35 Burst results for "One Customer"

President Vladimir Putin's influence on everyday life in Russia is spreading  to fashion

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

President Vladimir Putin's influence on everyday life in Russia is spreading to fashion

"President president Vladimir Vladimir Putin's Putin's influence influence on on everyday everyday life life in in Russia Russia is is spreading spreading to to fashion fashion with with the the launch launch of of the the first first potent potent branded branded clothing clothing store store the the potent potent team team store store is is run run by by the the federal federal ministry ministry of of industries industries and and trade trade in in is is that that Moscow's Moscow's main main International International Airport Airport the the clothing clothing has has the the colors colors of of the the white white blue blue and and red red Russian Russian tricolour tricolour flag flag with with the the logo logo Putin Putin team team Russia Russia because because they they did did that that because because the the general general director director of of the the brand brand Dimitri Dimitri Shishkin Shishkin says says he he has has been been given given the the green green light light to to launch launch the the project project by by the the Russian Russian president president himself himself what what was was up up with with a a shiny shiny and and he he says says every every detail detail every every textile textile was was calibrated calibrated and and honed honed only only when when we we were were one one hundred hundred percent percent convinced convinced that that we we could could create create a a high high quality quality product product we we launched launched the the opening opening of of the the retail retail chain chain Alexander Alexander unless unless you you have have was was one one of of the the first first customers customers he he bought bought a a red red baseball baseball cap cap with with Russia's Russia's coat coat of of arms arms at at the the navy navy hoodie hoodie he he says says the the clothes clothes are are good good and and the the ambiance ambiance is is very very pleasant pleasant adding adding new new rules rules you you lose lose a a job job he he said said I I love love Russia Russia and and respect respect the the president president I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

Russia President President Vladimir V Federal Federal Ministry Minis Main Main International Intern Putin Putin Moscow Dimitri Dimitri Shishkin Shish Putin Alexander Alexander Navy Navy Baseball Donahue Donahue
SpaceX Set to Launch First All-Civilian Crew Into Orbit

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:01 min | 9 months ago

SpaceX Set to Launch First All-Civilian Crew Into Orbit

"Is set to launch four civilians into orbit as soon as today marking a key milestone for the company. It's inspiration for flay will orbit about three hundred sixty miles from earth for at least three days before splashing back down to earth off the coast of florida. It will be the first time a crew entirely made up of civilian astronauts will be sent into orbit wsj reporter. Mike edinburgh edinburgh has more in a sense. It's kind of like a a culmination of many years of work. By nasa the agency years ago started thinking about tapping you know private sector space companies to provide it with services. Space x is one of those companies and nasa always wanted a situation where they'd have you know they'd be one customer amongst many potential customers in so that's kind of the agency wanted to sort of help. Spur a sort of private space industry that it could use in that could be used for other purposes emissions as well

Mike Edinburgh Nasa WSJ Edinburgh Florida
"one customer" Discussed on No Code No Problem

No Code No Problem

04:51 min | 9 months ago

"one customer" Discussed on No Code No Problem

"Single copy that you'd right for website so we're adding about pages Mission statements Are stories where you you For example the this feature that we just added is called a brand story and you enter a quick description of how you started your business and the reason behind it and we hope you generate Engaging stories on you know on your startup. that's that's just one example and we're also adding Some writing tools to help you with blogs awesome so like you just launched this. What state. you're in what adrian. Do you have any paying customers yet. Like like give me the traction. Yes so we actually just had her first bank customer. We are still early access. Were about to open it up to everyone and Yes so we have about sixty or so sign ups and this has been mainly just from things like twitter and talk and we just had her first customer which is Big for us. Because we're still in that. Mvp stage Where we don't have a bunch of features but the fact that People are interested in what we're what we're doing is is a good sign absolutely so like what's future vision like you know there's tolls like this out there right now that you. Cpt three like copy. A i There's there's a number of other. I'm curious like how do you see yourselves. Differentiating you know. And like how are you can combat churn. I know turns a huge issue for these toll. Love to hear your inside license that yeah churns huge And one of the things we're building out is a very basic website builder where you can easily generate copy and then throw it on a landing page And then we'll actually host it for you. So one of our strategies to reduce churn is by hosting people's websites And that's the other thing that differentiates us from things like copy and You know snazzy. I there's a bunch of them out there But yeah the are us focusing mostly on website copy as well as hosting people's websites.

adrian twitter us
Warehouse Manager Sells Twitter-Threads-as-a-Service

Side Hustle School

02:46 min | 11 months ago

Warehouse Manager Sells Twitter-Threads-as-a-Service

"That hugh alexander works as a retail warehouse manager by day. When he isn't thinking about the logistics of his job he's hanging out online looking for inspiration and ideas yet he also knows an idea is just the starting point making something in marketing. It is win. The real battle begins that was never more evident than his first attempt at starting a profitable project you had the technical know how to make a website but he fell short on finding an audience at least until matthew started noticing twitter threats now twitter threads for those who aren't familiar are a series of related tweets that tell a story or elaborate on a topic when two hundred and eighty characters isn't enough. Some people share their best tweets or connecting. Anything they feel requires the additional text for example. A thread might include a series of exercise tips or tips to improve your business. In a specific way it might be political commentary. It could be anything. In relation to matthews project. He'd seen a lot of twitter threads go viral and helped to significantly boost the poster's profile in number of followers with that audience. They could monetize their service and products at least potentially so he said about trying it for himself with his accounts and lo and behold things improved. He didn't set the world on fire overnight but his follower numbers increased after he started posting threats. Forever business-minded matthew. You saw an opportunity if twitter threads worked for others as well as himself might people be willing to pay for a service that wrote the threats for them. It was an unusual idea so he said about testing the concept. He purchased the domain name. Taas dot co that stands for twitter threads as a service and used a free website. Builder called card to launch. The site quickly card intern allowed for easy. Integration with stripe to process payments after customers paid macua. Direct them to a google form or they answered a few questions about their business objectives. That was all it took to be up and running for a cost of well under one hundred dollars being part of online communities such as indie. Hackers made validation a little easier. Matthew simply tugged on the strings and hopes of selling his twitter threads service. It didn't take too long to find his first customer and he charged fifty bucks for the first month in exchange he create ten threads and also offer scheduling as well as performance reports. Matthew analyzed customers content and audience but before actually doing the work. He made a confession. He told that customer they were his first one and he'd be using their account to learn feeling bad about it. Even offered a fifty percent refund on the purchase price. It turns out he needed to have worried. Because after the first month they were happy and wanted to keep going

Twitter Hugh Alexander Matthew Taas Dot Co Matthews Google
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"If you're new to the ecommerce space you're probably thinking what we all were in the early days where the heck starred product photography discount codes a logo thankfully. There's a really simple answer. start with your theme. You're store theme. Is the foundation of your online store. Fund picking the right theme influences. The way your store looks how it works. And more importantly how easy it is for visitors to see the value in what you're offering and convert them into paying customers with close to ten years of experience building beautiful high performing themes the that out of the sandbox are experts in knowing what it takes to make your store success from the unmatched speed of turbo to the endless customization of flex. Their themes are to look great. And more importantly help. You sell more whether you want to upgrade your existing theme or launch a brand new online store out of the sandbox has a theme for you visit out of the sandbox dot com and use promo code kurt twenty for twenty percent off their bestselling themes and my favorites flexing turbo. That's out of the sandbox dot com slash unofficial. Promo code k you. Rt to zero for twenty percent off flex end turbo. If you'd like to help us spread the joy of entrepreneurship please give us a five star view and tell your friends to subscribe. You're listening on a smartphone tamper. Swipe up over the cover of this podcast. You'll find some episode notes including links to sites we discussed and maybe some details. You missed you also find offers from our sponsors so please support our show by supporting them and thank you the unofficial shot five podcast was recorded and hosted by me cred elster produced by my business partner. Paul rita barshop five-burner agency ether cycle. Check us out at recycled dot com. Thanks for listening..

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"It's an entirely different game that you're playing and But you can look to those brands and say what are they doing that. I can do In different ways. It's taking away the like let's just copy and paste and looking from a more investigative standpoint. What are they doing. How can i deconstruct that. A bit and bring it into my brand and is there a way that i can do this. That doesn't cost me as much money as they might be spending on it Yeah exactly. I mean you have to look at like okay. What is there. what is the strategy here in. What's the tactic and try and implement that in your own business with your tools as opposed to like well. We need to slavishly copy everything. They do not practical. That doesn't particularly work. Well take what works of an apply it to your own business in whatever processes work for you right. This house of white site is really nice. Wise w. i s. I put that in the show notes but are there any other examples. you like. Oh of brands. That are doing that like kind of long game thing Bloom is another great one b. l. u. emmy they have a whole referral affiliate program built out sex recalled bloom tovia So and house of wise calls at wise women so like they're not just creating a link that's buried in your account dashboard. But they're creating movements. They're creating groups of people community by naming it by bringing them together I think bloom does like a. They're very focused brand and they do like a private instagram account. That only members of bloom tovia can Join and then they do like special stories and things like that for them. so cool. Yeah instagram account. Well and like the wise women wednesdays there zoom thing for their affiliates. It's always. I think it's like eight. Pm or something. it's acknowledging the fact that most of the women that our customers are also parents the founder of the parent of young kids And so it's like this isn't after bedtime thing. It might even be a nine pm eastern. I'm not sure But you know it's like they are the the the things that their customers need that their affiliates need whether it's a private instagram account or connecting at nine pm after the kids are in bed. It's what their customers need. And that's where i think is really important is knowing your customers really whilst you can deliver on what they actually need. What matters to them all right. Let's we've gone long. So let's wrap it up What do you want people to take away from this. I think the most important thing to do in marketing to remember that there are human beings on the other side of what you do consumers not contributed locusts no not leeches And also not robots zombies rate. They are. They're human beings who take into account a lot of different factors about why they make purchases and sometimes those those things that are taken to an into account are not your product at all so making sure that you are connecting with customers in the exact same way you would if somebody came into your house for dinner party i connecting with them telling stories sharing who you are learning more about them And the knowing that all of that leads.

instagram nine pm eastern nine pm wednesdays Bloom bloom tovia emmy house of wise u.
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"I think that that's like what the most important thing that i want to impress on. Merchants is go from being company focused to customer focused. Like stop worrying about putting your brand out there and start thinking about. How do you connect with the customers that your brand can.

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"For all of their friends and family. Because they've tried it they've built. You've built a relationship with them on the feel connected to you as a brand and you don't have that rush of we have these massive for goals and so we just need to like push product with people you get the chance to build relationship with ultimately helps you meet those q four goals and then when you have that relationship you can be much less reliant on just discounting that helps quite a bit To drive drive our profit revenue goals. And if you you're saying hey acquire the cold traffic now and so you could build them relationship. Well okay during the relationship part. You're going to pay a lot more for any traffic. You drive the closer. We get to black friday. Yeah so all right. I've got Drive them to list. I get them into the welcome series. Is there anything else there so providing the opportunities to connect with you. I think is really important one. We've talked about deliverability and any chance that somebody is replying to you is increasing your deliverability. It's also further establishing that relationship And like your connection with that brand through sms Having getting a reply you replying. And whether that was automated or not it feeling like a conversation changes how you think about that brand. You brought it up in this conversation. You might not have if you had been on the website been in the car and they never talk to you again You're right. Because i thought it was like a fun in. It's such a fun catalog. And they're doing some advanced marketing. But the thing. I have shared retold sms. Story i've you're probably the third time i've talked about it. So one hundred percent. You're right and it was because it was approached as like a customer service agent reached out was how was framed and it was totally believable. I loved it. And you're right. It was just like the most basic human and other basic things that you can do. Is you know. Let's say that relationship goes to the point that the sale is accomplished. Simply you a personal connection in the packaging I ordered supplements the other day. And i got a well. First of all. They arrived within like three or four days which was awesome and just on the packing slip. There was no there were no additional inserts. Knows it was not even a special box. It was just a box. The only way. I knew it was from the company was on the return address the on the packing slip. The someone wrote a two sentence like. Hey thanks for your first order with us. Hope you really enjoy these And they signed her name and that was it. There was no ask of me. There was no Like super branding about anything It was just a handwritten note in green pen and it stood out And and i've seen other people who order from that brand also share images of that two sentences written on their packing slip so it's obviously not unique to me. They didn't like choose me out of all customers to write a note. do they do it for everyone. But it has an impact. Because i've seen people share on social media yet still feels cool when you see that especially like when you make it. Look a little more low fidelity the way they did that adds authenticity all right so tug and cheek but maybe not what. Just got like Lined paper ripped out of a spiral notebook and then you wrote the note on that and folded them there. I mean that would. It really feels like a small business then van. Yeah i mean. I've i've ordered so many things from different brands of all sizes and there's everything from like super.

three four days one hundred percent two sentence two sentences third time First first order four goals super black friday
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"Increase your shop. Affi- sales by ten to fifteen percent overnight. This is not mission difficult. Mr hunt its mission. Impossible don't worry tom cruise. This mission isn't impossible. Just use zip. Affi- one click upsell got mobile optimized offer pages that drives sky-high conversions plus built in split testing for maximizing results. It's no wonder one click upscale has made its users an extra one hundred sixty two million dollars in sales and it only takes a few minutes to install the app launch your first upsell and start generating ten to fifteen percent more revenue overnight to start your free thirty day. Trial go to ziprecruiter dot com slash. Kurt z. p. ify dot com slash. Kurt k. u. r. t. and to get an unadvertised gift email help zip dot com and ask for the tech. Nasty bonus tech nasty. Okay so i really for new customers. I just want to drive them to an opt in so that i can get them a welcome series that will introduce them to me to the brand to the story. Our values are competitive advantages by really like drive that messing home and and do that. I have several follow ups. But i want to add to that to do that now. Like were were the you know end of spring beginning of summer ish time right now. If you're listening right when this airs doing that now allows time for the relationship to grow and if you play that little bit of longer game those customers become customers now who then have a chance to try your product and then come. Holiday are buying your product.

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"And that's why they keep coming back. And i mean in all cases hopefully our product is frigging great but you can do a lot with an okay product and building relationship because it's easy to walk away from a product and try something new. We have a million choices Even like i. I've been trying out different. Natural deodorants like nonaluminum deodorants. And there's a yeah. The aluminum is the yeah. There's a million options even when you eliminate baking soda which is apparently an era ten for me but when even when you do that even when you take like multiple ingredients out there still a dozen options. So i have all the options in the world for this very niche product. And it's the companies that i'm building relationships with through my inbox that i stick with because they treat me like a human. Do you look for companies that align with your values. How much does that play into it. And you hear people merchants talk about like. We want to tell her story. We wanna share our values at try. I definitely do. I i think i'm like a jack millennial casper So i don't have as deep of a need to have a company align with my values in my case it feels a little bit like a like. It's a really nice to have thing if you are very clearly not with my values and most likely not going to be buying from you. But i know that there is a certain audience who that's number one four. You have to align with my values. I'm going to go shop somewhere else. So it really does depend on your cost for me. It's a bonus like for sustainability. Is my thing. So i want i want the value. I wanna reliable product. I want something good. And then if it's got sustainability is part of the message you get automatic bonus points so like and then i'll i'll go for it and then you know if you're like. Hey you know we for fun. We don't see goals in vats of oil. Okay i'm not gonna go with you but you're right i'm similar. I'm like i am at the very top end of millennial if you very clearly don't align then no i'm not spending my with you but yeah for me. It's like a female and minority. Owned businesses are very important to me and So but if you aren't female or minority owned i am going to look into. Who's on your team. And if i get emails from a woman on your team or if i see faces that are not white. Men on your website You know those kinds of things are indicators to me that maybe it's okay like i might spend money there but i'm probably going to look for a female or minority owned business. I go to the about page. I've seen this behavior. In screen recordings people go like they had no heart then they go to the about page they see who they're buying from and it's the story or the team in one of the two and like oh that's why also tell people..

two a dozen options a million options one four million
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"New interface. Every day business manager drives me crazy. I've never like. I've honestly never even looked at it because i think i looked at it. You know ten years ago. When i was running my business and obviously very different product then But yeah i just feel like having that ability to connect one to one with somebody. It's they are coming to their inviting you into their house. You know we've talked before about dinner. Party strategy the remind me. I love it. I love this analogy because whole recapping a little caught customer acquisition costs through performance marketing channels so facebook. Google ads really retirement facebook ads That keeps going up. Keeps getting more expensive and it's essentially getting less and less accessible to smaller brands and so they're moving away from it for myriad of reasons and so we have to have better ways to connect with people but for facebook. Ads your advices. Hey focus on using it as a traffic acquisition channel but just to get people your list so that you can move them from. We lease them from facebook to they are part of our first person marketing. Yes yes okay. Direct now once. I've gotten them there. This is where the dinner party strategy begins. I loved it dinner strategy at dinner party. Is you know you're inviting friends to your house for dinner. And this is why. I've always loved email and now a mess in that mix is. This is a person. Your your customer. Potential customer is a person who has given you one or both pieces of very personal information which is their email address and their phone number. I'm those two. Things are not given away very freely for most people and it is an invitation to show up at the end and interface with them. When you invite someone to your house for a dinner party. You're most likely hopefully not greeting them at the door with fully pleaded meal and a fork in hand. And saying here you go but that's what we're doing when we stick a product in a facebook ad when the first email we send is a push to buy When were approaching the relationship with nothing but the purchase in mind that's where we start to lose the connection to the people So you know. I have this whole dinner. Party strategy built out and we did talk about it on the last episode. So i think if people want to hear more about it they can in-depth go back to that episode and listen i will. That episode is entitled getting customers for life through email from april twenty third two thousand nineteen episode to twenty three. I will put it in the show notes but the the intention is we are building relationships with customers over time. And when you're able to do that when you're pointing your facebook ads to an email opt in and then using email. Sms to drive relationship and to talk to people like people and not just credit card. numbers then you build. Do you build a customer for life when you follow them all over the the internet with an ad you build a customer for once and then hopefully your product is frigging great..

facebook april twenty third ten years ago two first email Google two thousand both pieces twenty three first person once one nineteen
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"If they say. Hey we're we're killing your page. We're killing your group. We're killing your ads. Whatever it is you have now lost that access. You were just leasing them. The whole time versus eating. If i have an email list in klay view they have opted in to my list to communication with me. That is now portable. I own that list. I can export that list. I can put it into something else. It's that's mine. I own that audience. And then i you know. I could sink that to facebook and access my custom audiences there. So that's how i perceived that distinction why it's important. Yeah i think. I want to take it. One step further and say first person marketing versus owned. Because i think then using the word owned has this connotation of like i own these people And generally. If i go i own you. That's not a great not a good laws so instead of like own and also. I've always had this thing about like my list. They're not a list. They are actual people. There are subscribers to a list. My list is not a group of people. I agree with you and i will challenge you if you believe that. Why do i think we should stop using the phrase consumers. I hate it. i think it's grows consumers. Are i think of locusts. Yeah that's what i think. We're just a horde of locusts descending on resource versus customer like people customer. I like that. Yeah yeah visitor visitor. All all of those are good. Disney calls them guests friend right friend. Yeah i like gas. I love places that how use words like that that feel very welcoming and family You know The yeah owned marketing first-person marketing is the ability to connect with those people directly. No matter what happens to the platform right so even flavio. Flavio could not exist tomorrow. You could still have that. Csv of every person who subscribe to your email list so that is the most powerful channel. Not just because i work at cleveland has been doing email for years. I've been doing email for so long. Because i see the power of it and i see my friends who run facebook. Ads getting frustrated with not knowing attribution not knowing the being held to court by customer by their clients who are saying how is what is the on. What we're we're investing in you running our ads. We were paying you to run our ads and the return is just not there and it has nothing to do with that person skills and building ads and everything to do with the platforms ability to serve those ads or how it how the algorithm works like in email. You're not working against an algorithm other than maybe like the primary. Tab situation is going to say beyond just deliver believed general deliverability which also is like It's like telling the weather you know you're wrong. Seventy five percent of the time but there are some you know it. It's not all magic deliverability. So there's some definitely gonna say stuff. That is actively documented deliverability there are standards and practices. Yeah versus the algorithms are always for advertising. Networks are always closely guarded secrets closely guarded constantly changing. Yes that's another reason. I don't work in facebook ads. Because i don't want to have to learn a.

Disney facebook Seventy five percent tomorrow cleveland One step Flavio flavio years first
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"Com which sells like just the most gangster pendants. You can come up with but they have these really fun licenses to go with it so you can get like just a blink doubt spiderman pending officially licensed for marco. It is one of the most fun stores. I've seen but here okay so like playing with this Added item car leave an hour later. I get a text message. That's like hey we saw you being like. Hey this is whoever we saw. You abandon your cart will you go ahead and Or did you want me to check if i get a discount for you. That was just like my engagement. Of course ever polite. If you get some to reply engagement goes way up. So i replied and i said yes and then like a minute later. Oh i see i checked. I was able to get discount for you. And it was a discount code for like ten fifteen percents that affect and i loved it. It was the best abandoned cart. sms experience. I've had yes so the top of mind. I expect to see this playing on you very soon. i did not actually purchase kurt. Elster in some blamed out spiderman. Does something just big big miami link chain and spider man. Was there a disney easy pendant. Yeah you needed his knee one to go really you know. I'm sure i'm sure it could find one. Who's got the license. yeah. I dunno disney themselves. I actually got s abandoned car from inc box and in just said it was like three hours after i had abandoned car. There and said did this. They'd make a temporary tattoos but they're like four week temporary tattoos. I did this tattoo. Catcher in to exactly the tattoo that i was looking at so. It sounds like browse abandonment. Well it was actually in my cart though so was a truly abandoned and then the next day they sent me still deciding he in case you missed it. Here's a code for your purchase so yeah. sms email. I think abandoned carts belong there and not in.

disney four week an hour later a minute later ten fifteen percents big miami link chain kurt. next day marco three hours one of the most fun Elster spiderman spider man
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"I don't i think adds have a forever purpose. They've existed since the beginning of marketing. Or maybe longer. I so i mean. We ran ads in world. War one to get people to build machines and more so like the ads have existed forever and they always will and it's a question of what ads will look like and how they this shift from company focused a customer focus. So currently it's the landscape for merchant that you're talking to is that they're moving their resources away from Ppc ads but they still need a strategy. They still need to be able to acquire customers. So how can a brand get customers if they're not if they haven't budgeted for it's not that they don't have the resources if they're saying look. We're not putting our effort into that into facebook ads. Yeah so there's a couple of ways one is. Let's consider that you've simply reduced your spend on ads. That means you're still running ads and the ads that you're running become even more important because they are less likely to be seen but when they are seeing you want them to have some kind of impact reducing your spend often increases the overall cost of.

facebook one
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"Favorite things to do is connect people who need to know about each other that is It is deeply rewarding when you introduced to people and then like a month later discovered. They're doing something really cool. And you're like wow. I sent an email and kick that off. Yeah i think it's actually one of the ways. I grew my business. So maybe this is a a thing that merchants can take away to is introducing people who need to know each other in one way or another. There's always if you have enough conversations with other people you Find out problems that they're having and you know another person who has the solution to that problem and with double optin on both sides. I want to put that caveat out there. Make sure both people are open to the introduction but then making those introductions if you do that once a week you build your network you become a person that people look to for that kind of connection and They people remember you and they remember what you do. You've helped them do what they do. That is a a brilliant piece of advice. So i want to discuss these these customer acquisition strategies though so you mentioned that there's uncertainty and today as of this recording iowa's fourteen point five. I stalled on my phone this morning. And so this is the uncertainty that we're talking about weird because this episode will air several weeks from now when we'll have a better picture but what's the fear. We'll have slightly more certainty when this is airing The fear is you know there are a lot of changes happening in data and privacy for the better of the consumer quite honestly like we can't as it's very disheartening marketers and brands to say like you can't just go follow people around the internet unless they say it's okay to do so and that's basically what the privacy changes are is it's kinda like gdp are in that. Hey don't be a jerk with email. This is kind of like. Don't be a jerk with ads. Don't follow people who don't want to be followed you know. That's a very over simplification of the the details of each change. But it's essentially what we're talking about this like you see a lot of articles about the cookie lewis future and lots of talk about cookies in general and how it's playing into how we run ads and the uncertainty comes from what what does that mean. What does it mean that we can't follow people around anymore I heard was it. The apple announcement there was something like there used to be four hundred some properties that you could target people through and now there's going to be like nine..

apple four hundred today both sides this morning a month later both people each change fourteen point nine once a week one way properties one of double ways iowa lewis five weeks
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"And also everyone once the black friday deals and so they're gonna come and and that's when we'll get oliver customers but the wait till the last minute yes so we should start now to or customers.

black friday oliver
"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

"Offering bundled products is quite simply one of the most important things you could do when running an online store. Bundles are so effective. That it's one of the few things that's on. Every single product page amazon. Why because it works the easiest way to add powerful and flexible bundle options to your store. Is the bold bundles up. It's become my favorite bundle app. I recently learned. It's one of the few on shop by the doesn't duplicate products or variants doesn't rely on coupon codes either so it doesn't mess up your inventory. Every store is a different idea of how they want to offer bundles old. Bundles can handle them all. It could do traditional group bundles. Bogo bundles even know discount. You may also like bundles. The coolest thing though at least according to me is the combo product bold lets you create a virtual product that represents the bundle..

How Do I Get My First Customer?

The $100 MBA Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

How Do I Get My First Customer?

"It's awesome to see somebody by what you're putting out in the world. It's validation that your product has value in the marketplace and gives you hope for the future of your business so it's super important for us to get that first customer to have all the fields right all those feelings and to capitalize and use it as momentum. So how do you get your first customer. And i'm going to be speaking as if you do not have any audience know email list. You have a brand new website. So no real traffic aggressee. Oh yet know audience so you have a product you know that it could help people. You validated it in the process of cranial so out. Let's get our first customer or customers. So i'm going to share with you a few strategies. These strategies require you to make some effort. This is probably a little harder than you're used to working but it's going to pay off and things will get easier once you get the ball rolling. Now jason asks onto new and say how do we do this. Is this going to incur costs. There are different ways of gaining customers if you have a budget to market to gain leads then obviously this is going to be an advantage to speed things up but even if you don't have a budget there are ways to do this and i'll explain so i let me start with the fact that let's say you have a modest marketing budget. How do you get those first customers. Some people say lemme advertise. Let me run some facebook ads. some google ads. i'm not really bullish on that type of marketing. When you're starting out why because those ads really perform well when you have some data where you know what kind of deal visit your website. You have some analytics. You have an existing audience or email lists that you can build lookalike audiences off. If you're going fresh with facebook or google you're really gonna be Doing billboard marketing really. You're just putting out. Hey i have this thing check it out. The chances of you converting are very low and is gonna get expensive quickly because you don't really have a target market or audience.

Jason Facebook Google
NYDIG Partners With FIS to Offer Bitcoin via Hundreds of Banks

Unchained

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

NYDIG Partners With FIS to Offer Bitcoin via Hundreds of Banks

"Bitcoin in your bank account fintech firm f. Fis is partnering with digital asset manager. Dick to bring about an industry first customers at hundreds of us banks will be able to purchase hoddle or sell bitcoin directly within their bank account without having to go through an exchange such as coin base or payment obligation like paypal ni- dig will handle custody insecurity. The program has already enrolled hundreds of smaller institutions as reported by cnbc night big is in discussions with several of the larger banks in the us. About bringing them into the program. Morgan stanley and goldman sachs have already announced that they will offer bitcoin funds to their high net worth clients with j. p. morgan repeatedly mulling a similar product. Perhaps the decision of smaller banks to train front run. Bitcoin adoption for the everyday customer will pressure the larger institutions to follow suit for their retail customers

Hoddle Bitcoin FIS Dick Cnbc Paypal United States Morgan Stanley Goldman Sachs Morgan
Bahubali Shete CEO of TinyChef on His Journey to 1M Voice App Users

The Voicebot Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Bahubali Shete CEO of TinyChef on His Journey to 1M Voice App Users

"Remember when you and i i spoke about what you were doing that. You're working on the the knobs and the scale different things in order to automate all the mechanical parts of cooking. And then you're going to add. Recipes is just that was like sort of a secondary element in some ways and you totally flipped. It eliminated the first part. So i guess that makes more sense because you started out in the iot that's equipment and then you wound up determining that wasn't the best way to go. So what data points did you get. And and how did you collect those data points. The convince you to make the switch in your focus so Don't change the cooking equipment very often in the sense that smart kitchen appliances which are coming definitely You need smart kitchen appliance. You need robotics but consumers do not have enough space in the kitchen to add more wrote gadgets in the kitchen they already have enough and they don't chain them in unless there are no small blender on those kind of products so the basic cooking up a novel on wednesday by his dad with them for any answer fifteen years and it's it's not easy to change and you cannot retrofit on these devices because they're so attached to things that the look and feel and us except those products are very important so i felt that numis been not willing to know either it off changes equipments and hence the market was becoming very niche game smart kitchen appliances and i felt that i was right in saying that that it is going to be yields before the Plans has become a commodity. And become you know get used to them and start using them in the kitchen and in the meantime you know me as a startup definitely wanted to find where the pinpoint sought and assault them. And that's really felt that the pain points really in the journey and that's where we shifted our focus to this. How long did it take you to come to that conclusion to be already reality mad about you. Know five thousand knobs and be able to ship it to them. We made a road running campaign and all that and then we had noted on everything. Get so you had a indigo kickstarter. Yeah in new right. So you fully funded that you actually produce the product you could have shipped them the product but at that point you decided it's it'll be better for us to refund the money than to have to deploy this product in support it because you didn't really believe in that market segment anymore. I say so. That must have been a very painful decision to make. It's it's both painful as well as emotional for me. Because i come from robotics in address space and i'm so attached to hardware. I believe i can saw putting hardware than getting away from data and then being myself as a businessman rather than being technologist was said that a decision so tell me how that decision played out. was that just. You looked at the data. You made the decision or did you have a mentor. advisors other people in the company that you consulted with. How did that play out. This is really important. I know a lot of people have had go through these pivots and this is sort of a soft pivot but a significant one. Be great to share your experience on that. Yeah definitely for explain a very major role in that. So it is in vlad. I met so many People i met from meek it companies see yours to Big marketing gle ascent from campbell. Nestle and unilever walmart so many people and then i had the vehicle does the idea in understand the views on it and definitely doesn't have any clear advice coming from all of them which was also deflecting in my initial trials Consumers that it was difficult for them to add up or product in that existing kitchen and yeah a lot of an Next so it was. You talked to a lot of people they all gave you. Basically the same advice you were seeing the problems on the customer side so it just became obvious even though there was a painful decision for you emotionally given your background. Yeah well it's hard to. It's hard to kill the baby right. I mean i think that's what we would say is a baby for adoption or whatever it is you're doing and focus So then the the feature that you thought was going to be complementary to your main product became the product so once you decided that this how did you change. How did you change your strategy. What did that mean was going. You're going to be doing differently. Reduced doing more of the stuff that you already doing the recipe side or did you have to basically start over I had to start or in some sense It was in the same direction. Same solution same in a find though solid from the consumer angle but the approach is completely different. I i i i may have said this in one of the podcast but you know one of the consumer is such just nine initially conducted a focus group discussion. One lady told me a benign asked her a question that what is that your family as as it acknowledgee vici-. You had that in the kitchen to help you in the kitchen. And she said google maps to said my husband who is seventy plus. Now who couldn't drive denise back even in our own city now he's able to drive in any part of the world anyplace from any to any point with all the confidence just because he has maps. It doesn't get up. And i wish that technology was available in the kitchen with which i can walk. Can anybody can walk into the kitchen. Cook any dish they will and that goes in iowa for me. So that's fascinating so that's a really interesting insight so you you spoke with this one customer and you realize what they needed was google maps for cooking. And it's really interesting because we really think about recipes is being more mechanics of it. So how do i know what to do. When and what sequence. But it's really as much as anything a confidence builder if you could build them something like a cooking concierge or adviser that helps them through the entire process. So there's both a functional and emotional aspect to it grew and when i looked at it I also realized that there is so much of resources so many this is available in thumbs up man you can find it as a bs in a local all lack but still not satisfied for the simple reason that didn't know what to trust because it's one thing about searching for some election bleeding some reviews but other thing about cooking that dish yourself for your family it could end up being a messy meal basil. They didn't know whom trusted partner in himself. At spiezio sweaty critical of them and an back. I felt that you know be need not only a good content but a good experience in order to make be committee For consumers in the kitchen so to become the will the good expedience than realize that we need any is solution which understands colletti techniques colletti science. Which can then have a very fruitful conversation with the consumers and make that choice. I expediency really a natural expedience intense. I started my journey on the i or colletti

Numis Unilever Nestle Walmart Campbell Google Denise Iowa Spiezio Colletti
Epic Games Lawsuit Is Significant for Future of Big Tech Companies

Planet Money

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Epic Games Lawsuit Is Significant for Future of Big Tech Companies

"Sweeties lawsuit. Epic games Lawsuit against Apple is an antitrust lawsuit Anti trust is the part of the law that deals with competition and monopoly power. An antitrust law is a big deal right now because lots of people are worried about the growing size and power of big tech companies. And what happens in Tim Sweeney's lawsuit is going to tell us what the courts are willing or Unwilling to do to some degree about the kind of power that Apple has over its APP store, and that lots of other tech companies have in their own way. Learn more about how this will all work. I called up Eleanor Fox, who has been carefully watching this fortnight Apple lawsuit, But I'm not a faithful watcher of fortnight. Fair enough. Don't ask. Don't ask me about the program. You're not a place you don't have any favorite No favorite fortnight dances or anything, but I like dances, but I don't see the epic stuff. Buddy my eye because it's so related to the heart of what's happening in big tech. Eleanor is a law professor at N Y U and an antitrust expert. We We talked to her a bunch last year when we did a serious on antitrust enforcement. And we were curious. Just what was she watching for in this particular case, and she told me about two key things. That epic is gonna have to prove in court. In order to win this case. Let me say first we're talking about a very particular statute. The law against Monopolization. Okay, so you have one firm and it's in a monopoly position or close to it. Okay, So the first thing the plane just have to prove is what is the market and what percentage of the market does Apple have? So the first thing epic has to prove here is that Apple has a monopoly in this market. But there's a debate over what the market actually is here. Epic games, is arguing that the market in question in their suit. Is the market for APS on the iPhone. Just that, and the only place you could buy APS for the iPhone is on Apple's APP store. It's the only store apple allows, and that Apple is 100% of the market. The only way in is through this bottleneck the exploitative bottleneck. That is controlling us 100% of the market obviously a monopoly. But Apple says, no, no, no. The relevant market here is not just APS for the iPhone. It's the market for APS on all mobile devices. If you don't want to use the apple APP store, don't buy an iPhone by a phone that runs Android. It's hard to get specific numbers, but you'll see estimates that Apple only has anywhere from like 15 to 30% of the entire mobile phone market. So the first question the court has to decide what is the market Is it just iPhone apse 100% monopoly or all mobile APS like 25%, not a monopoly. This question. What is the definition of the market? We're talking about it. It is actually a common question that comes up in antitrust cases. And then if the court decides Apple has monopoly power, then there is a second question. Has Apple done something bad with that power, something that hurts competition and hurts consumers. This question may have broader implications about tech companies and the power that they have, because Apple's APP store is what's known as a two sided market. And a lot of the big tech companies are in two sided markets. And here's what that means. You know, one sided market. You essentially have just one group of customers you are. Let's say a hot dog stand. You buy those hot dogs from the hot dog company, and then you sell them to people who want hot dogs. You're one customer. In the APP store doesn't work that way. Apple isn't buying APS and turning around and selling them. It's it's creating a virtual place where people who make APS and people who want APS confined each other. Then the APP makers in the APP buyers the iPhone users. Those are the two sides of the market. And there was a big, relatively recent Supreme Court case dealing with the weirdness of two sided markets. It was a case against American Express. American Express is in the middle of a two sided market, bringing together customers who want to buy stuff and merchants who want to sell stuff. American Express charges merchants higher fees than other credit cards, and it doesn't let its merchants tell customers. Hey, you know, I could give you a cheaper price if you don't use American Express. Case against American Express argued that those rules are a violation of antitrust law. And here was American Express his defense. Those high fees we collect from merchants on one side of our market. Those pay for all of the things we do for the people on the other side of the market. The people who use our cards. They get perks. They get free flights. They get better stuff. American Express says This is a two sided market. And you can't look at one side and say this harm. To consumer welfare. You have to look at both sides and netted out on if, in the end of tallying up both sides of the market consumers win. Have to be allowed to do this. The court agreed with this argument they found in favor of American Express and in the Apple case filings. You can see that both sides know that they need to make these kinds of arguments. So Tim Sweeney epic is saying. Developers are one side of the market and they are being hurt by having to pay this huge amount of money and the iPhone users the other side of this two sided market. They're also being hurt because costs are being passed on to them. Then on the apple side. The argument is that on the whole, the consumer is benefiting from this. They get a safe, trustworthy app store, and developers are also benefiting from that trust. They want access to the iPhone users because they love their iPhones because Apple has created this safe place. How this case turns out could affect lots of big tech companies

Apple App Store Eleanor Fox American Express Tim Sweeney Eleanor Supreme Court
A Coworking Community of First Believers

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

08:21 min | 1 year ago

A Coworking Community of First Believers

"Get started. I'll ask you an about launch pad. You and chris co founders of launchpad. What is that exactly so launch pad is a network co working spaces really focused on smaller communities what we call them into markets throughout the united states. And we're located in nashville newark. New jersey stockton california new orleans. And we're coming to many other cities like mesa arizona and louisville kentucky. So we've really focused on becoming part of the entrepreneurial community and acting as a home base for entrepreneurs of all kinds. So i'm going to ask you about your locations in a bit but i wanted to ask you about your unique value proposition. I mean you're playing in a growing space. What defines launch pad among all other players in the space i think the biggest factor is an alignment with the success of our members. We really focus on people who are working on cnn. Really is the way that we define our marketing so that's much more expansive than just people starting a startup right. There's a lot of people who are working entrepreneurial league whether you are starting to start up a small business freelancer even working remotely. The nature of work is changing so much and we really focus on helping her members be successful in whatever their goals and aspirations are a lot of people are new to this and we believe that diversity of member shall ross. The types of businesses in diversity on level is so important so the lot of factors that set launch pad art and. I'm sure we'll we'll talk a little bit about sort of the ups and downs of the co working world today in the in the on gas. But we've been around for ten years and have really focused on the growing success of ecosystems that we play a part in that starts with helping the members that work at launch pad really achieved their roles. So when when i was doing my research a term popped out of the text and that was first believers. What does that mean. And why is it so important at launch pad. They mainly sat down and belts sort of the core values with business and or operating communities that we serve. I believe i one that always talks up and crystals. Everyone's firstly a ride often on journey. You hear the words know whether that from an investor whether it's from your mother whether it's from your little that little guilty had You're telling you that it's not gonna work and what you really need levers and so me think of that as sing the level within lunchtime and oftentimes those folks were working in the community. They are each other's levers members to show every day. They're the ones you hear the saab sorting things go wrong. Who celebrate the for sale. Who ring the bell with you. And you create this environment where we're all sort of on this entrepreneurial jury ourselves and help each other and we consciously about it every day about being people's first lemurs and we do that in righty one. It's the cities that we choose so we often go to places that maybe be overlooked by big providers or big big Operators in our space and we take bets on the city's because we really believe in supporting them supporting their entrepreneurs and we also believe that being i believe her is not just about writing a check. It's also being someone's purse customer so we try actively to support our businesses within launchpad by not only being their mentor their friends but to be their customer many years ago before i even started executive recruiting. I tried my hand at starting a new suspect on intellectual property. I spent a lot of money. I wrote a patent got a patent issue and then i tried becoming operational as a startup and was so soul-crushing and yes i got told no every day i never heard yes and i was like how can i put up with this so i can see the value in doing that. You know it's so true. I it's the journey of any entrepreneurial venture hearing no all day long in whatever role you are and it's also the internal journey right. I think the first believers concept is really the antidote to imposter syndrome. rain holds us back is am. I truly the ceo of this company. Am i truly hanging my big corporate job in stepping out to follow my passion project and so by being a community of first believers has not just us founders that that believe in our members radium culture where people believe in each other and push each other and support each other along that journey wondering if you could give me a sense of how that gets flushed out. So i'm a startup entrepreneur. I set up shop at launch. What can i experience at launch pad. That's going to help me flush out my business model in my path to success. Oftentimes the process starts before you become a member and typically what we see a lot of the journeys especially for startup founders. Is they'll connect with one of us or another member of our community around something as simple as pitch practice or a mentor session. Or hey i'm looking to raise money. Can i tap into your network to connect with others and get some funding. You know they always say if you ask for money you'll get good advice and we have that conversation with us. Start to be able to demonstrate the power of the network the power of the platform and power those connections and oftentimes some of the way we recruit startups into launchpad is through those very first early conversations. Once they join the community we have an on boarding process for folks where we connect people. It's starting out. A co working. Space is a little bit starting your first day at school or your first day at your job and we approach that very similarly by creating programs and connection points doing a little member matchmaking. So that folks who have like minded challenges or personalities or different types of businesses. We can connect them. And so we're really sort of smooth the path of on boarding in the community and then we have a variety of different programming and curriculum and supportive activities that happen throughout the year to be able to support entrepreneurs obviously dumb one some group sessions but we really sort of enable the platform to basically support it. And what we end up seeing these collisions of connection moments where people come together and they find their technical co founder amongst our member base or they find their first customer if they're hanging their shingle to be a consultant. Every time we do surveys of our member base about the benefits of being at launchpad we consistently hear that it helps them do more business. It helps them be more professional helps them achieve more their goals. That's fabulous so you take a lot of the sting out of being a startup entrepreneur with dimension. We also are sort of on converts so we understand deeply the challenges that we all face. And i mean i think especially in a year like we've had with the pandemic with twenty twenty struggled ourselves as as many businesses and i think it's been really valuable for us to be able to share those struggles in to go through that together with our members. We wake up every day. Thinking about launch pad are members. Were not a big corporation. We don't wanna be. And i think that really comes through in terms of the connection points that we can make with entrepreneurs are our

Chris Co Stockton Newark Mesa Louisville Nashville New Orleans CNN Kentucky New Jersey Arizona Ross California United States
The chip shortage is a manufacturing problem that wont be easy to solve

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:31 min | 1 year ago

The chip shortage is a manufacturing problem that wont be easy to solve

"Here's what's going on. With the chip shortage thing. I among us chipmakers only intel fabricates. Its own chips in the us. The rest contract with big companies mostly in taiwan or korea which are known as fabs the biggest tsmc in samsung. Their facilities are incredibly expensive and take years to build and even upgrade now add in pandemic lots of people at home buying computers tablets phones throw in the pandemic slowing down. The actual manufacturing and there aren't enough chips for cars medical equipment or all those other devices last week. President biden requested thirty seven billion dollars from congress to kick start the domestic supply chain for chips on shell. Sag covers the semiconductor industry at more insights and strategy. I asked him. If that'll be enough. I think thirty seven billion dollars is very likely a down payment. I'm not really sure it's enough because ultimately if we want to move enough chip producing capacity to the us There needs to be a considerable monitor investment to incentivize the tsmc's in the samsung zoo world to do that. So the companies that develop chips in the united states many of them all contract with the same foundry right. Tsmc so it's not like they're completely in charge of their own supply. They are constrained by how many chips say. Emc can produce and what other arrangements. It has to sell tips to other companies exactly. So there's there's tsmc the samsung and there's global foundries Those are like the bigger ones. Tim is their provider of everyone. Silicon and based on the customer relationship that accompany house with tsmc ultimately determines what priority they get in that pecking order of. What's available and then tell me about intel does have its own foundry but it doesn't seem like that's going that well yeah. They had some of their own challenges with these new or process nodes and they've been struggling to overcome them and they just recently got a new ceo and they're really aggressively pushing for resolving these issues But they've they've shown that they've been able to overcome some of their challenges and increase their supply because they had shortages of their own prior to the pandemic And now they seem to be kind of getting back on track to a degree but ultimately intel is only producing intel products. This is a complicated problem to solve. Do you think that there is a best solution like do. We just have to wait out. Covert it in this shortage and beef up. Companies like tsmc or is the intel model of companies producing their own chips. Going to be the future. I think there is a valid concern in wanting to have a certain percentage of chip capacity in the us. We have to just figure out what is the right number. For how much chip capacity. We need in the us and how much we as us. Taxpayers are willing to front that bill to ensure that national security level of chips. Apply right because it will most likely come down to a minimum necessary investment. Because i just don't think that it makes sense for the us to try to replicate what tsmc incur and samsung have done in korea and taiwan. Because it's double digit billions and that's just a short term cost. What is and this is just out of curiosity in some ways. What is the role. What role does apple play. I mean i wasn't apple like pretty early to go fabulous and maybe kickstarts some of this trend and then now apple is like intel creating its own chips for many of its products and building this kind of big apple only business. I'm just kind of curious about where they sit in this whole landscape. It's interesting because like you said apple is fabulous and they do. They do design their own chips but they ultimately still do depend on. Tsmc to those trips. And i believe they are number one customer but they do have a role in the industry where they they do influence. What kind of tools are necessary for the fabs to purchase Materials and new technologies are being adopted because ultimately you know what apple wants does drive how the market moves in terms of sensors and and chips. So i think apple's influence is one its size They do influence how much industry will grow and they also influence what kinds of technologies get adopted because their scale make make certain types of technologies profitable And i think with this trip shortage. You're seeing apple not really talk about it very much at all. Because they're kind of the first ones in the pecking order and I think that they've anticipated chip demand just enough that they probably don't really have much to be worried about. So and the pecking order

Tsmc Intel Samsung President Biden United States Taiwan Apple Korea EMC Congress Silicon TIM
Some Washington DC banks to reimburse overdraft fees for unemployment benefits after tech glitch

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Some Washington DC banks to reimburse overdraft fees for unemployment benefits after tech glitch

"Week, thousands of unemployed D C. Residents did not get their benefits because of a technical glitch. But today, D C council member Elissa Silverman said Bank of America Capital one and Wells Fargo have agreed to refund Annie overdraft fees that resulted from the glitch. Those three banks represent about half of the region's consumer banking market, Wells Fargo and capital One customers are asked to call their branch to get that fee

D C Council Elissa Silverman Bank Of America Capital Wells Fargo Annie
How I Built Resilience: Michael Horvath and Mark Gainey of Strava

How I Built This

06:14 min | 1 year ago

How I Built Resilience: Michael Horvath and Mark Gainey of Strava

"But before you want to ask you about the business model Is free to use. There is a paid subscription side to it. it's a freemium model. A lot of brands uses. Dropbox is a great example. We had drew house on the show and think he said something like three or four percent of dropbox users actually pay for the product. But that's more than enough to make it into a profitable business. Tell me a little bit about your business. Because they don't think you advertise on the app. Right we don't we focus on building things. Athletes love to us and are really glad to pay for an tell their friends about that's the aspect of our subscription offering and it's a number of different parts of the experience that you get when you when you subscribe that make it even better And so by focusing on building things that athletes love that builds a great business. Yeah mark yeah. I know i think michael hit the nail on the head. We really like this idea of having just one customer that we can focus on and that is the athlete for us if you sweat. You're an athlete. It doesn't matter what pace you run. It doesn't matter how hard you out. If you're going out and walking the dog on sunday afternoon put it on strava. That's fantastic for them in and for us and so. That's the idea is to focus on that athlete. We love our free members. They're contributing great content and activities and and being part of the community but our focus is to convince them that there's something here worth paying foreign investing in and together. We're going to build over the long term. Npr's a great example as public. Radio's greg sample because we offer all of our content for free and we hope that people will voluntarily contribute to stations and i think almost ten percent of public radio listeners. Do they voluntarily contribute to their station. But it's a social contract is like we kind of hope. Most of you will in that model works. I know you can't talk about because you're privately held and you don't talk about financials and so on so forth but can you give us a sense of whether the business model works i mean. Can you talk about whether you're you're profitable yet. you're right. It as a as a privately held company. It's not something that We share what we can tell you. Is that when we focus on things that athletes love. It really does make for a strong business and so we have. We have starting point of mark mentioned. That customer is is the person who wakes up every day wanting to be active. And we wanna help them. We want to bring joy to their lives in the movement that they do. That is the basis of this twelve year old old company. We started with a team of six of us with an idea that it didn't have to be big. It had to be great. It had to make meet something meaningful impact in people's lives and we're here twelve years later and growing and thriving. It's been a fun journey. And we're really looking forward to the next twelve plus years a lot of folks watching our early stage entrepreneurs small business owners and they look at people like you for advice. So here's a question that i left to to hear your answer on You have investors. You've raised tens of millions of dollars in those investors at some point one a return on their investment so you have resisted advertising on the platform. But you've got tens of millions of eyeballs on your app. I mean you've got a lot of people who who use it How do you resist the pressure to run ads because at that would be an easy way to to clear some cash. It's we watched social dilemma recently guy and you know this notion of if you're not buying the product you are the product and i really. We believe deeply in that thesis. As we're we're convinced that there's a capacity within this fit community to continue to support and grow this business whether investors are excited about. Its we've not felt that pressure from the outside Do we believe that there's opportunities for diverse finding kinds of services. We offer over the next again. Ten twenty years of course but we really are stuck on this principle that you need to understand who your customer is and stay focused the only to add that you also get to pick your investors so for entrepreneurs out there as it is really important to aligned. What you see is the vision for your company with who you're bringing in to help you grow it. And we picked our investors really carefully on that regard. Let me ask you a question about privacy. Okay i'm one of these people who has like twenty burner email accounts and i use that for pretty much everything i sign up with even though i know that doesn't matter because my iphone knows who i am but i've got this this ring here that tracks my sleep. So they know me. It does concern me. Because i i really am worried about privacy. I know you guys had a feature called fly by that you you now allow people to shut it down. Basically allowed you to you. Know when you're passing by somebody you could see. They're running route. And how do you deal with this question of privacy because people are becoming increasingly aware of how important it is to maintain privacy so you. I mean for better or worse. There's a lot of information that is you know that that's on the app that is revealed on straub. You're absolutely you. you hit the nail on the head. It's it's a. This is very important to us. Because it's very important to do the athletes on strava. So we take our athletes data and the privacy of that data very seriously and we are working all the time on trying to make sure that we're providing the right set of tools and understanding of how to use it in the way that you want to. You can use it in completely private mode. You can open it up to a larger circle and you can be completely out there in public but the important thing is making sure you can educate people on how they wanna set that level of privacy for them and for their needs and thinking ahead. So we've done a lot of things over the years and we're never done it's like it's a constant constant pursuit of making sure that people understand how to stay in that mode of feeling. Good about the information they are sharing and we can go some things that have very specific things. Like how do you educate people on and experience that they may not have really understood yet. When i joined so you have to continually remind them that the privacy settings are there and and think ahead and that's why for example making fly bys something that you have to opt into was really important to us so that someone who joined may not even understand what that feature means wouldn't inadvertently be

Dropbox Drew NPR Michael Straub
Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

"So this episode armed joined by kirkwood luck is a digital marketing specialists based knee may in brisbane and much like may as background working across tech startups and digital agencies. He's responsible for utilizing the latest digital marketing strategies to enhance conversion outcomes. Luck also runs. Click truro platform to help digital marketers. Connect with jobs they love. I love the idea of that because there is much quake out there but it's not always loved doing so i love that idea lachlan. Welcome to the episode. Thank you very exotic jumping boom crite. Sorry laughlin has the company web flow. And we're gonna pull apart web flow from the outside from a market his point of view we look at what we love what we hate what we're curious about. We don't understand what we think to better and we're going to see if we can work basically web flow from the outside what marketing is doing it. Also a little bit about the that whole space about web design and non code and everything behind that and that movement so lachlan for those people playing along at high. Can you tell us a little bit about web. Fly before we dig into it. Yeah absolutely so. We're pretty ubiquitous right now in the tech industry. It's pretty much interrupting the whole no code. Move it on over the past couple of years and it really has been in the past twelve months that no codes taken. The wolves stolman essentially. What occurred is just tools that allow you to build products without having to actually see kurt itself. So it's almost like visual programming and this certainly being tools out there for years. Things like wordpress that it'd been able to do that full people but the tools a getting won't powerful these days or you can create user accounts and just like dynamic content across websites and being around for a very very long time. Actually it's been through many iterations. I think it was in two thousand and nine found. Start working on it. But the reason. I guess it's gotten so big is because the whole creator right now is booming especially throughout covert wherever almost starting to explore what it could be to build their own businesses and people without technical experience. More in pal emba build anything in the space of a couple of weeks and the other big reason is that the tackles better so you can scale things much better on no code these days much easier to design things with custody. Assess without even having to know how to write. Css and two boys strengths. That's what they specialize in the most. And the reason i chose web flows. Because i'm actually contracting for a company called bubble and they one of the other leaders in the no code base is actually one of our competitors is that i for years have worshipped his marketing strategy. I think what they're doing is absolutely fantastic. So i always take inspiration from one day doing and try to add a little fight onto it if bobble great so this space that i love when something like no code is invented because like you said it already existed my people already using. He said wordpress. Maybe they had weeks or squarespace. And you know he wasn't given a name and then marketers and advertising and branding type people were always brilliant at taking something and then it already existed to a certain degree and then creating a little definition around creating a movement was wet flow. Did you say they jumped onto the nike. Instead of position cells around that or would you think will instrumental of really pushing the whole non code movement hit by the found. That bubble actually didn't prefer or didn't like the cut because they thought it was like another blockchain kind of hardwood before using so they prefer visual program because that is descriptive. As to what it is way floor didn't coined the term. I think the community just started giving it that night because they wanted names for like who they would not software developers but there will so people who can build software so what you call them so they just started calling himself. No code is and where floor really saw about as an offer changes to kinda mold that identity within the industry and they started using that pretty commonly throughout debris raining. They'll using i know they have no code. Which is like yield conference the no code space which the first people to coin so yeah definitely been writing that way and trying to push that as much as they can now and even a problem. Now we're really starting to embrace the whole code movement and use that within content that we share. So let's let's get a little bit into that besides just heads completely around it so people who in one sense no code is in the fact that they they built a website on wakes card but actually the designer of code starts to feel to me like somebody who has an appreciation of code all the need for bespoke but doesn't actually code the base back end. Because when i look at web flood look at their interface. It's a bit more complex. It's not it's not week there is card. You can just go in there and you can adjust by the pixel you can change something from sixteen pixels. Seventeen pixels you can. Actually edit the actual definitions is not just drag and drop is that. Is that how carter defines themselves. It's it's more than just not cutting with no card. That's almost like a simple version. This is much more. It's a bit like being vegan. Not just about not eating animal products. It's about the movement of veganism. No code is basically the vegan so the coding world further point. Do they then shout about. I don't like vikings yes. Yes and yes absolutely on the avid note of myself. And the reason. I contract bob because i was using bubble for year and eventually ended up just out the founders and often producing more full them so i guess i fit quite nicely into the digital market out. My background in tech sought ups. I can read some strings of code. But i definitely can't write anything. Hdl's probably the furtherest. My knowledge goes to. But i certainly have an appreciation for it. I know how important it is and yet there is definitely staple learning cove to tools like web particularly bubble because bubble. You're actually writing logic. You just don't see the java script that you're writing it just visually for you. But it certainly does take quite a bit on the senate and the one of the reasons that i love web blow it so much and i'm happy to dive into the sun is just the amount of content created around education for even just like on boarding people to that product is phenomenal. I think that's one of the reasons why eighty so while you let's trump strains that so what i always do. My first love of marketing was seo. That's the first discipline i got gotten. So my depot position is eight sticker dominion and have a look and look at it and kind of guys. Sixty three thousand referring domains. Thirty five million back lanes but whatever that's worth but five hundred and ten thousand six hundred eighty seven organic monthly traffic. So i'm looking at. Nih risk worth one point six million dollars worth of sea traffic right so good start but to your point you know that half a million organic keywords. That comes from amazing content and that content that goes beyond sort of someone searching for no code web design till this is about understanding the pain points of a persona and giving first and then sort of building from matt can you. You've obviously looked more at the may what what do you feel like. They content strategy is for this particular persona so it wasn't a casa Previously in haas about the found is all web flow and when they initially started a business the actual personas that they created and it was two of them that they just laser focused on. That was all. They focused on building for and the main one was a an existing software. Developer knows how to write code. He knows how sorry they know. How to build custom websites or prox- but they just want a streamline that time so they might be a freelance that might have an agency and they can only just. I'd sell that time for money. And you know the time it takes to build a custom. Product is just much longer than it is to build it on web play with have existing templates or you can just drag and drop elements so that was one of the main problems that we're going to solve the thing you'll notice on that blog is suddenly post a low content around like the industry but then may educational content. Is things like a series where they actually educate those uses. All those personas on how to better themselves. So they've got like a blog series for building Agency oil building a website with good. Seo or even if you're building a costume e stole just how to build that still but how did you first customers how to build your attention with customers how to create a u x so that way you know your conversion rate increases so they really want that cost us to succeed and i think that's why we're succeed so

Lachlan Kirkwood Luck Laughlin Brisbane Kurt Nike Vikings Carter BOB Senate SUN Matt SEO
How to Create a Safety Net For Your Business

The $100 MBA Show

06:15 min | 1 year ago

How to Create a Safety Net For Your Business

"I decided to do this lesson today. Because i hear from so many entrepreneurs about the stresses of running a business. The stresses of the unknown the stresses of the market whether it's a market crash or a pandemic or in some cases in some places in the world war these things can affect economies can affect your market can affect your business for an indefinite amount of time. You don't know how long that slumps gonna last. When covid started people thought. Oh this is going to be all done and dusted in a couple of months for good year in and people still don't know how long this is going to affect our lives and of course our businesses. So what you do when the inevitable will happen for talk about change things will change around your business in your environment in your market. One of the best things you can do to set yourself up to have that safety. Net is to make sure you have healthy profit margins. I know sounds very obvious. But this is just the first step. And he's gonna allow you to feel a little bit more comfortable. You should be working on building a war chest of funds for your business. This is not just for a rainy day. But it allows you to have a fallback something that you can use to pivot in your business just in case you have to reinvent yourself. This is what apple is so powerful. They have over two hundred and forty five billion dollars in cash in the bank. Why do you think. Apple doesn't just reinvest that money to make more money to build more products to hire more people. Will they know this rule. You have to have a safety net. Even apple is not totally immune to the things that can happen to them. Now i'm not asking you to have two hundred forty five billion dollars in the bank but the healthier margins the more likelihood you'll be able to have some cash reserves if you're self funded business a two one ratio should be your minimum meaning for every dollar you spend. You should be making to that means at the end of the month. You should be making double what you spent that month. Which means you have the equivalent of what you spent that month in cash. Leftover that you can put in the bank and safe now. Of course that's going to be counted as a prophet come tax time but your corporate tax are going to be a lot less than your income tax than if you just pocketed the money now. Having cash reserves is not as good. Because you can use that cash. If you need to create a new product to pivot you need to change but also by having some surplus having some cash in the bank Lenders are so so more likely to give you a line of credit. That will extend your runway that will extend your likelihood to be able to reinvent yourself like we say money is the oxygen of any business so the more of an extra reserved tank. You have of oxygen the better because things might be going well right now and they could go better but they could go worse to gotta plan for those rainy days or months or even years. Sometimes sometimes abysses can take a slump and then come back. It could be the market. It could be the fact that they're still doing. Research and technology is not there yet but it will be a couple of years. It could be that. They took a hit on their brand. And then you some time to recuperate. So that's the finances okay. But that's not all there are other liabilities in your business that you may not be aware of like the people that you work with the people that you hire. What's your safety net. What's your backup plan. If your top engineer leaves you or decide to retire what do you do if your best copywriter decides to part ways or your social media marketer Decides to work for different company. Can't be seen a panic and you can't allow your systems or your business to just totally stop doing. What only does because somebody's leaving. This is why systems are so important in a business when you're building a business or building a set of systems and you want to document these systems in what we call. Soap's standard operating procedures is literally. Google docs writing out exactly how to do. Every task in your business and the person who does every role so say for example the customer service manager in your accompany their job other than being the customer service manager is creating an sap for their job. This is gold. This is one of the biggest assets you can build your business because that way everybody can live and breathe comfortably. Why because save for example somebody in our company leaves. You have a playbook to give somebody new and say hey. This is how you do your job. This is what was done Before this is what your predecessor was responsible for in this. How did it so building and soap's in your business creates a layer of safety just in case something happens and by the way something will happen. People will leave your business. This is the nature of employment people. Move on next if you can afford it especially in the most critical positions in your business have some redundancy so for example if you're in the service industry and you service people on the phone then is a good idea to have more than one. Customer service agent right. Just get somebody leaves you. You don't have any agents left. You have a few backup right. You have people that are trained up and can do the job. They might have to do some extra hours. But you're not left high and dry if you're running a software company. He's redundancy in the engineering department. This creates a safety net okay. You're don't lose nights of sleep if somebody leaves your company next. Is your critical tools. Have some redundancy with your tools. And i'm talking about just the major once. You don't actually have to buy these tools to have the research and know what's available so if you need to switch out you know exactly where we're going. What are your backup tools. What's your backup website servers. What's your backup domain name registrar. What's your backup payment processor. If you have to change things around if you have to swap out which ones are they just going to be a list people that you've already vetted you don't have to do any homework afterwards when switch. You're ready to go.

Apple Google
Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

Talking Automotive

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

"Hi everybody welcome to Talking Automotive my and name John is my co-host Sinclair Mark Palvestra . Thanks John. Today we've got Michelle de Novian the chief marketing officer from rhode. Stay in the us at right. Sta are omni channel digital platform for the auto industry dealerships and michelle. Hsieh's some very powerful information with the insights that have that she saying from the covid situation change and move to more digital transactions of more importantly h transaction is different sets not just a pure one hundred percent digital plight it is interacting digital with the dealership experience and actually improving efficiencies with the sales put units unit sold per south consultant has moved from ten units units and customer satisfaction has increased significantly some very powerful information that she shares all support bossom. Very strong data is fascinating for me. Is that the sales price as Longer linear where thousand works with one. Customer from beginning to end delivers a vehicle. He's not working with multiple customers at different touch points. And it's happening in the customers on tomek when the dealerships close very exciting think. This is the way things are going to and such. It's a really with listen for this jump into talking automatic analysis identification and implementation of profit opportunities for the automotive ak system with thirty years experience in logistics and started the out locations in five major shrines. Cities breakout fleet services is an independent. Division of prayer services offering specialty flake. That's for commercial applications ranging from simple try and taiba statements to fully bespoke service body and accessory installation with quality issued safety compliance and standardization of vehicle builds. Breakout fleet. services are a premia in one solutions provider for commercial vehicle fleet operators leasing companies and original equipment manufacturers for further information on. How breakout fleet. Services can assist in solving your commercial vehicle fit aetna aids. Please visit pre-cut dot com dadu and click on the link to flight services. John talked about Just yesterday assist really powerful stuff that really raise the as the way we way we need to go as a as a as an industry in. That's what you guys in the adoption in the. Us is much faster than bank. This is us. He still thinking that online listings. For years cazes a good thing in a net cutting edge raisin haram do you to have the omni channel and what is on the channel that main the word is out there but that really comprehend. What does that make I was having a conversation with a Dealer here in the states earlier today. We're doing some research on sort of their they're buying journey for digital retailing. And it's interesting to hear how the progressive dealers have been all about. You know how do i. How do i modernize customer experience. And that seems to be where a lot of people were leading the conversation in their own organizations until covid. And then everybody's like oh wait this could be really great for productivity to hours talking hats. Never like that immediate hurt. You know that we're all responding to but it's that moment that's sort of what the omni channel steph. I think brings Beaches what we've what would they added. That way would be spending a lot of time. Educating not to seal us but even just people who worked within the ends that would be countless thomas guys for different organizations and you'd have to read trying not retrying but just get people up to speed. This is how dealer works. You'd get inflexible. A williams were really good at bringing. Fm cj to into the auto industry but then the deal is wouldn't were liked to the principal's side. We found that we would spend all his time. Just got through. This is had the business thinks this is how consumers upright at mrs Comes but just a reeducate but then the downside also is that there were people now games. That are so blinking into thinking. This is just how estimate and something new comes in nightcap. adjust to it with a whether it's a pivot or even just a mind move The thought patented by should go down that road because now we've always done so therefore we must do it this way. So you Al mission if you like without series is to it's one of enlightenment But this one. Also you'll come as i should with with david that was an autograph mesa. Yes gotta get shell on on the shire to give your insights and your expertise because the journey that use shea is the journey that many needs to be undertaking Oh actually i should have been undertaking five years ago. But if you're not on that right now you hear it's yeah it's it's tough. I think that. I know we talked to mike. About how the pandemic has been a bit shorter of a time period for you guys than it is here at this in the states but i think it was a forcing function for the future so that was a big wake up call. Thank for even dealers here. I don't think it's just internationally. I think in general change is hard and it's hard to contemplate in until after requirement. You know there's a lot of people that will just sort of sit

Sinclair Mark Palvestra Michelle De Novian Tomek Division Of Prayer Services John Hsieh Rhode Michelle United States Aids Al Mission Williams Mesa Shea David Mike
Business Community Mourns the Loss of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

Business Wars Daily

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Business Community Mourns the Loss of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

"Tony shay was a rarity a business. Executive who was almost universally beloved shade died november twenty seventh at the age of forty six following injuries sustained in a house. Fire connecticut home. His death prompted outpourings of stories about shay's unusual and unusually successful approach to business for twenty years. he was. ceo zappa dot com the online shoe and clothing retailer. He let it with philosophy summed up in the two word title of his best selling book delivering happiness in two thousand ten. He told cbs news. He believed it was possible to make customers. Employees and investors happy while still turning a profit which he did in spades amazon acquired zappa's dot com in two thousand nine for one point two billion dollars shea invested in the online shoe cite zappa's dot com. Then call shoe site dot com in nineteen ninety nine a young entrepreneur. He had already founded in grown and online. Advertising site called link exchange a year earlier at the age of twenty four. He sold link exchange to microsoft for two hundred sixty five million dollars shortly after investing in shusei dot com. He became ceo and the company changed. Its name to zappa's taken from the spanish word for shoes ocado when she was initially pitched on investing in shoe site dot com. He was skeptical in nineteen ninety nine. The beginning of the internet bubble ecommerce was still young and untested. conventional wisdom. Was that you couldn't sell shoes online. Because customers were used to try on shoes before buying them but then she learned that five percent of shoe buyers already purchase shoes from catalogs. That's five percent of what was then a forty billion dollar market that persuaded shea to take a crack at online shoe sales even though he later told cbs news. I'm not a shoe person at all. Rather he would wear one pair for two years until they wore out and then by another to conquer the hurdle that customers needed to try on shoes shape pioneer to custom. We take for granted today. Zappa's would ship for free and allow returns for a year. It was not uncommon for customers to order five pairs of shoes in return for. That was okay with shay. He wanted customers for life to that end. He invested in domestic call center workforce rather than outsourcing to countries with cheaper labour famously. He empowered those customer support employees to do whatever they needed to make customers happy. There are no time limits on phone calls one. Possibly apocryphal story was that a worker stayed on the phone with one customer. For more than five hours. Critics wondered how zappa's could make money by investing so much in the people who answered the phones after all only about five percent of customers ordered on the phone the rest purchased online shea. Believe however that the phone was branding opportunity customer service by workers who bent over backwards to help them would be customers forever and of course they tell others about their experiences in addition he wanted his employees to be so happy that they would consider working at zappa's a calling not a career. He went so far as to offer to pay new employees to quit. The offer received a few weeks into a new job. Ranged from about one thousand to three thousand dollars the idea. He didn't want employees to stay if they weren't passionate about the job and the culture his quirky management technique became widely known simply as the offer growth was swift in two thousand revenues. Were about one point. Six million dollars by the time of the sale nine years later revenues had reached a billion dollars after the amazon acquisition shea. Stayed on as ceo. He retired last summer. Devoting himself to an economic development project in las vegas where he lived under shays. Leadership amazon is said to have allowed zappa's to remain as independent as an amazon acquisition. Could be recently. However the company's begun integrating it more fully offering prime rewards to zappa's customers the idea to help it. Maintain competitiveness against chains like dsw owned by conglomerate designer brands with several hundred warehouse stores. Nationwide dsw's one of the largest shoe retailers in america it consistently plies customers with loyalty discounts and coupons in an effort to get them to return to its brick and mortar stores again and again but cova closures hit designer brands. Hard in the second quarter which offers first sales fell. Almost in half third quarter results will be released next week. Twenty years after a young tony shay became convinced that yes you could sell shoes online. He turned out to be not only unconventional but prescient in a pandemic. it may be about the only place to sell them in a statement following shays death zappa. Ceo kadosh dish. Pandey said the world has lost a tremendous visionary and an incredible human being

Tony Shay Zappa Ceo Zappa Shay Shea Amazon Cbs News Shade Connecticut CBS Microsoft
How to Start a Customer Support Team

The $100 MBA Show

05:33 min | 1 year ago

How to Start a Customer Support Team

"To begin. When should you start building your customer support team. Well in my opinion if you're getting thirty or more messages from customers a day whether their emails facebook messenger Chat messages phone calls. Whatever it is thirty or more. It's time to start team because to really take care of your customers at a high level that's going to take a couple of hours a day. Even if you're the most efficient worker in the world i would say at least a couple hours a day so now that we've established that. How do you get started one when it comes to hiring your first customer support team member. It's a really critical. It's really important for you to choose the right person. They need to be flexible. They need to be adaptable. They need to be organized and self motivated. Why because they're going to start building your team with you. Yep they're going to help you build that team and i'll explain how so basically you're first hire is like a super duper customer support agent. Why do i say super duper. Because they're not only going to be answering your customer support emails or tickets or whatever they are. They're going to be helping you build a customer support system. You need to build the system so that you can start building a team and the system includes how your company is portrayed to your customers. what are the protocols. How do you regret your customers. How do you close tickets. How do you make sure that your customers are satisfied. This also includes you know how to use the customer support software. You're using with us to intercom or zen desk or maybe it was just email. This also includes standing operating procedures. What do they do. And there's a problem with its billing or a technical problem so this first agent is not only helping customers. they're also documenting the system documenting. How do the job and from the start you to tell them. Hey you mar super duper agent. You're going to be doing all this stuff. But the next person i hire is going to be somebody on your team and you're gonna have to train them. That's going to be responsibility. So get ready. Have your training materials ready. In my opinion this. I hire needs to be inexperienced. Customer service agent. Somebody that has done. Customer service knows The job has done high pressure situations and is above and beyond qualified. Right you on someone. Who's really good done this before because this is going to be a challenging position you want somebody who's hungry. Our first customer service agent was cindy highly experienced highly motivated. Just a super hard worker. The reason why this is important. It's because they're going to help you find other agents there in the market right the people that do their job and they're gonna know what it takes to work in your company to deliver great customer support and they're gonna be able to really prequalify and tell them in advance. Hey this is what it's like to work here and this is how you win. This is how you can be successful. And that's exactly what happened with us. Cindy actually had a sister who was in customer support. Her name is cj so in cj joined our team and cindy trained her. She hit the ground running. She knew exactly what to expect. She knew exactly what. The company's like is cindy told her. And even if you're second higher is not you know somebody sister or somebody's relative. They will tell them in the first interview. So what's important here is to set the tone with agree. I hire for the second higher now funny enough. Cj who joined us over five years ago. Who started as an agent then became a customer support lead then a senior lead and then now. She's a customer support manager for the last couple years. She's moved up in the company and she's really been a great hire because of the foundation we built and she's helped us hire the rest of our team nine other people on the team but it all starts with a strong foundation with great training materials with grace standard operating procedures. And that's how the team is built. Now you're gonna do some work at the start because you're first hiring needs to understand the product these understand the system the tools and you're going to shoot some video so you're just going to do some screen casts videos on your computer or better yet you can do a meeting and record the meeting with The new hire and train them step by step the first week. You can do a whole bunch of sessions and record these individual videos and put them in your team. Collaboration tool withers base camper. Jiro whatever it is even trello and now you have a database of training. They can go ahead and create documentation that training. They can then start creating some training materials about six months ago. We hired five new customer support agents. And guess what who train these agents well. Cj did our customer support manager. She created all the training based on the trainings. That we had in the past. She created all the sap credit trail aboard for their first week of training. Actually the first two weeks and all because we started with one solid higher trained. Cj and then leader on trained the rest and of course it started with our documentation and recording of the procedures of the star. Obviously if you look at our first videos and how things were done It looks nothing like today. Because they've evolved and the people on the team have improved. It have taken it to the next level and made decisions. That really have helped the business in a big way.

Cindy Facebook CJ Jiro
British gambler bets $5 million on Trump in biggest-ever political wager

WBZ Afternoon News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

British gambler bets $5 million on Trump in biggest-ever political wager

"In Britain is betting on a trump victory is believed to be the biggest bet ever placed on the outcome of a political race. The Sun tabloid reports. An unnamed mystery man described only as a rich former banker has been $5 million on a Trump victory. If he's right, he'll end up nearly $15 million richer. British bookies have actually been giving odds based on a Biden win. At least one customers put down a million dollars on a Democratic victory that better could double his money in a

Sun Tabloid Donald Trump Britain Biden
How To Crush It With Interactive Content, Randy Rayess

The Official SaaStr Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

How To Crush It With Interactive Content, Randy Rayess

"Randy is so great. I've had so many good things for many prying acid. Thank you so much joining me stay. Thanks for having me not to let me sign in finance but I'd love to start with a little bit of context to tell me how did you make your way into one for welders task, but it comes to found out very nice. Recently sure. As you probably remember in the early twenty tens their mobile APP store launched and start at the scale out and what we. Realized, was that there was a lot of uncertainty and there was a lot of information that people wanted to gather around building mobile APPS, and as you remember very few people, mobile apps because it had just launched it became pretty clear that nearly everyone who's going to have a mobile APP and so required an insane amount of mobile APP developers and understanding an explanation of what are the things involved in building mobile APP, and so we built a mobile APP cost calculator to. Understand all the moving pieces and we made it just ten questions in on the results speech we'll show you how the price varies by the features listed in the ten questions and how the price varies by the geography of the talent, and it was really really useful and it turned out to be such a great marketing strategy that we said he every marketer should be able to build this without requiring their tectonic to build, and so that's when we got into the SAS. Let's create a festival for marketers to build this without any talent and that's how we got into. Algebra. When we got into this, absolutely love it and I need such a greatly I think so many more should dip me but I would love to send the discussion same really around the Fund South East. All right beginning in majority of cases we need the vote on the mental equivalent customer, and before we dive in I guess into the Hook, the question that I want with. A little bit farms on the ideation process, and so if we start on that and like I was interactive content in your eyes. So I just think about it as a way to communicate with customers. So it's a dialogue, it's an interaction, and so for example, like right now, what we're doing is we're having a conversation, my response personalized your questions and vice versa, and that's great and human to human interactions from a marketing standpoint it's a one way communication and what we're trying. To do is we're trying to enable marketers to build this two-way communication. So example would be if I have a chat Bot I'm personalizing my answer is based on your inputs right. If I have a recommendation engine or calculator or Greater, I'm personalized information I'm giving you based on the information you're giving me, and so that's basically interactive content. There's just a way for you to communicate interactive way, and there's so many different examples of like John. Boston assessments calculators are common examples of. Totally, I love the calculator is all in terms of like what stages Ryan often we have to be the ones own boating, sailing the first customers and ask feed is GonNa be. Of handheld, I guess my question is, when did you start to think about intrinsic on ten annual is I think it's kind of like a blog most companies will start a blog very early on process, and then the way the execute on the blog will change over time, and so I think it's very similar to interactive content. So if you're in the early stage, you're going to build something to help maybe an assessment or content. It's GonNa help build some awareness and help build some trust because you're. Very new brand but then the way you launch and promote will change as the company evolves grows. So once you have an ad budgets, you're GONNA send traffic to it whereas if you're small company, you kind of create one and you just haven't maybe as an exit intent when someone's leaving your or you have a link to win on the homepage, and so I think it's kind of relevant across the whole spectrum. But the way you launch promote and the types of content you create will vary as you grow. Kind of resourcing I. Think you know resource allocation? Thing, we think about resource allocation being tried to content found a saying he bought implementation strategy what resources both in terms of structuring of teams teams themselves do they need to put in place cheating to be effective when starting interactive content strategy from a cost standpoint it's pretty cost effective if you're using SAS tool, obviously, if you're using developers a bit more time than zooming in a bit more expensive but using SAS, the cost is relatively low. So it's really just about the. Time investment. So when it comes to time thing we've seen is sometimes content marketing department with the same content marketing is brilliant. Your blogs will come and build content on and we've seen people do that. But then we also see companies coming to say, Hey, we're overwhelmed. Can you guys built for us and so we have added the custom build option or you can go to agencies in freelancers to build it for you. So the key thing though regardless of WHO's building is to. Make sure that it's useful and so you want to make sure that people from the content marketing team or the people from your sales or see us our product team understand the product in the value deriving and making sure that that's some key valuable insights or being given in the content so that it's very useful. So that's the most important thing and that time is critical, but he's not that long but you WanNa make sure you have if you really think it through. What make sure you're driving down and then the actual design and building out that can be done by company US or by agencies or freelancers. So that's the most of an issue

Randy United States Boston Ryan
"one customer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"one customer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Listing expected soon. This is a company where the CEO said publicly If you don't like us pick a different company. Well, some insight and a volunteer I want to bring in Bloomberg reporter Lizette Chapman lives. They were going to do a direct listing real soon, but it looks like that's been post poems, you know. 17 years. We can wait another few days, right? Yeah, Yeah. They were originally scheduled to do the reckless ng on the 23rd. But that has to 29. Do we know why, Uh, we're still learning some of the reasons behind that. I think the bigger question is like, Hey, um, you know, is this a big deal? You know, some people would say, Hey, we've waited 17 years. Another week's not going to kill us. Well, let's start at the beginning for me. Where does this name Palin tear but come from? I think that's important for people to know, because it's it's very telling. Yes, Palin chair is actually a reference to the Lord of the Rings trilogy and the withered store on Maybe you remember the all seeing stones. Was there his magical orb the pounds here that allowed him to see everything. Everywhere at any time. What does what does the company do? Exactly Similar to the you know, cofounder other, you know, Lord of the Rings named fund like mithril and driven Dale. And it was not a big Jared token fan here but it but it is appropriate for what talent here does. It's a massive data collection Integration and analytics company, and so what it does. Is it will, you know, create a single source of truth. The Palin cheer if you will, which it then apply down rhythm begins. And it allowed you as the user to figure out what it means. So your might your able to integrate different data silos. You know that you either Own or that license and somehow have access to the customer. And then talent here, pulled it together. And then you figure out what the heck it all means. Okay, So if I'm a bank than I wantto find out if employees are cheating and making illegal trades and that sort of stuff I give all the dreams of data that I have to this company, and they can come up with some sort of program that will tell me, you know who did what and when. If there's any shenanigans going on, and also the Defense Department with their reams of data. It's a predictive kind of tool to tell us. You know if there's gonna be a roadside bomb coming up when we have a Humvee traveling somewhere in Afghanistan there say something like that, right? Yeah, exactly. And so the applications like you just pointed out, John, It really varies depending on how the customer wants to use this tool. So you know, BP may use it to you know, like you said, you know, beating, they use it to increase in and maximize oil production. Mark will use it too. Help me drug discovery and the department of Defense. Which is was it first customer? The CIA through the CIA, actually, um, you know, uses it for a range of applications. You know, as do governments all over the world. They used to be in Silicon Valley, right? And they moved to Ah to Denver with that's kind of that's it's. It's interesting that move with what was behind that. There's been a couple things behind that The first one is that there's been a lot of protest, and there's a lot of been a lot of blow back in Silicon Valley, which tends to lean a lot more liberals and other parts of the nation. Against some of the work that talent here performed on the half of ice, the immigration Customs Enforcement Agency and I had a bunch of protest in front of their headquarters there, um, frustration. So you know if they move to Denver, maybe you know a little bit harder to get to. It's also kind of a statement saying Hey, you know now that we're going to a public company we are going to continue. We're doubling down on on all the work, even the controversial one. We don't think it should be up to software engineers in the Valley. Like, you know, like, You know, those Google who protested the way that computer vision is being used for project may, even for example, you know, our engineer should be the ones controlling policy. We're gonna leave that up. To the policy makers and one of the founders is also panic controversial because of his association with Donald Trump. Yeah. You're talking about Peter Kill now, Peter. He'll, you know, uh, did speak on behalf of Trump donated to him to get him elected and, you know, really became very, very tight with him in the early days, right after Trump was elected, installing Michael Crossfield as the you know, White House sealed and helping other people that he has been tied doing circles in positions of power, he says. Gonna back off Unilateral support for Trump. But he's still very tightly associated with the administration, which you know I didn't quite right with some of the employees. Um, you know, when other people outside the company is well, that saw hell, possibly using this technology or his company, doing it to help, um and other groups implementing policies that they disagree with. Thanks for explaining all that. I think I've got my head around it now, Lissa fix for much bluebirds, Liz, said Chapman. And just remember daybreak weekend Special European Council competing next week, and there's a lot.

Donald Trump Palin Lizette Chapman Defense Department Silicon Valley CIA Denver Bloomberg Trump CEO Peter Afghanistan reporter Jared Dale immigration Customs Enforcemen Google Special European Council Lissa
"one customer" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"one customer" Discussed on KTRH

"Cruz was the first customer of Dallas hair salon owner Shelly loop here on Friday this after she was released from jail over opening her salon during the shutdown orders senator Cruz on cage here ages Michael berry show says he was bothered by the judge's demand of Mister miss Luther apologize really crazy it'll be to give the United States elected officials don't get the demand the dissidents in the bank holiday not the way it works you work for the people not the other way around adding that he supports the strong safety and cleanliness standards but things that Americans and Texans need to be able to get back to work speaking of salons and enforcement inspectors with the Harris County fire marshal's office facing discipline for failing to wear a mask while shutting down a tanning salon and Crosby surveillance camera at island hands caught the incident about a week ago when the two inspectors came to shut down the salon in response to a complaint owners David de givens said that the inspectors threatened to arrest him if he didn't shut down the business however the inspectors were not wearing protective masks at the time well the owner of a Houston area strip club is allowed to re open it kinda club onyx has been allowed to re opened as a restaurant but cannot have any dancers performing since the club generates less than fifty percent of its business for alcohol and it has the proper permits it can operate as a restaurant only under the governor's re open guidelines well for been county is stepping up their efforts to get residents tested for the corona virus officials announcing to do testing sites one in the Richmond at the Galleria furniture the gallery furniture store of the Graham parkway and the other is in Katy at seven lakes high school both will operate Monday through Friday eight AM to five PM judge KP George says the sites are free some people cannot.

Cruz Shelly loop senator Cruz Luther United States David de givens Katy KP George Dallas Michael berry Harris County Crosby Houston lakes high school
"one customer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"one customer" Discussed on KCRW

"Ex girlfriend who is appreciative of the fact that he broke up with her inside his car because it was cold outside one woman said he was a great storyteller and also quote unreasonably sweaty he served right like what it like it's so easy not to include that sentence but as Dave kept scrolling past the funny memories of course things got heavier many of his friends have been devastated and they took to Facebook as a form of therapy pouring their hearts out about their loss dozens painted Dave as a devoted friend the kind of guy who was there with hugs and advice and beer whenever you needed him then I got to this one customer friends that just got it am Hey did pretty sure kit took this photo right before I told you I was going to leave a party in order to go to bed early and then you made fun of me for doing that I guess I never thought about this before but you were totally my best friend in college even though you're a senior when I was a freshman you insisted on treating me and everyone as equals even though we weren't did you really made me feel so effing cool my dumb smile in this photo is one hundred percent genuine because I was so happy to be with you all the time it wasn't just me who felt that way whenever we went to CVS or Walgreens every employee recognized you and said hello we've even eat at chipotle for free because you have it going on dude thanks for telling me not to be so hard on myself and then laughing about how funny that sounded coming from you thanks for all the rides home thanks for being my best friend it looks like it's finally your turn to turn in early you weren't it I'll talk to you later duffer yes it's just really sweet it's really.

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