2 Burst results for "Oncology Diagnostics"

"oncology diagnostics" Discussed on Global Health

Global Health

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"oncology diagnostics" Discussed on Global Health

"Hello everybody welcome back to the podcast right today. We have a great episode. Today we will be speaking with Dr Jennifer. He'll who is a pediatric oncologist in Johannesburg South Africa. And and she along with some colleagues from the International Society of Pediatric Oncology or sign up have been doing a project for the last year where they we're trying to catalog all of the healthcare services available to pediatric oncology patients in low and middle income countries. They call it. The global mapping project. So as you could imagine this is a fairly large scale project. They're literally trying to get information from the the ends of the Earth about where kids in any country may find care and they started with focusing on Africa so today we'll hear the results so far. What they found? And for oncology care that is available in Africa and then we'll also hear their next steps. They planned to focus their efforts next in central and South America so so I think it's a really fascinating project. A really really important project and so I think you'll enjoy hearing about it but this is also one of those things where we hope that that you the listener can get involved so if you are a healthcare provider who cares for kids with cancer in any form then we would invite you to fill fill out the survey you can find the link on the show notes attached to this episode or at the website at G. pod dot com So please go there. Click on the link and fill out the survey because this is really important information and it only works if they have your involvement okay. That's that's all I'll say for now. Let's go ahead and get to the episode and you can hear the rest from Dr. He'll herself everybody. I'm I'm here. Live at Sei up with Dr Jennifer. He'll who is a physician in South Africa and she is in charge or one of the many folks in charge of the sigh up. Global Global Mapping project which she is linked to talk to us about so jen. Why don't you go ahead and introduce yourself? Who are you where you work? And how did you get involved in the project HAMMOCK. Thanks thanks for the opportunity. So I work in Johannesburg in a State Hospital and I'm part of the SIPE APPEAR DC education and Training Working Group so the Peo- D. C. Group is the pediatric oncology in developing countries group which is part of science which there's growing larger and what we try and do is we try and link people with education and training opportunities so especially people in low and middle income settings. Yes you need a little bit of extra distance and we'd like to improve the service to children with cancer. All right well thank you. Why don't you go ahead? And tell us about the mapping project what what is it and how did you get involved so about five years ago. At least five years ago I wanted to see what kind of services were available. Four children with cancer in Africa. Basically looking at radiotherapy looking at pediatric oncology diagnostic imaging etcetera. Gotcha so I put it out there in my university as a potential research project. I was happy to supervise students and strangely enough. They did not think this was interesting so nobody took us up on the offer. Then I became parts of the SIPE education training working group and got involved in trying to link people with always opportunities and we found that we had a lot of done a lot of work. We had a website that was up and running. We had a lot of people who keen to help. We had a lot of seminars and training programs to advertise but people weren't taking advantage of what we put together so we thought route that we needed to try and get as many contexts as possible and again with the resources that we had. We weren't really getting very far. fortuitously the ZYPPAH board of directors decided that they also wanted to delve a little deeper into global oncology services and they managed to secure secure agreement from my child matters in office for foundation grant and they approached us and they said would be interested in taking on this project so we had no idea that it was going to be so much work and we put our hands up and we said yes and a year and a half later. We are utterly exhausted but we have begun to the world. So it's about it's it's about seeing what services are available globally. It's not just in low and middle income countries. It's everywhere but we starting with with under-resourced settings because those are the places that need the most attention so we started with Africa because Africa is the continent that's got the lowest survival rate it very very few published reports but those that are published show survival rates of zero percents in some countries twenty percent and others my own country's Africa has vibrator between fifty two and fifty fifty five percent. which is really something that that we can improve on so we thought we'd take place? It's got the lowest reported incidents and the lowest just reported survival rate and create a baseline there and then from the move it across the continents. So the motivation was to see what is available in Africa at first because of the low survival rates you want to see are there resources available and if not I guess the the utility would be you could target resources to certain regions or certain countries is fair. Yeah that's exactly it so from the kind of data that we have at the moment. We Cam mm-hmm compile reports which can be used in specific countries so for example if you're in the Central African Republic we've got some survey data which can show exactly what's available there and it's available to people so all they have to do is contact us and we will give them the data and they can take it today local authorities to the ministries of health way but they think that the data can be useful. We've also we're also in the process of making a bunch of Info graphics so pictures that show the data in a way that's easily accessible that makes sense to people that make meaningful comparisons so. It's the kind of thing that can be shared on. Social media can be shown donen presentations. So what kind of information are you collecting. Well we're we're trying to get information from every single person who works professionally. Officially in the pediatric oncology sphere. So we'd like responses from pediatric oncologists from pediatric oncology nurses psychologists richest nutritionists bereavement counsellors play. Therapists Pharmacists People. Who Do diagnostic imaging and concentrate on? Oncology ecology or have oncology as part of their practice pediatric surgeons or specialist surgeons people radiotherapy. Anybody who spend a lot of time in their pediatric oncology sphere and what we the kind of information we want from them is. Where do they work? What what is the setting thing is a faith based institution is a state? Funded Institution is privately funded. We want to know how many beds are in the institution how Omni nurses work full-time with children with cancer. What's ancillary services are available so for example is there adequate support of care is adequate Imaging facilities is spiritual support is their psychosocial support is A. There's a whole range of questions and a lot of people find and they can answer most of the questions with a degree of accuracy and some of them they can't and that's fine. All we want is as many responses as possible. And then we work doc on the other side on verifying data so we miss the data together and we see whether there's a degree of concordance with the responses and so you have all these questions together in a big survey and I guess you send the survey to people is that right. How are you getting it out there? Okay there are a variety of ways that we've done it so the the first one is just through email so we've got a long list of context through safe and through various other organizations. We send emails. There's a link which which is up on.

Africa International Society of Pedia cancer Johannesburg Dr Jennifer South Africa South America ZYPPAH jen Funded Institution Omni SIPE State Hospital Training Working Group Peo- D. C. Group
"oncology diagnostics" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"oncology diagnostics" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Two billion dollar market per year in the U._S.. Also you don't really charge for the kind of old EXTA value at that. We have unity so you're basically nine and that makes a lot of sense. You're you're adding more value than anybody else in the market hit and therefore introducing yourself as a value added option to take share yes it's awesome I love it and it's great right because that's the Byu innovation and the benefit to consumers and and practicing physicians is when things get better and there's existing codes tobacco them then you doesn't increment your costs but enables you to increment the value added patients which is which is inevitably a great thing yeah yeah I mean the feedback that we received from will be Wyans. Genetic counselors. Medical <unk> has been phenomenal like almost everyone recognizes Hafbro materials turtle carrier testing birth Lois new tests all these mothers you get all these positives in dozen even. Delete to any actionable outcomes because you don't figure out what the baby has the day and they realized how unity will fix it and they really liked the fact that it's not a five thousand dollar auto <unk> pests. It is a covered benefit ruled today man. That's awesome and frankly I'd tell you what that definitely is a proud moment. We always talk about all right hanaway add value. How do we add innovation right when you when you think of like the traditional equation for am I doing being value based care you divided by how much value you're offering an additional cost? It's coming in and you're not adding additional cost if that you're leaving so much more value I mean the are in fact decreasing local healthcare coasts. I mean if the mother is supposedly than the father needs to get screened in the current workflow. The don't require that so it cuts down the task goes but it also in terms of actionable outcomes improves the healthcare scare outcomes in very significant ways while man that is so cool I mean I think it's a it's a really neat approach that you guys took and I mean how did you guys land on that so I think we landed on that by just realizing first thing that most diagnostic companies fail not because they have a background check but because it takes us of trying to convince the system that their product should be paid for in that realization that gets foundation sponsored the research on this Y via GNOSTIC companies failed number one reason while that it takes years for reimbursement to kick in and they don't get paid so we started thinking about okay what would be a way to build a product from day one on what would be a vape to add value to the system and still get paid by building your diagnostic products that sold on in very important Norton Unmet medical need but also enables us to use the existing system to get paid man. That's genius. I love it nights and it's the power of questions folks if you think about the business models that you're that you're shaping the example that Assan just kind of gave us is you don't have to invent something and try to convince the system to form new reimbursement think about that reimbursement model that exists what what player is there. How can you add more value than that player and take market share while improving outcomes? That's the key love it love it. Love it and so what would you say is the exciting product or focused that you guys are most tuned into right now. So we are unity unity. They're still have a want to get unity to handle essentially every physician in the country and really make it the gold standard for carrier testing it is how it should be done so focusing on that in making available is our primary goal but we also realize that the molecular counter that we build souls many other molecular uh of diagnostic solutions and really want to build solutions that are not only affordable land not only be merciful but also the want to build them in a way that the cost structure of these solutions enables enables them to be distributed globally though that is another thing that we are working on both with unity and the Oncology Diagnostics that we are working on that making sure that the price the cost of the test is so low that they can be sold through distribution partners globally beautiful while emissions bear and <hes> also the economic proposal the structure. Is there so certainly wishing you guys the greatest success. Ask Your next steps getting close to the end here Ozan <hes> we've got a lightning round followed by a book you recommend the listens you ready okay..

Byu Hafbro materials Oncology Diagnostics Assan Wyans five thousand dollar Two billion dollar