21 Burst results for "One Billion Years"

Who Was First on Earth?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Who Was First on Earth?

"Today are mysterious past the first the people on Earth. Where did they come from? Leonardo Davinci. Tesla is dying these three in one hundred others over the centuries all with ideas. You were ahead of their time. Where did these ideas come from? Metal Staples at held Mexico's Ancient Pyramids together yet. Local indigenous business people had no knowledge of metallurgy. The NASCA wells relied on air pressure to bring water up from underground rivers and the unexplained tunnels on on the two thousand five hundred mile. Inca road that are carved through solid stone. How did that happen? How were these deeds? Possible where to disadvantage. What's knowledge come from could survivors of a long extinct species of Homo Sapiens have somehow passed on the tiniest spark of knowledge through DNA? What a silly question indeed based on science I guess not so silly before you dismiss this premise? Completely let's take a look at the evolution universe. Science would agree that the planet earth is about four point five billion years old to put that number two perspective consider that a billion is a thousand million and a million is a thousand thousands for no less than a century. It has been believed that the earliest earth was covered with the see of vocally magma however evidence of this of the rocks have either eroded with time or stay down underground inaccessible enter Zircon crystals. Not the man made versions but tiny crystals pulled from the Jack Hills of central Australia. The oldest of which have revealed that during the first five hundred million years so the planet earth was not covered with the see of magma indeed that it was cold enough for the formations of continents were above sea level. What is revolutionary is these ancient crystals have revealed that early earth and some aspects? Wasn't that different from today. These science-based facts are less than a decade old. That already gaining aning the respect of mainstream science in one four point one billion year old crystal carbon was found suggesting that life existed justed on earth. Three hundred million years earlier than scientists previously thought. Twenty years ago this would have been heretical. This carbon resembles modern carbon. Though this all adds up to the conclusion that early Earth was more hospitable to life than science thought and begs the question could could the environment of early Earth supported. Humans could earth's I people have crawled out of an ancient ocean. The primordial soup so to speak and evolved over the next two hundred thousand years if we run with that rough figure man and is developed brain may have been walking walking around over a billion years ago not two hundred thousand. But where's the evidence of a civilization that all the answer is. Where's I the evidence of anything? Over one billion years old science degree so there have been five periods of mass extinction. Four hundred forty four million years ago. When eighty six percent of all species became extinct? Three hundred seventy five million years ago. When seventy five percent of all species became extinct and in two hundred million years ago with the loss of eighty percent and finally sixty six million years ago when seventy six percent fell to extinction keep keep in mind that the tortoise of the Galapagos has evolved over twelve million years each of the known periods of mass extinction did not eliminate all all the species and some fossils remain science agrees that there certainly could have been far earlier periods of mass extinction and extinction say over a billion years ago? One that would leave. No fossils. Time would take care of that. If Homo sapiens were among the victims uh-huh of an early earth extinction. Of course there would be no fossils. But what are the carbon found in Australia's ancient zircon crystals and what of the advanced knowledge displayed by South America's earliest indigenous people. Where did they come from? Your guess is as good as mine and only time time will tell

Australia Leonardo Davinci Tesla Mexico Jack Hills Galapagos South America
"one billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Their emissions testing and they also found bits and pieces where companies have been going the wrong direction whether it's a direct cheat on they've been stretching the boundaries too far so that's one thing and the consumer in Europe also requested far more stringent emission testing because people really wanted to know how much is my call emitted not just in the laboratory environment but what is in a meeting when I'm driving it every day last year the E. U. announced new emissions tests with stiff penalties for failure the penalty is about thirty one billion euros thirty one billion years so it's huge the emissions scandal came as public concern grew about air pollution electric upstarts like Tessler we're capturing consumers imaginations for Germany home of diesel it was a double blow says people don't want to buy the season's anymore and the regulator makes it harder the Germans are more exposed to this needs to transform and the engines away from diesel which is deeply deeply embedded in the German engineering college her towards electric motors and that's not necessarily a call committees of the Germans has there ever been a moment like this in the history of the German car industry I truly can't think of one the social pressure these days to move away from fossil fuels it will set it will cost a lot of jobs because you know we need fewer people making engines to put a very simple but remember this is Germany there's a spectrum of failure here I mean also I am a loan is for this year making you know close to twenty million of pre tax profit we won't feel too bad for them by this measure the answer to our question is Germany okay seems to be despite many setbacks yes for now at least.

Europe E. U. German engineering college Germany thirty one billion years
"one billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Into their emissions testing and they also found bits and pieces where companies have been going the wrong direction whether it's a direct cheat on they've been stretching the boundaries too far so that's one thing and the consumer in Europe also requested far more stringent emission testing because people really wanted to know how much is my call emitted not just in the laboratory environment but what is in a meeting when I'm driving it every day last year the E. U. announced new emissions tests with stiff penalties for failure the penalty is about thirty one billion euros thirty one billion years so it's huge the emissions scandal came as public concern grew about air pollution electric upstarts like Tesla we're capturing consumers imaginations for Germany home of diesel it was a double blow says people don't want to buy the season's anymore and the regulator makes it harder the Germans are more exposed to this need to transform and the engine is the way in from diesel which is deeply deeply embedded in the German engineering college her towards electric motors and that's not necessarily a call committees of the Germans has there ever been a moment like this in the history of the German car industry I truly can't think of one the social pressure these days to move away from fossil fuels it will set it will cost a lot of jobs because you know we need fewer people making engines to put it very simple but remember this is Germany there's a spectrum of failure here I mean also I am a loan is this year making you know close to twenty million of pre tax profit we won't feel too bad for them by this measure the answer to our question is Germany okay seems to be despite many setbacks yes for now at least.

Europe E. U. German engineering college Germany thirty one billion years
"one billion years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"North Carolina area the right area of myrtle beach yeah was one of my clients he was what he did the book called us back a moment Harry gets passed away that way this year and he was one of my long time client my public relations I know exactly who you're talking about a year and that is on bass and then you actually care or conversation well yeah we will but I love that these in sounds like you two are trying to go ahead with your question very all right well here first quickly Carol reward turnaround in western North Carolina you're in I'm in Franklin all right okay where you're not there your guide that was all goes to coach a few weeks ago are you know okay remember that George yeah yeah but that's not you okay goes are are you my wife and I have a condominium in hours North Carolina yeah I got to get you to your question of get loads walls going across okay year accord great can you tell me what the difference is between your dome and the old work but Mr full were urging here days it down all the the difference but we use a tow truck thank you ring shaped okay and that is the strong this year metrical shape on planet earth lucky you yeah yeah okay and am I he said well we can improve on they always yeah his was all around right yeah we're all well we're all around when we were still round okay the shape that we put this what it makes the detective work yours is stronger yeah we will stand category order category five when but he did pretty good for not having a computer do you know are you you know hi and he started his first open where it was black mountain North Carolina okay how big was there was a pretty big thing there the first though we've ever made you know those who wouldn't want to share we had to work we were growing up yeah with the slats yeah with what what was his first though when it collapsed all wow I hope nobody was in it road though there will be a little model they were short is a lack let's go to Walton Allentown Pennsylvania Hey Walter go ahead your your your your it's always great to talk to your body thanks Walter your job why should she goes with all due respect there are from what I understand their two schools of thought on not near it is going to be rendered uninhabitable oh one more or less agrees with what Mr Simpson said might be termed the eyes are the Mars hearing that we are you run Donnelly heard that the earth the iron core is gonna cool to the point where there's not gonna be a magnetic flux and we're gonna lose a protective magnetic field and the atmosphere is going to be lost to the solar winds and the yeah and I mean radiation now that's that's one theory that's up yeah I March thirty now the other theory is might be turned the Venus theory of the boat the fire theory and it's much less well known your job there are some scientists think that are you know stars go through I'm not show live cyclorama normal I've been maybe come a red giant you have a super Nova car yep lotion and then finally comes a white white the one and then where history the right one either way were hit St George now you know what's frightening from what I understand they think that the the earth is turning into a red giant much more rapidly than was originally fought you mean the sinus yeah yeah the sun you know yeah we we thought you know what when I was a kid yeah you read that well we have another four to five billion years before the well that's what happened to me in grade school I went home crying one day wall because my science teacher said the sun's going to burn out eventually then he met five billion years and I went home as a kid crying to my parents saying we're gonna die the sun's gonna burn out my dad said George that's five billion years from now don't worry about it I don't remember that I remember that I remember we were told that but even though it's happening quicker Walton stills could affect us but won't get hotter not colder if that happens yes it will get hotter but the frightening thing is George that up there's some scientists from what I read they think that we only have more or less one billion years left Gee it's happening incrementally and it it doesn't mean we have one billion years lot because Wong before we get the one billion year mark the earth will already be like Venus yeah too hot it will already be too hot this is station that any sort of like you much less human life well I in again even if it's a million years from now I don't think we really have to worry about that what do you think the other thing the other thing I'm going to play is after the solar none on the comes with solar maximum but those solar minimum and goes back and so a maximum so in twenty fifty paddle start warming up again and many people believe it'll warm up even more than it is now well is this Sir it's kind of sad though you isn't it yeah it's kind of let you know it's kind of sad to know that this is the way it it really is yeah we grew up thinking that we we are in there your kids can be around water by like that you know and you know I I think you know like the shooting the happening every year I I think that we're getting so stressed out well all the time you were gonna hit did a quick break we'll come back with a final phone calls with you in a moment you Simpson our special guest talking about his book the extreme preparedness on land and sea we will be back with you the rest of.

Harry North Carolina myrtle beach five billion years one billion years one billion year million years one day
"one billion years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on KTRH

"Whole family literally from the Greenville well I was with the one of the co founders of beach music association international all right gosh actors shed light hello great music of the South Carolina North Carolina area the right area of myrtle beach yeah was one of my clients he was what he did the book called us back a moment Harry gets passed away that way this year and he was one of my long time client my public relations I know exactly who you're talking about a year and that is no less than a year after jail or conversation I love that use it sounds like you two were trying to go ahead with your question very alright we're here first quickly tell me what town in western North Carolina you're in unemployment one all right where you're not very good your dad that was all goes to coach a few weeks ago are you know remember that your yeah yeah but that's not you okay because are are you Malard but I have a condominium in hours North Carolina but there again again I got to get you to your question of double loads walls going across okay here are quicker you can you tell me what the difference is between your goal and the old work but Mr full or are you using no the difference but we use the tactics here grin shape okay and that is the strong this year metrical shape on planet earth well what do you use yeah that's it okay and he said well we can improve on they always his was all around right yeah we're all well we're all around when we were still wound okay shape that we put this what thank you the detective work yours is stronger yeah we'll stand category order category five when but he did pretty good for not having a computer you know I you will have to start his first album where it was black mountain North Carolina okay how big was there was a pretty big thing there the first though he ever made you know those who wouldn't want to share we had to work we were going out yeah with the slats that was his first though when it collapsed oh wow I hope nobody was in that road there would be a little bottle sure you recollect let's go to Walton Allentown Pennsylvania Hey Walter go ahead your your your your it's always great to talk to your body thanks Walter your job why you should be King goes with all due respect there are from what I understand their two schools of thought on the on the earth is gonna be rendered uninhabitable oh one more or less agrees with what Mr Simpson said might be termed the eyes of the March during that we are you run Donnelly heard that the throughout the iron core is gonna cool to the point where there's not gonna be a magnetic locks gonna lose the protective magnetic field and the atmosphere is going to be lost of the solar winds and the yeah and I in radiation that's that's one that's that yeah March thirty now the other theory is might be turned the game this theory of the boat the fire units much less well known your job there's some scientists think that right you know stars go through our I'm not sure why cycle where they have a normal let them come a red giant you have a super Nova car yep lotion and then finally comes a white white and then more history the right one either way we're St George not but you know what's frightening from what I understand they think that the the earth is turning into a red giant much more rapidly than was originally fought you mean the sinus yeah yeah the sun I've heard that we thought you know what when I was a kid you know your read that well we have another four to five billion years before the well that's what happened to me in grade school I went home crying one day wall because my science teacher said the sun's going to burn out eventually then he met five billion years and I want all of his a kid crying to my parents saying we're gonna die the sun's gonna burn out my dad said George that's five billion years from now but don't worry about it I don't remember that I remember that I remember we were told that but even though it's happening quicker Walton stilled could affect us but won't get hotter not colder if that happens yes it will get hotter but the frightening thing is George that up there's some scientist from what I read they think that we only have more or less one billion years laughs it's happening incrementally and that doesn't mean we have one billion years lot because long before we get the one billion year mark the earth will already be like Venus yeah too hot well our rented league be too hot this is station that any sort of like you much less human life well I in again even if it's a million years from now I don't think we really have to worry about that what do you think the other thing the other thing I'm going to play is after the solar panel the comes the solar maximum but those solar minimum it goes back and so a maximum so in twenty that the paddle start warming up again and many people believe it'll warm up even more than it is well is this Sir it's kind of sad though he was in a yeah it's gonna let you know it's kind of sad to know that this is the way it it really yeah yeah hello we grew up thinking that we are in there your kids can be around water by like that you know and you know I I think you know like the shooting the happening every I I think that we're getting so stressed out well all the time you were gonna hit did a quick break we'll come back with a final phone calls with you in a moment you Simpson our special guest talking about his book extreme prepared this on land and sea we will be back with the rest of your calls ghost insiders the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iPhone and now android four dot one above listen live or on demand anywhere anytime good a coast to coast.

Greenville beach music association South Carolina North Carolina myrtle beach five billion years one billion years one billion year million years one day
"one billion years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Music of the South Carolina North Carolina area the right area of myrtle beach yeah was one of my clients he was what he did the book called this magic moment Harry gets passed away pathways each year and he was one of my long time client my public relations I know exactly who you're talking about a year and that is a lesson that you actually care or conversation well yeah we will love that these in sounds like you two are trying to go ahead with your question very alright we'll hear first corporate jail reward turnaround in western North Carolina you're in I'm in Franklin all right okay where you're not either go to your god it was all gross to coach a few weeks ago are you know remember that George yeah yeah but that's not you okay because they are are you are gonna have a condominium in hours North Carolina yeah I got to get you to your question of get loads all school I had a question okay year accord great your new chair only what the difference is between your dome and the old work but Mr full were urging here daisy girl the the difference but we use a tow truck thank you ring shaped okay and that is the strong this year metrical shape on planet earth lucky you yeah yeah okay and am I he said well we can improve on they always his was all around right yeah we're all well we're all around when we were still round okay shape that we put this what it makes the detective yours is stronger yes we will stand category order category five when what he did pretty good for not having a computer yeah do you know are you you know hi who started his first login where it was black mountain North Carolina okay how big was there was a pretty big thing there the first though we've ever made you know those who wouldn't want to share we had to work we were growing up yeah with the slats yeah with what what was his first though when it collapsed all wow I hope nobody was in it road though there will be a little model they were short is the collapse let's go to Walton Allentown Pennsylvania Hey Walter go ahead your your your your it's always great to talk to your buddy thanks Walter your job why should she goes with all due respect there are from what I understand their two schools of thought on not new years is going to be rendered uninhabitable oh one more or less agrees with what Mr Simpson said might be termed the ice spear your Lamar's hearing that here are you run Donnelly heard that fierce throughout the iron core is gonna cool to the point where there's not gonna be a magnetic flux and we're gonna lose a protective magnetic field and the atmosphere is going to be lost to the solar winds and the yeah and I mean radiation now that's that's one theory that's that yeah I March thirty now the other theory is might be turned the greenest theory of the boat the fire theory and it's much less well known your job there's some scientists think that are you know stars go through our I'm not sure alive cyclorama normal I've been may become a red giant you have a super Nova car yep lotion and then finally comes a white white the one and then we're history right one either way were hit St George now you know what's frightening from what I understand they think that the the earth is turning into a red giant much more rapidly than was originally fought you mean the sinus yeah yeah the sun I've heard that we we thought you know what when I was a kid you know you read that well we have another four to five billion years before the well that's what happened to me in grade school I went home crying one day Walt because my science teacher said the sun's going to burn out eventually then he met five billion years and I went home as a kid crying to my parents saying we're gonna die the sun's gonna burn out my dad said George that's five billion years from now don't worry about it I don't remember that I remember that I remember we were told that but even though it's happening quicker Walton stills could affect us but won't get hotter not colder if that happens yes it will get harder but the frightening thing is George that up there's some scientists from what I read they think that we only have more or less one billion years left Gee it's happening incrementally and it it doesn't mean we have one billion years lot because one before we get the one billion year mark the earth will already be like Venus yeah too hot well our rented we'd be too hot this is station that any sort of like you much less human life well I in again even if it's a million years from now I don't think we really have to worry about that what do you think the other thing the other thing I'm going to say is that after the solar panel becomes the solar maximum but those solar minimum and goes back and so a maximum so in twenty fifty five it'll start warming up again and many people believe it'll warm up even more than it is now well is this Sir it's kind of sad though Hugh isn't it yeah it's kind of sad you know it's kind of sad to know that this is the way it it really is yeah no we grew up thinking that yeah we we are in there your kids to be around one over by like that you know and you know I I think you know like the shooting will happening everywhere right I think that we're getting so stressed out well all the time you were gonna hit did a quick break we'll come back with a final phone calls with you in a moment you Simpson our special guest talking about his book the extreme preparedness on land and sea we will be back with the rest of your.

Harry South Carolina North Carolina myrtle beach five billion years one billion years one billion year million years one day
"one billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Was like well if you get the book called this magic moment Harry gets passed away pathway this year and he was one of my long time client my public relations I know exactly who you're talking about a year and that is a fascinating you actually care or conversation well yeah we will but I love that these in sounds like you two are trying to go ahead with your question very all right well your first quickly Jeremy what town in western North Carolina you're in I'm in Franklin all right where you're not either go to your god that was all goes to coach a few weeks ago are you know remember George yeah yeah but that's not you okay because they are are you my wife and I have a condominium in highlands North Carolina I got to get you to your question of get loads of goals going across okay here are corporation you generally what the difference is between your dome and the old Burton Buckminster fuller a year do you think the all the the difference that we use the tactics here good shape okay and that is the strong this year metrical shape on planet earth lucky you yes yeah okay and you might see that well we can improve on they always is was all around right yeah we're all went well all around but we were still around okay the street we put this what the hologram it makes the detective yours is stronger yes we will stand category order category five when but he did pretty good for not having a computer do you know are you you know hi who started his first known where it was what about more Carolina okay how big was there was a pretty big thing there the first though he ever made you know those who wouldn't want to say we had to work we were growing up yeah with the slats yeah with the flat that was his first though when it collapsed all wow I hope nobody was in it very little model there are shortages of the collapse let's go to Walt in Allentown Pennsylvania Hey Walter going at your your your your it's always great to talk to somebody thanks Walter your job why should she goes with all due respect there are from what I understand are two schools of thought on not near as he's gonna be rendered uninhabitable oh one more or less agrees with what Mr Simpson said might be turn the eyes are the Mars hearing that here are your room Donnelly heard that the earth for a three iron core is going to cool to the point where there's not gonna be a magnetic flux and we're gonna lose a protective magnetic field and the atmosphere is going to be lost to the solar winds and the they analyzing radiation now that's that's one that's that yeah March thirty now the other theory is might be turn the gain a serial number the fire theory and it's much less well known your job there are some scientists think that are you know stars go through I'm not sure alive cyclorama normal I've been made come a red giant you have a super Nova yep lotion and then finally comes a white white and then more history the right one either way registry George now you know what's frightening from what I understand they think that the the earth is turning into a red giant much more rapidly than was originally fought you mean the sinus yeah yeah the sun the sun of you know yeah we we thought you know what when I was a kid you know your read that well we have another four to five billion years before the well that's what happened to me in grade school I went home crying one day wall because my science teacher said the sun's going to burn out eventually then he met five billion years then I went home as a kid crying to my parents saying we're gonna die the sun's gonna burn out my dad said George that's five billion years from now don't worry about it I don't remember that I remember that I remember we were told that but even though it's happening quicker Walton stills could affect us but won't it get hotter not colder if that happens yes it will get harder but the frightening thing is George that up there's some scientists from what I read they think that we only have more or less one billion years left Gee it's happening incrementally and it it doesn't mean we have one billion years lot because long before we get the one billion year mark the earth will already be like Venus yeah too hot it will already be too hot this is stating that any sort of like you much less human life well not in again even if it's a million years from now I don't think we really have to worry about that what do you think the other thing the other thing I'm going to say is that after the solar none on the comes the solar maximum but those solar minimum it goes back and so a maximum so in twenty fifty fad it'll start warming up again and many people believe it'll warm up even more than it is now well is this Sir it's kind of sad though Hugh isn't it yeah it's going to let you know it's kind of sad to know that this is the way it it really is yeah we grew up thinking that we in there your kids can be around one over by like that you know and you know I I think you know like the shooting the happening everywhere right I think that we're getting so stressed out well all the time you were gonna hit did a quick break we'll come back with a final phone calls with you in a moment you Simpson our special guest talking about his book the extreme preparedness on land and sea we will be back with you the rest of your calls because the senators the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iPhone and now android four dot on a boat listen live or on demand anywhere anytime go to coast.

Harry five billion years one billion years one billion year million years one day
"one billion years" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Rover is traveling around Mars right now. It's getting data. It's doing sampling in, it's doing all of this, in gale crater that Exo Mars. We'll be landing in axiom. Plenum in the Klay deposits are dated at four point one billion years old and curiosity is in the crater where it's only three point six billion years old. So excellent Mars is going to be in a place. It's much older than our curiosity is right now. So therefore it can search for life from past marks from a long time ago. You know. Another almost another billion years older than what curiosity is check in every now and that's the epoch from when Mars is surface was plentiful with liquid water systems. Exit Mars missions will be capable of securing many firsts the oldest site investigated on Mars, the first exploration of the Martian subsurface, the most accurate, geological inorganic composition determination, so far, and the best chance, yet to make bio signature detections on another planet, and the other thing than ex Amar's has going for it is that it has the longer drill. Then March twenty twenty Rover so it can dig down deeper and also get more samples from a longer period of time on the surface of Mars. So March twenty twenty is going to be a very important Rover. Exo Mars is also going to be a very impor-. Portent rover. We're not gonna have a battle about, which one is going to be more important because they're posted both important in their own specific ways. X Omar's, they want to bring stuff back to earth. So scientists on our planet here can actually do science with very, very complicated and technical specifications, on bars. You only have a certain amount of room to have scientific instrumentation and once it's there, that's all you have. And it could not, you know, it might not be the most up to date science stuff, because they build these things years in years in years before the launch, and this technology might be a little bit outdated. By the time the Mars Rover gets the cash of samples back to earth. So it's gonna come back and twenty twenty eight and by twenty twenty eight maybe technology will catch up. Maybe technology will move forward so much that the samples that we. Back, we may be able to find things that we weren't able to find when XL Mars is doing it science up there. So that being said, I'm excited about all these Landers and Rovers on Mars in the coming years. It's twenty twenty know we're launching that thing in twenty twenty so next year it has gone

XL Mars gale crater Rovers twenty twenty Amar Walden Landers Omar one billion years six billion years billion years
"one billion years" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"In twenty twenty three Rovers one from the US want from Europe and one from China will leave earth and depart for the red planet of Mars to look for past in present life. And these Rovers are just going to go to Mars. They have in their mission directorate to bring back samples from the red planet to earth, which is going to be one of the most influential. Botches in landings in science experiments of human history. Parts of Mars directly from the regular of Mars will be returned to the planet earth. So scientists on earth with really sophisticated instruments can study, what's in the ground on Mars. So the Rovers will be sent up in twenty twenty in the land, though do science, and the cash, the, the samples for a return mission for Mars and are from Mars and the return to earth in twenty twenty eight if America in Europe come together and make the mission as success, but a project scientists on the east Rover Exo Mars that will land in twenty twenty one along with the American Chinese Rovers might be worth reconsidering, which samples would actually be the. The best valuable to send back to the scientists waiting on earth. And the scientists said Mars twenty twenty will acquire samples from the surface, where I n ising radiation is likely to have damaged any organic molecules, it is. Excellent Mars with its two meter depth drill in advance organics detection, instrumentation MoMA that has the best chance to make an import discovery regarding the possibility. The Mars may have harbored life in its distant past, if this proves to be the case, perhaps, we may need to rethink where they, we should not think of bringing back. Well selected subsurface samples rather than those collected by Mars twenty twenty in the bars twenty twenty Rover which is a NASA Rover. It has the ability to cash the samples that against, but Exo Mars does not have that capability for a return mission leader on and he goes on to say that requires a complicated. Yup. That weighs allot it would have been impossible to combine our present very capable payload with a sample caching system on the same Rover. In fact, Nasr's twenty twenty Rover his Pete a dear price to include the caching system, and that's compared to curiosities analytical firepower. So what they gave up an analytics and studying the actual surface of the planet Mars. They gained a caching system. So instead of doing the science on Mars itself, what they're doing is putting it away for a little while and they're using that space to harbor though samples, then they're going to return them to earth on the March twenty twenty Rover. And then George Vago goes on to say the point I am trying to make is that bringing back the right samples will make all the difference in this regard, Exo Mars will be super important are the samples collected at depth more interesting and better preserved. We think probably yes, in once we will have investigated this, perhaps it will be time to rethink what samples to bring back to

XL Mars gale crater Rovers twenty twenty Amar Walden Landers Omar one billion years six billion years billion years
European rover more likely to discover life than NASA's Mars 2020

SPACE NEWS POD

03:03 min | 2 years ago

European rover more likely to discover life than NASA's Mars 2020

"Rover is traveling around Mars right now. It's getting data. It's doing sampling in, it's doing all of this, in gale crater that Exo Mars. We'll be landing in axiom. Plenum in the Klay deposits are dated at four point one billion years old and curiosity is in the crater where it's only three point six billion years old. So excellent Mars is going to be in a place. It's much older than our curiosity is right now. So therefore it can search for life from past marks from a long time ago. You know. Another almost another billion years older than what curiosity is check in every now and that's the epoch from when Mars is surface was plentiful with liquid water systems. Exit Mars missions will be capable of securing many firsts the oldest site investigated on Mars, the first exploration of the Martian subsurface, the most accurate, geological inorganic composition determination, so far, and the best chance, yet to make bio signature detections on another planet, and the other thing than ex Amar's has going for it is that it has the longer drill. Then March twenty twenty Rover so it can dig down deeper and also get more samples from a longer period of time on the surface of Mars. So March twenty twenty is going to be a very important Rover. Exo Mars is also going to be a very impor-. Portent rover. We're not gonna have a battle about, which one is going to be more important because they're posted both important in their own specific ways. X Omar's, they want to bring stuff back to earth. So scientists on our planet here can actually do science with very, very complicated and technical specifications, on bars. You only have a certain amount of room to have scientific instrumentation and once it's there, that's all you have. And it could not, you know, it might not be the most up to date science stuff, because they build these things years in years in years before the launch, and this technology might be a little bit outdated. By the time the Mars Rover gets the cash of samples back to earth. So it's gonna come back and twenty twenty eight and by twenty twenty eight maybe technology will catch up. Maybe technology will move forward so much that the samples that we. Back, we may be able to find things that we weren't able to find when XL Mars is doing it science up there. So that being said, I'm excited about all these Landers and Rovers on Mars in the coming years. It's twenty twenty know we're launching that thing in twenty twenty so next year it has gone

Xl Mars Gale Crater Rovers Amar Landers Twenty Twenty Omar One Billion Years Six Billion Years Billion Years
"one billion years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"App. Good morning everyone. Happy friday. It's jobs in the US. We also have a little bit of movement when it comes to the markets really can't treasuries yesterday. We had the Ohio. So there's a lot going on. You're listening to daybreak Europe live on London db digital radio. Now, the news, of course, coming in thick and FOSS. We had a lot of earnings today also on the banks, and then we had we're just getting some breaking into cutting. It's like for like net rental income forecast to minus four to minus six they're actually giving us a range. This we need to look into a little bit more of an idea of what exactly this means. But they're saying they're Seagate twenty nineteen challenge due to higher-than-expected CVA's. They're also noting of slowdown in U letting so this is into properties we'll have of course, a very close eye on into it's a UK shopping center owner, and we did see a couple of news yesterday ahead. Head of first-quarter trading update today, which was much worse than expected. And it's almost it feels like a profit warning. So we'll have plenty more, of course on into these. In the meantime, what your markets are doing looking at futures are countries sideways. A lot of the focus will be on trade. A lot of the focus will be on again trying to digest some of these earnings that we had a lot of focus, of course, will be on jobs. So stocks a little bit mix. Investors now, turning their focus to earnings and the upcoming US jobs. Eight are treasuries futures. I'm actually looking at what they're doing right now pretty much steady after yields climbing overnight and the dollar edging higher. There are still concerns about this US China trade deal remaining elusive keep an eye on that. So let's get straight to our top stories, and let's kick it off with the banks and John Flint looks to be making headway bring costs under control. That's as HSBC. First quarter profit beats estimate revenue gains outpaced costs increase in the first three months of the year. And here's a chief find. Officer. Stevenson, target certainly has fallen until throughout the year. As I said, if you if you strip out the one offs in the revenue the court underlying growth with broadly in line with cost growth, we do think we're going to be able to achieve coming quotas. Continuing Paul Jewell was for the remainder of the will your speakers lender has faced questions over its strategy since it failed to deliver on that metric lost year onto another Bank. And this is the French Bank has reported net. Income of one billion years in the first quarter of nineteen and improved peuvent of capital levels with the ratio of eleven point seven percent. Will that said fixed income revenues were down? Fifteen point nine percent equities revenues down five point three percent on the quarter. While the deputies the bank's deputy chief executive officer savant Coban spoke with Bloomberg's Cowan could not in Paris. The situation in voted to t- remains very low which is positive titties. But clue. Nobody speaking we are really live whereas markets in this business. The big thing for me is equity business is as a times on the average..

French Bank US Ohio Europe HSBC Paul Jewell Bloomberg Cowan Officer UK savant Coban deputy chief Stevenson John Flint Paris Seagate China executive officer one billion years
"one billion years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro global warming polar ice caps, melting general doom and gloom. Well, how's this cheery book title earth-shattering, violent supernova, galactic, explosions, biological mayhem, nuclear meltdowns, and other hazards to life in our universe author. Bob Burman joins us now from the students of W A M C in Albany, New York. Welcome to the program. Well, thank you. So what prompted you to write a book full of so many cataclysms? Well, I keep hearing when I'm doing lectures, or when I was running this community observatory people would always be worried about things colliding with earth and some of them were imaginary like there's this imaginary planet Nibiru that supposedly is on a collision course, and and so I realized that there's a lot of juice and an interest in it. There is an lot of movies about it too. I mean, I'm a personal fan of these sort of end of the world scenario. Movies. So let's go through a few disastrous greatest hits. There's the big bang, of course, but much more recently, many more stars have gone supernova, including one that was visible by humans in the eleventh century, tell us about that. Yeah. And that was big because not only did nobody see it coming. But it was the brightest light in the sky. That's ever been seen in terms of a point source something that looked like a star it easily cast shadows it was much brighter than Venus looks now. We know it's a supernova. But they didn't even have that word back. Then what did they think it was? It was not good. That's for sure. A bad omen. Yes. Changes in the sky were always bad things. And usually the worst they had to put up with where comments every fifteen to twenty years, but this was off the charts entirely. But supernova is actually do you. Write some good for humans. Oh, yeah. They ended up being good in the short term. They completely incinerate their solar system. So part of the good news bad news thing, but they do create every element. That's heavier than iron. So the iodine, for example in our thyroid glands and our necks right now could only have come from a supernova. Amazing. What was the most surprising thing while you were looking into this? What was the thing that you thought? Wow. I had no idea that this was something that was so devastating to humanity. Maybe it was the nineteen eighteen Spanish flu because considering that was H one one ordinary type flu not too different from the kind that goes around in our own lifetimes. You wouldn't think that the flu could ever suddenly get so very lint that it would destroy one or two percent of the earth's population. So that was fascinating to me. Another was something that was very reassuring. I've found that in really studying the nuclear power plant accidents that make up a few of our chapters. The things were not as bad as they were made out to be for example in the Fukushima. What we call disaster. The real disaster was in the soon NAMI the tidal wave that came earlier that day from the greatest. Earthquake that has ever hit Japan. That's what produce all the loss of lives. So why do you think so many of us are interested in the end of days? My own guests is that even though we're all more likely to be done in by our own stupidity by smoking when we know we shouldn't her now launching our cholesterol or things like that. I think people naturally want to tie their lives in with a bigger picture. And that the idea of when they leave the earth the earth goes as well because you know, loss of life is a disaster. Vanity vanity. As much as trying to find an epic meaning to things. So what's the most likely thing to wipe us out? Well, most likely thing is the thing that we don't have to think about because it'll happen in one point one billion years. And that's the fact that the son gets ten percent. Hotter. Every billionaires the earth will equalize in about seven hundred ten degrees, which will boil off all the oceans and earth will be uninhabitable. That's just in one point one billion years, and there's no getting away from that. Bob.

Bob Burman Lulu Garcia Navarro Albany New York Bob Earthquake Japan one billion years seven hundred ten degrees twenty years ten percent two percent
"one billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is weekend. Addition from NPR news, I'm Lulu Garcia, Navarro global warming, polar ice caps, melting general doom and gloom. Well, how's this for a cherry book title earth-shattering, violent supernova, galactic, explosions, biological mayhem, nuclear meltdowns, and other hazards to life in our universe author. Bob Burman joins us now from the students W A M C in Albany, New York. Welcome to the program. Well, thank you. So what prompted you to write a book full of so many cataclysms? Well, I keep hearing when I'm doing lectures, or when I was running this community observatory at people would always be worried about things colliding with earth and some of them were imaginary like there's this imaginary planet Nibiru that supposedly is on a collision course, and and so I realized that there's a lot of juice and an interest in it. There is a lot of movies about it too. I mean, I'm a personal fan of the sort of end. Of the world scenario movies. So let's go through a few disastrous greatest hits. There's the big bang, of course, but much more recently, many more stars have gone supernova, including one that was visible by humans in the eleventh century, tell us about that. Yeah. And that was big because not only did nobody see it coming. But it was the brightest light in the sky that's ever been seen in terms of a point source something that looked like a star it easily cast shadows it was much better than Venus looks now. We know it's a supernova. But they didn't even have that word back. Then what did they think it was? It was not good. That's for sure. A bad omen. Yes. Changes in the sky were always bad things. And usually the worst they had to put up with where comments every fifteen to twenty years, but this was off the charts entirely. But supernova is actually do you. Write some good for humans. Oh, yeah. They end up being good in the short term, the completely incinerate their solar system. So part of the good news, bad news thing. But. They do create every element that's heavier than iron. So the iodine for example in our thyroid glands and our next right now could only have come from a supernova amazing. What was the most surprising thing while you were looking into this? What was the thing that you thought? Wow. I had no idea that this was something that was so devastating to humanity. Maybe it was the one thousand nine hundred thousand Spanish flu because considering that was an H one and one ordinary type flu not too different from the kind that goes around in our own lifetimes. You wouldn't think that the flu could ever suddenly get so very lent that it would destroy one or two percent of the earth's population? So that was fascinating to me. Another was something that was very reassuring. I've found that in really studying the nuclear power plant accidents that make up a few of our chapters. The things were not as bad. As they were made out to be fruit sample in the Fukushima what we call disaster. The real disaster was in the soon NAMI the tidal wave that came earlier that day from the greatest earthquake that has ever hit Japan. That's what produce all the loss of lives. So why do you think so many of us are interested in the end of days, my own guess is that even we're all more likely to be done in by our own stupidity by smoking when we know we shouldn't are now launching our cholesterol or things like that. I think people naturally want to tie their lives in with a bigger picture. And that the idea of when they leave the earth the earth goes as well because you know, loss of life is disaster so much vanity as much as trying to find an epic meaning to things. So what's the most likely thing to wipe us out? Well, the most likely thing is the. The thing that we don't have to think about because it'll happen in one point one billion years. And that's the fact that the son gets ten percent hotter. Every billionaires the earth will equalize at about seven hundred ten degrees, which will boil off all the oceans and earth will be uninhabitable. That's just in one point one billion years, and there's no getting away from that. Bob Burman.

Bob Burman NPR Albany New York Lulu Garcia Navarro Japan one billion years seven hundred ten degrees twenty years ten percent two percent
"one billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Lou Garcia Navarro global warming polar ice caps, melting general doom and gloom. Well, how's this Richard book title earth-shattering, violent supernova, galactic, explosions, biological mayhem, nuclear meltdowns, and other hazards to life in our universe author. Bob Burman joins us now from the students of W A M C in Albany, New York. Welcome to the program. Well, thank you. So what prompted you to write a book full of so many cataclysms? Well, I keep hearing when I'm doing lectures, or when I was running this community observatory at people would always be worried about things colliding with earth and some of them were imaginary like there's this imaginary planet Nibiru that supposedly is on a collision course, and and so I realized that there's a lot of juice and an interest in it. There is a lot of movies about it too. I mean, I'm a personal fan of the end of the world. Scenario movies. So let's go through a few disastrous greatest hits. There's the big bang, of course, but much more recently, many more stars have gone supernova, including one that was visible by humans in the eleventh century tells about that. Yeah. And that was big because not only did nobody see it coming. But it was the brightest light in the sky that's ever been seen in terms of a point source something that looked like a star it easily cast shadows it was much brighter than Venus looks now. We know it's supernova, but they didn't even have that word back. Then what did they think it was? It was not good. That's for sure. A bad omen. Yes. Changes in the sky were always bad things. And usually the worst they had to put up with where comments every fifteen to twenty years, but this was off the charts entirely. But supernova is actually do you. Write some good for humans. Oh, yeah. They end up being good in the short term, the completely incinerate their solar system. So. Part of the good news bad news thing, but they do create every element. That's heavier than iron. So the iodine for example in our thyroid glands and our next right now could only have come from a supernova amazing. What was the most surprising thing while you were looking into this? What was the thing that you thought? Wow. I had no idea that this was something that was so devastating to humanity. Maybe it was the nine hundred eighteenth Spanish flu because considering that was an H one one ordinary type flu not too different from the kind that goes around in our own lifetimes. You wouldn't think that the flu could ever suddenly get so very lint that it would destroy one or two percent of the earth's population. So that was fascinating to me. Another was something that was very reassuring. I've found that in really studying the nuclear power plant accidents that make up a few of our chapters. The things were not as bad as they were made out to be for example. In the Fukushima. What we call disaster. The real disaster was in the soon NAMI the tidal wave that came earlier that day from the greatest earthquake that has ever hit Japan. That's what produce all the loss of lives. So why do you think so many of us are interested in the end of days? My own guests is that even though we're all more likely to be done in by our own stupidity, by smoking when we know we shouldn't are now launching our cholesterol or things like that. I think people naturally want to tie their lives in with a bigger picture. And that the idea of when they leave the earth the earth goes as well because you know, loss of life is a disaster. I don't know there's so much value as much as trying to find an epic meaning to things. So what's the most likely thing to wipe us out? Well, most likely thing is the thing that we don't have to think about because it'll happen in one point one billion years. And that's the fact that the son gets ten percent hotter. Every billionaires the earth will equalize about seven hundred ten degrees, which will boil off all the oceans and earth will be uninhabitable. That's just in one point one billion years, and there's no getting away from that. Bob Burman his book is called earth.

Bob Burman Lou Garcia Navarro NPR Albany New York Japan one billion years seven hundred ten degrees twenty years ten percent two percent
Was Earth's Oldest Rock Found on the Moon?

BrainStuff

06:53 min | 2 years ago

Was Earth's Oldest Rock Found on the Moon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listen ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here on February six nineteen seventy-one. Be late astronaut Alan Shepard the commander of NASA's. Apollo fourteen mission was taking a walk on the moon. He and fellow space traveler, Edgar Mitchell were out gathering rocks around a depression called cone crater to quote shepherd himself. Many of these were hand sized grab samples, but the pair took home some larger mementos to one basketball sized rock collected by Shepard earned itself. A nickname big Bertha officially known as lunar sample one four three two one big Bertha weighs about nineteen pounds. That's nine kilograms making it the largest rock that Apollo fourteen brought back to earth and the third largest collected by any of the Apollo missions. Although shepherd found big Bertha on the moon that may not be where it story began. The rock is a Brescia a hodgepodge of geologic fragments called clasps which are held together by cement like mix. A newly published hype. Office says that part of big Bertha formed billions of years ago right here on planet earth. In fact, despite the lunar connection this could represent the oldest earth rock ever discovered. Big Bertha's origins were the focus of a study that was published in January in the journal earth and planetary science letters the paper's authors include an international team of geo. Scientists who looked the moon rocks procured by Apollo fourteen including lunar sample, one four three two one for the most part the classes on this famous Brescia are dark gray. But there's also a lightly colored one that catches the eye. It's made a fell site a kind of all Cannock rock that contains the minerals feld Spar end quartz. The light grade class which is two centimeters that's point seven inches across is loaded with tiny zircon crystals as well many cons contain vital information about what the environment was like when and where they formed close inspection of zircon and big Bertha's light. Patch showed that the crystals were produced by cool oxygen, rich magma. Yet molten rock of the sort doesn't exist anywhere near the moon's surface defined some you'd need to travel more than one hundred miles. That's one hundred sixty two kilometers below the surface of the moon where Shepard and Mitchell found big Bertha. So how did these cons and the class? They belong to end up on the surface of violent impact was probably involved when a meteorite or asteroids smacks into a planet or moon, it can transport material that's buried deep under the crest up to the surface. And as noted earlier big Bertha was found near an impact crater. So case closed, right? Well, maybe not cone crater and expanse measuring about two hundred and fifty feet that seventy six meters. Deep and a thousand feet or three hundred and four meters wide was created roughly twenty six million years ago. Scientists thinks that the violent episode that left this depression behind would have failed to dredge up geologic material lying more than forty five miles or seventy two kilometers underneath the moon. A big Bertha's fell site classed. Could have originated deepen a lunar magma pocket. But it doesn't seem likely. The study authors think different scenario is way, more plausible around twelve miles or nineteen kilometers blow planet earth surface. There's a supply of cool oxidized magma. This is exactly the kind of raw material that probably made his cons on big Bertha's light patch. And by the way, they're con crystals. Have a helpful habit of preserving uranium isotopes? Those can be used for radio metric dating a process that tells us the fell site classed is four point zero to four point one billion years old, but both of these clues together and a potential timeline of events emerges. According to the policies championed in the study, some of that cool oxidized magma lying deep under earth's continental crust hardened into this class between four point zero and four point one billion years ago. We know that our planet was besieged by meteorites in those days a process that by the way created a lot of old Granitz. Repeat impacts would have driven the class ever closer to the surface until finally a projectile hit the earth with enough force to launch the fell site clear out into space. It's estimated that four billion years ago. Our moon was around three times closer to earth than it is right now, the far flung class might have bridged the gap and settled on the moon, but around that time meteorites from space also harassed the moon and approximately three point nine billion years ago. One of these impacts could partially melted. The class and driven it under the lunar surface where it merged with other classes and became part of Brescia then twenty six million years ago, the asteroid strike that gave birth to the cone crater could set big Bertha free propelling it to the spot where Alan shepherd came and grabbed it up one historic day in nineteen seventy-one if the fell site class really did have terrestrial origin. Then ironically enough, it might be the oldest known rock from planet earth. There's a four point zero three billion year. Old rock from Canada's Northwest. Territories that's comparable in age and over in Quebec, the greenstone belt is at least three point nine billion years old out in the Jack hills of Western Australia. Scientists have located circum- that formed roughly four point three seven billion years ago, but these crystals seemingly detached from their original rocks at some point big Bertha's fell site, classed and zircon seemed to have formed simultaneously. This episode was written by Mark van Cini and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other far flung topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. This is April and Cassidy, we're the host of the podcast dressed the history of fashion and this season, we traveled throughout history and around the world to bring you more of the fascinating stories from behind the clothes. We wear we traveled a central Asia tiller all about the resist dyeing technique known as e Kat and to Paris to learn all about the legacy of Christian Dior. We also spore the history of a whole host of topics from plus size fashion or the clothing choices of colts listening to subscribe on apple podcasts or the iheartradio app or wherever else you get your podcast.

Bertha Cone Crater Alan Shepard Brescia Alan Shepherd Edgar Mitchell Lauren Bogle Nasa Apollo Missions Commander Apollo Asia Testif Christian Dior Cassidy Canada Apple Mark Van Cini Paris Granitz
"one billion years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"It's pretty much a couple of years ago, the US raise the question of how and whether we can find the pieces of the material the moon in the loser collections in just realized that we may already have this dissemble. So we did some additional analysis and then come up with this possibility not one hundred percent with proof, but it's closest to cherish show stuff that we probably have the moment. So what is it about this Roth that makes you think it originated on earth rather than the moon? Normally, we different shades temples between different planets based on the some differences in chemistry, for example. And we can say that's meteorites coming from moon. We can say to meteorites coming from Merce. So there these differences that pretty much less determine where? Sample originates so different from some of these other planetary bodies. So we should be able to interior pick us material on any other planets, if the res something these particular case chemistry of the sample suggests that conditions so formation kind of similar to what we expect from earth. And then then the really very unusual for them. It's it's still probably possible to to form the sample on the moon that going to be very unusual set of conditions for them of granite, you found there had cool and Phil spire in it zoo a little bit different from these. The moon previously. And of course, the way the whole thing was put together with water and oxidized atmosphere. That's that's exactly what we're talking about conditions programs of water oxidation that that is is very common on earth. But move he's very different in that respect. So it's very hard to form this conditions on the moon as far as we know you looked at you use those to date the sample. How does one today a Roth? Very common mineral that is used for Geochronology when we studying terrestrial rocks. The best age we can extract these coming from Zurich insights, it's very useful tool. So at some point many years ago when Phil samples came from the moon people realize that there are some circus on the moon as well women's stuff using them to get the age of some different drugs. It's pretty much based on the fact that Zirkin accumulate it'll be the uranium and uranium is radioactive decays into let and then they can measure quantity of leads than radium and knowing rate of decay, you can determine age change once crystallized they're like a little stasis field. Yes, they are very hard to to modify their is I'm processes that. Of course can change there can, but it's very robust it tends to live very high temperatures, and it's mechanically very stable to. That's the reason. It's one of the best tools to get the h uranium decays into let you look at the ratio. And. As you know, how long it takes uranium to convince you can look at how how long ago that particular Cirque on crystal formed how earth rock get to the moon. I mean, this is after the moon formed, of course. Yes. Of course. Well, you you probably need quite substantial impact of surface. That's how material is from sort of between different planes removes. So you hit say if hit us with a lot of Chester Royd, some of this material can reach velocities that allowed to escape tation. And so they launched into space, and then then someone's finish on on other planets rewards. So we expect something like that happens. You know, this to some of this stuff from earth. Who give you this rock of around four billion to four point one billion years ago at that time the earth and moon, we're a lot closer than they are now. Yes, how many people that it's probably of the current distance at the time of fish, particularly event mobile any other than proving the fact that rox cook Cook the the poll, poll. I guess we can look at this simple even food. And then try to really understand if it's really coming from there. And then the thing about it is it's quite old. And then we don't have a lot of drops on earth of age. That's right. Because there's it's very active and then say, it's constantly destroys, whatever it's produced. So going back he is very tough in Joji. Well, the reason single rock on earth that h which is I guess tonight in Canada, nothing older. Now if we start to search for tourists loops on the moon..

Phil spire US Chester Royd Geochronology Joji Zurich Zirkin Cirque Canada one hundred percent one billion years
"one billion years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So there's a few hypothesis for it a big one is that there may have been a break-up in an asteroid family. So asteroids live in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and sometimes two of these large asteroids or more collide into one another and they get broken down into smaller pieces, and as they absorb heat from the sun and re emit the heat back. They start to shift them their spot. They start to move around and eventually they exit the orbit and they start moving towards the inner solar system so towards the earth and the moon, you can think of it as a landslide. Slept starting at the top of the mountain and think of the earth and the moon as a house in the valley. So we see the footprints of those broken pieces of asteroids as craters on the earth and the moon. So something happened. Hundreds of million years ago. All of a sudden, you had more bombardment. Yes. So an asteroid family broke up, and they started to move towards the inner solar system, and that that caused more of a bombardment you let some people use your data. I understand to create a piece of music that represents these impacts on the moon using sound gives an explanation of what you did. Yes. So system sounds kind enough to take our lunar data and turn it into a video and also into sound. So they've turned the last I one billion years the history of the impact of the moon into sound where every note represents the size of an impact crater, and you can hear the frequency of the bombardment and they've been doing more turning into strana me and space data into music..

one billion years million years
"one billion years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So there's a few hypothesis for it a big one is that there may have been a break-up in an asteroid family. So asteroids live in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and sometimes two of these large asteroids or more collide into one another and they get broken down into smaller pieces, and as they absorb heat from the sun and re emit the heat back. They start to shift them their spot. They start to move around and eventually they exit the orbit and they start moving towards the inner solar system so towards the earth and the moon, you can think of it as a landslide slip starting at the top of the mountain and think of the earth and the moon as a house in the Val. Ali. So we see the footprints of those broken pieces of asteroids as craters on the earth and the moon. So something happened. Hundreds of million years ago. All of a sudden, you had more bombardment. Yes. So an asteroid family broke up in they started to move towards the inner solar system, and that that caused more of a bombardment you'd let some people use your data. I understand to create a piece of music that represents these impacts on the moon using sound gives an explanation of what you did. Yes. So system sounds kind enough to take our lunar data and turn it into a video and also into sound. So they've turned the last one billion years the history of the impact of the moon into sound where every note represents the size of an impact crater, and you can hear the frequency of the bombardment and they've been doing more turning into strana me and space data into music..

Ali Val one billion years million years
"one billion years" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

The End of the World with Josh Clark

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on The End of the World with Josh Clark

"With the exception of maybe half a dozen astronauts on the international space station at any given time we are all stranded on this island earth. Those astronauts aboard the ISS show just the famous beginnings of our future. If we become a spacefaring species, all of humanity's eggs will no longer be in just a one basket of earth should some catastrophe befall those of us here on earth. There will be other humans living elsewhere to carry on. We will begin to trickle from our bottleneck in spr-. Read throughout the universe. And when we do we will have made it through the great filter colonizing beyond earth is something we should begin working on as soon as we can't because earth is vulnerable to a wide variety of catastrophes that are pretty hustle to life things like exploding stars the death of our son even earth zone systems going haywire. Take our son for starters remember that Goldilocks zone that habitable area around star where planet can sustain life earth is in the Suns Goldilocks zone, but it's not a permanent position as a star. The sun is currently in its main sequence it has plenty of hydrogen atoms in its core that fuses into helium and these constant nuclear reactions released tremendous amounts of energy, which we gratefully accepted light and heat here on earth. But the sun is slowly using up. It's available fuel and as it does its core shrinks and size that smaller core means that it's closer to the center of the sun, which means that gravity exerts more force on it making it denser, all of this is what one would expect, but we're talking about cosmic stuff here. And as with all cosmic stuff. Something weird always happens to because the core grows denser is a gross smaller. That means more fuel is closer at hand for the sun to burn. So it's main sequence begins to speed up. It uses fuel more quickly actually shortening its own lifespan. At least compared to what it would be. If it managed to maintain a slow steady burn during its entire life as the sun burns through its fuel supply more quickly. It's actually going to grow larger much much larger in about one point one billion years the earth will no longer be in the Suns Goldilocks, you'll be a lot closer, and it will keep. Closer from there. This is Astro physicist Lia Neal when it goes through this end stage when it starts turns what's called a red giant, and is pretty my red giant is pretty descriptive by was gonna bay it will expand possibly I to the the orbiting earth. So this the some basic fill up our entire our entire sky. You look out the window. Just be a big seething mass of of star. So you can imagine that what the sun right on top of earth. There won't be much room for life. But billions of years before that point the biggest issue will have to deal with is the increase in solar radiation. Sure things will get much much hotter on earth than they are today. But as with the fallout from the KT asteroid, there are places that some life could go underground deep underwater. Sorry cows. Sorry elephants. Sorry, feral pigs shirt. But as we've seen life is persistent, if anything it would almost certainly find a way to adapt to the changes from the. Increased heat on earth at least at first, but the radiation from the growing, son. We'll be so intense that it will tear apart the very molecules that make up earth's atmosphere all aerobic life life that breathes oxygen would die, obviously. But even in aerobic life would find it impossible to continue on earth without an atmosphere to regulate temperatures the wild swings between intense, heat and cold on a daily basis would evaporate the oceans leaving earth a dead lifeless rock planet without an atmosphere is a dead planet. So we have a billion years to figure out either. How to slow the Suns burn right ambassador extended main sequence or how to live away from earth. And the odds aren't that bad actually that we may be able to do both within that time. That same issue star reaching the end of its productive life poses another natural threat to earth as well, depending on the size or the type of the star could explode at the end of its life. As a star nears the end of its life and its fuel cord becomes denser, and denser, the force of gravity acts evermore strongly on it and just.

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"one billion years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"one billion years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Six or one million years to evolve in new species tend to the seventh power or ten million years to evolve a genus ten to the eighth power or a hundred million years to evolve a class ten to the ninth power or one billion years to evolve a file them in less than ten to the tenth power years or ten billion years to evolve all the way from the primeval slime to home most sapiens i'm not sure if his tax nommik organization of timescales of evolution is exactly right but i mean he's working essentially with orders of magnitude he's definitely rounding up these so for example he says you know less than ten billion years i guess that's actually that's a fair number to work with if you're just trying to estimate galactic evolution right because you're ultimately trying you're dealing with with life and life on earth which is just a pin drop in the in terms of cosmic history and you're you're so you have to work with these exceedingly large of orders of magnitude right but playing with rough orders of magnitude gives you more essentially more room to play around so life on earth has not been around for ten billion years but it's been around for more than one billion years so you can sensually just round up or down to the nearest order of magnitude now ultimately for an open universe scenario he he does say that he does think it's pretty hopefully says quote so far as we i can imagine into the future things continue to happen in the open cosmology history has no leeann and his in this paper his basic breakdown in this paper is that you've consciousness is not bound by all of it is structural then we can move beyond the body right he can become digital machines we can become a you know black clouds of particles that intelligence doesn't necessarily have to be confined to flesh beings anymore and he there's also an interesting point in this we retox about immoral computing i hadn't really thought about he says quote a society with finite material resources can never build a digital memory beyond a certain finite capacity therefore digital memory cannot be adequate to the needs of a life form planning to survive indefinitely fortunately there's no limit in principle to the capacity of an analog memory built out of a fixed number of components in an expanding universe for example a physical quantity such as the angle between two stars in the sky can be used as an analog memory unit the capacity of this memory unit is equal to the number of significant binary digits to which the angle can be measured as the universe expands and the stars recede the number of significant digits in this angle will increase logarithmically with time measurements of atomic frequencies and energy levels can also in principle be measured with a number of significant figures proportional to in the refers to an equation log t therefore immortal civilization should ultimately find ways to code its archives in an analog memory with capacity growing like log t such a memory will put severe con constraints on the rate of acquisition of permanent new knowledge but at least not forbid it altogether whoa so i love them because he's he's really thinking big about about how even memory in recorded history would work with a civilization that is this far advanced beyond what we have now again what we have now does not scale up well so alternately dyson is taking a very optimistic view of the ways that intelligence position could adapt to the changing physical environment of the universe at large right but again this was this was nineteen seventynine yeah we've had some some some changes since then and in fact bbc writer adam becker reached out to dyson in twenty fifteen on the the matter of of of the expansionary universe seeming to accelerate right which which puts a new spin on everything that we've discussed this far and and so we reached out to dyson and dyson said that he's he's far less optimistic and that they most optimistic view is that perhaps the acceleration will slow down on its own because he points out we don't know what's celebrating it so it's still possible that it could stop or slowdown otherwise he says our descendants will lose touch with most galaxies drastically limiting the available energy that he's discussing in these models and that sets us up in a pretty key way to talk about one of.

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Firefighter killed as natural gas blast rocks Wisconsin city

Steve Cochran

03:16 min | 3 years ago

Firefighter killed as natural gas blast rocks Wisconsin city

"And tune in and if you get too close to your radio you might sense a little bit of cherry slurpy on my breath i don't know that will ever be the same steve's steve good morning everyone seventy five degrees on our way to maybe eighty eight today one firefighter has died another has been critically injured in a natural gas explosion and fire that level leveled several buildings in southern wisconsin in the community of sun prairie thirty say that at least six firefighters were injured along with some civilians when a private contractor struck a natural gas main about six thirty yesterday laurie oakley lives there she talked about the downtown area where it happened at around seven o'clock last night just done so much work the city to maintain it and approve the structures and add more you know more restaurants for people to come downtown and now we have just devastation down here forty cents on prairie say the critically injured firefighter is improving this morning grief counselors have been sent to offer assistance to chicago police officers at the district stationed on the city's south side a veteran officer collapsed and died there yesterday on sunday an officer committed suicide in the station's parking lot a veteran cook county judge is facing a misdemeanor gun charge sarah sheriff's deputies saw him drop a pistol in criminal court house at twenty six cow wgn's pam jones with more courthouse surveillance video shows judge joseph claps walking in the lobby he has a jacket folded over his arm a handgun drops to the floor from underneath jacket representative from cook county sheriff tom dart's office tells the trip it's believed the gun was loaded judge claps has a ford card and concealed carry license but weapons are banned from the courthouse even for concealed carry holders pam jones wgn news president trump here's at nato headquarters in brussels for the first of two days of summit talks he began by lecture shering nato allies this morning and targeting germany specifically saying germany in his words is totally controlled by russia secretary general says he agrees with president trump to a point that nato allies should contribute more to the alliance in terms of defense spending but he also defended nato saying there is strength in unity it is in the interest of europe earning interest of states i ain't gonna stay together the color of bubble gum flamingos and cotton candy bright pink is the world's oldest color according to a recent study researchers discovered the ancient pink fig pigments in one point one billion years old rock deep rocks deep beneath the sahara desert making them the oldest colors in the geological record the bright pink colors are more than five hundred million years older than the next oldest known pigments and were produced by ancient ocean organisms now wgn sports here's dave bennett well for the second straight night a pitch dole between the cubs and giants in san francisco this time the cubs came out on top a score the games only two runs in the seventh inning one on an error what victor kartini devil and the cubs blanked the giants tuesday for the ninth win in eleven games jose cantata six innings at three hip ball followed by carl edwards junior and then justin wilson and then steve see shack more good news for the cavs kris bryant expected.

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