35 Burst results for "Omicron Omicron Omicron"

4.4M Americans roll up sleeves for omicron-targeted boosters

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

4.4M Americans roll up sleeves for omicron-targeted boosters

"I Mike Gracia reporting nearly four to 5 million Americans have rolled up their sleeves for omicron targeted boosters The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday 4.4 million Americans have received the updated COVID-19 booster shot so far The White House has its own count saying by its estimate more than 5 million people have received the new booster Either way health experts say it's too early to predict whether the demand will match the 171 million doses of new boosters ordered by the federal government for the fall The new boosters are designed to target the most common omicron strains There has been a temporary shortage of Moderna vaccine The issue should be resolved soon As government regulators complete an inspection and batches of the vaccine are cleared for distribution I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Centers For Disease Control An White House Federal Government
EU regulator clears Pfizer-BioNTech's tweaked COVID booster

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

EU regulator clears Pfizer-BioNTech's tweaked COVID booster

"European Union health officials have cleared the way for an updated Pfizer BioNTech COVID booster I Norman hall the European medicines agency is recommended the authorization of a tweaked booster dose of Pfizer's BioNTech coronavirus vaccine The updated version will include protection against two of the latest versions of omicron as countries look to bolster their immunization programs ahead of winter the combination booster will target both the original COVID-19 virus as well as the sub variants BA four and BA 5 and should trigger a safe effective immune response According to the World Health Organization the BA 5 version is a responsible for most of the COVID-19 spreading globally I Norman hall

Norman Hall Pfizer European Medicines Agency European Union World Health Organization
EXPLAINER: Is COVID-19 winding down? Scientists say no.

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

EXPLAINER: Is COVID-19 winding down? Scientists say no.

"Booster doses of the coronavirus vaccine that target today's most common omicron strain are being rolled out across the country CDC director doctor Rochelle Walensky says the number of virus deaths around the country is still too high And in my mind far too high for a vaccine preventable disease White House coronavirus response coordinator doctor Ashish jha says the virus has been evolving while the vaccine remains the same But now we have a vaccine that matches the dominant strain out there The hope is the modified boosters will ease in other winter surge The new doses are available around the same time people get flu shots The good news is you can get both your flu shot and COVID shot at the same time It's actually a good idea I really believe this is why God gave us two arms One for the flu shot and the other one for the COVID shot Jaw says the coronavirus will likely be with us for the rest of our lives Ed Donahue Washington

Rochelle Walensky Ashish Jha CDC FLU White House Covid JAW Ed Donahue Washington
AP EXPLAINER: Should you get a new COVID booster? If so, when?

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

AP EXPLAINER: Should you get a new COVID booster? If so, when?

"Should you get an updated coronavirus booster Within days Americans will be offered the new bivalent boosters that target both the original coronavirus and today's dominant omicron strains and BA 5 The Pfizer shots are for anyone 12 and older while Moderna's version is for those 18 and up For most people the FDA recommends waiting at least two months after your last booster or COVID-19 infection while CDC experts say it's better to wait three months or as long as 6 months if you're not at high risk CDC adviser doctor Sarah long says that if you wait a little more you get a better immunologic response Another reason to wait a few months is to reduce the risk of heart inflammation a rare vaccine side effect The CDC notes that most Americans eligible for an updated booster have already gone at least 6 months since their last shot I'm Jennifer King

CDC Moderna Sarah Long Pfizer FDA Heart Inflammation Jennifer King
The Story of Eight Lab Mice

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | Last month

The Story of Eight Lab Mice

"What do you think about the recent news that the vaccine was approved, a vaccine was approved by only testing them on 8 mice. I don't quite understand it. Yeah, I was just kind of reading this story. It's extraordinary. And apparently, one of the vaccines and again, I want to make sure I get this precise because we have a commitment to the truth here on this program. Is one of the vaccines was approved. By only testing the boosters on mice and not on humans. So instead of a set of three blind mice, we have 8 mice that are dictating whether or not we take vaccines or not. Play cut one O three. We're going to do revoke all of their license, revoke the license of 40% of rural pediatricians or myself who wants to see more data about something like the new omicron specific vaccine that yesterday just got magically authorized by the FDA based on 8 mice and no publicly available clinical data in humans. That's how they authorized it. The purpose of science is to challenge orthodoxy and dog money. That's how science advances, and that's exactly what was banned in this bill that governor Newsom may sign at any moment. So apparently we're learning that the vaccine was approved on 8 mice trials. We've been trying to warn people about this and we were laughed at and scoffed at the way they're going to pivot is they're going to blame Donald Trump for this. That article has already been written.

Governor Newsom FDA Donald Trump
UK to begin rollout of new COVID-19 vaccination campaign

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

UK to begin rollout of new COVID-19 vaccination campaign

"Britons beginning at the next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations The full COVID-19 vaccination campaign is getting underway in the coming weeks after experts authorize booster shots made by Pfizer and Moderna that have been modified to target both the original virus and the widely circulating omicron variant The medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency says it had approved the Pfizer vaccine for using in people aged 12 and over after finding it was both safe and effective the agency at authorized the Moderna vaccine last month the government will offer the vaccine to everyone aged 50 and over as well as frontline healthcare workers and other groups considered to be at risk of serious illness Charles De Ledesma London

Pfizer Moderna Medicines And Healthcare Produ Government Charles De Ledesma London
CDC endorses updated COVID boosters, shots to begin soon

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

CDC endorses updated COVID boosters, shots to begin soon

"The CDC has endorsed new COVID-19 boosters that target today's most common omicron strains I'm Ben Thomas with the latest The tweaked vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna are known as bivalent half regular vaccine half protection targeting the BA four and BA 5 versions of omicron the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending the shots to help blunt and expected winter surge of COVID-19 Doctor Rochelle Walensky saying the new boosters can help restore protection that's waned and are designed to provide broader protection CDC's advisers struggled with who should get the new boosters and when because of the exact recipe has not been studied in people so far Still the panel deemed it the best option with the U.S. still seeing tens of thousands of COVID-19 cases and hundreds of deaths every day I'm Ben Thomas

CDC Ben Thomas Moderna Rochelle Walensky Pfizer U.S.
US advisers endorse updated COVID shots for fall boosters

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

US advisers endorse updated COVID shots for fall boosters

"U.S. health advisers are endorsing new COVID-19 boosters that target today's most common omicron strains I'm Ben Thomas with the latest The tweaked vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna are known as bivalent half the regular vaccine and half protection targeting the BA four and BA 5 versions of omicron A panel of CDC health advisers voted to recommend the shots to help blunt to win her search of COVID-19 However they struggled with who should get the new boosters and when because the exact recipe has not been studied in people so far Still the panel deemed it the best option with the U.S. still seeing tens of thousands of COVID-19 cases and hundreds of deaths every day The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expected to adopt the recommendation the last step before shots can begin I'm Ben Thomas

Ben Thomas Moderna Pfizer Centers For Disease Control An U.S.
US clears updated COVID boosters targeting newest variants

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

US clears updated COVID boosters targeting newest variants

"Federal regulators have authorized the first update to COVID-19 vaccines Until now the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have targeted the virus's original strain the updated boosters are aimed at taking on today's most common omicron strains and other variants So it really provides the broadest opportunity for protection Pfizer vaccine chief Anna Lisa Anderson Now that the FDA has signed off shots could begin within days but the CDC must still recommend who should get them and the question remains who will want them Just half of vaccinated Americans got the first recommended booster only a third of those 50 and over received a second one Sagar Meghani Washington

Pfizer Moderna Anna Lisa Anderson FDA CDC Sagar Meghani Washington
Pfizer COVID shots appear 73% effective in children under 5

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Pfizer COVID shots appear 73% effective in children under 5

"Pfizer says it appears COVID-19 shots were children under 5 are effective I Norman hall New numbers from Pfizer show that it's COVID-19 vaccine was 73% effective in protecting children younger than 5 as omicron spread in the spring Health authorities authorized taught size vaccine doses by Pfizer and its partner bio intact based on a study showing that they were safe and produce high levels of virus fighting antibodies but until now there was only preliminary data on how that translated into effectiveness against symptomatic COVID-19 only about 6% of youngsters ages 6 months through four years had gotten at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by mid August That's according to the American academy of pediatrics I Norman hall

Pfizer Norman Hall American Academy Of Pediatrics
Pfizer seeks OK of updated COVID vaccine booster for fall

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Pfizer seeks OK of updated COVID vaccine booster for fall

"Pfizer is asking federal regulators to authorize an updated COVID-19 vaccine booster The FDA has told vaccine makers to update their shots to target the super contagious omicron variants Pfizer shots for those 12 and older could start in weeks with quick approval and Moderna's expected to seek the okay soon for its updated adult boosters The vaccines currently being given still offer strong protection against severe disease and death but they target the virus strain that spread in early 2020 and no longer protect nearly as well against infection The new combo doses are essentially a second generation vaccine The White House says it'll be key for people to get the new shots this fall and winter Sagar Meghani Washington

Pfizer Severe Disease Moderna FDA White House Washington
British regulator authorize Moderna's updated COVID booster

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

British regulator authorize Moderna's updated COVID booster

"British regulators are the first to okay the use of Moderna's updated COVID vaccine The United Kingdom's medicines and healthcare regulatory agency says it has given the green light to a double action adult booster shot a so called bivalent vaccine by Moderna that protects against both the original version of the COVID-19 virus and the BA one omicron variant Regulators described it as a sharpened tool in our armory as the virus continues to evolve and says the mild side effects were similar to the original Moderna vaccine In the U.S. regulators are telling vaccine makers any booster shots adapted for this autumn must include protection against V8 four and BA 5 That's the omicron variant the World Health Organization says is driving the latest global surge I'm Jennifer King

Moderna Medicines And Healthcare Regul United Kingdom U.S. World Health Organization Jennifer King
Germany: EU could OK combined COVID vaccines next month

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Germany: EU could OK combined COVID vaccines next month

"Germany's health minister Karl loiter back says E regulators may authorize the use of vaccines that are each effective against two variants of the coronavirus low to back expects the European medicines agency to meet on September 1 to consider a vaccine that would provide protection against both the original virus and the so called omicron variant also known as BA one the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has said the combination vaccines known as bivalent or multivalent shots will allow boosters to retain the proven benefits of original coronavirus vaccines while providing additional protection such an approach is used with flu shots which are adjusted each year depending on the variants that are circulating I'm Charles De Ledesma

Karl Loiter U.S. Food And Drug Administrat European Medicines Agency Germany FLU Charles De Ledesma
We Have Lost the Fight Politically About Vaccines With Dr Redlener

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:33 min | 2 months ago

We Have Lost the Fight Politically About Vaccines With Dr Redlener

"It is depressing. And I've said this before, that we've obviously lost the fight politically. Do you know what I mean? Like you were saying about vaccines and masking. I mean, and it is insane. I was just telling you, I just heard yesterday. It's the third person I personally know. A friend of mine or a friend of a friend. It got COVID traveling. And I just booked my ticket to go see my mom and go do D.C. sexy liberal. And I'm like, you know, again, I'm double boosted. That's why I wore my shirt for you today. But that is beautiful. Yes, thank you. But you know, that's where we are. I've had to talk a friend into getting her second booster because she's like, oh, I'm gonna wait for the variant specific one. Well, I'm like, no, you need all the protection you can get now because we're in another wave because of the BA 5 sub variant, correct? Yes, it is totally correct. And it used to be till an hour and a half ago that we thought that the omicron specific booster was not going to be available till the end of October sometimes in November. The fact is that I'm just hearing very recently that it might be available next month. You know, if it's really close, if we knew it was coming out two weeks from now, you know, okay, wait. Otherwise, don't wait, get second booster. I mean, look, there's a lot of people that haven't even had the first booster. And the CDC is still calling fully vaccinated to mean just the first two shots, which is not fully vaccinated. We need the damn boosters. Yeah. We do.

D.C. CDC
US rules out summer COVID boosters to focus on fall campaign

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

US rules out summer COVID boosters to focus on fall campaign

"Federal health regulators have ruled out summer COVID boosters and are focusing on a fall campaign I Norman hall federal regulators are no longer considering authorizing a second COVID-19 booster shot for all adults under 50 this summer The focus has been shifted to revamped vaccines for the fall The Food and Drug Administration says Pfizer and Moderna expect to have updated versions of their shots available as early as September That would set the stage for a fall booster campaign to strengthen protection against the latest versions of omicron two sub variants BA four and BA 5 are even more contagious than their predecessors They push new daily cases above 125,000 and hospitalizations to 6300 Those are the highest levels since February though devs have remained low at about 360 per day Norman hall Washington

Norman Hall Moderna Food And Drug Administration Pfizer Washington
US reaches deal with Moderna for omicron COVID-19 vaccine

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

US reaches deal with Moderna for omicron COVID-19 vaccine

"The Biden administration says it's struck a deal to buy 66 million doses of Moderna's next generation COVID-19 vaccine The vaccines designed to target the omicron variant which has been the dominant U.S. strain for months The administration says the agreement will provide enough doses this winter for anybody who wants the upgraded booster It already has a deal to secure 105 million doses of a similar vaccine from Pfizer both orders are scheduled for delivery in the fall and winter assuming federal regulators sign off While about 261 million Americans have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot only 108 million have gotten a booster Sagar Meghani Washington

Biden Administration Moderna U.S. Pfizer Washington
New Zealand Tried to Hide From Covid. But Covid Found It

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:44 min | 2 months ago

New Zealand Tried to Hide From Covid. But Covid Found It

"New Zealand COVID deaths soar to record high as omicron wreaks havoc. COVID death rates have reached pandemic highs in New Zealand as the country battles another havoc inducing omicron wave. Once held up as evidence that it is possible to suppress the virus, New Zealand's swift response to the pandemic and its geographic isolation allowed it to escape the wrath of the pandemic. Jacinda Ardern's government dropped its zero COVID policy. Which saw the nation nicknamed a hermit kingdom last year, once the population was largely vaccinated, 8 in ten people now double jabbed. So what does that mean? What percentage of the people are single jab must be even more obviously? 8 and ten double jabbed since then, the virus has spread. Are you ready? Here's one of the great lines in modern journalism. Experts told mail online. That's the daily mail. That previously low levels of infection in New Zealand due to strict COVID curbs. Is behind, actually, should be our behind. Daily mail, writers are not known for their grammatical acuity. Or behind the high fatality rate, because the economically crippling measures only delayed inevitable infections that could have built up immunity.

New Zealand Jacinda Ardern
test expansion 2022-08-26-1

TestUpload

01:40 min | 2 months ago

test expansion 2022-08-26-1

"About 16% of new U.S. cases has the same spike protein mutation as BA 5, but doesn't seem to spread as quickly as its ability to infect and reinfect almost anyone. This highly contagious strain can evade people's built up immunity, whether from vaccination or previous infection. As nature reports, lab studies show that even people who have so called hybrid immunity from vaccination and a past infection with the omicron BA one strain are less able to ward off reinfection from either the BA four or BA 5 strains. Experts believe this is due largely to changes in the virus's spike proteins. Current COVID-19 vaccines and boosters target the original strain of the virus rather than any of the variants. So being vaccinated doesn't offer as much protection as it once did against infection. Luckily, the vaccines still confer broad protection against the worst outcomes of the disease. Since BA four and BA 5 have taken over, we have seen some cases of reinfection. Doctor Wesley long an experimental pathologist at Houston methodist hospital told CNN and I have seen some cases of reinfection with people who had a BA two variant in the last few months. Combine the virus's greater transmissibility and more immune evasion with fewer protective mandates across the country and the threat of infection is high. Conditions are also ripe for

U.S. Wesley Long Houston Methodist Hospital CNN
"omicron  " Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:59 min | 3 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Vaccinated yet, because vaccine wasn't really ready. And but they went and did everything was out there masks anyway, and they all got sick and then January and February. They're dying. So that was the worst. Worst time. For us, but and now, of course, it's so frustrating because the low vaccine vaccination rates are really bad for the vulnerable. I mean, they're really bad for the people who got vaccinated, but aren't going to get a full response. Traditionally, what predict what protects those people is high vaccination rates. Because it's high vaccination rates that help stop spread in the community. So it's not just about getting vaccinated. It's not just about protecting yourself. It's about protecting others. And that's the thing that I have found very frustrating about the lack of people wanting to not be vaccinated because they say it's a matter of their personal freedom. I was engaged in that point of view very aggressively during alpha and delta. I'm not sure it applies so much to the omicron and its variance because this just breaking through all over the place. And maybe but it still may be less likely. It's still keeping you from dying. Oh no, don't get me wrong. Don't get me wrong. Get vaccinated. Don't. I mean, the problem is that, right, it's out of the horses out of the barn. And maybe if people had gotten vaccinated back at the beginning, we would have never got to omicron, but we will never know. But that's not what happened. Yeah. And then with omicron, there was the whole myth that omicron was less virulent. Just tell that to the kids, over a thousand kids have died from the omicron variant, because very few of them are vaccinated yet. So omicron is only less virulent if you're vaccinated. Yeah, I've seen a lot of that's an example of a confounding variable. Omicron has been protean in what I've seen it do to people. I've seen it destroy unvaccinated. Young people, and I've seen it hurt unboosted people. And I've seen it be very mild, typically for boost it up, or hybrid immunity. Hybrid immunity in my experience was very good for omicron, which means you had it and you had the vaccine. And that's me. And omicron, and I get destroyed by viruses. So it caught my attention when I had a very mild go of omicron. It's unusual for me. I had H one N one. I get everything. I get everything viral. And H one N one, I assure you, was from my perspective. I was much more, I was sick with COVID. Don't get me wrong. It was a very weird illness. But I was sicker with H one N one. It was toxicity, really awful. And so that was our last pandemic that no one even knows about. That's what I kept saying. You don't know we had one in 2008 or whatever that was. I remember it, 'cause I was an ER doctor.

Omicron
"omicron  " Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | 4 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on WTOP

"To protect against omicron sub variants Companies says people who were given the shot experienced an 8 fold increase in antibodies that can fight off arm a crime Here's CBS News medical contributor doctor David agus who talked to debian Nick I think both Moderna and Pfizer have vaccines that include the new boosters and gives you a much broader immune response We're lucky the current vaccines the original ones protected well against serious illness but the hope is giving an even broader bigger immune response will give us more protection and stop some of the spread that's going on now So I think it's encouraging We'll see the data reviewed in the next couple of weeks And then hopefully by late summer these are around I want to ask you about these two newer sub variants of omicron They are now making up about 13% of new COVID cases in the United States They seem to be spreading more quickly than earlier variants What do we know about them The hallmark of a variant is and the reason it takes hold is that it's more infectious than the other ones And so these are BA four and BA 5 which are remarkably infectious and very different than the original omicron that much of the country was exposed to So what that means is if you had had the prior omicron you can still be susceptible to these That immunity doesn't necessarily carry over because these change so much And so it really brings a whole new cohort of people in the country Everybody is susceptible to these new variants and they're going up pretty dramatically in number week by week And as you said if you had omicron already you can get this but if you did have omicron in your vaccinated what are the chances now that you're going to get seriously ill with all this Very low unless you have other medical conditions And that's the good right And that's why we can live with this virus And that's why I think our shoulders are coming down and we're continuing to keep schools open if kids are still in school where it's continuing to keep things running because we can live with it If you have serious illness or you get sick we also have tax lovat which is kind of a fail safe that take this pill virus levels will go down The two of them together the existing immunity impact flow that give us a lot more comfort going forward We're not going to shut down from these variants.

omicron sub variants Companies David agus Moderna CBS News Pfizer United States
"omicron  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:32 min | 8 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"You <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> know, <Speech_Female> in Chicago we <Speech_Female> saw hundreds <Speech_Music_Female> of students <SpeakerChange> out in the <Speech_Music_Male> street. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I came <Speech_Music_Male> here because loyal <Speech_Music_Male> foot chose <Speech_Music_Male> to send us to school <Speech_Music_Male> over the <Speech_Music_Male> COVID <Speech_Music_Male> issue with these surges <Speech_Music_Male> happening because <Speech_Music_Male> of the variance.

"omicron  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"All this concern, all this chaos, so today we're dedicating this episode to those on the cusp of adulthood, 17 and 18 year olds like Malan who are navigating growing up with COVID. After the break, we'll take you inside the classroom with an LA times reporter and students who were hitting all kinds of barriers as they continue to push to make their schools feel safer. Hey, what's up? It's me, Gustavo. As you know, the times podcast is dedicated to bringing you fascinating stories from entertainment news to climate change developments to the random tales we should care about. With your support, you make shows like the times possible and help independent journalism keep you informed. If you haven't already, consider subscribing at just $1 for 6 months. So go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. Gracias. Welcome back. Our LA times education team has been on top of the COVID-19 Macron surge story and reporter Melissa Gomez has followed the challenges that schools face to keep their doors open. And she also reported on why and how students are tired and starting to take action. Melissa, welcome to the times. Hi, thanks for having me. Man, just when it seemed schools and parents and teachers were figuring out how to do in person learning again, I'm a just messed up everything and it really blew up while winter break for schools was happening here in California, which means that when they reopened, there was going to be problems. From your reporting, what has it been like for students and teachers coming back? You know, we saw that happening in every city and every state, a lot of students were missing from the classroom because they tested positive or they were quarantining because they were exposed to someone who tested positive a lot of staff members were out. So there was already a staff shortage when school started, but the omicron Marianne, which because of how contagious it was with just affecting everyone, really compounded that issue, a lot of teachers and support staff were testing positive. So you had district administrators leaving their offices to cover classrooms and sit in those teachers. Wow. Not only that, the people who are actually going in, they're also scared because here's this variant just going all over and so many people are testing positive, even if they were vaccinated and boosted. Right. The absences among students was not just students who were testing positive for COVID. It was students who were afraid to go back, you know, their parents were free to send them back because everyone was catching COVID at that time. So everyone that Los Angeles unify is now required to take a COVID test before they come onto campus. How are schools implementing that? Yeah, so Los Angeles unified the second largest school district in the country has been doing this since the start of the school year. They pretty much have it down when it comes to testing folks. It's something like 500,000 people every week. So what Los Angeles unified ended up requiring at the beginning of the spring semester was asking everyone to come back with a negative COVID test in order to come back onto campus. They issued that decision over winter break. So it was sort of a mad scramble to get that out to everyone, make sure that students and staff knew that they had to come back to campus with a negative COVID test and causing a little bit of chaos on the first day because of the fact that they had to upload a negative COVID test onto the daily path, which is a system that they use to come into school every day, but ultimately it worked in the sense that it kept a lot of folks who were testing positive away from campus. Earlier this month, 12 Oakland schools had to close down when teacher staged a quote unquote sick out and they were asking for more COVID safety measures to be put in place. How are teachers dealing right now? LA USD is pretty unique in the sense that they do mandatory testing regardless of vaccination status for students and staff. Not every school district has capacity to do that. So in the Oakland unified school district, teachers were essentially asking, you know, can we implement mandatory weekly testing? Can we make sure that students have KN 95 masks, which we know are the most effective when it comes to stopping the spread of COVID? The sick outs in Oakland were not organized by the union. These were essentially teachers at schools who were getting together and deciding to do something as a way to get the attention of their school district. So a lot of teachers are scared. And I know a lot of teachers are even putting their own money into buying students. The proper mass because sometimes those surgical vas aren't the best fit or are barely anything to really stop the spread of COVID. I spoke to 17 year old neural fajitas from Oakland technical high school. She's one of the student leaders who signed a petition to demand extra COVID safety protocols and is helping to organize around the issue. I think, especially highlighting the lack of communication that we got from a lot of our admin people it was really difficult. Like most of the information that I got coming back was from peers or even teachers that we had to go out in search ourselves instead of it being readily available to us, which is a little bit important if it's something as big as reopening and going back into schools. In Oakland, students started circulating a petition essentially asking for increased COVID safety measures can 95 months for our students protected outdoor spaces so that they could eat outside. So that petition got a lot of traction online more than 1200 students signed it. You know, clarifying, hey, this is what we need. And this is how we should do it. This is how you can incorporate what we really want in order to make our whole community safer. When the district did not meet all of their demands, the Oakland student how to boycott, where they told students to stay home or ask their teachers to mark the maps and if they chose to go to school. I know an alternative for me and something that I talked to a lot of other kids were to still go to class, but asked to be marked absent so that we'd still get our education, but participate in strike efforts. The district initially met some of the demands of students were asking for, but not all, so they officially began to boycott. But on Tuesday, the district came to a tentative agreement with the teacher's union to offer weekly access to COVID testing for students and staff. Satisfying the final demand students were holding out for. The ones actually facing it on a day to day basis and it's really, really tiring if us.

COVID LA times Melissa Gomez Malan Los Angeles Gustavo Oakland Oakland unified school distric Marianne Melissa the times Oakland technical high school California
"omicron  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"How are my peas? Peter piper picked a peck of pickled peppers a peck of pickled peppers, Peter piper. It seems fine there. But it comes out in the recordings more than zoom. For our listeners, Mario Diaz is our engineer. He makes sure I sound great. The podcast sounds great. Of this year podcast, akr rock, our foundation, our badass. How are you doing? What's up, man? And Mario, I know you've been working from home since the time started and you have three kids in school. So how have they been during this whole bean chip pandemic? Well, they've been good. I mean, we all have the stresses of being at home working from home, trying to be safe, and it's kind of the same thing for them, maybe a little bit more exaggerated because we keep them from socializing as much as possible. We have to let them do stuff, but you know, we're all trying to be safe. And it's hard for you folks because you have three children, obviously different ages, but they are all like different levels of this pandemic. Talk about Maurice. My oldest Maurice, who's a sophomore now in Cal state Long Beach, he started his senior year in high school when the pandemic hit. He was doing his school from home and no graduation, no prom. It was like really disappointing. We had a prom through Zoom. So we just joined through a camera. There's just a DJ, and then people would just turn on their cameras. You'd see your faces and you'd hear them music. And then Marcus, who's a freshman at Cal state Long Beach now, his whole senior year was during lockdown and schooling from home. I tried joining a club to meet people, but the only connection I could make with them was just on social media. My daughter Malin is a senior at Downey high school. One major concern that me and my Friends have been talking about is that it's been pretty ambiguous, whether or not we're getting our senior activities for the year. Kind of rallies or dances or parties, it seems that we're not going to get those either. Damn, so you had three kids. One after the other going through seeing a year and not being able to experience what people go through in senior years. As a parent it's sad because you know those are your formative years, those are the years where you make those friends that are kind of your lifetime friends, as far as for me and my wife, we still hang out with our friends from high school from our senior year. Same. You know, there's a certain bond that happens you're going to all these parties and you're starting college together. But don't stop by sander. It's not happening. Totally not the same. The high schools, they're still the ones who are trying to do it in person. And all of this confusion, sometimes it's hard for parents to really know what's happening in their kids minds. And that's why we.

Peter piper Cal state Long Beach Mario Diaz Maurice Downey high school Mario Malin Marcus sander confusion
"omicron  " Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:13 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"A crime was basically announced right after Thanksgiving. It was the new variant. Made the stock market plummet. New York in anticipation of a Macron decided to re-engage and lockdowns, mask mandates vaccine mandates on a cron is something that we must be very afraid of is what we're told. Oh Macron, if you just watched Fauci, the NIH and the CDC, it sounds like this is COVID two. It is mutating in a more vicious, deadly and aggressive manner. What's really going on here? How many people have actually died? Of all Macron. Is the virus getting stronger or is the virus getting weaker? Well, according to Neil Ferguson, who was the original lockdown artist, he was the person that originally, the imperial college study, way back at the beginning of the pandemic in March of 2020, he has even come out and he said that Amy Kron is 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, by the way, that's without factoring an Ivermectin hydroxychloroquine azithromycin vitamin D levels vitamin C, obesity age, underlying health conditions, intravenous intervention, aspirin melatonin or Qin. And if you're not able to rattle off all those treatments, I encourage you to listen to our podcasts and equip yourself. Your government wants you to be scared and unprepared. Your government wants you to be fearful and confused. There are legitimate interventions and treatments that could potentially help you. Get to know them. Do not leave yourself or your loved ones helpless, trusting the federal government or the bullet bureau going into Christmas. 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, according to a major British study by Neal Ferguson. Among the previously infected, the risk of hospitalization from a drop by as much as 69% for both the vaccinated on the unvaccinated. So what does that tell us? That means that if you've had COVID before, even if you get COVID again, it's likely not to be as intense.

Neil Ferguson Amy Kron Fauci NIH imperial college CDC Neal Ferguson New York obesity army Kron federal government United Kingdom delta Alma cron HSA AstraZeneca
"omicron  " Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"I know a businessman here in Baltimore who has sort of a mantra for entrepreneurs just starting out by the bricks. As in why pay rent to a landlord when you can own the building and have a lot more control and stability while building equity. In today's real estate market though, owning the bricks can be a real stretch. That's the case for a record store in east Nashville, Tennessee, trying to buy its own building or risk losing it all to developers. From W PLN, page flagger reports. The groove is a small record shop. Nestled into a 1920s craftsman style house on the city's east side. The whole personality of the house is having the old freaky door so that we know when people come in. Inside racks of records line the walls, which are plastered in band posters and black and white photos from punk shows. Owner Jesse Cartwright straightens a few albums perched above the fireplace. It's just like being at your best friend's house looking through records. Beyond being homey, the groove has built a reputation for being a community space. They throw concerts with bands, often before they get big, like Alabama shakes and the singer yola. In the fall, they host scary movie nights on a projector in the backyard. But the groove is in jeopardy. Their landlord is selling the property. Fortunately, part of their lease agreement gives the groove an opportunity to buy it before it hits Nashville's competitive real estate market. Unfortunately, the price tag is nearly $500,000. People say, oh, it is a good price point for Nashville. And I agree, but for a small business, it is a lot. Heart rate's husband and co owner of the groove Michael combs, jumps in. We don't have half a $1 million just lying around in the bank. I mean, I wish we did, but we do. Com says they need to raise the funds by the end of January, and this massive expense comes at a tenuous time for the business. On one hand, final is more popular than ever before. Sales have skyrocketed. But the supply chain is rocky right now, and they're having trouble actually sourcing vinyl. So that also causes prices to go up. In turn, profit margins are down. Plus, indie record shops like theirs aren't the only ones getting in on the action. There's a lot more competition because stores that never gave who about vinyl, like target and Best Buy in Amazon, there's no CDs anymore, but they have vinyl sections. They didn't care because they just see a way for them to make money. These factors make the buildings price tag feel even more unattainable. And what's happening to the groove is becoming a familiar tale in Nashville, especially among independent music related businesses. For example, beloved independent music venue exit in, made a similar bid to gain ownership of their space through crowdfunding earlier this year. Despite their efforts, the building was sold to a developer. Luckily, the developer says it has no plans to knock it down. So it's business as usual for The Rock club. But standing outside the groove, Jesse Cartwright fears their building wouldn't be so lucky. If we don't purchase it as soon as it's purchased, I'm sure it will be bulldozed. All around Nashville, small old houses like this one are being bought up and torn down. Sometimes multiple modular looking houses or mixed use buildings are squeezed onto one lot. He says that type of cookie cutter development doesn't match up with Nashville's culture. We can have progress beginning a hot city without destroying everything that makes music city music city. Nashville is.

Nashville Owner Jesse Cartwright Michael combs Baltimore Tennessee Alabama The Rock club Best Buy Jesse Cartwright Amazon
"omicron  " Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:57 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"When we do the numbers..

"omicron  " Discussed on Science Vs

Science Vs

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Science Vs

"Doesn't even have it. So that man, this team was in prime position to find out what exactly was the delta variant doing to our jabs. In the U.S., in May, delta made up just 1.3% of cases. But by the end of June, it was the dominant strain, and it stayed that way ever since. So, as things started getting hairy in the U.S. in around July. Barbara and aunt stock combing through their database, analyzing the information of nearly 800,000 veterans. And they were looking to see whether the veterans who got vaccinated were getting more and more breakthrough infections. And the thing is, even with this beautiful database, things took time. For one, they couldn't just use their home laptop to run their data. They had to use a computer at veterans affairs. I'm imagining this on a computer that's still printing out the in a basement somewhere. The evil lair, there's a castle with lightning behind him. No, it's the corporate data warehouse. It's a big computer, but you know, you have to set it up and tell it to go when it takes 20 minutes to come back and give you a result because it's looking through 800,000 patient records and you know it takes some time. It's not trivial. This meant they were really busting their bots pulling wild hours. So is this an emergency or what? So we worked round the clock on this. Round the clock. And yet, it's still took around a month for the team to start to see a picture of what might be happening. So we're in August now. We had those data by then. And we dramatic enough Barbara. Barbara called me, Barbara called me on a Friday night and I found 5 o'clock she goes, oh my God. Did you see this? This is amazing. We have to publish tonight. I'm like, okay, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. That's true. Is that actually true? Is that actually true? Like, oh my God, it's a big deal. And the big deal that they were saying is that more and more people who had gotten vaccinated were now getting infected. By the end of their study, once Delta had completely taken over, Johnson & Johnson fell to an estimated 13% effective at preventing people from getting coronavirus. So 13% Pfizer and Moderna were roughly 50% effective. So, not useless. Now, the vaccines still did a lot better at preventing death, but even there there was a drop off. And around this time, other studies around the world were showing similar trends. Though sometimes it didn't look quite as bad. Back at the evil layout, Barbara and aunt were seeing something else. Breakthrough infections weren't just affecting all the folks. Our data says everyone our datasets everyone. And we're looking at this and those curves that are in our paper show no age difference. In the end breakthroughs. And we're going, what about these younger people? They have families. They have grandparents, and they're going to be spreading this thing. The team took some more time checking and rechecking their data, making sure that what they were seeing was real. And by the time they went public with all this, it was November 4th. So that was more than 6 months after Delta showed up in the U.S.. In Israel, they started getting data on this sooner. Partly because they had higher vaccination rates and delta became dominant faster. So by July, they could start to see that vaccine effectiveness was taking a hit. And this brings us back to a Macron. I think it's a weird name, but anyway. It's like a superhero. I know miracle. Transformer, I'm necron. From here, aunt and Barbara will be keeping a close eye on that fancy database. To see if they get a whiff of a Macron, say, another drop in our immunity. And how quickly we'll know what's going on here will depend on how contagious turns out to be. And whether a bunch of vax people start getting sick. But we did just get an early draft of a study that doesn't look good. It suggests that there have been an unusual number of reinfections in South Africa over the last month. Suggesting that people who should have some immunity from COVID are now getting infected again. Maybe with your omicron variant. It's early days here. And we don't know how many of those people were vaccinated. But it's some of the only real data we have right now. And then there's the question of how nasty this is if you do get it. And so with amor crumb based on what we know right now is it possible that it's going to be less deadly. Maybe this will become like the flu, like a good year of the flu. It could be whatever. We don't know. But we have to figure that out. I would hope for that, but I have a feeling it's going to be unpleasant. While initial reports were suggesting that people with oma cron weren't getting that sick. A lot of those cases were in younger people. And the World Health Organization has said that it'll be days or weeks before we know how bad this is. So given all this uncertainty, what should we do now?.

Barbara U.S. delta Delta Moderna Johnson & Johnson Pfizer COVID amor crumb Israel South Africa flu oma cron World Health Organization
"omicron  " Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

06:01 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Governments around the world appear to be preparing for the worst when it comes to the omicron variant. They're shutting borders as scientists still try to uncover just how quickly it's spreading. And those restrictions will certainly affect the global economy. That said, each variant has had a decreased negative effect on growth as the world becomes better at tackling the pandemic. So for more on the potential economic effects of the OM variant, we are joined by Paul hannon. He covers the economy from his base in London. Welcome back. Hi, how are you today? I'm doing well, thanks. It has been all of a week since we first learned about this variant. What do the early signs show us? Well, it's still pretty unclear exactly what this is and what new challenges it might present for the health systems and for government economic policy. What we do know is that while scientists are trying to figure out exactly how different this virus is and what its potential threat level might be, that some governments are acting very conservatively. And putting limits on travel, considering the possibility of new restrictions and in that case there will be a small hit to growth and there will be some sort of addition to the inflationary pressures that we've seen from disruptions to supply chains. Yeah, that's something that we heard Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said yesterday on Capitol Hill. Let's take a listen. The recent rising COVID-19 cases and the emergence of the amaran variant. Post downside risks to the employment and economic activity and increased uncertainty for inflation. Paul, what do you hear there? I hear a policymaker who's being quite careful about things, not making too many rush judgments, which is his job. But you know, being aware that there might be new challenges ahead as a result of this new variant. We don't know yet exactly what the scale of those challenges will be. It could range from something that's pretty mild that isn't a great deal different from the delta variant. We've been through, which did come with cost. There's no question about that in lies and in terms of lost economic activity and higher inflation or there could be a different sort of path here where we see something that quite closely resembles the very first wave where lots of governments have to close large parts of their economies down. And in actual fact, with inflation in that case, you might see prices falling. So when somebody says downside risks, what they mean is there is a possibility that this will do harm in a certain way that I can predict. But it's also possible that it won't. Are there certain sectors that might be at risk right now? Yeah, I mean, it's back to the airlines, international tourism, for sure. And you've seen that in a lot of the early equity market moves. The first response was to put up barriers to travelers from Southern Africa, the places where people think this new variant might be most widespread. But some governments have also broadened that so that they are asking for more conclusive testing before people arrive in their countries and testing once they get in. In the UK, we've had that sort of response. So that's going to deter people from traveling even when they've decided it. It's okay from a health perspective. What about countries are any countries more at risk of economic fallout from this than others? Well, to begin with the southern African countries that have been at the receiving end of these travel bans are probably most immediately susceptible to harm. Further out, it's difficult to say, you know, going by Delta, it's spread pretty quickly and it spread everywhere. But there is a group of countries that are still sticking to this zero harm, goal, China is now by far the most important, which means they won't tolerate any sort of new infections of any kind. And they pursue that goal by closing parts of their economies down, including ports in China's case. So in terms of economic damage, that seems to be where it's going to be greatest. If it remains just a sort of variant of concern without any particular new problems. If it's something that evades vaccines, then the lockdowns are likely to be much more widespread and the sort of track record suggests that Western Europe in particular would go for quite stringent lockdowns and in that case the economic damage would be greater. In the U.S., historically, it's been quite variable. It's varied from state to state. So the U.S. as a whole probably less likely to see a big loss in our but then Europe or China. We should say that the world is in a better place than when Delta emerged over the summer. And it's certainly much more prepared than it was when the original wave of COVID hit in March of 2020. People are vaccinated economies are growing. How severe could this actually be? I don't think it would be as severe as the very first wave. Back in early 2020, we didn't even know if there was going to be a workable vaccine to use against this thing. Right now, the worst case scenario appears to be that it would take something like a hundred days to adapt the vaccines that we do have so that we could get back to the situation that we're in now. So it's unlikely that it's going to be the first wave impact which just to give you a sense in Europe was a loss of about 15% of economic activity in a 6 month period. By the time the second big wave had hit around the turn of this year, the last output was about 0.7%. And that was with higher infection rates and higher death rates than the first time out..

Paul hannon Jerome Powell Capitol Hill Federal Reserve London Southern Africa China Paul UK U.S. Western Europe Europe Delta
"omicron  " Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Now how to open their tabs because it's really hard to estimate demand, basically, like we saw with the omicron variant coming up, things might shut down again. You know, there's no gang that we're out of this COVID pandemic. So it's hard to estimate whether to open it or not. Last week the U.S. and other nations agreed to release some barrels of oil from their strategic reserves. Are we seeing any price changes from that? Last week on the back of that news, we definitely saw a crude oil prices and Brent crude prices pull back a little bit. And then toward the end of the week, what happened was the news of open crown variant spread out and that created even more downward pressure on oil prices, causing them to pull down. I think it was 13% or something like that. And just on Friday itself. So it definitely seems like just that news in the combination of travel restrictions possibly coming back up, lockdowns being instituted again, that is really creating a lot of pressure on prices right now. What do we expect moving forward? Moving forward, well, first of all, it's hard. But what I've been hearing from analysts so far is that the new variants spreading out and people perhaps going back into lockdowns, it might be a little bit better, prices might come back down, and then in addition to that, obviously, the news we saw last week where a bunch of countries have come together to release more oil. That might also have an impact for a little bit. But yeah, it's hard to determine. Lastly, I would say as we discussed OPEC plus trying to live supply could also help the prices. So I guess it's just a wait and see period kind of right now. Hark, thanks for your time. Thank you, Peter. That's hard to kissing. She's a market reporter. Coming up, I look at the potential economic consequences as governments rush to prevent the spread of the omicron variant. Facebook leads the industry and stopping.

U.S. OPEC Hark Peter Facebook
"omicron  " Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

05:42 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Short Wave

"The travel and tourism industries and business. And those concerns really echo around the globe. I mean, look, omo Kron has already spread to many countries. And it hasn't been identified in the U.S. yet, but experts say it's just a matter of time. And even U.S. officials have praised South African officials for acting swiftly and transparently. I mean, the identified the variant, they shared information about it with the world. Doctor Margaret Harris of the World Health Organization told NPR that the South African scientists deserve a metal for all their work identifying omega and sharing the information. But now they may feel as if they're being penalized. So that's what's happening globally. Here in the U.S., if oma cron were to gain a significant foothold to what extent would fully vaccinated folks be protected? You know, it's really not clear yet within the next week or so, there will be a better sense of that. Scientists around the world are already taking plasma from vaccinated people and testing to see if the antibodies in the blood neutralize or kind of fend off the omicron variant of the virus, this will offer some indication and clearly infectious disease experts will also be tracking the known cases in South Africa and elsewhere to get a sense of severity. You know, looking at how sick do people get among fully vaccinated people, the expectation is that there would be some protection. Okay. Here's former FDA commissioner Scott gottlieb. He's on the board of Pfizer. He spoke on CBS on Sunday. The question here is going to be whether or not a fully boosted individual, someone who's had three doses of vaccine has good protection against this variant. And right now, if you talk to people in vaccine circles, people who are working on a vaccine, they have a pretty good degree of confidence that a boosted vaccine. So three full doses of vaccine is gonna be fairly protective against this new variant. You know, even if there is some decrease in protection, the vaccines have been shown to work against other variants. And so the expectation is that this will also be true to some extent with oh Macron, but again, this is their best guess. This new variant has a lot of mutations that could complicate this, so there's a lot to figure out. A lot to figure out still. And this is playing it out even further if it turns out that the vaccines are not that protective against ome. Is it possible to retool them? Yes, that is possible and this is sort of the beauty of the mRNA technology. Moderna has already started working on and specific booster. Yeah, a spokesperson told me that on Sunday, in terms of timing, Moderna says it can get a new booster candidate to clinical testing in about 60 to 90 days. So vaccine makers haven't anticipated that they may need to alter the boosters, so they've been kind of preparing for all possibilities. That's right. Because even before news of the new variant emerged last week, Alice and experts were already concerned about a post Thanksgiving spike. Is that still a concern on top of? Yes, absolutely. I mean, just before Thanksgiving, cases had climbed pretty significantly to about 94,000 cases a day..

omo Kron Margaret Harris oma cron U.S. Scott gottlieb World Health Organization NPR infectious disease Pfizer Moderna South Africa CBS FDA Alice
"omicron  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Won't boost global stocks anytime soon. But again, the manufacturer is not the only limitation here. If people refuse to get vaccinated, you know, if they are misinformed, or if they have some degree of hesitancy that isn't addressed, then having all the doses available really doesn't solve the problem either. You know, we've been leaning really hard on this technology focused approach that. You know, if we get the vaccine that's highly effective out there, we can ultimately solve the problem. But clearly, that's not the case. You know, we still need to be able to address people's social concerns. We still need to address a lot of underlying inequities in our healthcare system. And also just allaying people's concerns, some of its well founded, some of it is not. And just being able to parse that, it's all very difficult and it shows that relying on technology alone doesn't solve the problem. Do you think the arrival of omicron might galvanize countries to kind of be more vigilant about the spread of mutations or even about COVID in the first place, especially countries that are sort of ready to put this in the rearview? Yeah, I mean, it shows that, you know, we can't turn our backs on the virus that, you know, we can not allow it to be spreading unchecked. We can not take our eyes off the ball here. A surveillance is important vigilance is important. This is the only way we're going to stay ahead of this. And it also shows that, you know, we can't lean on any one particular approach. You know, a single focus on just vaccinations means that we're going to be missing dangerous changes. That could be out there. So, you want to keep your eye out for any potential threats and be able to adapt to them before they become too dangerous. Thank you. My pleasure. You can find his reporting at vox dot com earlier in the show you heard from Andrew Joseph at stat news. You can find his reporting at stat news dot com or show today was produced by miles Brian, with help from will read engineered by ame Shapiro, edited by Matthew collette.

Andrew Joseph stat news miles Brian ame Shapiro Matthew collette
"omicron  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:51 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Akron. Umay irrfan vox the second we heard about oma cron people were saying this was inevitable because the west was hoarding all the vaccines. Is that true? Is that what happened here? That's not entirely true. We do expect that in general, as long as the virus spreads, there is a greater chance of mutation and the more spread there is, the greater those odds. But, you know, South Africa is one of the more vaccinated countries on the continent. About 41% of adults in South Africa have received at least one jab that goes down to 35% for people who are fully vaccinated. Mobile vaccination sites are being set up next to welfare offices and supermarkets all over the country. The idea take the vaccine to the people. You know, they've been a bit ahead of the curve there. But if you look across the rest of the continent, we're looking at roughly 10% of the population as being vaccinated. And that leaves a huge swath of vulnerable people where this virus can continue spreading. The vaccination rates in Africa are ridiculously low. I mean, and it's not just a problem that's limited to Africa, of course, you know, some of the poorest countries in the world in general are suffering from low vaccination rates. There are more than 50 countries that have about less than a quarter of their population vaccinated, whereas wealthy countries that have about twice the population of low income countries have about 50 times as many doses available to them. So way out of proportion with their population in terms of what they have available to them. And that huge resource inequity is a problem not just for humanitarian reasons, but it creates situations where we can end up perpetuating the pandemic. Let's talk more in detail about why the global vaccine rollout has been slow and uneven, especially for poorer countries, starting with this idea that the west is hoarding. Is that true? I know we've talked on the show before about this Kovacs initiative to get the vaccine out to poor countries. Well, Kovacs was this idea of where countries would pull resources and help distribute the vaccines more evenly across the board. The World Health Organization program is aiming to deliver 2 billion doses to people in a 190 countries by the end of the year. And it started with a lot of promise and there was a lot of good intentions behind it. But it struggled to get funding to actually purchase the vaccines to begin with. And so by the time they actually had the money lined up, a lot of the first batches of vaccines that were being manufactured by manufacturers were already spoken for and by bilateral deals that were made by the U.S. by the UK, also the European Union, and they basically bought up the vaccine market. So there was a little left over for covax to actually distribute to our countries. And so a lot of Kovacs administrators are saying that they would like wealthier countries to kind of give up some of their spots earlier in line to help them actually get the doses that they already paid for. You know, these are not all donations. These are things that they've already bought. And they're saying that, you know, we don't want to end up competing with governments that are already looking at, you know, giving people third doses or expanding the eligibility pool to younger and younger children. And they're saying that, you know, we still have frontline health workers that are being exposed to this virus in very high risk scenarios and we really need to be able to bolster them in order to help contain the spread of this virus around the world, which is something that is in everyone's interest. Sounds like you're talking about the United States when you mention third doses and kids getting the vaccine. What is President Biden doing about this? Well, certainly the United States has expanded its exports of vaccines and is donating to other countries. You know, President Biden has set a target of helping every country vaccinate about 70% of its population by fall of 2022. Put another way for every one shot we've administered to date in America. We have now committed to do three shots to the rest of the world. But if you're looking at the current vaccination rates in some countries, you know, if we continue on the same path, some of the poorest countries may not get to that level of vaccination until 2023. The U.S. has pledged about 1.1 billion doses and other countries have pledged millions more and some of the manufacturers are doing tiered pricing schemes to help make it cheaper for countries to buy them. But a lot of this is ad hoc and piecemeal. And that makes it really hard for a country to actually anticipate when they'll be able to receive vaccines. And then, of course, you run into other hurdles that we see around the world misinformation, hesitancy, just all sorts of pushback on vaccines for various reasons. That isn't just an American thing. That's not just an American thing. It's a problem that's around the world and it manifests in different ways for different reasons. But it's certainly a problem. We need to get as many people vaccinated as possible. And if we hit a stubborn plateau, that means there will still be a population of people that can get infected and make other people sick and also create the risk of coming up with new variants that will undermine what little progress we've already made. And it's not just a matter of vaccine hoarding. It's also like a matter of vaccine shipping, right? And vaccine infrastructure. Right. Well, at the outset, no country was really doing a great job of vaccinating. The U.S. struggled to get vaccines out to a lot of people. We had dosas getting spoiled. We had people getting vaccines out of turn. And we had a lot of misinformation floating around. And so it's difficult even in the best of circumstances even with the most resources. Now, if you're in a country with a poor healthcare system with poor information and limited access to supplies, all those things just get more difficult and more problematic. So that's one factor to keep in mind. The U.S., of course, produces vaccines. So the rest of the world does not. And so they're counting on imports of vaccines from other countries, like the U.S. like Western Europe like India, these countries that do manufacture vaccines at scale, but that leaves them vulnerable to supply chain shocks, things like problems that shipping ports where they have a hard time getting supplies in. And it's not just the vaccines themselves, but the raw materials used to make them. Those are also bottlenecks. So while some countries are now lifting export restrictions on the vaccines themselves, they still have restrictions on things like the glass that's used to make the vaccine vials, the rubber stoppers, the syringes. So a lot of the ingredients that go into making an effective vaccine supply chain are also being constrained in other ways. And that ends up manifesting with very limited vaccine rollout in some of the poorest countries in the world. I mean, talking about getting these vaccines to people in 2022 or even 2023, it just feels like we're going to be seeing so many more variants and mutations and we're just not going to put an end to this thing anytime soon can the so called international community do more to speed this up? I mean, one big thing countries can be doing is, of course, you know, lifting the restrictions and export bans on many of the materials and the vaccines themselves. Make them more freely available to other countries so they can purchase them, make more donations available. But it's not just the vaccines themselves. You need to have people on the ground train to administer the vaccines. You need to have better infrastructure to identify people who are at risk and get them the vaccines first and also information about correcting the misinformation that's out there as well. So there's no one lever that's going to solve this problem. You know, you need to have multiple approaches to actually getting the vaccination rate up. Even countries with the most resources struggle with this and the struggle is just going to get worse in countries that have less resources. So we're all kind of in this together. We're facing the problem. But certainly some countries are going to be afflicted worse than others. Could vaccine manufacturers be doing more to help share access to the vaccine to help get shipments to countries that need them? There's been some talk about lifting intellectual property, restrictions on vaccines and licensing it to other countries. And doing South Africa have led the campaign, arguing it will help poorer nations vaccinate quicker. But Pfizer and BioNTech, who developed a COVID vaccine together, say a waiver.

Kovacs President Biden U.S. Umay irrfan oma cron South Africa Africa Akron World Health Organization European Union UK Western Europe India BioNTech Pfizer
"omicron  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:50 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Today, Explained

"So those studies will take a few weeks.

"omicron  " Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:11 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Recommending that everyone age 18 and older get one due to the risk posed by the variant, the agency had previously foremost encouraged an additional vaccine course for those 50 and older. The Biden administration says it's working with Pfizer at Moderna and Johnson & Johnson on contingency plans in case additional boosters are needed. Here's President Biden speaking from Washington today. This variant is a cause for concern not a cause for panic. We have the best vaccine in the world. The best medicines, the best scientists, and we're learning more every single day. Meanwhile, drugmakers have expressed concerns that their current vaccines may not work as well against omicron, which contains several mutations and have already started testing against it. Pfizer and Moderna say they could have vaccines specific to the new variant ready within a few months. Johnson & Johnson is also evaluating its vaccine and says it will begin working on a new targeted vaccine if necessary. Shares of Moderna rose nearly 12% shares of Pfizer fell nearly 3% and shares of J&J were up .3%. In the broader market after a record setting sell off on Friday, U.S. stocks ended the day with modest gains that I was up .7%, the S&P 500 gained 1.3% and the NASDAQ rose 1.9%. Jack Dorsey has announced he's stepping down as CEO of Twitter. Dorsey cofounded the social media company and has led it since returning to the role in 2015. Heard on the street columnist, Laura foreman says there are questions about why he's taking the step now. In his resignation letter, which he posted fittingly on Twitter, he says very clearly, this is my decision. And he talks a lot about how, you know, a fatal flaw of many tech companies is that they keep the founders on too long, that being founder lad is inherently limiting at some point. And there's certainly some truth to that, but that, of course, completely ignores the fact that he's got these two activist investors Elliott management and silverlake who have been pushing for him to resign for over a year now. They basically have taken issue with the fact that he's running two different companies. And while square has done it's a FinTech company that he also cofounded very well over the last, well, since going public, Twitter has been lagging. It's user base, growth is slowing. And it's been behind the curve in terms of social media, tech developments. Twitter's chief technology officer parag agrawal will take over as CEO. Dorsey will remain on the company's board until his term expires next year. Shares of Twitter initially jumped on the news, rising as much as 11% before ending the day down 2.7%. For more on this story, listen to our tech news briefing podcast tomorrow morning. Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama will hold a new vote on unionizing after a federal official tossed out the results from a vote earlier this year. According to a spokesperson for the national labor relations board, the agency determined that Amazon violated labor law in its campaign against organizing, including by installing a U.S. Postal Service collection box next to the facility that could have confused employees. The retail wholesale and department store union cheered the decision and Amazon spokeswoman defended the results of the first vote, calling the NLRB decision disappointing. The company can appeal the decision. Amazon doesn't have any unionized employees in the U.S.. And the Treasury Department says it's planning to redirect rental assistance money from states that haven't used the bulk of their funds to localities with greater demand, including those with request backlogs. Buying administration officials did not specify which areas could lose or gain funds. But they noted that rural states like Montana and North Dakota have large amounts of untapped money. While more populous states, like New York and Texas, are closer to exhausting their aid. Sources say the initial reallocation is expected to be unveiled early next month, and could exceed $800 million. Coming up, how companies are planning around oh Macron. Facebook leads the industry and stopping bad actors online. That's because they've invested $13 billion in teams and technology to enhance safety over the last 5 years. It's working. In just the past few months, they've taken down 1.7 billion fake accounts to stop bad actors from doing harm..

Pfizer Moderna Biden administration President Biden Johnson & Johnson Twitter Moderna rose Laura foreman Dorsey Elliott management Jack Dorsey parag agrawal Amazon
"omicron  " Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

12:48 min | 11 months ago

"omicron " Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Quickly you could see a mutation around that. It seems like it's highly conserved. There's no reason to think that this new variant that that protease inhibitor would be any different than the one in delta or the original COVID. But at this point, you have other targets that you're working on that you just haven't told us about at this point that might be used in a combination with what looks to be very promising already. That's a very very good question. And as I said, we designed that the current one without in mind, so that will be able not to develop resistance when the virus mutates. Because as you know, all so far, the mutations that we have seen in variants of concerns are in the spy. And this has nothing to do with the spy. It works in a very different method. And the fact that the mechanisms that it worked, which is inhibits the protest in the virus, it starts that this protest it is very vital for the virus to survive. So it's very difficult for the virus to create a mutation that doesn't need this protein. And so that the dragon of work. So I'm very, very, very confident that this drug works for all non mutations, including the omega. But we are working on follow up. Drugs for the eventual case that may be a resistance is developed. Are there other things that other targets, there's polymerase? I mean, I don't know, it's a very small genome, obviously there's not a lot of different proteins that are coded for in COVID. There would be something else I figured you could use for some type of cocktail. Is there anything else that you're not telling us about that Pfizer researchers are working on Albert? Nothing that would be announced, let's say next week. But we are already working with and this is you need to know a standard practice when you're doing the virus or already we are working on second and third generation. Albert wanted to also separately just ask you about cost and cost of the antiviral. We've talked about it before, but if in fact, the antiviral pills become a critical component of this, especially if the vaccines don't have the same kind of efficacy. Could you see pricing come down? Would you consider rethinking the pricing because as we know a vaccine might be 20, $30, this antiviral pills could be ten more than ten times that. I think we're talking about 6 or $700. Yes, you're right. But, you know, we went out with a price and for the government that takes that thing that was very interesting. You need to know the price of this undivided despite a very, very high efficacy. It is almost one third of what the prices of the antibodies are there. So it's really. Very cost effective right now for the system. Given the hospitalizations that would be avoided. And keep in mind that we wave the patterns completely for the low income countries. So barriers should not be priced or intellectual property for anyone to make. So Albert, you do sort of adapt your vaccine all the time, and we can do it quickly and you're able to do that sort of in a flu vaccine type fashion to the new variants from COVID. Do you foresee that this would be would you call it a booster? We'd get another booster every year or would be a modified booster that would provide a better antigenic response than the original vaccine. Well, do you see this happening every year? We either get a booster boost a regular booster of the same vaccine or a slightly different vaccine every year to deal with what we're seeing with these mutations. Is that what you forese? It's almost like a, I mean, for Pfizer, you'd be selling these things every year, and not that you want to do that. I'm sure you're not hoping for that, but it would be almost like an annuity for Pfizer. I did make a projection a month ago that the most likely scenario, it is that we would need after the third dose annual revaccination against forbid for multiple reasons because of the unity that would be waving because of the virus that I'm sure will be maintained around the world for the years to come. And also because of the need of variance that will emerge. I'm more confident right now that this will be the case than I was when I met. The projection. I think we are going to have a manual for revaccination. I don't know how we're going to call it. But will be a 9 year revaccination. And that should be able to keep us really safe. Albert, just trying to take a step back sort of a big picture view of things. As you learned about this variant emerging and the information that exists about it is limited as it is, what is your level of concern about it at this point? You mean? Yes. Look, I am concerned, but as I said, we have been preparing for that. We have to start with a treatment. If things goes wrong, right? And we can't provide protection, which I don't think will be the case. We have a treatment that will work against this virus that can be taken home. You don't need to go to hospital. Secondly, we have done it twice. We were able to create 95 days a new vaccine tailor made to new virus. We started to write making for the shelter, which is this one. So if the current dose, which is very likely that three doses from the current vaccine will keep us well protected, but repeat three doses of the current vaccine will keep us well protected. But if we find out, but this is not enough before the virus starts emerging in those places in, let's say, more places in the world than becoming the big one, we should be able to have one developed. The third, manufacturing, we have been working for that without in mind. This is the playbook. How can we switch manufacturing of a new vaccine to show that we will not lose volume capacity? And we have been reached a level almost overnight. So we will be able to switch our manufacturing capacity and the line that was producing before the old vaccine within two days will start producing the new vaccine with no loss of volume. And I repeat we have reached a capacity of a billion doses third quarter already this quarter remained a $1 billion. So next year, it is almost in the pocket 4 billion doses that we can make. If there is a need for a new one, we will make almost 4 billion doses of the new one. So with that in mind that availability will not be an issue. But the efficacy is very high, but there are treatments around, no, I'm optimistic we have been preparing for that and we are going to win this battle as well. All right, so I'm optimism is what we need Albert. Thank you so much for being with us this morning. And we hope to have you back soon as we get more information about the vaccines in this variant. Thanks again. Stay well. Cheese will be next. Next, on squat pod, what all this only cron news means for the energy markets and for your gas prices. With CNBC's Brian Sullivan. I think this COVID news gives OPEC some political cover if it wanted to pause to say, well, it's COVID and it's demand and we don't know rather than pausing based solely on the SPR release get the best CNBC pro offer Black Friday through cyber Monday, exclusive stock picks and money making ideas all at a special price. Three months for only 59.99. Joint CNBC pro today at CNBC dot com slash cyber Monday pro. I'm Stan Andrew by. You're listening to squawk pod. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin. We wanted to get an update right now on the oil markets. Brian Sullivan has more on what is at stake. Brian. Yo, what's the sake of global pricing Andrew? Okay, of course, crude oil took a 13% hit on Friday. It was a biggest drop of all time in the futures markets going all the way back to 1988 right now. We are recovering, not quite half that, crude oil futures up about 5% 4.9% whatever you want to say as we were saying that maybe they were shot of the downside. A lot of positive stuff about demand coming out, right? Demand for petroleum products. Gas buddy, say the gasoline demand in America said a four day record last week. If you were on the roads, you know what I'm talking about. Everybody was driving. Filippo has been talking about flights. Well, jet fuel demand at least right now not expected to take a major hit. Remember, the fuel used on the few flights per day back and forth from the U.S. to Africa is basically irrelevant. It's just a couple of flights a week. The question is whether any demand to hit the domestic U.S. flying so far does not appear so yet, again, that could change, but yet, a lot of fear in the oil markets coming into last week about lockdowns for Germany does not look like that will happen. They may have some regional shutdowns among the unvaccinated. That's pretty much it. Bottom line is this guys have not read or seen anything as of yet, and that's key yet suggesting a meaningful hit to demand. Again, that could change, but we are not seeing it at this time. Now, globally, there are a lot of things happening, particularly this week. You've got OPEC plus meeting on Thursday. The question is, will it continue its path of adding an extra 400,000 barrels per day each month like they've been doing scaling up? Or decide to pause because demand is uncertain. We'll see. There have been some headlines today. The Saudi energy minister abdulaziz bin Salman sang sort of in a passing comment that he has put calm and not really concerned what that means we can read into it also lost to the headlines guys, talk some reviving the 2015 Iran nuclear deal kicked off in Vienna, Austria today. It is unknown how those will turn out, but if they turn out well, it could bring Iran back into the global market sort of on the U.S. side in dollars anyway, legally, which could add more demand or supply, not expected to see that, but the Iranian nuclear talks also kicking off if we needed something else to weave into this global story. You know, Brian, the biggest question, though, if the Saudis are going to go ahead with this or not, will they get a pass from The White House? If they do, if they say, okay, at this point, we're going to hold off and wait and see what happens, which maybe is a reasonable thing to go ahead and do. The White House has already put so much pressure. How would they react to that? That's a really interesting question, Becky. I'm gonna say the three most hated words anybody on TV wants to say. I don't know, 'cause here's the Domino's game, right? You've got the president coming out sort of urging OPEC to release more oil at the same time, by the way they want to increase fees on drilling in federal land. They're doing that. So they get together this coalition with R SPR, the coalition is small, but the SPR released 50 million barrels kind of sending a message. If OPEC pauses and says, well, we're going to wait and see that could increase attention for the no pec build. These sort of outlawing cartel bills that have been in Congress. Do you know who the co sponsor of that no pec Bill was back in the day? I have a Delaware by the name of Joseph R Biden. Correct. So I think this COVID news Friday gives OPEC some political cover if it wanted to pause to say, well, it's COVID and it's demand and we don't know rather than pausing based solely on the SPR release because you also got to remember Joseph R Biden the senator from Delaware urged then president Bill Clinton to sue OPEC 21 years ago. His history with this organization has been adversarial. It's going back a long time. Thursday should be very interesting, assuming the meeting is not delayed. Indeed it will be. Brian, thank you. That is squawk pod for today, thanks for starting your week with us. Squawk box is hosted by Joe kernan Becky quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin. Tune in weekday mornings on CNBC at 6 eastern. Follow, squawk pod wherever you get your podcasts and send us feedback on what you hear. We're on Twitter at squawk, CNBC, or leave us a rating or review on Apple podcasts. Thanks.

Albert Pfizer Brian Sullivan OPEC COVID news CNBC SPR Stan Andrew U.S. flu Andrew Ross Sorkin abdulaziz bin Salman