us

"Now one of the reasons why we are in such chaotic times because the institutions that we used to trust to say no to the activists and be a bulwark against the radicals have done the exact opposite you see. We need institutions as backstops and constance in times of chaos and disorder in fact chaos and rebellion is the human norm having something that is permanent. Something that is around. The idea of transcendent order is very rare. So nine hundred eighties. Republicanism focused heavily on building up the united states military institution on building up private schools and institution building up corporations and institution. Yet as you look at the landscape in america do you actually trust those institutions. Are they communicators and are they. Are they stalwarts for defending natural rights. Children and passing down values from one generation to the other.

America
Echo Devices to Support Matter

Voice in Canada

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Echo Devices to Support Matter

"Hey hey Terry here and I want to tell you about another announcement that Amazon made at the Lexi live event a couple weeks ago. These have been going on for a long time. I know because they announced so much. We're almost at the end of the announcements but it's fun to talk about the new things that are coming down the pipe. And this one is that Lexi is going to be incorporating this new interoperability protocol called matter. And it is aimed at making it easier for customers to know that their smart home devices will work with all major voice services. So matter again is an open source cross platform standard and it is coming later this year. Amazon says that it will be updating just about every single one of the plugged in echo devices. In fact it's only the first generation echo and echo dot and echo tap that are not going to be updated to this protocol called matter. So this will be interesting. I think it's great. It'll help us to make our smart homes a little more seamless and make sure that things work together. And we can look for that coming out soon. The general idea is that matter seems to be launching in late 2021. Will that launch in the U.S. first compared to Canada? I don't know it wouldn't be surprised but that's kind of the timeline

Amazon Terry Lexi U.S. Canada
The 7 Keys to Health & Longevity

Mind Pump

02:13 min | 2 months ago

The 7 Keys to Health & Longevity

"Back when i was You know in college. I actually went to usc to study study cells in petri jewish and there are you know i studied these lung cells. And there's two type along. Sales one is type. One cell that basically lines the long participates in gas exchange. Then there was the type to sell which like a stem cell that could turn into type one cells but it also helps secrete something called surfactant which keeps the lung moist. Well we studied how these cells behaved in a petri dish and we started to learn. Okay well when does this. One cell differentiate into another cell. How does this help behave well. When we started to change the nutrients in the medium. We started to behave different. We started to change the temperature. It's hard to shift its behavior. In terms of how rapidly divided which changed the light and it started to change so turns out what determines the behavior or the state of a cell is not actually the dna. But it's actually all the energetic environment that's around that terms how the cell behaves and that. Dna's constantly listening again moment to moment with all that energetic environment right and what controls that environment everything because you dna's constantly listening but to learn everything and there's an infant amount of things that affects ourselves is going to help you or me but there are actually seven main things. In the book sleep nutrition movement emotional stress mastery relationships in purpose our thoughts and mindset those seven things is the eighty twenty rule or the ninety ten rule as to whether or not you can be in the thrive state which gives you access to optimal health longevity performance. Or if your cells think you're in stress because you haven't mastered those seven things. They think that you're in actually stress dangerous state. That's when inflammation increases immunity decreases. That's when you have chronic symptoms. That's when you get chronic disease this totally supports the studies on jeopardy. Where they'll they'll notice that you know people in this particular part of the world live on average ten or fifteen or even twenty years longer than people in this part of the world. it must be the genetics. Then they'll do. They'll follow their offspring. That move to a different part of the world within one generation their life span matches the place that they live

USC
Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Hello my name. is joanna from joanna eve Business i am from new york city in currently live in new york city. Beautiful so joanna. Please tell us about how you grew up so you were born and raised in new york. Your family is from trinidad and tobago to pick So talk to us about what it was like growing up. First generation trinidadian beggaring american. So i pretty much grew up in queens raised and which is a very diverse Borrow but for the most part. I grew up in lake southeast. Clean so There's more like black. American on some lessening americans in that area but Some of my older brothers and sisters. They live from brooklyn In mike flatbush Areas too so. We grew up pretty american like eating on foods. I for the most part mate myself and my older brother like the three young. Have six brothers and sisters. So i'm the thanks Of seven so Older brother anger sister will like the baby so we pretty much grew american but very much caribbean on around the holidays. We always ate Caribbean foods Listen to korea music.

Joanna New York City Lake Southeast Tobago Mike Flatbush Trinidad Queens New York Brooklyn Caribbean Korea
"Not Your Mother’s Tiffany" Campaign Sparks Backlash

Pop Fashion

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"Not Your Mother’s Tiffany" Campaign Sparks Backlash

"And company has a new marketing campaign. Just about everyone hates it so in this campaign which is online and it's on posters. There is pictured some variety of a young woman looking real cash wearing a piece of tiffany jewelry. She's wearing like high wasted jeans a tank top kind of thing and the big black taxed just says not. Your mother's tiffany. This is the first big campaign since. Lvmh bought tiffany's last year for remember it. Sixteen billion dollars. Then the pandemic and people weren't exactly buying jewelry which was not a good luck for tiffany. The rams of laying low and now that we are emerging from the pandemic fingers crossed. It is clear to just about everyone in the jewelry and luxury markets that tiffany is sort of olden dusty and could use new energy. They just recently pulled this trick where they made everything yellow including their bosses. They were disliked throwing off the norm. We didn't even talk about that but it did a yellow campaign yes and they try that at the same time. It's also becoming clear that gen z. Is ready to spend money but they are very particular about where they're spending money. You have this campaign that seems to be targeting gen z. Or a very young millennial but at the same time you are discounting you meaning tiffany. Tiffany is discounting their core market. Which is women are at the very least millennial age if not older right discounting completely forgetting that they spend money with you. They don't seem to want to be told that the brand isn't for them anymore. So social media hates it analysts and branding experts hater. I hate it. I think it feels cheap and to like some up. How cheap this is. I really liked this quote from marketing brew. They had a bit from katie. Keating who is founding partner and co chief creative officer at an ad agency called fancy. And here's what she had to say boy. Do i have a lot of feelings about this campaign. None of them good. It's too easy. It's been done plenty of times in one version or another to say desperately. We're not old fashioned. No really. we're not it's like they're apologizing for the previous one hundred eighty four years. Yeah and then. There's the issue of tossing one generation away in favor of another not cool especially when that other generation has been loyal customers for

Tiffany Lvmh Rams Keating Katie
INTERVIEW With Christina of Melanin Travels Magic

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:45 min | 2 months ago

INTERVIEW With Christina of Melanin Travels Magic

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location in the name of your business crew. Hi everyone manages christina I'm originally french guy. Benza was born in pirates. My burned cell phone From looping second generation I'm currently in london. I've been here for seven years in a row. Now and the name of my businesses millennium travel magic It's a group tool company focused on black re-teach alasia tools So you grew up in france. Tell us what that experience was like. So you're first generation than your parents came from waterloo to france correct. Yes yes so. Guadeloupe is a french of Abutment so technically we are fringed but we leave eight thousand kilometers away and so That yet my. I was specialty vision. Guadalupe mike burns. Send me to my grandmother. So that's why. I'm a bit more connected than most people. I guess also I was raised by a lot of people in my family. Which makes me someone very social sociable. Because i had lots of nineties my mom had me young twenty one and the brothers and sister the youngest twelve and thirteen so for example On wednesday every wednesday take me to cinema to mcdonnell. So i used to have little of have from both sides because my mom gets me again. That was the first girl in the family.

Benza Guadalupe Mike Burns France Christina Guadeloupe Waterloo London Mcdonnell
The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

teikirisi

01:45 min | 3 months ago

The Story of Jose Marti: Poet, Patriot, Dreamer

"Monty was born in louisiana on january twenty eighth eighteen fifty three aquarius. His parents were poor. spanish immigrants. His father was sent to cuba. As first sergeants from valencia. Yeah and so it. Only sixteen years of age as modesty was already arrested and accused of disloyalty to spain. It's interesting that he is one generation off from being spanish but at the young age of sixteen is already against spanish but he saw a lot of atrocities at the hands of the spanish. Exactly when we get into what life is like in cuba. During that time a lot of it was influenced by the spanish colonial rule. In so back will at the as early life. After he was arrested in accused he was sentenced to force labor. He got actually pretty lucky. Because he was granted clemency and deported to spain. The reason i say he was lucky is because A lot of other folks during this time. Who got accused of something like this loyalty. They were sent to the firing squad. So this teenager rebel. Who doesn't like spain and gets accused of disloyalty to spain get sent to spain. And what does he end up doing while you know what they say. I can allow gondola threat. Dasa so he gets to spain and he continues with his bullshit he continues making writings against the spanish and he specifically writes political prison in cuba where he described his experiences in cuba and critiques spanish further handling of him as a prisoner and further handling of

Spain Cuba Monty Valencia Louisiana Dasa
Briana of Black Queer Travel Guide, Fringe of Colour Films

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:54 min | 3 months ago

Briana of Black Queer Travel Guide, Fringe of Colour Films

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name or your from your current location and the name of your business i wanted. My name's brianna forgot her from washington. Dc currently based in edinburgh risk auckland's or the united kingdom depending on who you're asking and i am the grand development manager for the black rear travel guide am also the creative director of festival fringe of color films which is an alternative arts festival for black people and people of color internationally. Sometimes i'm not always also. Sometimes i should say most also the co director of an organization called. We are here. Scotland is a community interest company that supports black people people of color indigenous folk in the arts and creative industries across scotland. So many hats talk to me please. About growing up in the united states of america. I believe you in the dc area. I'm not sure if you had an awareness of age of seven that you had anxiety but like talk about all of that also don't know when you started to experience chronic pain like tell us your story gave us the tea please. Yeah so. I grew up in washington d. c. born to an african american family that basically migrated up north During the great migration of a lot of black families from the south and basically that side of the family was based in and around the washington. Dc area the Metropolitan area the dmv. I still family in north carolina and on my dad's side of the family. I m first generation begajah which is my last name or in the united states. My dad was from angola which is two countries of south africa on the western coast.

Brianna Washington Auckland Edinburgh United Kingdom Scotland United States DC North Carolina Angola South Africa Western Coast
AI's Economic Impact in a Future of Digital, Virtual Immersion

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

02:16 min | 3 months ago

AI's Economic Impact in a Future of Digital, Virtual Immersion

"Bronwyn glad to have you with me here and you and i have been in touch for quite some time before. Finally this interview together and this seems like the topic to talk about before. We t- ops or where the virtual space is taking us. I want to get your perspective. I've seen some of your tweets on this as to what are the forces that are pulling us more into virtual spaces we're all on zoom calls now. Video games are more immersive when you look at. What's pulling the human experience into something that's more digital than physical. What are those big forces in trends for you. Let's suppose you can look at it. From cushion approved specs of i think in the near term we looking for people being pushed into these spaces by the just general creative constraints of twenty twenty literally having to work from home djing lockdowns and a lot of people so adapt that forms that adopt two platforms. That perhaps they wouldn't be resistant to in the pastas security old people who might not be comfortable with using virtual environments to interact with banana field. They have to and of course. The united states is the mother of invention in. We have to do these things. We can adapt not that terrible candidate. But i think that's a superficial on there. In a more borton on cigars back to the cool trends but have been pulling society interim much mobridge allies face who actually very very long time as more and more also of earthy value abandoning placed on our lives in hosted online. It makes sense the follow. Their without physical body is not time in our tension. I think some of the reasons behind that you wanna get quite deep into it. Is that old concept of the difference between expectations and reality and at the moment particularly in the developed world. I'd like to speak about it as being developed as e. d. as in kind of finished complete. There's a lot of hopelessness particularly now. Mind young people about how much impact and how much six six they can have in the real world and it's becoming easier to make amok fuel cells in a virtual main to face is in the real world and we have to talk about this honesty. Most of the developed will my generation and a millennial. Unfortunately i don't take responsibility for my generation a lot of us first generation to literally not able to meet our parents standard of living

Bronwyn Borton United States
The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

Bon Appetit Foodcast

02:40 min | 4 months ago

The Foragers Dilemma with Alexis Nikole Nelson

"Wanna ask you about your background. So i know you're not the first generation of of nelson or whatever surname. There is on your maternal side in this in the ohio. You've talked a bit about your mom's relationships with plants and what you learned from her. But i also know it goes even further back than that. So how far back. You want to tell me about how that kind of relationship with the land is part of your family. Oh absolutely so. We're very lucky because not not every person of color especially not every black person in the united states is lucky enough to be able to trace a lot of their familial history back on my mom's side of the family with her father they'd been they've been in the united states since the sixteen hundreds they were farmers in new england after the revolutionary war. And with my mom's mom's side of the family with my my nanna. She was a second generation. Cape verde an immigrant to the cape cod area and with a lot of bigger and immigrant families. A lot of them brought foraging practices with them and i mean my nanna was like working in the cranberry bogs in the nineteen thirties. To help better support her family and bats a whole lot of exposure to plant lice. But you just get to learn about with each passing day while you're out there so tell me more about that. She was picking the cranberries and selling them for a while. Picking the cranberries for a someone else's business which one of many reasons why i think being a forager of colour is very revolutionary as because nine times out of ten historically in even in the present day you're a person of color and are attending the land it is typically for someone else's game and that person tends to be richer and unfortunately often quieter than you and so when you go back far enough has some sort of connection to foraging because none of us would be here wasn't for that action but for the indigenous people who are already here like that. That was food that was eating and then a lot of those indigenous folks in turn taught black people who were enslaved. Those same tips and tricks in about the same kinds of plants because as a black person living on a plantation. You're lucky if you were getting enough to eat to sustain the kind of duress you were putting your body there every day so it was smart to know how to forage. How trap how to fish how to hunt so you could better take care of yourself. Better take care of your family and the rest of your community

United States Nelson Cape Verde Ohio Cape Cod New England
"one generation" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"one generation" Discussed on KTOK

"Are from the first generation of dream station products. Nearly 100 New Covid 19 cases reported in Oklahoma. The State Health Department announced yesterday that 99 new cases have been confirmed since Friday, bringing the statewide total to 454,884 17 more Covid 19 deaths were reported, bringing the state's provisional total to 8500 and 46. New details are emerging in that attack by an unruly passenger on Delta Airlines crew members that caused the plane to make an emergency landing at Will Rogers World Airport. Tanner Carlson reports. The plane was en route from Los Angeles to Atlanta on Sunday. Now we're learning that 34 year old Stefan Duncan had been stashing food, trash and tennis balls with writing on them around the plane. Oklahoma City, police say Duncan gave a crew member a note that said a terrorist was on board and to contact the captain's authorities say Duncan also used the flights P a system to tell passengers the flight was being taken over and they should be ready to put on their oxygen mask. Duncan was arrested. The FBI is investigating a woman shot in Oklahoma City. It happened last night near Rockwell and Britain. Police say three men approached her as she sat in her car and asked her for a ride. The woman refused and they shot her. She was taken to a hospital in critical condition. 13 year old boy continues clinging to life after Midwest City Police say the team was shot at point.

Los Angeles Delta Airlines Oklahoma Atlanta Stefan Duncan Sunday Tanner Carlson 8500 454,884 99 new cases Duncan Rockwell 46 Oklahoma City FBI Friday three men Midwest City Police last night yesterday
"one generation" Discussed on Strength to Strength

Strength to Strength

02:27 min | 6 months ago

"one generation" Discussed on Strength to Strength

"All kinds of people knew. It wasn't just paul. It was all of the apostles and he trained timothy so timothy could train the next generation hand the faith to them and he said prepare them so that they can teach others also so this would be passed from one generation to the next so. The faith was complete by the time. The last apostle died a john which would been around the year one hundred ad and have go back and see. What did christians believe that type period. Obviously the.

paul one generation one hundred christians timothy
President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

Dark Secret Place

02:07 min | 6 months ago

President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

"Talking about international reaction from From around the world has specifically from from turkey about prisoner biden statement earlier today the hundred six anniversary in what's known as genocide day. The president said quote each year on this day. We remember the lives of all those who died in the ottoman era armenian genocide and recommit ourselves to preventing such an atrocity from ever occurring again beginning on april twenty four nine hundred fifteen with the arrest of armenian intellectuals and community leaders in constantinople by ottoman authorities. One million armenians were deported massacred remarks to their deaths campaign to extermination than he. He goes on important thing. Is he says armenian genocide and the turks almost immediately. The turkish foreign ministry almost immediately reacted. The president actually had a phone call with president earlier. This week. I don't recall the readout of it. But the g word wasn't in there and it really has gotten to the point for the turks. The are the last people in the room stomping around and that it. It really doesn't matter what they do. They're not the reason we tread softly for the last sixty years with. Because turkey was a key cornerstone there in the balkans in nato. We pre position nuclear weapons on on turkey. We had our first generation of ballistic missile nuclear nuclear missiles in turkey at the time the cuban missile crisis. They were key and they were they were key goud right up until the dissolving of the soviet union and then we. We've seen this rise in turkish nationalism. And here's sort of the problem. Is that the. Turks are fiercely fiercely fiercely proud of their own history and they're turkishness but but denying that. This actually was a campaign that the turks portrays ono no no. It was a civil war. And you know things happen. It was

Turkey Turkish Foreign Ministry Biden Goud Balkans Nato Soviet Union ONO
Interview With Shar of the Xpat App

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:47 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Shar of the Xpat App

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. I wanted thank you for having me. Shar winter from detroit michigan currently living in lisbon portugal. I am the founder and creator of the At in expect chats community created for the black ex-pat community so talk to me about detroit so is like detroit by way of dominica jamaica by way of detroit. Talk about your caribbean experienced up in detroit. Yes i am. First generation american on both. My parents are from detroit. I mean from jamaica. Mom actually came over to the. Us she was pregnant with me. Solve almost four to make With my sister in tow my sister was about three at the time My dad was already over near living in florida on. We went up to michigan where my grandmother was in. That's how we ended up in detroit because my grandma had come over about maybe eighteen years prior and you know for job opportunities so my family's from a pretty remote town in my mother's side in jamaica call in you know is really really remote mountainous region of jamaica not at all the tourist spots by casey nine months ago. So yeah it's always acts. My family like how did you end up in the cold. Each in verses jamaica. Because you know where my dad would make sense right. You're miami many caribbean people down. The air is kinda like you're still at home a little bit by year groping he choi move to the suburbs when i was about heading to fifth grade of detroit outside of detroit and then after that went to school in atlanta s spelman. College style haven't really been back home home to like or vice time

Detroit Jamaica Michigan Lisbon Dominica Portugal Caribbean Florida Casey United States Miami Choi Atlanta
Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

Therapy for Black Girls

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

"Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr g and q. It's a pleasure to be in conversation with you. yes it is. I'm so glad that you were able to squeeze into your schedule. And i would love for you to start bunches telling us a little bit about yourself as well as your practice. And what brought you into the field of psychology. Sure allegra-d delight to warm first generation afro-caribbean gender queer being and i am a writer. I'm a psychologist public speaker of british chaplain. I always tell people if it's something to do with women as if it's about liberation than that's what i center and that's what i do so. My clinical practice focuses much on the liberation of by poc and lgbtq mines and so that will look like somatic work. Existential work afro-centric work when i do a lot of trauma or work and they've been doing backer last over fifteen years at this point. We just stopped counting after ten. Yeah so a lot of people who find their way to me seem to be change. Makers activists men people who really appreciate the process of growth and transformation in their own lives but intergenerational. You know i'm always so inspired by how people in psychology how to just make their own spaces in like figure out how to use what we've been taught but then transform it you know we're communities that are not typically what we're trained on so i would love to hear like how you've been able to kind of do continuing education or other work that has allowed you to like expand your practice in this way. I feel like a was really blessed for the school. That i went to i went to the chicago school professional psychology and chicago and they were so community based and so from there. Learn to just go to the community to learn about whomever and what what wasn't covered in school.

Dr G British Chaplain Caribbean Chicago School Professional Ps Chicago
"one generation" Discussed on The Impossible Mission Omni-Feed!

The Impossible Mission Omni-Feed!

02:42 min | 9 months ago

"one generation" Discussed on The Impossible Mission Omni-Feed!

"But it's like how through the cycle of console releases. They'll release their own console. And please don't give angry beef in the comments below because we know this is a controversial opinion is nowhere to do. An episode called is playstation four xbox one generation a good generation. Vote a niang some people. The closed on the title and the tagline of show impossible mission is entirely possible about video games. Devout pissing someone off yet But after the playstation two to see this is going to be controversial. I i would say that the any s masa system era of gaming and by the. I'm not just talking about console talking about just across. The ball was actually better than the playstation three era in terms of creativity in development. You off like memory. My memories of air. Kind of hayes of euphoria. But only just. I'd say i'd say it's a very close call between those two generations. I land playstation. Four is kind of bomber. The bottom of the pile not saying playstation four is a bad generation. Is just. It's not memorable memorable moments memorabilia. Bits memorable parts as a whole. Yeah not really been kind. Wakes ostrom yet has is being kind of like barbecue sauce and you get at home and it basically just browns us. That's what it has been. Tests brown and on bombshell. I think we have to call this a dare. Because i'm getting rude and that's a good time to end an episode i'm green williamson and i liked films starving popstars. I like films of bounce popstar us. I like films which have set design by pop stance probably going to bed. Father comically think of one of those. Anyway this is why. I launched the choose new podcast pop. Scream where every week make an guest host. Take a look at one fell me. The starving by over bouncing pop star and by pop could mean anything from heavy metal. Bloop was discord to hip hop and we analyze it. The lentil asleep asking all of the big questions at human favorite spike scalp richard e. grunts playschool and even giving answers with our level of research and schnaps..

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