35 Burst results for "One Company"

Watch Live: Biden to deliver remarks on Ukraine as U.S. prepares to send tanks

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 d ago

Watch Live: Biden to deliver remarks on Ukraine as U.S. prepares to send tanks

"Ukraine's allies are responding as president zelensky requests heavier battle tanks for that nation's defense. The White House says President Biden will talk about the continued support for Ukraine at a noon address. This coming after U.S. officials said the United States had agreed to send M1 Abrams tanks to help Ukraine's troops push back Russian forces in the country's east. Chancellor Olaf scholz says Germany will provide one company of leopard two a 6 tanks, 14 vehicles, and the goal is for Germany and other countries to provide a total of two battalions or 88 tanks. Schultz says they are acting in close coordination with

President Zelensky Ukraine President Biden Chancellor Olaf Scholz United States White House Germany Schultz
Germany agrees to provide Ukraine with advanced battle tanks

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

Germany agrees to provide Ukraine with advanced battle tanks

"Germany has agreed to provide Ukraine with advanced battle tanks. After weeks of hesitation, the saw growing impatience among Germany's allies, Chancellor Olaf Schultz, has announced his government would provide Ukraine with leopard two battle tanks and approve a requests by other countries to do the same in a statement the government says it would initially provide Ukraine with one company of leopard two a 6 tanks, which comprises 14 vehicles from its own stocks, the goal is for Germany and its allies to provide Ukraine with a total of two battalions or 88 tanks, Germany's acting in close coordination with its allies. I'm Charles De Ledesma.

Ukraine Chancellor Olaf Schultz Germany Government Charles De Ledesma
TVS Motor Companys Chairman Sir Ralf Speth conferred with University of Warwicks Honorary Doctorate

ACN Newswire

04:10 min | Last week

TVS Motor Companys Chairman Sir Ralf Speth conferred with University of Warwicks Honorary Doctorate

"12 p.m. Saturday January 21st, 2023. TVS motor company's chairman sir Ralph's Beth conferred with university of Warwick's honorary doctorate. Singapore, January 21st, 2023 ACN newswire sir Ralph speth, chairman of TVS motor company, has been conferred with an honorary doctorate in the field of science doctor of science, honoris kalsa from the university of Warwick, United Kingdom. The honorary degree was conferred by the university of Warwick Chancellor baroness Catherine Ashton of up Holland. TVS motor company post chairman sir Ralph speth conferred with university of Warwick apos honorary doctorate. Sir Ralph is accompanied by the university of Warwick Chancellor baroness Catherine Ashton of up Holland, who conferred the degree, sir Ralph is a fellow of the Royal Academy of engineering, and a fellow of the Royal Society. An honorary professor at Warwick manufacturing group WMG. He has been closely associated with WMG ever since obtaining his engineering doctorate in 2008, under the pioneering leadership of former WMG chairman, lord Botticelli. An outstanding engineer with a vast experience in the global automotive industry. Sir Ralph has held leadership roles with some of the renowned automotive and industrial giants such as Jaguar Land Rover, BMW, Ford, taught a motors, and the Linda group. He was appointed honorary knight commander of the British Empire in an additional night commander of the most excellent Order of the British Empire, commenting on the honor, Venice srinivasan, chairman emeritus, TVS motor company, said quote my heartiest congratulations to Ralph for this well deserved recognition. Over his distinguished career in automotive and industrials of more than four decades, he has built world class products and brands. He has been relentlessly working towards transforming the industry with his passion for technology and strive for excellence. This honor is a testament to his leadership, vision, and dedication to the industry, and we are privileged to have him lead TVS motor company in its transformational journey dot clothes, and venue, MD, TVS motor company, said quote sir Ralph's exemplary leadership skills, tremendous vision for the industry and descending approach towards technology make him unique. His energy and passion is inspiring. We are proud to have him amongst us we wish him many more accolades recognizing his immense contributions to the industry dot quote sir Ralph has a degree in engineering from the university of applied sciences rosenheim, Germany, and a doctorate of engineering and mechanical engineering and business administration at the university of Warwick. About TVS motor company TVS motor company is a reputed two and three Wheeler manufacturer globally, championing progress through sustainable mobility with four stadia off tart manufacturing facilities. In hoser, messieurs and in India and karawang in Indonesia. Rooted in our 100 year legacy of trust, value, and passion for customers in exactness. We take pride in making internationally aspirational products of the highest quality through innovative and sustainable processes. We are the only two Wheeler company to have received the prestigious stemming prize. Our products lead in their respective categories in the JD power IQS and appeal surveys. We have been ranked number one company in the JD power customer service satisfaction survey for consecutive four years. Our group company Norden motorcycles, based in the United Kingdom, is one of the most emotive motorcycle brands in the world. Our subsidiaries in the personal E mobility space, Swiss E mobility group a CMG and EGO movement have a leading position in the a bike market in Switzerland. TVS motor company endeavors to deliver the most superior customer experience across 80 countries in which we operate. For more information, please visit WWW dot TV's motor dot com. For more information, please contact Priyanka Kumar Priyanka dot Kumar TV's motor dot com copyright 2023 ACN newswire. All rights reserved. WWW dot ACN newswire dot com.

Sir Ralph University Of Warwick Tvs Motor Company Sir Ralph Speth WMG Honoris Kalsa Baroness Catherine Ashton Tvs Motor Company Post University Of Warwick Apos Chancellor Baroness Catherine Warwick Manufacturing Group Lord Botticelli Holland Linda Group Venice Srinivasan Royal Academy Of Engineering Jaguar Land Rover Royal Society Beth
Cryptomining  The Opportunity Fog Hashing Broght to CES 2023

E-Crypto News

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Cryptomining The Opportunity Fog Hashing Broght to CES 2023

"6 p.m. Sunday January 15th, 2023 krypton mining the opportunity fog hashing brought to CES 2023 E crypto news update provides the latest articles on technology and cryptocurrencies data stars rising. Fog hashing might be the game changer in the krypton mining industry, with its innovations in both consumer and home mining and commercial and farming markets. Las Vegas, January 13th, 2023 globe newswire last year, at CES 2022, fog hashing was the world's first company to release a product tailored for decentralized home war. If crypto news dot com

Las Vegas
Santa's back in town with inflation, inclusion on his mind

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Santa's back in town with inflation, inclusion on his mind

"After two holiday seasons with COVID-19 precautions, Santa Claus is coming to town. Merry Christmas to everyone. The jolly old elf is back this year in person without plastic partitions or faraway benches. And kids once again sitting on Santa's lap, except at Macy's in Herald square, where Santa sits behind a bench. The company hires Santa dot com, says there's been a 30% increase in bookings this year compared to the last two seasons. Although COVID fears are easing, inflation is taking some of the twinkle up. Santa's eyes, many of the portrayers are older. They live on fixed incomes and bending under the weight of higher prices. But at least one companies paying more around 5 to $12,000 for the holiday season. Sandra Booker say this year, there's a higher demand for inclusivity, meaning they're looking for santas who are black or Spanish speaking, and those who know sign language. I Jackie Quinn

Herald Square Santa Claus Santa Macy Sandra Booker Jackie Quinn
Glenn and Leigh of Patriot Mobile Tell Their Side of the Story

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 5 months ago

Glenn and Leigh of Patriot Mobile Tell Their Side of the Story

"Another group that's coming in hot because they've been in hot water a little bit this year and this week. Is Glenn's story and Leigh Wong guests from patriot mobile with the CEO and the VP of government affairs because NBC, we talked about this yesterday, they are going hard against patriot mobile and what was the headline, right? It was the far right Christian cell phone provider that is taking over Texas school boards. I want to get them on to get their side of the story because boy, they are really mad that the rights and really just common sense regular Christian folks because this is the fight of our country and here patriot mobile is one company that is willing to stand up. Glenn Lee, welcome to the program. Thank you for having us. Jack, thank you for having us. It's always great to see you. Oh, it's great. We were just down at cpac together. We did an incredible event. We did the book signing. We had my antifa book. We just did a segment talking about some of the stuff that was in the NT support, by the way. Kenosha, but first, tell us what was it that you all were up to with the Texas school boards, and then explain why at NBC is so mad at you guys. Well, NBC being mad at us is not a new thing. And this particular reporter has a history of being very interesting with facts, but the bottom line is what happened Monday night in Texas. Is elected officials did in an elected position. What they said, they were going to do when they ran for office. And neither the left nor the right is used to that.

Leigh Wong NBC Glenn Lee Glenn Texas Cpac Kenosha Jack
"one company" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:20 min | 7 months ago

"one company" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"First company applies to make birth control pill available without a prescription in the U.S. by Abigail Abrams. Since the Supreme Court overturned roe V wade and set off a cascade of abortion bands around the country, access to contraception has taken on increased importance. To get birth control pills and other hormonal contraceptives in the U.S., patients still need a prescription. But now, birth control pills are one step closer to being available over the counter. HRA pharma, a French drug maker, has submitted an application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first over the counter birth control pill in the U.S.. We're very proud of being the first company to submit the first ever application to the FDA for daily birth control over the counter, and obviously it's coming at the right moment, says Frederic Weldon, chief strategic operations, and innovation officer at HRA pharma. Although the company had been working on its application for years before the Supreme Court's decision, the announcement is a bit of light in this very dark moment for reproductive rights in the U.S., well grin says. Nearly half of pregnancies in the U.S. are unintended. And research shows that nearly one third of women who have tried to access prescription birth control faced obstacles. If HRA pharma's application is approved, reproductive rights activists and researchers say an over the counter pill would remove barriers to healthcare and expand access to birth control throughout the country, especially for poor people, those in rural areas and other marginalized communities. Oral contraceptives were first approved by the FDA more than 60 years ago, and they are the most popular non permanent method of birth control in the U.S. the pills are already available over the counter in more than 100 countries, and recent polling from data for progress shows that the majority of American voters across party lines support making birth control pills available without a prescription in the U.S.. In order for a medication to be sold over the counter in the U.S., the FDA says it must be safe, must treat a condition that users can self diagnose must have a low potential for misuse and must be something people can effectively use without the supervision of a healthcare provider. Many researchers and major medical associations in the U.S. say oral contraceptives meet all of the FDA's requirements. Groups, including the American college of obstetricians and gynecologists, the American academy of family physicians and the American medical association have supported moving birth control pills over the counter for several years, and the AMA last month urged the FDA to approve over the counter access to the pills without an age restriction. While millions of people take

Elaine Parker: How You Can Join the 'Rock the Woke' Movement

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:35 min | 8 months ago

Elaine Parker: How You Can Join the 'Rock the Woke' Movement

"Rock the woke dot com is a great way for all of our listeners to get engaged in fighting back against this woke garbage. Well, you know, last year, we actually took on the woke, the wokeness last year with Major League Baseball when they pulled that All-Star Game out of Atlanta over all the lies being told about that voting law that was passed in the state, which, by the way, turned out to they had record numbers and voters. There was nobody being kept from voting. So that's a lot of voter suppression now going on in Georgia, huh? Exactly, exactly. So we stepped into that last year because we just couldn't stand what was happening. Not only to Americans, but to our small businesses and how they were hurt so much. And so we launched rock the woke last week. You were listeners can go to rock the woke dot com, and they can take the no mouse in my house pledge. And that's because we want to send a message to Disney that they need to focus on what their mission is. And that's entertaining children. Not stepping into the social wars that are cultural wars that are going on. But this is a cultural battle. This is a cultural war that we've stepped in. And we think Disney is the first company that should get the message that they need to focus on their mission and focus on providing the service that they set out to do and not hurt the value of their company. I mean, the value of their company has gone down some 30% since they stepped into this issue with the state of Florida and the parental rights act that was passed by governor desantis.

Major League Baseball Atlanta Disney Georgia Florida Governor Desantis
Nazi Billionaires: The Dark History of Germany’s Wealthiest Dynasties

History Unplugged Podcast

02:14 min | 8 months ago

Nazi Billionaires: The Dark History of Germany’s Wealthiest Dynasties

"In particular, you mentioned Germany's most important business dynasties who were involved in this. Which ones are they? And how do they exploit abandoned Jewish assets or make use of this free labor as you described, what were you able to find? So there's 5 men does defied men dynasties in my book and the main one is well actually a decentral one is the quant family, which today, one branch, two members of one branch of the family, judae control, BMW. They own about 47% of the stock. And as I mentioned earlier, it's their grandfather, gunter Khan, who was married to Margaret goebbels from 1921 to 1930 and who had the battery company called and this weapons weapons company called the DVM and he used mass and for he used force the mass driver mass slave labor on a particularly big scale in his factories and estimated almost 60,000 during the war. And then there is, you know, he stole, he acquired Jewish companies far under a market value between 1936, I believe, was the first company and it ended somewhere midway during the war 42 43 that is his final attempt to acquire either companies owned by Jews, but also companies owned companies that were seized in Nazi occupied territories by French people by French or by Danish or Danes or polish, thirdly, I mean, he and so that's the man. That's the dark key to the book. Red line, the threat threat of the book. Second leaders Friedrich fleck has afflict dynasty, which controlled which until 1985 were the controlling shareholders of Daimler bands. And but during the war, British flick at a massive steel coal and machinery conglomerate, one of the largest in Nazi

Judae Control Gunter Khan Margaret Goebbels Germany DVM BMW Friedrich Fleck Daimler
Can cancer blood tests live up to promise of saving lives?

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

Can cancer blood tests live up to promise of saving lives?

"There's there's there's there's a a a a new new new new type type type type of of of of blood blood blood blood test test test test that that that that can can can can screen screen screen screen for for for for signs signs signs signs of of of of cancer cancer cancer cancer but but but but the the the the government government government government will will will will be be be be researching researching researching researching that that that that type type type type of of of of product product product product to to to to see see see see if if if if it it it it lives lives lives lives up up up up to to to to its its its its claims claims claims claims these these these these blood blood blood blood tests tests tests tests called called called called liquid liquid liquid liquid biopsies biopsies biopsies biopsies are are are are already already already already being being being being used used used used in in in in cancer cancer cancer cancer patients patients patients patients to to to to help help help help pinpoint pinpoint pinpoint pinpoint specific specific specific specific treatments treatments treatments treatments now now now now one one one one company company company company California California California California based based based based grail grail grail grail says says says says for for for for just just just just under under under under a a a a thousand thousand thousand thousand dollars dollars dollars dollars it it it it will will will will test test test test healthy healthy healthy healthy people's people's people's people's blood blood blood blood to to to to look look look look for for for for tumors tumors tumors tumors in in in in the the the the pancreas pancreas pancreas pancreas ovaries ovaries ovaries ovaries and and and and other other other other areas areas areas areas that that that that don't don't don't don't have have have have routine routine routine routine screening screening screening screening methods methods methods methods it it it it looks looks looks looks for for for for cancer cancer cancer cancer by by by by checking checking checking checking for for for for DNA DNA DNA DNA fragments fragments fragments fragments that that that that would would would would be be be be shed shed shed shed by by by by tumor tumor tumor tumor cells cells cells cells U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. government government government government researchers researchers researchers researchers are are are are planning planning planning planning a a a a large large large large experiment experiment experiment experiment perhaps perhaps perhaps perhaps two two two two hundred hundred hundred hundred thousand thousand thousand thousand people people people people over over over over seven seven seven seven years years years years to to to to see see see see if if if if these these these these DNA DNA DNA DNA based based based based blood blood blood blood tests tests tests tests can can can can catch catch catch catch cancer cancer cancer cancer early early early early I'm I'm I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

Cancer Cancer Cancer Cancer Blood Blood Blood Blood Test Cancer Cancer Government Government Governme Blood Blood Blood Blood Tests California Grail Grail Grail Grail Cancer Blood Blood Blood Blood Tumors Tumors Pancreas Pancreas Pancreas Pan Tumors Tumor Tumor Tumor Tumor Cells U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Cancer Cancer Cancer Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu Quinn Quinn
"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

05:07 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Fans tell them to just build <Speech_Male> like the biggest, most powerful, <Speech_Male> most automated <Speech_Male> models <Speech_Male> in areas where there's high <Speech_Male> data availability, <Speech_Male> low risk <Speech_Male> and low need, <Speech_Male> therefore, <SpeakerChange> for domain <Speech_Male> expertise. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> were to look <Speech_Male> 5 years <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in the future <Speech_Male> with big companies, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> fortune <Speech_Male> 1000 global <Speech_Male> fortune 1000 <SpeakerChange> Fortune 500, <Speech_Male> whatever. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> How far do <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> predict <Speech_Male> that they will <Speech_Male> be down <Speech_Male> this <SpeakerChange> path towards <Speech_Male> an AI first company? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> funny. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Music_Male> don't like to pronounce <Speech_Male> it too much, but <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> is something I'm very happy <Speech_Male> to prognosticate <Speech_Male> about because it's fundamentally <Speech_Male> an optimistic. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And is <Speech_Male> also the field of which I spend all of <Speech_Music_Male> my time. <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> I may know something <Speech_Music_Male> about this. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> If you're asking me <Speech_Male> the same question about something <Speech_Music_Male> political, I just <Speech_Music_Male> absolutely refuse to <Speech_Music_Male> answer it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know anything <Speech_Music_Male> about anything. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I think a lot of companies <Speech_Male> are going to be really far along. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Look, I <Speech_Male> just think this is undoubtedly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> an evidently <Speech_Male> more importantly, a <Speech_Male> very powerful tool. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There are <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male> senses, <Speech_Male> more sources of data, <Speech_Male> more ways to <Speech_Male> build these things. A <Speech_Male> lot of people are doing a <Speech_Male> great work to <Speech_Male> build tools <Speech_Male> that help us build these <Speech_Male> tools. So <Speech_Male> they manage machine <Speech_Male> learning operations, <Speech_Male> what is abilities, <Speech_Male> trust, safety, <Speech_Male> all these <Speech_Male> things <Speech_Male> being built around <Speech_Male> tools that <Speech_Male> help you build better AI <Speech_Male> models. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> so much out there that's <Speech_Male> happening. There's so <Speech_Male> much power to <Speech_Male> be gained. <Speech_Male> But building these <Speech_Male> things and <Speech_Male> it's being <Speech_Male> democratized for want of <Speech_Male> a much, much better <Speech_Male> term. <Speech_Male> Very quickly. <Speech_Male> So I think a lot <Speech_Male> of organizations are going <Speech_Male> to be really fun to <Speech_Male> journey <SpeakerChange> <Silence> on that time <Speech_Male> frame. Yeah, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I tend to agree with you <Speech_Male> as well. I think <Speech_Male> as we <Speech_Male> keep going down this path, <Speech_Male> people talk, <Speech_Male> we're going to go into an AI <Speech_Male> winter and <Speech_Male> I've been through those <Speech_Male> and they're cold. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> sort of ran up against <Speech_Male> explainability <Speech_Male> and the black <Speech_Male> box issue, but there's <Speech_Male> a lot of work going <Speech_Male> into solving that. <Speech_Male> A lot of great <Speech_Male> startups that are doing it <Speech_Male> that are <Speech_Male> to move great solutions. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So there's sort of <Speech_Male> derisking <Speech_Male> some of those <Speech_Male> decisions for <Speech_Male> companies. <Speech_Male> NLP, <Speech_Male> I think, is <Speech_Male> going to <Speech_Male> transform. I <Speech_Male> mean, where we've gotten today, <Speech_Male> just once <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> sea level <Speech_Male> exactly, it's really get their <Speech_Male> heads around <Speech_Male> how <Speech_Male> impactful NLP <Speech_Music_Male> can be in the <Speech_Male> organization. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> it'll open up and it'll <Speech_Male> be one of those little <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> light down mode and it's over <Speech_Male> their heads, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> right? And with you <Speech_Male> on that. So <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> we go to, are there <Speech_Male> any last thoughts <Speech_Male> that you have <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> both AI practitioners, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> C suite <Speech_Male> leaders who <Speech_Male> are on this <Speech_Male> journey to <Speech_Male> an AI first <Speech_Music_Male> company? <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> try more by shrinking <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> experiments. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> I talk in the book <Speech_Male> about lean AI, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> it's sort of intuitive <Speech_Male> as to what that is. But <Speech_Male> try <Speech_Male> more experiments <Speech_Male> on smaller datasets <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> simple models <Speech_Male> that are cheap at a <Speech_Male> run with more <Speech_Male> constraints. <Speech_Male> And see what <Speech_Male> you can figure out <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> there are a lot <Speech_Male> of datasets <Speech_Male> around these <Speech_Male> problems. There are a lot of <Speech_Male> really easy ways to <Speech_Male> spin up models <Speech_Male> really easy ways <Speech_Male> for non technical <Speech_Male> users to build <Speech_Male> and train models <Speech_Male> today.

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"You know, in the book, you also go into and you just touch on this, you know, there's decentralized versus centralized. And a lot of companies are putting this under a CDL. Data officer, if you will. Do you think there's a one size fits all for most companies or certain industries, more predisposed or should have a more decentralized sort of approach versus centralized, what you're thinking on that. Yeah, again, it just depends on the degree of expertise you need. And how nuanced the decision is you're trying to make. And how risky the potential outcomes are. So for example, in some cases, there's very little data available. Around a decision. I don't know to pick a really easy, but like sort of heavy example. Some medical conditions are super rare and so you don't have outcome data from certain treatments. Because there aren't many treatments and there aren't many patients to those treatments. Or to which you can use those treatments. So you might not have much data, but you may have people with a lot of functional expertise is in researchers or doctors that understand the mechanisms behind some of these rare diseases. That could work with you to develop something that could start. Sort of generating potential treatments, potential drugs or non drug treatments for these rare conditions. So in some fields, it's just not much data available and so you need to start with people that have functional expertise around the core mechanisms behind the input output function you're analyzing. So but in other cases, there's so much data available around something. There's this case with a lot of marketing things. I want to target everyone who is likely to buy this product. There's so much data on my people that are port that product before, that you don't really need any humans in the mix there. And also, if you think, so that's in terms of data availability. So if there's low data availability, maybe you need more people with functional domain expertise, there's low high data availability less. And also in terms of risk and actually, this is why I chose this example because if you think of the potential outcome for administering a treatment recommended by a system to someone with a rare disease potential is to die maybe or they are very made worse ill as a result of that. And so you want more people not just developing those models, but also more people making the final call about whether that treatment is medicine. Whereas if you're making a decision about sending out a marketing email, like, look, the worst cases you and I someone. And they unsubscribe. So that's not a big deal, really, to scheme of things. And so you don't really need another human at the end of that. So look, I think that to the point of decentralization and centralization. You would probably want to decentralize data science talent if you are in an industry where you're trying to build a model that requires log domain expertise, whether it's located in high risk. And you want to centralize.

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Decisions and ultimately have a real edge of your competitors. You touch on the book about this idea, which I also agree with, I'd love you to sort of tell the audience about this about embedding AI people throughout the organization. Because there are some, there's some fundamental differences as you also go into the book and most people are aware of who are in this process between software development, excuse me, and AI data science decisions, right? There's questions. It's this AI and data discovery is really sort of this iterative conversation that happens. Knowing what questions to ask. What questions you can ask? Bringing together these data AI machine learning people with business unit participants and executives. Can you talk about what would that look like in what problems does it solve to embed AI people throughout the organization? And by AI people, can you define that? Does it a PhD in artificial intelligence that you need in every business? Yeah, so the short answer to that is no. So look, again, there's a whole chapter about AI for this teams. And the roles that are different in an AFS company versus a non AI first company. So lots of different people from product managers to engineers business analysts, lots of different people are managed. Lots of different people are put in different parts of the organization. And I sort of go through in the book. What those roles are called, what backgrounds are relevant to those roles. So where you can find these people, what degrees did they study? What organizations have been a part of? How do you measure the effectiveness of these people? What are their outputs? And what tools they need and how much you pay them. So I go through all of these things in the book. So that's just a very easy answer..

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

05:51 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"And so your database never going to be a perfect representation of your reality. And you just have to sort of accept that and get on to making the decisions of the route point. Maybe not pareto optimal, but there's an optimal point at which you go. We've got enough data to make this decision. We actually just need to build a really good system to help us make predictions to help us make a better decision. I think that's where a lot of companies are failing today. Then trying to get the data perfect rather than just experimenting with what I call lean AI to get a model built to just see if the decision is going to be better with AI or not. And if it is, get feedback and generate more data through it. I completely agree with you, right? And not only are they do they try to get, you know, collect as much information as possible, but they try to optimize the information that they've been pulling out of databases. I've been around forever because they believe this historical data is going to go in some kind of insight and then COVID happens and supply chains fall apart historical data is gone, right? And that's just reality. But I think you just hit on something really critical there that I want to dig down into and it's this idea of lean into AI. The data just good enough and kind of move forward. And isn't that the problem circling back to startup companies have an advantage? Isn't that the problem that fortune global fortune 1000 companies or 500 companies, especially are facing today, right? It's this mindset of how do we change our entire culture to accept what you just said right there? Yeah. Because that's risky. Right? And if there's nothing that large global 500 companies hate more is.

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"It's IP. So the models do use or be able to machine learn system to build how you run them at scale. That's technical IP. So it's sort of three forms of competitive advantage in one. But in a needle, if you have all three represents something very different to what we've had before, is if it's not just a network effect or it's not just an economy of scale. It's not just one of those other forms of competitive advantage with heard about and sort of tried to discover it in a real world before. It's very different to any of them. So let me ask you this. On the first one on the data itself, right? When AI first came out, I mean, in the last big data, you know, as everybody's kind of excited about it as deep learning really sort of spurred this new wave of AI that we're in right now. Over the last 7, 8 years. There was this thinking that companies incumbent companies who had lots of data. We're going to have a huge advantage in the market, right? But people are finding that's not necessarily the case. I mean, I just love your thoughts on that. You know, at some level, I almost CEOs around the country who are spending billions of dollars in digital transformation and their projects are failing and we'll get into how you do teams and the expectations. But just sort of an existential question on the side. Before we get to that, do you believe that you almost have a better advantage if you are not if you're a pure AI first startup in an industry and a lot of these industries? So you have to put you on the spot, but it's something. I believe they do, right? Yeah, I do. And so look, when a lot of people look at the title of the book, the AI first company, I think, well, I don't know, my company didn't start building AI in the beginning. So how can I be in AF or something? The whole point of the book is you can be an AI first company, whether you're starting today or whether you're transforming an existing company. However your question was like, if you're starting to scratch, do you have an advantage? Yes, and it's for the reason I think you mentioned, which is you can be more targeted about the data you collect such that you only collect data that feeds the system that generates the prediction that you're effectively selling. Or helps you make the decision that you're making better than anyone else in your market. What to put on a shelf for where to send a product or how much energy to produce on a given day, how in your nuclear power plan or your co-pilot or whatever where to look for minerals. The data you're collecting to feed the system that builds the generates the prediction that helps you make that decision. Can be expensive to collect and process, and if you're very targeted about that in the beginning, you can get to that very valuable making that very valuable institution on a very smart decision. Much more cheaply than others. I think where a lot of companies and at the risk of going into an answer to a different question, but sort of in response to something that was part of that question. I think we're a lot of companies get wrong. They say, just spend so much time trying to have their database represent reality perfectly. And just spend so much time collecting all the data they possibly can, organizing it in the best way they possibly can and whatnot..

AI
"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"I think there's an opportunity to do a lot of good with that as in with that amount of data that can be turned into information that intelligent systems machine learning systems can learn over. There's an opportunity to do a lot of good with that. But the power of these companies that had developed this form of competitive advantage is certainly not less than me. So let's talk about that. You mentioned earlier, you know, it really is the core of what you're talking about, right? So for people who don't understand it, or haven't heard about it, if you will. Explain it. What are data learning effects? How do you, how do you get them? How do you identify them? How do you know if you're realizing them right now, purposely pursue that? So I do have to say, it is much easier to understand data learning effects if you read the book. There are diagrams that are equations for people who like equations and luck if it was as simple to properly explain in 30 seconds or whatever written a blog personal book. But I will answer the question. I'm just saying, if this doesn't immediately make sense to you, I hope it makes sense to you once you have the benefit of the diagrams and the equations in the words around it. And the examples of the book. So data learning effect is three things that when brought together compound in really interesting ways. So it's a one a critical mass of data. So that is just raw data ones and zeros. Structured data and structured data doesn't matter. But it's a critical mass of data. Now that doesn't mean a lot of data. It depends on the problem you're trying to solve or what you're trying to understand in the world. But enough. Then the second thing is a capability to process that data into information..

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

05:04 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"So a data product manager rather than a product manager like investing more heavily in data engineering rather than just software engineering or data infrastructure rather than just offering infrastructure. And policy as well. Being very upfront about considering the implications of handling a lot of data and putting that first in key conversations in your company that's practically what AI first companies do. They put those topics first. They put AI first in those areas. You know, I think the quintessential AI first company to give an example is Google. It's in a one sensor really obvious example. Maybe to a lot of people, but to me, having worked with dozens and dozens of AI first companies and having worked with much larger companies in a very large banks and whatever else around the world. I still think that Google is the first AI first company. It's a company that from day one really considered all the ways in which it could build the most intelligent system and made so many strategic decisions to pursue that over the decades it's been around now. Whether it's building a phone operating system or buying a maps company or driving cars around the street. All of these very key strategic decisions and big capital allocation decisions that they made. Really were in furtherance of the goal of building the most intelligent system to understand what information people want to get at any given time. So that's an example of, I think, the best AI first company out there or the first one at least and probably the best and most powerful. A lot of other big powerful companies now do it. I'd say Amazon. For sure. And Amazon's efforts there really started when they started that a 9 division that built for those out there that are unfamiliar with it. It was the start of the Amazon search bar. They built this big division to make search better and now it does all these other things too. Recommendations and whatnot. But they didn't start like that. They started as warehousing company. And Microsoft has done some of the most incredible research and computer science there is. So there are many decades. It's been around, but it didn't stand and say, that's an AI company. But Google did Google was an AI company from day one. You know, it's interesting because you point out in your book just to put, I think a lot of times, companies and CEOs, they sort of repeat the mantra of AI, right? We're doing AI. We're doing AI. We're doing AI. And they feel like they're getting pushed into it by their tech teams and the markets and their board. But in the book, you really crystallize it by pointing out that the $1 trillion companies today are AI first companies. And so for the listeners who sometimes you sort of forget or you don't focus on that, you get sort of in the weeds is that the opportunity really is the leaders in industries that the people who are going to win it all, if you will, will be AI first company. And I thought that was.

Google Amazon Microsoft
"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

03:38 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"I was there in the very early days of some really really important companies. I think in the field and I got to sit in the border and a significant investor in these companies. And I got a chance to work for a lot of these entrepreneurs and researchers that were building this technology and trying to bring it into market. In the very early days of AI you were there and it was you know that there were a lot of idiosyncratic things about bringing AI software I first software to market that were very different from spring and software to market, how you sell it, how you market it. How you communicate the value of how you measure it and whether it's working, who you hire, how you organize those people. There are a lot of challenges we face in the early days of building those companies together. And a lot of things we learned. So that was the knowledge I thought I had generated. But through the opportunity to work for those families. And so I thought, well, if I've got it, I should put it in a book. People kept asking me the same questions. And so I tried to consolidate all the answers to those questions in the book so that it's there and basically free for everyone to access. So the book sort of focuses on this term that we use a lot, right? AI first company. Talk what is an AI first company? Right now it's a marketing term, right? We're an AI first company. But from your perspective, really, what is an AI first company? I'm glad you hired Indian on that term because it's to turn I started using a really long time ago, like probably 7 years at 6 or 7 years ago now. And it was very clear to me what it was in the early days..

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

Pulse of AI

04:50 min | 10 months ago

"one company" Discussed on Pulse of AI

"Back to the pulse of AI. I am Jason stoughton here in Silicon Valley. On this podcast, I'm joined by ash Fontana AI startup investor and thought leader to talk about his book the AI first company how to compete and win with artificial intelligence. For the thousands of you in my audience who are focused on trying to transform your company into an AI powered leader in your industry, ash's book is going to end up being a well worn and dog eared resource that you will return to again and again along your journey. I guarantee it. I hope you enjoy this podcast as much as I did. Let's get to it. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much for having me. Tell the audience a little bit about yourself. What's your background? What's been your focus? Just as importantly, what's really your passion and what drives you. Yeah. The risk of talking too much about myself at the start, I just sort of focus on the bits that are relevant to what we're going to talk about today. So I guess you would say that investing is my craft. It's the thing I like to practice every day to think of practice for a long time. And it's the thing I keep trying to get better and better at it for a year. And your job there is to really, if you think about it on long enough time horizon, is to find out support companies that will have a really big impact. By also have a way to sustain that impact. So they have to sustain themselves for long enough and capture enough value for long enough to build and keep supporting something of consequence like whatever product or technology they bring into the world. And so my experience with various technologies is a builder. So I started a company at the beginning of the big data era and as an investor, I worked on building AngelList really early on since a lot of companies come through there, not with my partner Mark..

Jason stoughton ash Fontana Silicon Valley Mark
More record highs for S&P 500, Dow on first day of 2022

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

More record highs for S&P 500, Dow on first day of 2022

"Hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi a a reporting reporting more more record record highs highs on on Wall Wall Street Street to to start start the the twenty twenty twenty twenty two two trading trading year year the the first first day day of of trading trading of of twenty twenty twenty twenty two two on on Wall Wall Street Street so so more more record record highs highs for for the the S. S. and and P. P. five five hundred hundred and and the the Dow Dow Jones Jones industrial industrial average average the the S. S. and and P. P. rose rose six six tenths tenths of of one one percent percent gaining gaining thirty thirty point point three three eight eight points points to to close close at at four four thousand thousand seven seven ninety ninety six six fifty fifty six six the the Dow Dow rose rose seven seven tenths tenths of of one one percent percent gaining gaining two two hundred hundred forty forty six six point point seven seven six six points points to to close close at at thirty thirty six six thousand thousand five five eighty eighty five five oh oh six six the the nasdaq nasdaq rose rose just just under under one one hundred hundred eighty eighty eight eight points points to to fifteen fifteen thousand thousand eight eight thirty thirty two two apple apple rose rose two two point point five five percent percent in in closed closed just just shy shy of of becoming becoming the the first first company company to to hit hit a a market market capitalization capitalization of of three three trillion trillion dollars dollars the the solid solid start start follows follows a a banner banner year year for for Wall Wall Street Street in in twenty twenty twenty twenty one one the the S. S. and and P. P. five five hundred hundred gained gained twenty twenty six six point point nine nine percent percent last last year year posting posting seventy seventy record record highs highs hi hi Mike Mike Rossio Rossio

Mike Mike Rossi Rossi P. P. P. P. Rose Apple Mike Mike Rossio Rossio
Before You Buy (MM #3920)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Before You Buy (MM #3920)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. One of the many challenges that have faced online sellers in the last couple of years since the pandemic is selling clothes online. A lot of people still prefer to try them on before they buy them, of course. I'm one of those, just because it says it fits me, doesn't necessarily mean it's going to fit me. So I'm not often buying clothes online, unless I know it's something that I bought before, and I know we'll fit. Well, one company has come up with an idea they think will kind of help the try it before you buy it plan. If you're an Amazon Prime member, you can now order 6 items to be 6 pairs of pants, 6 shirts a combination, whatever it is for free. You order them, you try it before you buy it. If you like them, you got a week before you either have to send them back or you to simply buy them. It's a good way to try it before you buy it. It is still not perfect. I don't know if there ever will be a perfect way to buy something online before you can actually try it on. We'll have to see. But things are changing in the retail world. And of course, thanks to COVID, retailers who sell clothing are having to change too.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Amazon
Before You Buy (MM #3920)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Before You Buy (MM #3920)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. One of the many challenges that have faced online sellers in the last couple of years since the pandemic is selling clothes online. A lot of people still prefer to try them on before they buy them, of course. I'm one of those, just because it says it fits me, doesn't necessarily mean it's going to fit me. So I'm not often buying clothes online, unless I know it's something that I bought before, and I know we'll fit. Well, one company has come up with an idea they think will kind of help the try it before you buy it plan. If you're an Amazon Prime member, you can now order 6 items to be 6 pairs of pants, 6 shirts a combination, whatever it is for free. You order them, you try it before you buy it. If you like them, you got a week before you either have to send them back or you to simply buy them. It's a good way to try it before you buy it. It is still not perfect. I don't know if there ever will be a perfect way to buy something online before you can actually try it on. We'll have to see. But things are changing in the retail world. And of course, thanks to COVID, retailers who sell clothing are having to change too.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Amazon
Charging Stations (MM #3848)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Charging Stations (MM #3848)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason with gas prices rising and a lot of people starting to talk about electric vehicles. I've often wondered the one part of the problem that nobody seems to be talking about. And that's availability of charging stations. I just saw where some Midwestern governors have got together to create a regional charging station network that they'll all be responsible for. Because the big problem with any electric vehicle right now is how long you can drive it. As I've always said, I'm interested in electric vehicles, but I'll never be able to take it on a trip to Indiana because you've got to stop for charging for a half an hour or an hour or however long it takes, and that's inconvenient. Sure, gas prices are going to keep going up and while electric vehicles are becoming more and more prevalent. We've got to start worrying about the infrastructure to the electric vehicle market. I hear there's one company that can do a charging station a rapid charge in 15 minutes to fully charge your electric vehicle. If we're really serious about getting rid of the gas guzzlers and going electric, they've got to fix this problem first before anybody even myself starts considering going electric. Somebody will figure it out, but what it's going to cost me? Well, that's what concerns me most.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Indiana
Charging Stations (MM #3848)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Charging Stations (MM #3848)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason with gas prices rising and a lot of people starting to talk about electric vehicles. I've often wondered the one part of the problem that nobody seems to be talking about. And that's availability of charging stations. I just saw where some Midwestern governors have got together to create a regional charging station network that they'll all be responsible for. Because the big problem with any electric vehicle right now is how long you can drive it. As I've always said, I'm interested in electric vehicles, but I'll never be able to take it on a trip to Indiana because you've got to stop for charging for a half an hour or an hour or however long it takes, and that's inconvenient. Sure, gas prices are going to keep going up and while electric vehicles are becoming more and more prevalent. We've got to start worrying about the infrastructure to the electric vehicle market. I hear there's one company that can do a charging station a rapid charge in 15 minutes to fully charge your electric vehicle. If we're really serious about getting rid of the gas guzzlers and going electric, they've got to fix this problem first before anybody even myself starts considering going electric. Somebody will figure it out, but what it's going to cost me? Well, that's what concerns me most.

Kevin Mason Nasa Indiana
Locast Shutting Down After Losing Court Battle With TV Networks

The Tech Guy

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Locast Shutting Down After Losing Court Battle With TV Networks

"Low caste was a solution that let you watch your local channels over the internet. So if you didn't live near enough to the big city to get the channels but you were in the what they call the area of dominant influence the of that market as we are. We're about fifty miles north of san francisco too far for anything but antenna on one hundred foot masts to get the Get reception so that's why you know cable does well out here in the boonies in the suburbs in the burbs And of course those are the two constituencies really liked this idea of low caste because i could just fire up low-caste dot org and watch my local stations without an antenna without A cost and the rationale was. We'll hey they're broadcasting for free it's ad-supported why the heck not so the first company to try this. Remember the areo. Their excuse was they had a little dime sized antennas and every subscriber had their own antenna. So all they were doing is putting that intent ten on the internet supreme court. Shut that down mighty fast. That was it for area. So low caste thought. Well we got another loophole. This is a new tradition. It's kind of interesting You don't like the rules. The laws of the land. You try to sneak in through the side door. It's actually a the great american pastime. Probably great human pastime gaming the system right. there's a system. There's some rules but they don't apply to me. How can we get around those rules. Let's figure out a way to get around. So what low. Caste thought was in fact there right. If you're a nonprofit if you don't profit off of this in others. I just did. Leo's internet thing. If for free set up a tower got the reception and then put it on the internet. Made sure that only people in that area could see it. That would be legal

San Francisco Supreme Court LEO
Google Is Its Own Government, Cuts Texas Attorney General's Budget

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Google Is Its Own Government, Cuts Texas Attorney General's Budget

"Attorney general paxton. How many people do you have working for you. And the attorney general's office in texas so it's a total of about forty two hundred four thousand two hundred and you're saying that google has a lot of resources understand. How big these companies are. You have the understand the point. I'm making i mean you're the third largest state right or the second we're second we're actually selling. The census data second largest state in the country attorney. General's office is saying. Hey look we're going to try our best but like we're no google. Yes to show the size right amazing the money that they have a we have budgets and my entire budget for a two year period one point three billion which sounds like a lot of money six hundred and something million but a year which is a lot of money and we do a lot of great things with that money however if you think about google making you know hundred and thirty five billion a year and profits they could hire every attorney in texas they wanted to and every lobbyist in texas and i. We have to go up against that. There's no limit to what they can do. The experts they can i r- and and and what they can do to try to. You know go into a legislative session. Like i just went through where they try to lobby tab. My budget cut by twenty five percent. So really it's a force. They are a force. That's just one company that makes sense. Yes so google being its own government. Basically within our own country never should have been allowed to be this big or powerful comes in and says oh we don't like the attorney general's office in texas because their lawsuit is so brilliantly written. Let's go cut their budget. Because we have offices in austin and somehow we can justify and that's what they're willing to do absolutely. I think it's pretty smart. I mean if they get my budget by twenty five percent which was the strategy That makes it very difficult for me to carry. I actually asked also for money for the google case. I asked for forty three million dollars. Go fight go well they obviously. We're trying to fight that as well that imagine. I don't get the money to to fight him. But also lose the rest of my you know a high percentage of my budget and have to lay off a bunch of lawyers instead of ramping up to go fight them. That's nearly what happened.

Attorney General Paxton Google Texas Austin
Who's Afraid of Hipster Antitrust?

Motley Fool Answers

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Who's Afraid of Hipster Antitrust?

"So the other day i was driving in my car. Listening to npr. Like the mid atlantic coast metropolitan area residing person that i am when i heard the phrase hipster antitrust at first i was like his hipster thing. We're saying again. The answer is not really. And then i wondered. What is this antitrust business about. Well way back in two thousand seventeen. A woman named lena. Kahn wrote a now famous piece. For the yale lodge journal arguing that the rise of massive tech companies like amazon google apple etc proved that modern american antitrust laws were flawed. And how we decide. If a company has an unfair monopoly is outdated and ineffective so to over simplify the status quo. That she was railing against one of the joys of a free market is that you have many companies competing to sell the same product and they keep each other in check by trying to the better price or the best service or some other value proposition to customers. If one company has monopoly that they can charge whatever exorbitant price they want because the customers have nowhere else to go for the same product or service and this is

Yale Lodge Journal NPR Kahn Lena Amazon Apple Google
"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

"And john. I just wonder before we go today. If we could zoom out a little bit like just for the regular person living in yellowknife who wants an affordable apartment but an apartment where their needs are met right where the windows are intact and and there's heat when it's cold. What are the concerns here about. What all of this ultimately can mean for the future of housing in the north yet. It's interesting. I mean i guess the sort of put yourself in the shoes of a northerner anytime one company controls so much of something that's so essential to your health and happiness like housing. It makes people a little nervous and now that the holdings this company has in the north just such a small part of this bigger company that as you said you know it has twenty billion dollars in assets that just wants any concern that northerners might have. It's just such a small piece but you know also at the same time for northerners. That's kind of a familiar feeling to be on the edge of something that's much bigger than they are and to have this feeling that you know.

yellowknife john
"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

"And i mentioned starlight think that this name is probably going to be familiar to allow tenants across the country and to listeners of the show as well. We've talked about them on our show when one of the buildings was moving to victor tenant in toronto syrian refugee during kovin and in march of last year tenants at another one of their buildings in parkdale toronto started withholding partial rent because they called unfair living conditions. And as. we've also talked about more broadly. This is all part of of of what is being called the financialisation of housing right like big big companies. I believe starlight has more than twenty billion in assets Consolidating the rental market. And this is. This is now a fairly common model. In canada across the border in the united states as well and there's been a lot of criticism that tenants are now dealing with this totally faceless entity that is more interested in sort of maximizing their profits not like a mom and pop landlord and so how does north us for defend the critiques of their bigness. In yellowknife well. They wrote test and an email that they reject the narrative that their presence in the north is a quote reflection of dominance but the company does advertise south to investors as the largest private sector residential landlord in the northwest territories and nunavut Now north you also says there on the business of providing essential housing in a place that has a major housing shortage which is the northwest territories. And that also includes us. We've heard public housing. And they end. They say they proudly employed like over their history they probably employed hundreds of northerners and host to thousands of residents in dozens of communities across northwest territories nunavut and that they've contributed millions of dollars to the economies of the communities in which they operate. Okay i wanted to put the government response to this. So i know there's this former. Mla who sort of seems to. I don't know if we're is right. We're but regret that. The government of the northwest territories didn't do more to address this issue in john. Can you tell me about what she told you Yeah i spoke to this woman. Wendy sorrow she. She was a yellowknife. Mla from two thousand seven to twenty fifteen and this was kind of the key period where north northview was doubling. The number of units managed in the territory and. She said she didn't really notice at this company. Acquiring a bigger and bigger percentage of the territory's rental properties. I think it was a concern but it wasn't something that we talked about in terms of as a government. What are we going to do. I was not seeing that. They were going to take over eighty percent of the market. I guess i didn't see them as this sort of landlord up to grab everything under the naive in that regard and she sort of said that she felt naive. In retrospect about the whole thing she didn't really expect that this company was going to grow to this kind of size. But this was actually something that. I heard from a lot of politicians from that time. They just really didn't see this as a public policy issue. That government should have to deal with and they didn't really foresee how one company's growing control could create a bad situation for renters down the line and you know we're talking about reads like these were pushed by governments right like right in the nineteen in the one thousand nine hundred and two thousands. The canadian government the see they were really pushing this as a new investment model because they had seen how it had been so successful for investors and people building housing in the united states Sydney is there anything being done. Now what are we hearing now about about. What's happening in yellowknife. Yeah not a whole lot. There's one yellowknife emily. His name's ryan johnson. He's kind of made this his issue He says the government needs to do more. He says they should stop renting from northview and stop you know being the anchor tenant and all of these buildings that belong to this huge southern landlord. We tried to get interviews with the infrastructure minister housing minister neither would talk to us. The finance minister did acknowledge that the territorial government has influence over the rental market. And that you know. They're reviewing their procurement policy or their procurement process right now but you know the territory spends more than twenty million on its leases with north king. Set each year up here. That's actually a lot of money and does that all come from public housing or are they leasing other things as well. No that includes office space while Johnson the mla. He says that all the money that the government is spending on its with north. You could be going to local landlords you know or indigenous development corporations like anyone really will keep that money in the territory But you know. I will say they at least on the affordable housing side politicians. I think are taking more notice now. And the federal government has recently put.

yellowknife toronto parkdale north northview starlight canadian government united states Sydney canada united states Wendy ryan johnson john Johnson government federal government
"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

"Slash g three. How did northview get such a huge foothold in the north. Like how did this all start well in a nutshell it started in nineteen eighty-six and it was this project of a former deputy minister and a former teacher and they got their start mostly with government contracts so building things like schools and sports centers. Health centers are seeing pe- offices in these tiny little communities around the north places. Like you know. Joe haven and these are jobs that actually require like a very high degree of local knowledge because the construction season is really really brief in the north and basically you need all of your materials all of your workers all of your equipment to arrive basically on one sealift on a barge and while they were doing the work in these places. They realized that there wasn't anywhere to house. Their workers and they started to realize that there was a real shortage of rental housing in the north so they saw this as an opportunity for investment and they started buying and building apartments across the north and then in the mid nineties. They merged with this company based in calgary and went public and that kind of supercharge the company with all this new investment from across the country. And it really fueled the kind of buying spree around the north and in other sort of small resource dependent towns across the country. And then this company. I i understand it in the early two. Thousands turned into something. That's become really common now in canada. Right it's called a real estate investment trust or And can you just explain briefly. What that isn't how that helped them. I guess get like an even greater foothold here right so real estate investment trusts. Are this very simple. Corporate structure where investors can buy a very small piece of a company that rents apartments or commercial property and in exchange. What they get is a very small piece of the rental income that that company gets so it's basically a one for one exchange and essentially that just kind of opened them up this company northview to even more investment income so they were able to buy more and more and more properties and to put this into context they went from owning just a few thousand units mostly in the north to tens of thousands of units every rare across the country in you know multiple provinces and so they don't just operate in the north not anymore no okay and then i guess i want to fast forward to share so let me know if you think i'm skipping over some important point but then in twenty twenty. The company got bought right by to even bigger companies kings at capital and starlight investments. And and this was a pretty big deal in the real estate world right. Yeah it was. Actually one of canada's biggest real estate deals in history up to that point and when all the dust settled it was worth about four point nine billion dollars and in that deal the companies sort of merged and involved twenty seven thousand residential units and one point two million commercials square feet. It's these quantities that it's almost kind of hard to.

Joe haven calgary northview canada
"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"one company" Discussed on Front Burner

"I wanna talk a little bit more about The experiences that other tenants had in just a minute sydney. I also understand that. Northview provides public housing as well an inconvenience. Tony me how that works. Yeah so north. You has many public. Housing tenants like furner who we heard of at the top through these agreements with the northwest territories housing corporation. Which is the territory's public housing agency. So in these cases north you is the building owner and they rent units to the territory's housing corporation which in turn rents these units to public housing tenants. The hosing corporation rents around one hundred twenty units from northview in yellowknife and another forty six in new vic and this actually amounts to eighty seven percent of housing corporations residential. Lisa's m- okay. Wow so now that we have a sense of the role that these guys play in the rental market sydney. I wonder if you could take me through. Some of the criticisms you've been hearing so so at the top we heard from verna about these really challenging conditions that she's living in an and what did other tenants tell you yes. We spoke to sixteen current and recent north. You tenants on the phone. Zoom and in person. We talked to nine others over facebook in email and a lot of them shared the same complaints. We heard about water damage heating issues. Filthy common areas like the list goes on. I spoke with george lazard. Who said that in his his apartment kept flooding after rainstorms and he said during power outages at the key fob system to get into the building would fail so effectively locked him out and in yellowknife power. Outages aren't an uncommon thing. You know and this can be a really big problem in the winter when it's really really cold I also spoke with a woman named julian. Norman dn. She's a single mom. To a toddler she lives in a townhouse in northview conflicts called bison estates and last year. She said the parking lot was just fully coated in ice and she slipped and fell numerous times one time she found while she was holding her sleeping daughter and she went to the hospital because she thought she broke her arm And you know. I visited julie. Add her apartment this summer and the night before i came someone had thrown a chunk of concrete through her daughter's bedroom window shattered the glass. In north. you boarded up the window from the outside but she told me they didn't fix the shattered glass for more than two weeks. And so you know. That's julie's experience. Did you hear from from other tenants about what happens when they bring concerns to northview. How did they say that. North you response. Yes so a lot of tenants said that not much happens or like northview will make these superficial fixes but the problems just keep cropping up In north you also made a policy during the pandemic that it would only deal with what they called. Emergency work orders and julie for example. Who fell with her daughter. She told northview about the ice in front of her building and she said nothing was done about it. Like they didn't throw gravel down or anything and yeah and it's even more complicated for verna and other public housing tenants. I spoke to because technically she's supposed to bring maintenance issues to the housing authority. I like bernez told me that her windows been broken for many years. She's had you know heating and electrical issues for years but she says she's complained to everyone and no one is helping her complaining. And i'm just a headache. I went through housing narrowed letters to housing to them. Especially about my. I have a problem and have you put any of these complaints directly to north you. What did they say about it. North told us that they don't comment on individual tenants matters but they did say that since two thousand fifteen they've invested more than fifty eight million dollars in the north end that they strive for one hundred percent tenant satisfaction one hundred percent of the time but they recognize that there will always be issues to resolve.

furner northwest territories housing yellowknife george lazard verna Norman dn julie sydney Tony northview Lisa julian facebook bernez headache North
Q2-2021 Biotech Earnings, Commercial-Stage Biotech Suffers

Breaking Biotech

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Q2-2021 Biotech Earnings, Commercial-Stage Biotech Suffers

"And the first company. I want to talk about is by jin which is a real favorite of mine ticker symbol b. I believe and they're sitting at a fifty billion dollar market cap and what we heard is that they announced q to revenue of two point. Seven eight billion dollars and this is compared to twenty twenty cutie revenue of three point six eight billion so huge decline there and that is mostly due to a decrease in their ms revenue of twenty four percent year over year. And if you remember. When i went through the biogen episode i did. The majority of their revenue comes from their ms franchise and since the lawsuit against by jin was in favor of the generic companies including mylan they have launched generic versions of tech der which are now at risk because by genus filed an appeal. And what this means is that these generic companies are going to be able to sell their generic version of tech era at the risk of biogen winning on appeal in which case Going to be able to litigate against them for patent infringement. So during this time at which we don't know what the status of the appeal is gonna be biden's gonna start losing. Ms franchise market share pretty quickly to these generic companies. So we're starting to see this now with these abysmal. M s numbers now. The company did increase their guidance for the rest of the fiscal year. Only by about two hundred to three hundred million dollars so not a huge amount but they said that. This is due to better-than-expected ms sales. So who knows what's going on there but really the bulk of the call was the excitement around the addy home commercialization efforts and now just to say the amount of home revenue was only like one or two million dollars so very much a drop in the pan not very impressive so far. But it's because all of these infrastructure efforts need to take place in order to get hospitals up and running in order to treat patients

JIN Biogen Mylan Biden
"one company" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"one company" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"The more traditional where you idea you get a bunch of investors you raise money and then you go and you create something cool. I hate that way as you know. So we are the bruce chapter way. Which is like chris. Something amazing and then create fronted offers self liquidating to bring customers in and then you know. That's that's the bootstrap model. We've been doing that. I love but there's other ways to grow businesses. Well and this is why i wanted to talk about because this has been something really really interesting to us and i'm not going to share all the stats the numbers and all kind of stuff partially off. I'm legally allowed to partially. Because i don't know the numbers i was involved with all the the day to day because i'm no longer the ceo. Dave did all. The work is had signed a million times. So i wanted to give you some structural concepts of through that. Were really cool for me. So part of my understanding this dates back to about a decade ago. I was actually the mastermind meeting in in mexico and sitting next to this dude and he different kind of business person than me right. Like i'm like star guy. Started business grow at scale at launch. All kind of stuff where he was like. He's he told me that. I'm not an you stuff. It's amazing i'm a i'm in mergers and acquisitions and i think he had. He had bought like sixty or seventy businesses and bought and sold and made a ton of money and so trying to understand about my senior started businesses. Like no you guys do that. That's the way too hard. He's like i find entrepreneurs like you. He's like we understand. He's like probably to mess with these numbers. But this is just illustration purposes right. He said he said if you look at your businesses right he's get a certain level of say you're like three million dollars. He's like you're only going to sell frankie three x multiple right. So maybe you'll get nine million for it. He's like but at ten million dollars you'll sell for a five x tax multiple. Whatever it is right. I don't know that like the explaining. Okay he's like right now like you say your company's making three million dollars like best case you're going gonna get three x. It's probably closer to three x net. But anyway regardless of what i do i find three or four. Companies are east doing three million dollars a year and they're each valued at three x. Let's say he's like an eye by all four of them are all three of the four companies three million each them together now now because the revenue of this new company is now twelve million dollars. He's like i can sell that. I bought it for three expert. But i can sell now for six x for ten x whatever it is is they got so i do. I just find a market. I want to be in. I find three companies that are. They're selling it three x. I by all three of them. I bundle them together now. They're worth five or six or whatever it is and they flip them he's he. That's my business. He's like so. I these entrepreneurs like you guys who were geniuses. We'll start launch these businesses. And i just come into the acquisition guy acquire three or four of you bundling together value. Goes up because of how much more you're worth. And that's that was his business and i was like. Oh my gosh this is crazy. So it's been interesting over the last twelve months or so we've been clicked. I understand like what our evaluations. How did things work like. What are we actually worth. You know my head wars ten billion but we're probably not in real life and so it's interesting because you know there's anyway valuation because there's tons of ways like some companies value. We'd off top line some de summer off whatever but let's just say for For example is to say. Quick funnels is worth ten. X are eba right. And i don't even know what that is say. It's fifty million dollars. So that means fifty million times ten would be worth half a billion right so bias acquiring company. Let's say that company has twenty million dollars to right so we message these numbers in my head but regardless say we spend spend twenty thirty forty fifty million dollars but we buy it we plug it in. But then the eba. Let's say let's say the they had is worth twenty million dollars right. We plug that into our thing. It increases our twenty million dollars tons of ten evaluations. Two hundred million. Maybe spend whatever forty fifty million dollars in this thing but the value instantly ask for a company is one hundred two hundred million whatever it is right instantly just by bundling. The two companies together are value. Goes up way more than what we actually spent for it. So that's like the first thing that's really really interesting that i'd never considered. We started doing deal right and say oh my gosh. Even if like we'd never make our money back the value of our company dramatically goes up because we're adding all their revenues and their profits to our bottomline which is fascinating and then from there we also get the customer flow in the league flow and the cash flow and like all the other things that they come with with building a company or buying companies. Well and it's just. The synergy is really really interesting so anyway so that was our first acquisition and finishing the process. We literally finished it today. Which is crazy. Got me excited. Start thinking okay. What other deals are that where we can buy company for x. dollars we plug it into our our beasts machine and it instantly whatever x. is the value of our company but then also get lead flow customer flow cashflow. All of their things as well. It can come in and it's really interesting and fascinating so anyway just a different way to look at business that i wanted to kinda share with you guys. Because i've already had a lot of people like why are you buying a business. Why would you why would you. You know all the things that kind of come with that. And i want to show that because it's just a different perspective. I hadn't thought a lot about prior ten years ago when i met my merger and acquisition guy and so i would look that guys own businesses. Well i think about it is their business in your market you could. You could acquire that you could bundle together. Also now you get more customers. You get more traffic but also you're adding to your cash flow right like you. Buy company doubles your cash flow and now increases the value company. Because now you're in a different. A different bracket of what businesses are selling for trading for that number. And then you know kind of goes from there so anyway. The interesting games different game than i'm used to play. I'm much more comfortable in the whole like with bill the company and grow skillet through paid ads in organically without taking on nbc money. I understand in this new one like mergers and acquisitions is fascinating to me. Because it's going to get to our goals way faster. You know my goal. We've talked about a lot. My goal billion dollar valuation. My goals you know take over the world changed the world all these different things right and it's just getting there faster. Hopefully i mean honestly. I might thirty minutes into owning this new company and i have no idea maybe laci turned out really bad. Maybe things fall apart. I don't know we're gonna find out. But i'm hopeful i'm excited. I think it's going to be really cool opportunity. And so as we move forward. I will show share with asthma podcasts. You behind the scenes of what we're doing when i'm able to talk more about the companies and how they're synergistic and how are using the leave flow and how we're using their funnels that we're acquiring how we're using us in the back end and how we're just all the the other fun things mostly in my head. A lot of it's not vague. I know no vision of where i'm going with things. But we're going to be actually executing on it and i'll be sharing the vision with my team with everybody over next a little bit and it's exciting. It's a fun fun. Time to be live so we hope you guys this up so just gets you thinking a little bit differently. Who could you choir. And if not acquiring also licensing. There's three or four deals right now. We're we're we're we're going to sink. Companies have really good content or software things and instead of requiring them out because they don't have the customers or maybe you don't have the lead flow or maybe whatever there's a million reasons why instead of just doing licensing deals where licensing the technology and plug it in and then we can start selling or licensing their intellectual property licensing things like. There's there's a lot more fun ways to grow businesses than just the traditional stuff so anyway. I'm curious incident years which one more information about us buying companies like more about licensing late. We'll be the things you would want me to go deeper on. I love to let me know best way to actually take a snapshot of this podcast episode post on instagram or facebook and tag me in it and then post the what else you like to know what it'd be other things that you'd love to hear more about some anyway. Hope it helps go bounce and have some lunch and celebrate the acquisition american company and excited just want to celebrate with you guys right now and help you understand the reasons why and likes it over the next few months. Now that you know about it. I can give you more gives you native context. I can share more the inside details and other.

frankie Dave chris mexico laci nbc asthma instagram facebook
"one company" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"one company" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"If i could just call one company and you guys handle everything saves me time as long as you're good at all of them right now so you're talking about expanding into the security side kind of unpack that a little bit like what. What exactly are you doing. And how do they come to be. I mean as far as diving into it. You know we do with with panther being our size you know in private You know it's kind of like. I said a little bit ago in that we're we're we're able to easily pivot right and so you entrepreneur mindset. We we like to think up and brainstorm different ideas and so you know working internally you know with the pandemic and you know you see a lot of of companies demanding out in the field. Now we're not full on fans of demand and we understand you know and we appreciate the value that personnel bring to the location But for us there are certain scenarios where he can you know essentially improve the process so we looked heavily at the gate. Guard side of it you know. And where can we improve that process. We went out to location and We've found some flaws in the system and so we started thinking internally you know how how can we develop a more of a virtual type gate guard and so We've come up with a solution. Involves cameras You know essentially kind of remote operating room. yeah To where you can have a security checkpoint that the personnel can approach and not have really much human interaction But then we can turn around and provide all the necessary information and security to the operator itself. Yeah yeah i mean because think about that is normally about say. Let's talk about the traditional process..

one company
"one company" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"one company" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Handyman to come work at the house, and you had so many different projects, and he only had Maybe one and a point of view or whatever that hammer as you say. I mean, you need you need that fool. Let me fix your window with the hammer, huh? Exactly. Bring as much knowledge as much education as you can and solve those problems Cleaning the window with the hammer. I don't think it worked. Okay. Well, let's talk about how some of those things that you mentioned there truly impact the person that you're working with that you're helping out. Said the retirement for so independent how does that affect the person at the end of the day? Well, the most important part of dealing with someone who's independent number one I'm independent. So of course I'm gonna say good things about it. But I could be captive with one company and that wouldn't be good for anybody would be able to call myself in my opinion. How can I call myself a fiduciary? Which means I'm supposed to be doing right for you all the time. If I only have one company's products, think about it, and so I Where do you know we're in a litigious society. These days I can see down the road where someone says to somebody who claimed to be doing the best for him that but they were with one company. You really didn't do the best. We I'm suing you, right? That's already happening before one k world Because if you don't get enough for a week a options people have been suing the company because they didn't get enough. Good for okay up. Which makes a lot of sense because I only went with that one company that was gonna benefit. Think about all the growth you lost over 30 years. You could have had if you had more choices. Think about that. When we done that. We know what we did. Little fee report inside a box set which we're going to give way, folks gonna give away a little while our box set on the seven Financial blind spots. I think it was Thomas where you had the little fee worksheet in there, where which you have, and we also the 41 case Survival box that will show you how much Just 1% and fees. Maurin account can cost you over 30 years and it could be upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars, wouldn't it? Yeah, it's crazy. Absolutely crazy. Thomas give one example in there. Pick one pick number you got you got the chart, don't you? All right, So let's begin with $200,000 at the beginning of the period. 6% interest kind of easy interest rate easy number to start with, right? And every account's gonna be the same here. 6% interest $200,000 exactly exactly. So, let's say that you have no fees, which is, of course, never. Gonna have. Let's say you confined loaded? None You could. You would never if you're not looking around the right way for sure. So over over the course of 30 years with those rates that we indicated you would be up to $1,148,698.23 to nice one. That is absolutely a very nice thing. Now, let's just go upto 1% Fear ate. So at that point after 30 years instead of the 1.15 million that you would have had your down to 863. $1000. So the same interest rate the same starting him out the same kind of calm pounding? Yes, but just 1% more in fees. 1%. Yeah, go further. Let's go further. 2%. So, Morgan, do you have any idea what that maybe it's gonna be big is gonna okay, So we went with no with no fee. 1.15, right. So with 1% fee was down to 863,000 at a 2% fee. We have gone down to $647,000.931. No. So that's 2% feet, 2% feet. But there's other. There's some things that are even more than that. There's 3% fees are there there are and let's look at that. And this is going to cut those around $200,000 great growth. What is that? There we go after 30 years with 3% annual fee $484,640.

Thomas fiduciary Morgan