21 Burst results for "One Adviser"

"one adviser" Discussed on The Common Cents Show

The Common Cents Show

04:56 min | 9 months ago

"one adviser" Discussed on The Common Cents Show

"Low human rose limbless you are in a opium hayes of such proposing the you don't know whether yourself or your wife but how many are in that state home fifty percent of the people we win poles but leaned it show when we came up with the bitcoin thing so today i know the to something totally ridiculous. 'cause win the debt. You bought a hundred counseling piece. Our unity folks. To come in. I that what i said god outside of our communities in times of london everywhere yes mac is mcafee again and what's his bitcoin thing like all right so now it's a window. We had to do something to get out so by one adviser. Said you're gonna have to make a truly ridiculous. People will think she was trying to comfort these making fifty dallas nagano. There i promise you. One out of one hundred jackson to make it a hundred dollars one thousand that because nobody who can buy realize it all of the world could not be set value. Then we're okay million dollars right. Hello people actually did not think beyond there need to be led by the nose to the trough leading numbers you tricks to the trough by those you will find it on own because if this industry of crypto cryptocurrency on the blockchain is to free of and it can and will if. I have any love to do that. We do lead you to be led by the nose especially on me of all people..

mac london dallas jackson
"one adviser" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"one adviser" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The number one adviser three times by barons. I've received dozens of awards for this radio show and my TV shows to my 10 Bucks monthly newsletter, thousands of seminars and webinars. Lots of audios and videos and multiple citations as one of the industry's most prominent thought leaders. And now wealth management dot com, has just announced the finalists for their 2021 awards 900 plus nominations. I'm a finalist for the thought Leader of the year. Safe to say my leadership has helped advance the entire financial planning profession. Mortgages were just unheard of in the financial planning community. They were strongly opposed until I started touting my 11 great reasons to carry a big, long mortgage back in 1990. That strategy is now the default at virtually every financial planning firm in the country. In 2000 and five We began using ETFs and we introduced our daily strategic rebalancing review. Neither of those were common then. But today 90% of advisors do the same. I invented the first exponential technologies E t F in 2015. It's now used by thousands of financial advisors, and there are dozens of similar funds that have been launched by State Street Global X arc. And others. My focus on longevity has altered the retirement planning projections that advisors nationwide provide their clients and my proposal on retirement savings for babies called rise is getting attention by federal policymakers. And finally, I think it was perhaps the first financial advisor to talk about Bitcoin starting in 2014. As we look at the state of personal finance today, so much is different. When I started out, there were a few books on money, none of them any good. In my opinion. That's why I started writing my own. Today, though, there are thousands of books on the subject. Hundreds are published annually..

"one adviser" Discussed on Retire South Shore Radio

Retire South Shore Radio

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Retire South Shore Radio

"With reach all throughout the southern part of new england and beyond and markelle great to see on a very special weekend. Isn't it. I know yes Happy mother's day we can't Two things number one. I hope everyone's enjoying their mother's day. Weekend and i hope that every husband out there listening and every sunday there listening who forgot that. It's mother's day this weekend is tanking me right now. For the second funny side story was that mother's day arslan is on a different date than mother's day in america. Even though father stays the same day mother's day's not and i remember this day about a month ago. I called to talk to my dad about a rugby match and he answered the phone. He said oh. I guess you wanna talk to your mom. I'm like no no. No i want had forgotten completely. Oh that will irish mother's day. The only reason that i remembered it was i had turned on facebook. Then and then all of my irish and european friends where have to stay so to those who forgot. You're welcome thank you for that public service message to begin the show while that's great. It's it's such a lovely lovely time of the year and We're all feeling a lot better than we were last year at this time. Mother's day so mark a lot to talk about including Reviewing the fact that we now have something called the all hands analysis approach. Which i love. Because i'm a big fan of the sea and it's it's every man on every man and woman on deck to help out the clients but all hands analysis. I keep thinking aha. That's the moment the moment i love. I'm a big fan of the c. To in fact next weekend will be going back into the water for for the season. So i'm like a little kid a week before christmas. Getting everything ready to start fishing again but yeah the all hands analysis. It's kind of what it sounds like. All hands on deck. Everyone works with our firm works with the entire firm. Not just one adviser so you have multiple people thinking about your overall case It's not just about the you know the money of the income side of things which is obviously critically important. People want to make sure that they don't have to worry about running out of money in retirement but they want growth as well they still want wealth management and set your investment services offers those services To to be able to help people grow their money too. But we we. We do a lot with tax strategies here in the office and we have a cpa firm that can actually offer tax advice tax filings tax consulting to those clients and we do it in a proactive approach. So it's not all right. You've already taken the money out of these accounts. Here's my ten nine thousand nine. Here's my w to put that. That's just tax preparation so tax strategy tax planning is thinking about. What's the best way to arrange things. I have to preface this to say. I can't give tax advice. That's why i have a cpa that can And then we look at medicare planning Helping people make sure that you know. Don't take the wrong supplemental time. When they go on medicare part b stewart has been a wonderful resource is in the office last week. And i said tim stew. I i'd like to get you back on the radio against he'll be joining us in the next couple of weeks as well And then finally the estate planning side of things and making sure that your legal says an order is as critically important As making sure that your retirement has an order right at so we offer. Low cost legal work to our clients through the on all hands analysis. Three hundred ninety nine dollars for every document that you would need not per document for all of the documents that you would need and the thing that everyone seems to like. That works with our firm. Is that everything can be done under one roof. People can come in and have everything accomplished without having to drive to five different places to explain five different things to different people. It can all be done under one roof. What all hands analysis is all about and you can find out much more at retire. South shore dot com needless to say so mark. One of the things we wanted to have you discussed today is something called the thrift savings plan and some people may not even be aware of it. It's a very useful tool for those entering retirement or considering what is this all about. Yeah you know. I don't want to isolate an alienate people who are listening today. But if you work for the federal government you have access to great retirement savings plans but a lot of what. I'm going to talk about would transfer to a 401k or a four zero three b plan but some of this is specific to the thrift savings plan. And i think there's some stuff that people should be watching out for 'em plans about changing rules and and making sure that they're staying on top of everything and that's part of what we would do. We'll sit with clients and make sure that no stone is left unturned. Every t is crossed. Every i is dotted and to make sure that they're not leaving money on the table. So it's sometimes referred to as the t. s. p. This is a federal program. It's a federal kind of savings program. And they they changed last year. One pretty key thing that that Most everyone we meet with is aware of. But i've met a couple of people who were not aware of it so you want to make sure that you're at least contributing five percent to your thrift savings plan because the government will match five percent into that. So it's it's like free money and the reason. I say that they made a change last years. It used to be three percent. He used to be three percent match. And if you're automatically enrolled to contribute three percents and the increased contribution matching to five percent and you miss the bus on that while you're giving up two percent of free money so just want to make sure that you're on top of that but i think that's important for anyone who has any matching privileges in their four o. One whether they're funding of pretexts 401k. Or a roth after-tax 401k if there's an employer match you wanna avail if that money right absolutely and is there a limit in terms of how much you can install into that account. Yeah there's there's maximum contribution limits. It depend on your age. It's works in a very similar fashion to To a 401k plan so you can put in certain amounts and then you can do catch up provision and that's what we would look with clients On on a case by case basis to see what they should be putting in because just because you can make something. That doesn't mean that you. Should max something at which sounds counter to what anyone would say from a savings standpoint. But i think. I've made it pretty obvious that we help people a lot. From tax strategy standpoint and taxes are incredibly low right now so it might not make sense to continue to put money into a pre-tax account In the lowest tax environment that you potentially you're going to be in your life And then pay more taxes on the back end. It might make sense to do it but it might not make sense. And that's why we go through our process and our reviews and we have the software that we have that can help clients figure out what they should be doing. And by the way if you're interested in setting up a free no obligation consultation a fifteen minute or twenty minute phone call with the office and with mark and his team seven eight one. Eight three six four two one four. We'll give that number out a lot because It's very helpful Seven eight one. Eight three six four two one four you can also set one of these calls up online very simply it's retire so sure dot com and this is just another aspect of what we talk about regularly. There's a full throttle approach to the overall picture and some people. This might apply perfectly to thrift savings plan and others might not be the right thing. So it's really an individual.

america five percent mark Mother's day two percent three percent mother's day twenty minute last week fifteen minute Three hundred ninety nine doll last year today next weekend last years one adviser tim stew One facebook five different places
"one adviser" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"one adviser" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That's kind of depends on the advice we get, depending on whom we're sitting down and chatting with yet Mark, and I think you left out. We're also retirement planning and financial planning. On top of that, so not only do we We working both ends. We also then also do the planning for the services we provide. And I think that cleared up for people. I think there are many different sources of advice out there. There's different advisors who do things and also it's where you are what you're comfortable with. And so I break it down this way is if you're if you're one of those that want to self director you want to self manage. Your portfolio. Well, that's that's one thing, OK? And then there's also advisers out there who only do insurance or sell products and their product provider. And really, that's a self directed so you you use a. You use that one source to try to fix one problem or it's like taking a square peg and fitting into a round hole. And the reality is is if that's really good For some people, people want to Maybe me maintain control or even safe fees where they think they're saving money when they use a self Directed or they or are they self managing their portfolio? But usually you know that is the one adviser. You buy a product. Don't charge you a fee, and they solve a problem or Perceivable e solve a problem through just one source through a product and then you have the next level, which is your investment adviser. And there's a lot of people out there that use an investment advisor to manage their assets to give them advice on investing to give him advice on risk, an allocation and those And that's where that stops and a lot of times. It's just very cookie cutter. Very programmed, um, very template ID. You know, they tempt the thing where they say Okay. You fit. Uh, Let me give an example. You are conservative. You're moderate. Your aggressive. Okay. We have a portfolio for moderate. We have a portfolio for moderate, aggressive. And the reality is is that investment by stops there they don't get paid to do to give you advice on so security get paid to give you advice on taxes or long term care or other things. And the reality of that is that they're only good. They're going to stop it that investment advice and then there's really the holistic planning, which is customized right? It's about you and the reality is The holistic planner looks at investments. They look at insurance products. They look at risk and really, the way they go about planning his they understand, and they customize it to you, and they cover things like income investments, family Taxes, health care and it all flows and combines together. And so that's really holistic planning at its, you know, got its core, and those are the three different types that can offer you service is the question is which one is right for you. It's not a that's not making a state one, right? 11 good or once bad. It's what's right for you. And you have to seek out what you feel most comfortable with. That's gonna, you know, give you the confidence, give you control and really give you the clarity on your retirement planning. And I do think math, and a lot of people think that all advisers are the same. And I think your financial advisor Okay, Here's what you do, and it's kind of the same thing. You know that if you go to the Chevy dealer, you get this car you go toe Ford dealership to get that When you go to this Porsche dealership, you get that one, and they have their own line of cars. But they're all different, and they're all different Price points and all of that, so You know the car world the golfing world. I remember I'm playing in a mini tour event back in the day, and my buddy who's a golf pro was caddying for me and I had a three footer and it was, of course, that he knew, and I didn't and it was a challenging little par putt. And I didn't knows downhill. I didn't know if there's a little slider left or right or whatever. So I asked him and he goes. It's a 3 ft or just put it and I told him later, I said, never say that again. To me when you're doing it. It's not as easy as it is just watching. That's right. And so the advice he gave me a The time was not what I wanted to hear it all. I made it and then I lectured him on his comments so I mean, it is where we get our advice from really has a lot to do with where we're headed. I think yeah, I think the biggest key mark. I've always said it. Financial education is a key to financial success. But where you get that information really does matter. You know what I think? Just like to your situation with your catty and all that and again, you know advice. You have to be willing to accept advice, but it's also got to be the right advice. For what you're trying to accomplish, right? And so the end of the day you're going to get there. You get there in different areas. Well, what's right for you? You know what? Who's the right advisor for you? What's the right firm for you? Do you want it advisory firm that focuses on everything and all the different risk and all those situations you're going to deal with in retirement, Or do you want someone who just focuses on your investments? It's a good question. Dash yourself. If you're going to do it alone, and you're going to do it on your own, ask yourself, Are you the best person who's prepared to navigate all the different risk? We just talked about in retirement? You've got to ask yourself that that you might be really good at picking index funds. You might be really good at passive investing, but you have to ask yourself if you need and want Advice on everything else, and it's a good question when it comes to long term care, acid base. Long term care when it comes to like annuities. How do you know which ones are the best annuities? What have the best income writers one of the best no fee accumulation and duties? These are all questions that come up. And people seek advice, but they seek it in a vacuum, and I see it all the time. Why did you do this? I'm not sure. Why did we take so security this time? Or why are you making decision taking this stuff? I'm not sure. So that's kind of what we're talking about Mark, and so all the different vice from all the different places. It's really coming down to what Works for you. And if you can answer that question, you know the decisions get a lot easier. Easy to do. There's no cause for this. There's no obligation There's no pressure 7 to 0931 65 67 to 0931 65 60 is just a 15 minute phone call already talking her last segment about the importance of what could actually happen in 15 minutes..

Ford Porsche 3 ft Mark 15 minutes 15 minute Chevy three footer one problem 0931 65 60 one adviser one thing one source 7 to 0931 65 67 to three different types 11 good one both ends once of people
Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

Coronacast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Is the Oxford vaccine worse than the other ones?

"And we had some more exciting vaccine related news in the last couple of days. Norman the astrazeneca vaccine from oxford university has released results saying that. It's an average of seventeen point four percent effective which is less than what we were hearing about the other. Vaccines that have recently been announcing interim results from fifa and madonna. So is the oxford vaccine. Like the bad one or is it just the way they've crunched the numbers looking a bit different to the way pfizer and medina have crunched. The numbers and sean writes in. So we're getting the dot t. One thanks you'll have to force me to take that one advisor moderna. I'll be first in line stuff. The for'de astrazeneca one who trust the uk. Now anyway. thanks. I'm sean sean. Next time you say the question just tell us what you mean you a. You don't be the by bush. So here's the story of esther vaccine report. So this is the problem releasing by pressure lease and what they did. This press release was really naughty. They gave an average of seventy percent but it was an average over two separate trials. You can't do that. You can average two separate trials with different objectives different doses and so on and say was was seventy percent and you can only assume that what we're trying to hide wars that the food does trial. Which was the latte. The larger of the true was actually quite disappointing. Compared to the one thousand nine hundred ninety five percent results that pfizer moderna have been reporting for the amarnath vaccine where they get the average coming up. A bit is actually. What at first sight seems counterintuitive. So you try which the big what which is to fool does is and you've got a smaller trial where they did a half those to begin with and then a fool doors late about a month later and what the got with that one was ninety percent. Say to the to the other two. That's right but effective remember. This was affective in preventing covid nineteen disease. We still don't know whether prevents infection now said well. Why would a lure does one work well. It's actually quite conceivable that the lord does one is the better way of giving it because the vaccine works spy using a chimpanzee cold virus which has been inactivated sort of doesn't caused disease to carry the genetic message inside the cell for the sale to produce despite protein. That's going to generate an immune response in the body that will have memory to fight the infection. So that's how it does the chimpanzee vars whilst it doesn't develop disease in the person our immune system does recognize this virus and january. antibodies toured. So what can happen. Is that you give. The food does in the first. Does the body a gets. Antibodies to the chimpanzee vars. And then when you give the secon- does it doesn't work because your body's fighting off the victor really. That's right the train of the truck the text but if you want to call it the terms of the metaphor taking the phones of other words that blocks the driver from taking the from carrying the the vaccine into the cell so the f- the lure does wand doesn't generate a strong response to the chimpanzee virus but still pump primes the immune system against the vaccine against the spike protein. I should say so. The second vaccine does work so this is actually good news so could be. That is just as good and it'd be a nice one to be just as good because it's going to be a lot cheaper. It's going to be available in the developing world. Astros said that they're not going to take any prophets on it at least during the pandemic and transports in the fridge. So it's easy to transport and resilient so you can't average here so the sixty percent is completely misleading. Double full does pretty lousy half those plus four does pretty good and that director attention towards where it should go.

De Astrazeneca Sean Sean Esther Vaccine Pfizer Moderna Oxford University Medina Fifa Pfizer Norman Madonna Oxford Sean Bush Affective UK Cold
Biden coronavirus advisor Osterholm says U.S. is 'about to enter Covid hell'

Here & Now

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Biden coronavirus advisor Osterholm says U.S. is 'about to enter Covid hell'

"United states is about to enter co- vid hell that's how one advisor to president elect joe biden. Put it this week on. Cnbc the number of americans with new infections is hitting records daley. Yesterday john hopkins university recorded more than one hundred and forty four thousand new cases and we haven't heard from president trump or vice president pence on the pandemic and

Vid Hell President Elect Joe Biden John Hopkins University Cnbc United States Daley
"one adviser" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"one adviser" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"People. Governor Andrew Cuomo says the parties are the problem, blaming them for the spike in cases and he's demanding New York City's mayor. Employ the NYPD to enforce the new rules. Fox's Rick Leventhal reports. California's governor, Gavin Newsom, has ordered family Thanksgiving gatherings beheld outside with members of no more than three households present. And last no more than two hours instead of Georgia will do a hand audit of the ballots cast in last week's election in Detroit. The judge hearing arguments Wednesday and a lawsuit to stop the state from certifying its election results in order to audit of the votes there. Republicans controlling the state legislature in Pennsylvania will conduct a thorough review of the state's election. We've already charged. Pennsylvania Secretary of State violated election laws President Trump making his first public appearance in nearly a week Wednesday for a veteran's Day remembrance at Arlington National Cemetery. He did not speak about the election challenges. But behind the scenes President Trump working the phones meeting with his campaign staff about the potential path forward. According to one adviser driving action, the president's campaign urging the nation to take a breath while the challenge process unfolds. John Roberts at the White House president elected Joe Biden says he will tap Ron claimed to be his White House chief of staff. He previously led the Biden Senate and vice presidential staffs. The UN's nuclear watchdog agency, warning that Iran is continuing to increase its stockpile of low level uranium far beyond the limits set him the 2015 nuclear deal, and it's enriching it to a greater purity than is permitted. America is listening to Fox News. I knew from the Fox News Podcast Network, A look back at the 2000 election. I will work for you every day. And I will never let you down historic campaign retold by the people working on the campaign, those covering it and on the ticket, he was going to take the country in a different paths. Invention is rockets to the networks said that we had won. Florida Fox News presents Election.

president Fox News Trump Pennsylvania Andrew Cuomo Ron Joe Biden NYPD Fox Gavin Newsom Biden Senate New York City Rick Leventhal UN Detroit California John Roberts White House
"one adviser" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"one adviser" Discussed on KOMO

"Also had the widest margin among independents for any presidential candidate. Since 1984 so that the center really collapsed for Donald Trump and moved toward Joe Biden and Biden had always pitched himself as ah, moderate. It was unpopular with many in his own party, progressives and those on the left who were encouraging. Ah Boulder Vision and Amore. Greater or a greater distinction from from President Trump and the Republicans. But Biden has won in large part thanks to moderates and independents. ABC is Molly Nagel covered the Biden campaign and now President elect Biden. And that was who Joe Biden was. It's who he is. And in many ways will be 78 years old. He's never really changed. Have a plate. Erin, You know if he had been in politics project felt long, 29 years old and you have referenced earlier. Today is the day he was elected to the Senate 48 years ago. And when he got into the train, he did put a bit of a push back, especially on the debate stage is so crowded debate stages at the start of the race when he was against 10 9 other of his Democratic opponents. This's point for Joe Biden team that they feel particularly indicated by one adviser who you talked about how they were marked for. Coming into this season, pitching this idea, unity and being able to work in a bipartisan manner, and now they were and he said at that point, they want a couple meaning with that message, And that is a significant king. For them. They felt like they came into this being treated to a banyan was an end Trudeau government, which is that bipartisanship? The king is how you get things done is how you move forward in the system of government that we have set up in the country, and I think that it's going to be something that you're gonna have so much as we go forward with a fine administration how he handles both of the sides of the aisle, the progressives in his own party, the Democratic Party that have You know, gotten behind him, maybe more significantly than they did her behind Hillary Clinton and one of those Republicans that fighting says If you think you can bring with those 48 Republicans, he thinks he can get to join him across the aisle. Molly. I'm curious, too. According to the exit polls, we're going to get two more big into those exit polls.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Molly Nagel Democratic Party Erin President Hillary Clinton ABC Senate Trudeau
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 1 year ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

Success Zone

11:35 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

"Fortunately they. How do each other's backs? It was such a great thing to have partners to lean on to talk through the difficulties as we as we came along so if one of us was kind of down other to pull us up I mean we would not allow each other to fail finally admit mid mate the SEC license came through it was time to resign and launch their independent. Ria for more all there at six thirty in the morning super nervousness. Like you're about to get on a roller coaster and your cited about it but you're also afraid. My stomach was just full of butterflies. Wanted to be there waiting so that we could resigned as early as possible and get a start on our day. And so you know you're wandering around the office waiting for the first manager to come in and it was a long moment as people are showing up to work. Were saying goodbye to everybody and telling them what we're doing. Our officers are cleaned out. They know they know we're not going to be there. I remember it was the operations manager and as soon as he saw us together she knew that was a weird feeling too. Because you know for me. Thirty years of working their hand him a piece of paper the resignation letter. I think I'd printed twelve times with differ dates. And they go okay. Hand me your keys. Hand them their keys. Okay thank you see you later. And he said you know I'm really sorry to see go and Gave Hogs and fowls it. Our feeling was just ecstatic. Walked out the door. We walked down to our new location. I'm walking really fast because I want to get open up the opposite when you get started you just want to begin your new life so to speak as an independent walked in that door then. It was kind of a feeling of how here we are then. It was immediate realization. This is what we did. Now it's time to work. Dustin Jill and NANCI opened the doors to altus wealth group. They're independently owned. Ria On may nineteenth two thousand seventeen. I'm sure you're wondering how's business right? Well we'll find out when we check in with Dustin a little later in the show but first let's see what we can learn from how this team managed their transition together. I think it's powerful that Dustin Jilin. Nancy saw themselves as a really strong unit Nicolay. Turner is a managing director of business consulting at Charles Schwab. She helps. Independent advisors are their businesses for growth and take advantage of opportunities overcome challenges. The reason why they felt like such a strong unit was because they shared a common purpose. And that's really important for our as to know their y or to have a purpose and that bans people together even if they have different ideas about how the business should be run or you know what its eventual future will look like and it's not only a shared purpose or vision. That makes a strong team so a high performing team is one in my opinion that first of all they have that component of trust but they also then recognize that each of them brings something different to the table. Have a diversity of talent. True team works interdependently and when they can leverage each other's strengths and talents an emotional support. Then they can create that synergy. Which is you know being able to get something greater from working together than they could from the some of each of their efforts and that is really. I think when that comes together and they create that synergy that's what creates these amazing thriving are as also obviously great communication being able to talk to one another being able to make things really explicit. That goes into that vision again. It's really about the clear picture. Not necessarily how grandiose the vision is and Dustin story is typical in that at the end of the day. His team felt a great sense of satisfaction about their choice. I think that in the going independent is such a success story because of what happens to the folks after they've gone independent so that sense of building their own business building their own firm. That pride in ownership is very common and really the freedom. It's oftentimes the freedom to do. What's best for clients? The freedom to be able to serve clients in the way that they have wanted to the way that they feel is best suited to their interest. They grow fast. They retain a high percentage of the clients that they were serving before so the independent story is really a success story. Mickley Turner is a managing director of business consulting. Charles Schwab if there's one looming anxiety that hangs over the heads of every advisor considering independence. It's questions about clients. Will they understand my decision? Will they follow? It's been two years. Since alters. Wealth Group opened. Its doors and I wanted to know how they tried to answer those questions for themselves. I ran numbers as low as twenty five percent of our clients. Moving almost like nobody was ever a false. I thought okay. That's as good as it's GonNa get but when I started to clients if felt like every single call everyone was excited was how do I move. And how does this work? That was super surprising to me. So it sounds like you were able to retain the the majority of not all of your clients is at that right. Yes I I run those numbers. A lot and I think is close to ninety five percent was the size of your business when you were at the wirehouse. And what is the size today? As measured by either clients or assets under management both so our assets under management today are higher than they were before manage right around two hundred twenty five million and our client number is lower. There are so many clients that we had to service at our former firm that we really didn't have a choice whether we service them or not. Now we do so now. We can provide better service to those clients and we're growing. What would you have done? Differently would didn't pan out the way you had expected. You know there are a couple different things that we relied on. One of them was our phones so I hired this via voip company of voice over Ip Company to get a phone numbers and we find out the first day. We're in here that although is our same area and it was a local number two hundred miles south of us and so when local clients were calling from their home phone they. Wh had to call a long distance number. It was a big deal. We do so much business over the phone that I thought we have just destroyed our business bought. It wasn't a big deal at all when we ended up having to change those numbers and I don't think anyone even remembers what those numbers were. The other part was we we hired a HR company do payroll for us and they didn't really understand our business. I think it was a call. We did just on price sell. Oh well they're they're the cheapest one there is just payroll for a few of us. We can let them do it. We ended up changing them out within a couple months. And what about For you and your team teammates there On a personal level. How has the transition impacted your personal lives? Nancy just had her second grandchild. She spent a month and a half almost away from the office. Still working remotely. Which was impossible before. Jill spends her summers in Michigan. Still working and her her winters in for me. I look at mostly my kids. I young two young children. They both want to be entrepreneurs. And that's something that they saw firsthand and it is really changed. Their outlook on life so kind of summing up. What would be the advice? You'd give someone else who might be in the shoes that you were in a couple of years back considering a possible move to the independent model. I would say if if you're considering it all dear self a favor and go talk to somebody who's already done it. Spent a few hours with them and go through all those aspects because it's likely the fears or the concerns that you have are not really founded. I believe that any advisor that has a good practice where they're trying to do the right thing for their clients. They're trying to build wealth further own families in themselves. There's not a better path than than this independent are a model. Dustin bench is one of the three founding members of ultras wealth group there in Colorado Springs. Colorado today's story focused on the power of teamwork. And if you're contemplating a similar cure are a few things to keep in mind. Anxiety is a natural part of change. You need a vision. And it only takes one person to keep that vision. Live for the others and remember. A strong team is built on trust. And it's that profound trust gives a team the confidence to take the League to independence. And when I hear Dustin Story. Here's what inspires me. Most I nearly all of their clients that the wirehouse followed them to independence and that actually alliance with Schwab Zone studies on average independent. Ria's retain eighty seven percent of their clients second. Dustin and his team's transition to independence allow them to build stronger client relationships and have more flexibility in their schedules. All while running thriving firm that is still growing and finally they found the freedom they were looking for to work the way they wanted to and live the life they've been dreaming about and they're not alone thousands of financial advisers across the country. Take the leap and become independent. Ria's each story and each transition is unique but the steps they take and the support they need is often the same learn more lots more about the our model and how Schwab Advisor Services can help you for your own path to independence find US online at Schwab Dot com forward slash. Ria or look for the link in the show description to this episode. I'm Jerry COBB and this is how I became an independent. Ria UNORIGINAL PODCASTS. From Schwab Advisor Services.

Dustin Dustin Jill Charles Schwab Wealth Group Mickley Turner Ria advisor Nancy managing director Dustin Story Schwab Advisor Services Dustin Jilin Schwab Zone SEC operations manager Dustin bench Schwab Dot US
"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

Success Zone

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

"Today we'll look at how the independent Ria firm altus wealth group got off the ground. It's a story about the role. A team played in inspiring a successful transition to independence. We'll also check in with an expert on big transitions and the power of partnership and as always will get a little practical advice and bust a few myths about the Ria Journey. So you can learn from others as you consider your own path forward. So let's start with the decision. That almost didn't happen. Let's start with Dustin. My income is higher than most people. I've got two kids and a wife and a house and were doing the American dream and in it is beautiful and it's great. I go work I come home. Dustin is describing what life was like working at an investment firm in Colorado Springs. He was in his late thirties and had been with this company for over fifteen years. Work was predictable. The money was good. Life was great. It felt like we could keep along that path forever and that was fine. You know that was one way to live. Most of Destin's work. He did with two other senior financial advisers. Nancy and Jill. Jill had been at the company for most of her career. I had been there for thirty years and so I always thought I would stay there. I would retire. They're the same was true for Nancy. I never thought that I would be jumping ship. Let's let's put it that way. But as the months and years ticked by something. Intangible started GNAWING. Sometimes they talk about it Jill Nancy night several times. These conversation really well are we. We're happy we're all making good. Money clients are happy. The other side you it was. Am I really living up to my potential over time? The teams priorities shifted. Jill for instance bought a house in Michigan. Pretty far from the Colorado office she dreamed of working remotely but company policy meant that dream would be next to impossible. I was being given a lot of of restrictions which really made it such that. I couldn't work for the clients and do everything that I wanted and needed to do with them. Remotely Mansi also wanted more freedom. She was a seasoned adviser but felt like she was being treated like a novice. I understand that large warehouses have to protect their business on all levels but there should not be a need to have chains or restrictions that you can't do this and you can't do that and I think more than anything that's what I started to experience their frustration mounted all they knew was they wanted more wanted something better and it became ridiculous to us. You get to the point where you're like. You know what I. I'm met a place where the risk I can take to be so much better is is absolutely worth it. They have no idea what options existed for them. It was vision but without a plan. Dustin started some initial research. He learned about hybrid models independent broker dealer models. He explored opportunities at other wire houses but every time he came back to the team agree that it still didn't feel right. So here's what I will tell you. We'll be the shift for me. A day came when package landed on gills lap. It was standard marketing mailer. Any advisor might receive an in it. It explained the RIA business model and how it worked. I handed it to Dustin. She didn't WanNA head to me but but I was kind of the designated person and she knew is frustrated and I said you know if ever we were to do anything this would be the platform that I would consider and with that he was off. Dustin rolled up his sleeves and learned everything he could about the RIA model. I had lots of meetings with attorneys with compliance people with technology people and air all aspects. You know that. Make the Business Ron. And the more. He learned the more information he brought back to his colleagues and the more excited they became when Dustin started talking about it. I knew that okay. I have got to open my mind to this and learn and he was excited in had all kinds of information. Just very motivated. It was time to make a call. Stay or go. Dustin was out in his truck when Joe Garden on the phone and it was about of five thirty or six o'clock one one afternoons. In the fall I remember I was I was headed. I live in the mountains and so I'm driving up and I knew there was a dead spot just ahead of me. We were in this conversation of. Oh yeah this is a great idea. Kind of rehashing. What we'd already talked about and I'm going to pull over and we're finishing this tonight and so pulled over skit on the side of the road and dust is going all over and and my first question is if we're going to do this. Let's pick a date silence for a second and because I thought we don't pick a day then it's not real. The only thing that I remember is is in terms of a date. We said may thefts Cinco De Mayo. For whatever reason we would celebrate. Yes this was absolutely a go now. It was real now. They had to make it happen now. They had to get to work. There was plenty to do not to mention the responsibilities. They still had to their existing clients. You it to your clients to continue to do business as normal. 'cause you always want to give them your all and you couldn't say anything absolutely not months of checklists months of paperwork months of decisions on everything from setting up compliance to picking out office chairs that even though the path to independence had been blazed before and resources and infrastructure. Were there to support them. Dustin still felt anxious about the decision. I think what I was more worried about was leading Jilin Nancy. Down because at that point I was thinking. Oh my gosh you know I feel like I brought them down this road. And what if it doesn't work and that was the first time I I might. Confidence wavered a little bit and I thought Oh man I could be ruining everybody's lives doubt. Fear nerves all of that manifested itself at one point or another throughout their transition. Eventually the team had everything locked into place. We were ready. The officers ready I was. I kept checking things You know we had phone lists ready to call clients. All they really needed now was their license from the Securities and Exchange Commission. They did their paperwork than they. Wait and wait it. We did not know when the SEC would approve us every day. We were checking. Are We approved? Are We reapproved now? Every day doesn't have to print out those resignation letters and we were carrying with us. Then I start losing sleep over. What if what if our clients don't come? What if they don't understand or care about our story and and that was all scary for me constant level of stress and anxiety till we left definitely it really intensified because you're so close and but at any minute you now it can all blow up.

Dustin Jill Nancy Ria Journey Ria Colorado Colorado Springs Securities and Exchange Commis Destin Mansi advisor Cinco De Mayo SEC Joe Garden Michigan
"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

Success Zone

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Success Zone

"I remember waking up at three thirty in the morning was worried about letting Jilin Nancy down because at that point I was thinking. Oh my gosh you know I feel like I brought them down this road. And what if it doesn't work and that was the first time might confidence wavered a little bit meet? Dustin at that time he was a successful investment advisor at a large wirehouse firm and he decided to leave to strike out and start his own firm as an independent registered investment advisor and honestly. It wasn't the risk that was costing him his sleep. It was the fact that he felt responsible for his two closest office partners. Jilin Nancy who were leaving with him..

Cabinet reshuffle: Chancellor Sajid Javid resigns –

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:49 min | 2 years ago

Cabinet reshuffle: Chancellor Sajid Javid resigns –

"In Britain a cabinet reshuffle. When the prime minister reorganizes the key figures around him or herself can be dramatic messy even humiliating but most expected. Boris Johnson's first major reorganization. Yesterday would be modest. The economists prediction the night of the short knives. Instead there was an unexpected moment of high drama from such Javid the Chancellor of the Exchequer the Treasury Secretary and Keeper of the National Budget. He resigned coming out. Mr Java might have stayed but he would have had to fire all of his own advisers and replace them with a team appointed by prime minister. Boris Johnson and his chief aide Dominic. Cummings I don't believe any self respected minister would accept such conditions and so therefore I thought the best thing to do was to go in addition to a shakeup in other departments yesterday's people represents a significant erosion of the Treasury's independence. A cabinet reshuffle starts with those ministers. Who are going to be ousted being told by the prime minister that their services may not be required and mckelway a senior editor of the Economist and frequent hunter of Westminster's halls of power. And then those who will get the jobs Invited in one by one and if you remember the fear of being cooled into the head study when you were school I think it feels a bit like that even for seasoned menaces that walk of delight or shame up Downing Street who Press Bank of cameras watching. You can't be an easy one and Mr Java's walkout of that look Saya Javard. The now ex chancellor looked actually pretty confident. Think he was making a point that he was not prepared to take the deal on the terms that was offered by the prime minister. This was such a clash and seems to have taken place will come to a head so quickly that he was. I'm out of here and that was the walk. So the deal that was on offer was that she could stick around only if he basically got rid of his whole team. Why why was that? The deal that was on the table. Boris Johnson elected with a big majority very frustrated. I think in the last parliament by not being able to get on with the business of government as he wants to shape. It fell the Chancellor and the chancellor's team was somewhat in the way so having guaranteed to Mr Jovi that he would keep his job very publicly The end of last year he said well you can keep it. But you can't have this team of advisers around you and I think the underlying tension there is that they had different views about spending. They had different views about some curious of economic policy and that Boris Johnson was affectively. Trying to grab hold of the decision making process. If you don't have your advisers is very hard to put together a strong policy. Perspective could differ from number TANS. Mr Javert Simi said no you lost one adviser on the whim of Downing Street's he wasn't going to lose anymore and I think that will as the store that goes back as he say. So you say this. This was openly down to differences overspending economic policy. How so sergey of it comes from traditional you might call austerity light. He would accept some listening of the course on spending but he would still. I think want some constraint and you would see some risk in splurging splashing the cash. I think Boris Johnson thinks that everything is really changed. He's got this big majority. He can take more risks and the austerity years really needs to be put behind him and he wants to spend money particularly on the north of England in in the places where the Conservatives have made gains because he thinks that will nail down those gains and keep him in power for longer. Vaz's being around that is bubbled between the two of them. The danger here is that the treasury and number ten being too closely aligned has some risks of its own in prime ministers are more interested in short-term political goals rather than longterm fiscal ones and that balances often being a bit up and down in British Political System. And there's often been a bit of a competition but in this example it's happened. Very brutally very swiftly. The power has moved to one end of the soul to Boris. Johnson's view as has happened before with Mister Johnson. There's a lot of talk about the the power dynamic between him and his chief. Aides Dominic Cummings the Some would say power behind the throne. What does this episode to tell you about that dominate Cummings sometimes called the dark Lord around Westminster only home for Jokes? I think is very powerful. Figure had also clashed with Mr. Jarve it I think this decision to be so tough on the chance. That was primarily the prime minister's probably driven on Egged on by his adviser. They've been other arguments. That Dominic Cummings has lost recently so as power is not absolute. But I think if. Boris Johnson Dominic Cummings have a vision of direction? They want government to go. You put yourself in great dangerous administer. If you lie down in the road they will seem irrelevant. You so is that to say then that will end up with the government that is entirely made up of of loyalists of of yes. Men of people living in fear. I'm not sure that will also be yes. Men and women. But it's very clear that you kind of have to get behind the Boris vision of what is important and what is less important. Has He left enough room for independent advice. And for those who think of it differently. Omay send up a warning message. Things that could go wrong. I think that is the great risk. That he's taken here with essentials ation of power over the key decisions which brings us neatly onto Mr Chavez. Replacement. Help Tony me more about him. Richie soon act mid thirty s very trusted by Boris Johnson. Dominic Cummings but also the very interesting backstory is. He has also got a absolutely classic Oxford to banking seavy but as a small boy. He helped his mother who run a pharmacy to to do the adding open and the accounts. He's very good and gifted with numbers that you could say is pretty good going for chancellor always the case it would be. I think unfair to say to someone who's very far already in life and politics. He's only there is a naughty dog. The difference is the constraints are drawn. A kind of course it has been placed the work that he can do the budget's due in four weeks time. We don't know whether it's going to go ahead. But the country needs stability and I think number ten will not want to do it for very long. I think you will differ in some ways from the budget that Mr Javid would have given and in effect it will have to authors one will be the chancellor but the signature very prominently underneath. It will be the big spoiling hand of Boris Johnson. And all of the attention has gone on to to this this this debacle with Mr David and not so much on all of the other Reshufflings within the cabinet. Take a whole. What does that that whole story? Tell you about what Mr Johnson and indeed. Mister Cummings was for Britain. The overall message of the reshuffle is that Brexit is done that those wounds can be healed and that Britain get on selling itself as global Britain in the world. That's confidence not front foot feeling that. Boris Johnson often does exude isn't really particularly balanced left and right cabinet and conservative terms. And that's probably a bit of a difference. He has the majority. He's got the team. He's got the power and now he really wants to go. And that's the feeling it's been put behind this. Let's see where that ends up. And thank you very much for joining us visa.

Mister Johnson Dominic Cummings Chancellor Boris Johnson Dominic Cummings Prime Minister Mr Java Britain Treasury Secretary And Keeper Mr Javert Simi Treasury Mr Javid Mr Chavez Mr Jovi Mr David Westminster Press Bank Saya Javard
"one adviser" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The Glenn Beck program but now it is news radio six ten W. Y. O. D. W. one adviser from one PM until ten o'clock tonight with gusts out of the south you're thirty five miles per hour otherwise partly to mostly cloudy with a high of eighty four rain loosen later tonight in the low sixty nine and showers and storms tomorrow the hive seventy four with updates around the clock and South Florida severe weather station on the weather channel's Jeff Mar on newsradio six ten W. I. O. D. this report is sponsored by circle K. okay a dollar can get you the freshest Cup of coffee in the World Cup is ground fresh right when you want so for a split second your Cup is the freshest on every couple ground fresh starting the dollar at circle K. limited time only at participating locations enjoy three we we X. online it call home cast this report is sponsored by the exigent umbral scanner thermometer a brutal cold and flu season is here the number one flu symptom is fever so use a thermometer proven accurate by more than eighty clinical studies we can't always predict the flu season but we can always prepare for with the expert in temporal scanner ex Surgeon dot com.

Jeff Mar Glenn Beck W. Y. O. D. South Florida cold flu
"one adviser" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on KOMO

"When I see one adviser says the former mayor considers the president an unprecedented threat to our nation investigators in Massachusetts trying to piece together how an employee at buffalo wild wings died in what's being called a chemical incident police say they believe it happened when the employee used a powerful cleaning agent ten other people were hospitalized you're listening to ABC news stay informed como mid day good morning once again welcome to the mid day edition of the come all news as we bring your top stories on a couple twenty four seven news are currently forty five partly sunny downtown on tumblr it's always county about to get tougher on drug possession couple Skolnick reports an influx of cash will revive prosecution for small amounts position of cocaine heroin and math is a felony in Snohomish county but over the last year or so police have seldom arrested for amounts less than two grams the justice system didn't have the resources to prosecute all those arrests things are changing the ever Herald reports the county counsel's proposed twenty twenty budget adds four hundred thirty thousand dollars to pay for extra cord staffers the new staff would allow the county to reverse the two gram limit can once again prosecute those small amount offenders not everyone's on board Kathleen Kyle with the county public defender's association says the county is about to reinstate a failed policy we've tried this for forty years and it doesn't work that you cannot prosecute your way out of drug addiction that she we should really invest in treatment but some critics have link for more lenient policy to increases in homelessness and street crime a council vote on the plan.

president Massachusetts tumblr Skolnick heroin Snohomish county Herald Kathleen Kyle ABC drug possession cocaine four hundred thirty thousand d forty years two grams two gram
"one adviser" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on WJR 760

"Picture our philosophy relies on sound strategy and long term investing with plans tailored to each client's unique situation quite read wealth management is a well respected voice in the investment community and it's frequently quoted in prominent news media subscribe to our market perspective newsletter to access our steady insightful commentary let plant around financial advisors guide your investment strategy get to know one adviser today at platform rand dot com hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender let's talk credit card debt for a minute if you feel you're carrying too much of it you're not alone the average household in the U. S. carries over eight thousand dollars in credit card debt ready for some good news with a cash out refinance from quicken loans you can quickly and easily put some of the equity in your home to good use by paying off a lot of that high interest credit card debt a great way to take cash out is with our thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point zero eight percent call us today at eight hundred quicken to learn how taking cash out with a thirty year fixed mortgage might be the right solution for you and for a record nine years in a row JD power his right quicken loans highest in the nation in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com for getting our work for mission is a G. part account rates of exchange at one point two five percent fee to receive the discount rate all the cost information and conditions legal housing lender license in all fifty states and what number thirty thirty when state university Detroit receiving hospital and Henry Ford hospital in Detroit are conducting a study gold boost three that aims to help people with severe brain injury by adding a brain oxygen monitor to standard intensive care because this condition requires immediate care patients will be enrolled into the study without consent if a family member is not rapidly available however consent to participate will be obtained as soon as possible for more information go to boost three trial dot org that's boost the number three trial dot org this is.

"one adviser" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And says initial twenty twenty buzz fizzle democratic presidential candidate bene- Iraq plans, the re introduction. The former Texas congressman has seen. His once rising poll numbers sag is he's focused on criss crossing the country rather than making national TV appearances and prioritized in person contact with voters over issuing detailed policy positions. One adviser says all works entered an intentional quiet period. Concentrating on building out campaign infrastructure soon, though, he'll increase national media appearances and issued detailed plans on a number of top issues awards camp insists it's not beta two point. Oh, but a major change from his campaigns heady opening days in mid March. Rhonda rocks to reporting a strike by workers. Pimlico race course may have averted just in time for the running of this year's Preakness stakes. The Baltimore Sun reports the Maryland, Jackie clip, and employees Pimlico have agreed in principle on a new deal. News and analysis at townhall dot com. And a word about drug recalls today from Dr Charles Snyder men, although not common adverse effects or manufacturing inspections associated with pharmaceutical can prompt the FDA to recall, the product pharmacy, computer systems contract information on who got what batch. So if you hear that a drug you have been taking been recalled check with the pharmacy could fill the prescription Charles matter in Washington today is Sunday may the twelfth fits the one hundred thirty second day of twenty nineteen. It's also mother's day almost eight in history. Seventeen eighty during the revolutionary war the besieged city of Charleston, South Carolina, surrendered to the British on the state in nineteen forty nine the Soviet Union lifted. The Berlin blockade western powers had circumvented with the Pearland airlift and honesty in nineteen seventy eight National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration said that hurricanes would no longer be given only female names. More on these stories at townhall dot com. So along with everything else you have to do day to day running your business, and you're trying to manage.

Dr Charles Snyder National Oceanic Atmospheric A congressman Iraq Texas Pearland Berlin Rhonda Baltimore Jackie clip Soviet Union FDA Maryland South Carolina Washington Charleston one hundred thirty second
"one adviser" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And actually seems to support and remember Donald Trump just over the last couple of days have been defending what he said in Charlottesville, and it echoed call back into our memory right something that just happened. Not too long ago. What happened in Pittsburgh, Donald Trump and all of this hate, right? His part of. The environment of today. And he he bears some responsibility for and we don't know if it has any connection to to the politics that's going on. But I mean, it would be a stretch to say that it doesn't. It's always Trump's fault. You see everything bad that happens? According to the left must be Trump's fault because Trump is the evil bad Orangemen that haunts liberals dreams, and they can't ever just think about it an event for what it really was. And for in this case, the the atrocity of shooting yet another shooting in a house of worship they have to find a way to tie it immediately to the president of the United States. It is it is his fault. You know, the president who has a son in law who is Jewish and who is his top advisor, Jared Kushner is the president's number one adviser from everyone that I've spoken to in this White House. He has a daughter who he's obviously thinks the world of and she converted to Judaism. But the media would have us believe the President Trump is some kind of a secret anti Semite. This is really the this is the line. They're going to go with this is the way there. Going to try to make this baggage for Trump or the answer is. Yes, yes. Of course that that's what they do. They claim that the president is divisive. And then they tell you and me that the president the guy that you voted for not all of you, maybe. But most of you that listen to this. And that I voted for that guy. He's the reason for that. So if you support him, what does that say about you? That's what they want you to take away from this. That's their version of events here. That's what they're presenting you in the media, and here's C N N's, Don lemon and Varo two of the dumbest people on television. Talking about how they they don't even win. The president condemns. What happened? They don't believe his condemnation. Play clip one and said of trafficking in big and bigotry and racism and anti semitism in eight and making excuses force. I want to believe it. I want to believe that I'm to be real. How do you believe him? What should we believe? You don't believe him. We all saw. And we all know, and he didn't say a word about the black churches. We all know that he didn't say a word condemning Steve king, the congressman from Iowa. So it's time after time after time after time. No. But you want to believe that you want to you want to but we need to. But I don't know that we can do. They're delusional. Navarro, and I don't know who else was lemon and some other voice came in there. They're delusional. You can't believe that the president condemns bigotry and yet. They can't believe that he's condemning bigotry. The president had nothing to do with this shooter had nothing to do with this situation. But it is his fault. You know, this this is just so destructive. And and I would argue so dishonest. But this is what the Democrats do. Now, they find a way to tie everything to President Trump that is negative and nasty because there are people that will.

Donald Trump president Jared Kushner Pittsburgh Don lemon Democrats White House Charlottesville United States Navarro Steve king advisor congressman Iowa
"one adviser" Discussed on The CIBC Private Wealth Podcast

The CIBC Private Wealth Podcast

08:15 min | 3 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on The CIBC Private Wealth Podcast

"To the cia feet grab it will management's advisor podcast investors are always watching for changes to the market should use sellers should you buy or many different indicators people watch for any ocean typically isn't one of them but according to retired admiral james stavridis first navy officer chosen a supreme allied commander for global operations at nato what occurs on the waves can tell you a lot about not just potential changes any economy but also so the state of the world itself in he would know the breed of his latest book is seapower the history and geopolitics of the world's oceans he's also an operating executive what the carlisle group here's admiral stavridis starters the oceans covers seventy percent of the earth's surface in fact the pacific ocean is so big that you could take all the land on air and dropping into the pacific ocean end therefore they are first and foremost means of communication tation that connects the world the british you just say the sea is one meaning that there are no barriers in the sea so it's this highway point to is they economics ninety five percent of international trade moves across those oceans in thirdly in the history of mankind again and again we see these critical see battles that occur at a kind of a hinge in history that really changed the course of human in endeavors in so i think it gives you a look at going back twenty five hundred years ago and look at the battle of solomon as a word the greeks save democracy or look at the battle of trafalgar where the british sales off ski imperial french or the battle of midway united states turn the tide in the pacific against the japanese empire again and again you see these historical moments on ocean set really change the course of history so to summarize geography make some important economics the trade making important in military history in security outcomes mickey oceans critically important jamming how event suddenly oceans changed history it could be inciteful but what should investors be looking at concerning world events today china's economy for example has long used to be ocean to project military strength the chinese claim that at the south china sea is a territorial see a which is an extremely difficult claim to make realistically under international law but china claims that entire body of water south china sea which is massive it's the size of the gulf of mexico and the carribean secret together in in order to a track those claims they build these artificial islands and then they say gosh international law we everything is miles from each of these i was so over time you build enough these islands and you keep claiming two hundred miles around each of them any facts looks like a series of lily pads that eventually covered the entire south china sea so that's that's their strategic game show what they want militarily is used to those islands as if you will unsinkable aircraft carriers and put planes you could put long range surface the surface missiles on them and builds sensors on them a day can create this chain of if you will aircraft carriers that could never be sunk throughout the region so if it comes to a fight that would be a tremendous military utility to conflict with china would obviously be bad news and would likely have a severe impact on me economies of both countries and is there anything else to watch out for united states in china could come to conflict in cyberspace 'em in other both nations are competing to build new five g networks to get their first if you will on the creation of true artificial intelligence and machine learning found that you create a great deal of conflict in cyber in that is open to the public in general but a based on my security clearances i can tell you that were already in a kind of shadow war in the cyber world so that's another zone as conflict between the nations so having said all that i am cautiously optimistic that over the course of this century we can work with china we can avoid a conflict avoid falling into what is sometimes called the two cities trap the so called do cities trap is a phrase used to describe the writings of an ancient greek historian who predicted that when rising powers collide with established powers war is likely to ensue i think we can avoid that the city's trap but it'll require careful diplomacy and individuals at goodwill on both sides it'll be a big narrative of the twenty first century you know there's no silver bullet here it's gonna require both nations to a fall off of extreme positions work to negotiating outcome we avoided a war in the cold war that could have destroyed civilization i think we can do the same thing here but it'll require attention in maturity out of both cover what the united states need to do to maintain stability and a positive economic outlook i think if they're four key priorities for the united states broadly speaking in the century they are a international engagement in other words working with our allies improving interagency cooperation in washington enabling more private public cooperation notably in cyberspace in for strategic strategic communications telling her story in in you know are stories a pretty good one liberty freedom of speech freedom of education gender equality racial equality look we we execute those values imperfectly but they are the right values and we should not apologize for them are backed up on them in in order to do that we have to communicate and sometimes people say to me you know lambeau you're right it's a war of ideas out there no it's marketplace of ideas are ideas compete and we have to be smart about how we express them without arrogance without random down somebody's throat we are b m encouraging others to think hard about those values sets in that going back to china is part of the solution with china overtime win taking a look at current events and their longterm implications what advice to be unrelenting number one is keep it in perspective in a good way to do that is is look back a hundred years ago of the world is stumbling out of the first world war thirty million dead cap they have a global pandemics spanish influenza which is in fact forty percent of the world's population with a twenty percent mortality rate for gonna see the rise of authoritarianism under the rubric of fascism in a second world war which will kill sixty million people that's a bad century were not mostly in that place although the great powers have disagreements including u s china we had so many better tools so much more transparency better means of communication a much more prosperity globally poverty is reduced that reduce tension so point one for investors is yes it feels very scary but keep it in perspective point to is in finding investor these indicators i'm gonna watch are first and foremost the u s china relationship in saying that that in the south china sea i think will be eight an indicator of how things are trending for more insight from admiral stavridis and other topics check the latest edition of.

advisor twenty five hundred years ninety five percent seventy percent twenty percent forty percent hundred years five g
"one adviser" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Nine one advisor. In a different greeting for Facebook users users logging on were interrupted by a prompt asking for the Email password associated with their Facebook profile users like e sushi described the experience as an extra step to log on Facebook claims the password prompt was a simple security measure part of a process. They call two step off into -cation and insist quote these passwords are not stored. But just last month, the company did admit to storing hundreds of millions of user passwords, insecurity on logs that were easily accessible to its employees walks. Jillian Turner reporting history at Augusta her first win the women took the course at Augusta National Golf club for the first time ever this weekend for the inaugural Augusta women's national amateur tournament. Twenty one year old American Jennifer Cup show earned the victory by four strokes over Mexico's Maria Fosse. She was asked afterwards how it felt to win the first ever tournament in wire to wire. Fashion. It's just great to be able to do that. And get the first win after I hit the first tee shot of the tournament. It's it's affiliate. I can't describe sound courtesy of golf channel Cup. Joe? A senior at Wake Forest is the top ranked amateur in the world and the defending NCWA national champion Ryan mayor Fox News masses of additional to New York's nine eleven museum stone monoliths were installed symbolizing strength. They were hand chiseled in Vermont incorporating still from the original World Trade Center each monolith..

Facebook Augusta Maria Fosse Augusta National Golf club advisor Jennifer Cup Jillian Turner Ryan mayor Fox Wake Forest World Trade Center NCWA Vermont Joe New York Mexico Twenty one year
"one adviser" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"one adviser" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And we're talking about a lot of different things. Chris you know, what we do? And I just got a couple questions because it's kind of quick questions like what is our firms philosophy? What makes us so different than other people? What would you say? That's a great question. You know, many people think financial advisers, they think of brokers, they think of certified financial planners, they think of insurance agents, they think of you know, people in the financial arena as all being the same. And it's not true. You know insurance in license people just do insurance products broker. Stocks bonds mutual funds in investment adviser representatives can do complete planning fee-based third party money management is a lot there. That's that's different. So all that might be confusion confusing to you. But here's the make it simple. Would you wanna do is? You wanna find a fiduciary fiduciary someone's going to the best thing for you and their advisors out there that do complete planning their adviser there that just do one thing. Most people when we've been in this business for a long time, and we feel like people or visors need complete planners. You know, think about the millionaires out there people who are smart people. They have a whole team behind them that do complete planning. So what do we why are we different philosophies? We take a tax approach and everything we do we help people we help people do a tax preparation we help people find ways to reduce their taxes. They're advanced tax planning strategies out there that you can take a hold of if he just knew how to go about doing it. There are ways to have income on a tax. Favored basis, we can create an income plan for you to have income for guaranteed for life your own family pension. We can show you how how to have investments investments that grow with safety would no risk with no fees. We can show you how to have managed portfolio said actively managed we can get into those. There's a lot that we do. We have attorneys that work with us do estate planning, so security planning. That's what we do. And that's a it's it's it's a lot to talk about. But to make it simple is when you're sitting in front of somebody or trying to work with somebody. You wanna work with someone who has the knowledge that does complete planning, you know, and that's important because a lot of people the question, we get his, you know, should someone who's retiring keep their financial professional and the way I would answer that is it depends because get a second opinion. What do you have to lose get a second opinion because you can't get that from you first adviser, right? First adviser can't give you a second opinion. You know, it always remember, it's your money. Your CPA's your current advisors? I'm sure your visor is a great guy or a great girl. There's probably nothing wrong with them as a person. But what we're talking about is there's the accumulation phase and anyone can accumulate your money. But what about the distribution phase? How do you take income on the most tax efficient way? How do you take money out of those piles of money that you've created for guaranteed income to have those guarantees? We'd have to run out of money, and you know, Christmas brought up a good point the question. We get a lot of you out there probably asking how long will my money last in retirement, and you have to understand something about that question. When you sit down with us, we do a balance sheet, and we do a risk analysis to see what kind of risk you're taking because we do.

fiduciary Chris