29 Burst results for "Omer Omer"

"omer " Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:00 min | 3 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Team behind monocles dedicated weekly design program. I'm Nick manase, filling in phenol and Giles. Omer arbel is an artist and the cofounder of Vancouver and Berlin based lighting design and manufacturing firm, bocce. Arbel's philosophy, welcome surprise, and individuality in the manufacturing and design process, and boccio studio is testament to that. Filled with a vast array of experiments in material, this ever growing archive spans the 16 years of the practice and offers a constant source of inspiration for current and upcoming projects. At this year's salon in Milan, we caught up with arbel in our pop up studio to discuss why continually experimenting with materials and keeping an open mind is vital to his approach. Early on, I noticed that one of the most successful works that we've had the vision I had for it in my mind was so different than the way it actually ended up being executed for various reasons. The realities of production and the material qualities of glass and the time constraints involved. It ended up being very different from what I'm initially imagined. And much better. And the ways that it was better were surprising and directly related to the intrinsic chemical and physical and mechanical properties of glass. And so I was confronted by the fact that the best parts about this work were not designed. And then I had to have a kind of honest conversation with myself and decide that that moment of surprise was worth pursuing. So since then, we've structured the practice to really instigate or invite those moments of surprise from analog experimentation with materials, we only have a very vague idea of where we're going when we start an exploration. And we're ready to turn at any moment in response to those sort of intuitive discoveries that we have with processor materials. Many of the roads are blind alleys. And the only way that this works is that I pursue numerous explorations at the same time. And knowing full well that only a few of them will result in anything interesting. And I also never respond to a brief, in other words, I'm always pursuing numerous explorations on my own without any kind of context or program or purpose. And we just kind of archive them as I go, and then when opportunities present themselves, we match the opportunity to an idea rather than the other way around. So we're not responsive, we just we're constantly making work and the work just sits on the shelf until some of it makes sense in a particular context. The nice thing about that is that sometimes it takes decades for something to come to fruition. And sometimes I will also say that those blind alleys change after years with the right collaborator, the right piece of equipment, all of a sudden, the project that we thought was dead opens up again. For example, number one, we're developing 15 years later. It's kind of a shock, but it's wonderful and it's relevant again and an interesting and all the obstacles that had 15 years ago are no longer obstacles. That'll come out next year and it'll be sort of amazing to see it again after all this time. I guess we never edit. Nothing's ever a bad idea. Every single one of them is great. We cherish every single idea, but we just know that sometimes there they require a great deal of time to find themselves. So we have an infinite patience. And sometimes they take very little time. Like some ideas take a few weeks. Other ideas take decades. But none are thrown out ever. And it's the same with the open ended nature of the production or manufacturing or fabrication or construction of our projects. There are no wrong iterations. We control three or four parameters and the rest up to the craftspeople. Or the material itself to interpret, and the forms that come out belong to a family of forms or they follow an idiom or language that we establish, but they are unique and different from each other. And not a single one is edited out. I can say with confidence that we never throw out anything. And any iteration. That's kind of contrary to how I came up in an architecture school and when you're taught to criticize and edit yourself. That's exactly the opposite approach I sort of rejects the idea of editing. The physical archiving of our ideas is essential to the continuing production of new ideas. The studio becomes a kind of self referential entity where ideas are sort of regurgitated through a constantly changing group of collaborators. Until they're ready. We're surround ourselves with our own sort of failures. Successes. And it's beautiful. I think because the other thing that starts to happen is the pieces, the works start having conversations between themselves and we can make lateral connections between one technique or another, one material or another one collaborator or another..

Nick manase Omer arbel Arbel arbel Giles Berlin Milan Vancouver
"omer " Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

02:53 min | 5 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Who? Weekly

"But like she so famous that the way she behaves is completely alien. She doesn't you instead of twitter. She uses her own website instead of any of these platforms like whenever she releases. That interview was in the form of like. Sa as the harper's bazaar thing like everything is so specific and unique and she doesn't play by anyone's rules which again like. Why does she have to. She doesn't she can make the rules. But like i think it's so funny that instead of like wishing people happy birthday and any other way on twitter on facebook on instagram. She uses her website. Everything has to go through the beyond say funnel which goes through beyond say dot com like. It's so weird and all these photos. She can't even just wish someone happy birthday you know. She has to wish them. Happy birthday with the photo that you have to assume they provided to her because these photos don't exist anywhere else but like pinks. Grandma's house and yet there is a photo of pink that no one has ever seen before. Like sometimes i recognize the photo. Sometimes i'm like. Oh i've seen that photo like been used before or that's like the photos that they always give further. But then sometimes you're like is this a new did beyond to get like an exclusive baby photo of mother teresa. That's not true. I've seen that photo. Like taking an exclusive photo of daily porter to be on to get an exclusive photo. Gloria estefan or nick jones. Because i've never seen these before. I've never seen that babies. Like where's the where's the like. Beyond se exclusive badged. Like you know it's just so strange and the and and everybody's them but it is funny because it's like bernie sanders next to blake lively next to billy porter. All baby photos like bernie sanders baby photo and who where which archive is that from. But the only way you can behave like this and get people to send you stuff like this is to be as famous as beyond say. It's so weird. She's just like truly the a one of a kind. You mentioned earlier. It's fascinating also that she now does all of her like everything she does. She does through her own website even promote for like even her tiffany campaign which he just put out is like through her because for some reason she's created that being like the main place you go for her it's like it's easier for them to promote just through that channel then to just release through other channels they get it in a magazine or whatever. She's she's taken that like. Why give anything to the press when you have your own instagram thing to the next level like truly the next level without without launching person. Who can do this because like you're not gonna go like every famous person that i want to follow which any by the nature of our job is a lot of them like i'm not gonna go. It would be impossible if i had to go to nina. Dobrev dot com. Julian huff dot com. Like all these.

Los Angeles Chargers and Fresh Vine Wine Announce Partnership

Who? Weekly

01:30 min | 5 months ago

Los Angeles Chargers and Fresh Vine Wine Announce Partnership

"Lindsay. Did you see that. In of julian hubs fresh. Fine wine announced their partnership with the la chargers. I did back. Somebody kindly tweeted it at us knowing that. That was our kind of news. Can you think of something that goes together. Better than the la chargers and line apart from nina dobrev and julian soccer there football Because nina said in a press statement as a lifetime football fan. I couldn't be more excited to be joining forces. But the la chargers fresh fine wine promises to bring a premium luxury wine experience to the fans who love indulging in the greatest things that life has to offer while being conscious consumers with active lifestyle. Choice chargers really would not be soccer. That makes literally no sense that they would charge. Does it make more sense with football. Selling your like healthy. Fresh wine in a football stadium does not add to like the mission statement of it like stop it. Stop it. Stop getting nachos and cheese. That never gets hard. By the way cheese that will be eternally soft and spreadable like a fun party wine. Which i do think she also thinks her wine is. I guess i'll alcohol is like inherently in some ways being sold as fun and flirty. You know already to keep it to keep it light. Keep it light. Yeah but it but her her wine is so specifically sold as being like healthy and clean and like whatever and like bats shit that it's like the opposite of what i want from a football game if i'm eating or drinking at a football game which needs to be

La Chargers Football Nina Dobrev Soccer Lindsay Nina Chargers
"omer " Discussed on Sounds Profitable

Sounds Profitable

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Sounds Profitable

"Thanks for listening to sounds profitable on your favorite podcast app. It really means a lot to me to have you as a subscriber. And i hope you'll tell your friends and colleagues all about our podcast and stick around for some special bonus content at the end of the episode. Iv teamed up with. Ebo tara to give you a minute. Long strategic thought that is guaranteed to shift your perspective on the present and future of podcasting as we all work to make podcasting better. Thanks to omer for coming on to talk about my article tracking podcast add performance. That's hard to track. Don't forget that sounds. Profitable has also a weekly podcasts had tech newsletter a bill all over the world but especially in the united states. If you liked what you heard and wanna connect you can find me. Brian bar up. On lincoln way less formally on twitter as high five rpg. And of course. You can email me at brian at sounds profitable dot com spelled. Either way the most important part about sounds proper was providing you with more resources and making sure that i can answer your questions so check out the link to jaba in the episode description and leave me a message and with your permission. I'll answer it live on the show. Sounds profitable is completely recorded using squad cast. I'm such a big fan of all the features that they have from the video recording remote to their dolby features which are really fantastic. And then my favorite part that i used to the product is screen share aspect. We can record all that in high definition in. It's saved in real time so there's no risk of losing it so please. Checkout squad cast dot. Fm sign up for trial. Because i use it. And i know you'll love it. This sounds profitable. Podcast would not be possible without the help. And support of evil. Tara chains cridland. And ian powell. Thank you all for your help and support for sounds profitable. I'm tara with your minute of pods. Zen can spending five dollars a day on ads. Really add ten thousand or more new listeners. To your podcast. Well i highly doubt it. But i'm crazy enough to put up the money to see if i'm right or if i have ten thousand new listeners. I don't think you should spend a dime on advertising until you've nailed the fundamentals and have a show that you're hardcore audience continues to recommend but if you've accomplished those non trivial tasks why not spend some money to advertise your show. Good question and i'm about to put to the test as i'm a fan of eating my own dog food. Starting today. i'm trying out a system. That reports to by the end of the year boost the listening audience of podcast pontificating to ten thousand listeners that averages out to around eight hundred new listeners to podcast vacations every month clicks impressions not one time downloads but actual podcasters. Who don't yet listen to podcast vacations. And i'm going to get there by spending just five bucks a day on ads or so. The theory goes now. I'm skeptical of the efficacy of this initiative however it good skeptics should be willing to change their position when evidence is presented. And i want to be a better skeptic. Let's see what happens. You'll find more thoughts on this topic and other questions every working podcast or should be asking themselves at podcast. Quantifications dot com for sounds profitable. I'm tara this has been your minute of pods then..

Ebo tara cridland ian powell lincoln Brian brian twitter united states Tara tara
"omer " Discussed on Sounds Profitable

Sounds Profitable

08:26 min | 5 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Sounds Profitable

"Its latest financials for closer to twenty one. gene. Taylor is the new. Ceo of american public media on fireside chat has updated its terms which still say that the company can use your content. However they like. They've also banned some journalist accounts including mine. And that's the latest from your briefing. Useless abused dot net in my article. I wrote about alternative attribution which i've linked in the description. A discuss what you should be doing in order to get consistency to drive the most success. My old friend omer gilani from claratyne came by talk about the other side of that sort of attribution and how amazingly cool it is to help. Creators generate profit to keep their creative visions running. Well omer thank you so much for being here with me. Thanks so much brian. Nice savvy here so for those of you. This is the first time you're interacting with omer. Omer usually doesn't sound like this. He wanted me to kick off and let you know he kinda throughout his voice a little bit. And he didn't listen to my latest article or read. My latest article about microphones. So we're going to have to get him too. Expensive new microphone. Olmer owners here from clara. Toss me and omer of work together for. We were together for six years right. You came on when we're at at and then we became barometric. Can then we split off. When out. the aren't was acquired in barometric. Was its own thing for like a stressful year and then clarifies choir us and we're there for a while before i went to megaphone. And now you're kinda running the show on the attribution side right. Yes so we together for quite some time as you mentioned and we've seen we've seen a lot you know pop both positive and negative and now I am running the measurement side of the business or or call the optimized. Him harry artas. Yeah that's that's so awesome like it. It was very fun. And i think it gives you a really cool perspective because we started in digital attribution started as a as a a mobile. Dsp without aren't we transitioned into the attribution for everything with Was traction and the became barometric. Which i still laugh about the. It didn't click with me that our original like you are worst. Tr k. n. dot eu ass. And they're like yeah traction dot. Us and i was like no that looks like tracking us. Oh man. I laughed at that real hard. And then you know we pivoted into podcasting in claritin does more than just the podcast attrition. but like. You've you helped start that i mean pod sites and charter with the attribution started. After the fact the entire industry kind of grew around it and clarifies worked really hard to like. Set the standards. I believe we built the first reports. I believe we really made that a priority to get people away from the anxiety of not being able to track every single thing and focusing on the directional aspects. So you know. I what you've done at claratyne. has done for the spaces as been really foundational in podcast ad tech yet another. Thanks so much brian. Obviously you deserve some of the credit for that. There's there's others that deserve some of the credit as well so i've just been fortunate to benefit from the work You and others had put in. And you know i think your point at. It's a really exciting time now. To be able to take kind of some of the foundational things that we dealt that we were using across different channels and applied to the ecosystem and and podcast in your selfishly of just really enjoyed getting to know and learning about the podcast ecosystem and and it's been just as enjoyable reading people in that in the podcast audio ecosystem so it's been very exciting couple years for me personally as well as for claratyne as we scale our capabilities. Yeah you know you you hit on something. That's really neat. There like it is exciting. You when you think of like mobile websites or or senator websites and apps and whatnot the people creating the content that people engaging with that like making that site or app what it is are not the people that we and you deal with on the attacker business side but in podcasting we often are or dealing with the people that are very close to the creator's if not the creators themselves and there's something exciting about it. i mean. I've been talking to a lot of people recently and like i got into at tech. The technology excited me. But but it's also the fun of being like the right hand in the business and revenue generating side for those creators like now. It's fun that i'm creating content about this whole thing but before that like it's so neat to be able to see that creator do the ad and execute on it and show them that we can track the success and generate all that from eight meat really pulls it altogether and podcasting gives you that close connection that i don't think a lot of other channels get maybe like influence or marketing on instagram and whatnot but podcasting need. It's got that feel. I was thinking about this. I don't know if it's kind of when you're in the nascent stages of head of a new channel or new technology where you kind of see more collaboration. And you know even collaboration with people that you would consider competitors. I just find that and you know rather it's us or pot sites are chargeable like you know. I have conversations with those guys you know. we're comparing notes. And i think on the publisher side and the platform side. You know everyone is vested in delivering better attribution better measurement for the brand and the browns. Obviously you know after you know going through this measurement phase. Would you know branded search and things like that. They have certain expectations for any channel that they're running across so being lower closely with people like yourself the brands the agencies and the platforms. It's just been really collaborative. I i enjoy that. it's like nothing else. It's the most interesting part of ad tech. I've been in my entire career and you know so this week like what i really wanna talk about with you is like pod sites in chargeable are really heavily focused on digital attribution. And they're great. They knock it out of park and most podcasts. Advertising is digital right. A lot of its direct response brand recognition. We're driving somebody from experiencing a podcast. Add to a website to an app and the kind of connection that they have their being able to match that. That's the most like data we have but all of these companies with device. Graphs are empowered in different ways to match. Let's call it alternative methods and in the article that will reference in the episode notes. We talk about a few different ones here. And i kinda you know instead of like rehashing them. Because i don't know how much more technical we really need to get on them like. I wanna kinda reminisce about some of the stories that we did because these like my hands on experience with these was like side by side with you. I think very most of them were done. While we were traveling. None of them were ever convenient. It was never like we're not going to be on the road for six weeks. So let's do like a really tough campaign. It's like it's january. Do you wanna go to chicago. Which i reflected on and i've only been to chicago in january and with you multiple times and it's been quite some time since i've been on a plane for work. So hopefully we get we get back to those days relatively. Could you know one of the things that really stood out is like the device. Graph is all about focusing on taking the exposure right and identifying every piece you can and matching it to the graph to augment so own podcasting. That's just ip address and then you augmented if it is a household ip address which is really important. You have to filter down to the ip address the household ip address. Cause cellular just isn't going to do it right now. Business is chew wide and then from there you match that to. Can you tell the residents right. Can you tell the postal from the postal. Do you know any public information about them. Are you able to match twenty other device. Id's or cookies or anything else. And i think the most fun one that means it was. I think it was for bank right and it was postal. Like the bank focused on exposure to.

omer omer gilani harry artas brian clara Taylor eu instagram browns Us chicago
"omer " Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

07:08 min | 5 months ago

"omer " Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"Thank you question number. Three dr reed strikes me as one of those mentors who was ahead of his time. Gary i know you had very close personal relationship adopted. What peak of is can you share with me with oma as your mentor You know man. I feel like the kid the candy store on this one. Because there's so many so let me just read off some really really leverage. The relationship driven side of your practice omer omer was so far ahead of himself there Secondly hygiene driven practice. You know omer took me under his wing in one thousand nine hundred and he said gary always remember that. The high as a successful hygiene department is so important for a successful practice. And i believe that even more strongly. Now so it's a hygiene driven practice another takeaway for battery Another one assist of owner was very systems-oriented. he really. He planted the seeds and incubated those sees about the importance of a systems. Privet practice assistive driven practice where you have great people to have systems in place He also taught me the importance of attracting and keeping the best quality team. The best possible team when i first started working with dr reed in nineteen eighty his newest team member on the newest one. Only been there twenty six years. Think about that for just a minute. Ha twenty she had been there only. She was the new one twenty six years. What does that say. I remember seeing that now. I was neutered industry but it made an imprint on me now. owner must be doing something right. Keep these amazing people and you know homered is team were so synchronized that you could start a sentenced and his assistant could finish this really amazing another. It tells me a lot of things. Is he probably mastered how to build relationships not just with patients but even at this team members and also probably. He was a master of changing with the times. Because when you have team members that have been there for so many years not only do you need to change yourself but you need to help them change. So he's probably leader was absolutely Very very involved in creating change in his practice change was good. The team used to joke that all the walls were held together by velcro because to read my come in over the weekend and completely changed the floor plan. And so he was one that caught the concept of embracing change to his teeth And it was perhaps the best example. I've ever seen the team actually following his lead and embracing change and didn't use these words These are words that i put to it later but this was true for him that he always wanted to be better tomorrow than he was today. Always wanted to be better tomorrow. And so there's some great takeaways that you can apply as well so i rattled off quite a few there. And if you haven't done this already maybe the the most practical takeaway is take his concepts of the rolodex cards at digitize. That simply means that you have a place in your computer not in clinical notes because if they're in clinical notes he'll be lost but somewhere where you and your team members enter personal information about your patients. Spouses names kids names. Dogs named hobbies interests college important dates in their life and follow. Dr reed's guide and lead like coming in twenty to thirty minutes before your morning huddle and pulling those notes up on every patient you're gonna see either on your side or hiji doing your hygiene and that exercise a Elevate relationship driven of your Driven element of your practice. Like many other thank you. I have my fourth question for you. Dr de ghani's people's skills are legendary. I struggled with this especially as my practice grows. What concepts from the goni. Can i apply in my practice. He was legendary with his people skills. You know absolutely legendary. And i think it starts with a lane set. It isn't so much the tactics although he did have tactics. I got to know dr going very well. I i sat down with him. And i said one time tend to has got to be hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people in your life. How do you remember the details about them. Eddie's you didn't hesitate. He looked he said. I remember this. I remember things about you. Gary because you are important to me I thought he was going to show me some memory to trick and he did just wasn't what i expected. You said. i remember you gary. Because you're important to me. And i felt i was. I was young at the time. When i first met dr decoding. I was let me think about it for a minute. I was forty years old. And those words. How do you think. I felt when he when he said that to me. Yeah and i think not only did it say but he actually lived it. Every every version of it arch first time. I met him and met him. I was teaching at a pack life. Scipio said continue It was a postgraduate program. That dr david hornbeck was the director of one of the instructors and It was that you received civic or dentist. Dental students who was for practicing dennis were doctors would come to the university of pacific. They would provide a tenure up printer for severe case over two weekends. First week amid prepa temporizing second weekend they would seek the case and in our inaugural course a thursday night. The practice the courses were friday. Saturday sunday Thursday night. Dr goni hosted a reception for all the instructors and It really was just to get to know one another and it was at the very nicely put together and dr johnny would walk around introduce himself to a it was twenty. Four instructors myself twenty three others and he would sit down and he'd say gary I remember it was yesterday. He'd say gary I thank you for putting together this program so glad that you're here you're gonna make a massive difference in the lives of these dentists. Were taking your program. And also to their.

dr reed omer omer omer Gary gary Dr reed Dr de ghani dr david hornbeck university of pacific Eddie Scipio Dr goni dr johnny dennis
"omer " Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show

The Thriving Dentist Show

03:39 min | 5 months ago

"omer " Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show

"Thank you question number. Three dr reed strikes me as one of those mentors who was ahead of his time. Gary i know you had very close personal relationship adopted. What peak of is can you share with me with As you mentor a man. I feel like the kid the candy store on this one. Because there's so many so let me just read off some really really leverage. The relationship driven side of your practice omer omer was so far ahead of himself there Secondly hygiene driven practice. You know omer took me under his wing in one thousand nine hundred and he said gary always remember that the high as a successful hygiene department is so important for a successful practice and i believe that even more strongly. Now so it's a hygiene driven practice another takeaway for battery Another one assist of owner was very systems-oriented. he really. He planted the seeds and incubated those sees about the importance of a systems driven. Practice assistive driven practice where you have great people to have systems in place He also taught me the importance of attracting and keeping the best quality team. The best possible team when i first started working with dr reed in nineteen eighty his newest team member on the newest one..

dr reed omer omer Gary omer gary
"omer " Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

07:42 min | 8 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"And it's the idea that you train you train you train. You take the interview interview asks you these really atomic questions like inverted binary tree or solve this dynamic programming problem and you're on a whiteboard with very little resources but it's such a narrow scope that with the right training you can really nail the interview and then all of a sudden it's like okay. Here's our you three hundred million line code base. You know for our entire company and yours this task. That's gonna take six months. And so that. Sort of like really a gora phobic kind of experience just jars people it makes them think well You know maybe. I really don't belong here. I mean maybe you know this is I'm just totally out of my league fired. And and so we call we call imposter syndrome in everyone goes through it and i think a lot of the reason why that exists at least a degree that it does is because don boarding is just leaves a lot to be desired and so i think even you know big companies have a hard time with that and have a hard time with documentation in general what we talk later on about. How those two are kind of intertwine But yeah that's that's an amazing story. Yeah we're definitely. I'd love to dive into into some of the stuff. But i. I wanna hear tim on here. You talk about kind. Of what kind of experiences led you to deverell and and then to swim tim. I started out as a more of a systems programmer. My first language was basic and then I quickly went to see in later. Plus and i really cut my teeth in it on the back. End of thing colonels file systems things like that interested me immensely so i started doing a lot of that before we really had the web sort of as we it kinda showing my age. Here yeah back. Then i mean netscape. Was you know the newest and hottest thing. And we all had those. Go cities profiles with the animated under construction gifts. And all that stuff. yeah. I remember when microsoft made internet explorer part of windows and i thought oh netscape is in is in huge trouble by but netscape was a much better product. And then is the whole antitrust news. Very dramatic time. It still is sure we're still we're still. We're just now seeing the the resolution of bites that we picked You know twenty five years ago but the end result is were all getting along which has been great. But i quickly worked my way into. At the time there was a need for people that understood the unix philosophy. Have been working with. Can you in lenox since they started booting together and understood how to configure web servers and to manage these systems so i started gravitating toward the web hosting industry of very quickly because there were tons of consulting opportunities for me there and i started working on things. Like clusters Single system image clusters where instead of having two or three servers going kaput. All the time you know you could use the resources of all of them and through that endeavor and many consulting opportunities became known in the industry as someone that could all projects that were very late very over budget essentially death marches back into the black back into the actually shipping. Something wow interesting. So what did you go the consulting route instead of the sort of I guess i know what the other word would be like the joining the microsoft route. You know whatever you would call that. I was fortunate in that when i was in college. My first couple of years in college. I had a skill set that not many people had. I understood what lennox was. I knew what canoe was accessed to bit net at college so that i could download stuff without paying enormous long distance phone bills using a modem at the time it was twenty. Four hundred baud. I mean that was the fast as you were going to get. Yeah yep so. I had a lot of things. Go right for me to give access to things that many people didn't have and the industry came to me. I didn't go to it. I got hired poached essentially out of school and i went right to work during the first dot com boo. That really changed me. Because i never went to the route where i had to go looking for a job early on there was just always something else coming up someone else. That was calling me and wanted me to work on something for them and that just eventually like a big ball of over bands turned into a career and it just sort of happened. That way So a lot of luck lot of fortune some misfortune to there are some really shady characters on the web hosting industry even today so but a lot of it was really positive unfortunately due to the type of projects i was working on state that they were in. It was always a very high stress sort of working environment for me. Because you're inheriting something it's already late. You're not quite sure what it does. Not even quite sure what it's supposed to do. The scope is way far from the original and got a few months where you have to put it back together. I saw an article from the cto or the ceo of ways. And he was talking about when they were acquired by google and one of the things that really surprised him was that ways he would just fire people because of the environment so maybe he needed like ten lawyers and now he only needs eight lawyers. And so you're just fire to lawyers at a custom made sense but you in big companies. You don't really do that. Like people find a new thing to do at that big company if they're good and so that was one of the things that surprised him and so i think that might be one of the big differences between doing consulting and joining one of these companies. Is that consulting. You know you are just contributing all the time which is a double edged sword. But you always have to be productive. At least. That's kind of the way. I see it from someone who is all. He's never done consulting. That's kind of my thousand foot view of it. It is it's weird in that. Well it depends on where you are in the world to because the term consultant has some legal ramifications to as far as year security. Your job security house. In america we have at will employment and i think almost every state if not every state. I'm not sure at the state of that is no pun intended so essentially we are consultants with benefits because our status can be can be terminated. Anytime unless you have some sort of tenure that is beneficial both to the the organization and potentially to the consultant depending on what you wanna. Do you see a lot of people in consulting do this because they want to ramp up their skill set. They've on ramp up the resume the ramp up as we know when we go into interviews. What people really want to talk about us. What have you shipped before we can you point to that you've done see you want to get all that under your belt if you go and you sort of court the big companies you tend to move around a lot on your resume so you might spend a year here and then get the position above you another company and spend two years there and then get another position above you and spend three years there before you're up to the point where you you have the compensation roughly that you want and you're working on what you need to do consulting you can take a much more direct route toward that which i found to be very beneficial and you also have the ability to turn work down which is also extremely beneficial. There are some projects which are just way too late or involve technology. You just don't wanna work with. And i mean if you if you could say no to dot net throughout your whole career actively. I'm sure a lotta people could do that. You know not nothing. Not v dot net. But you know i know. A lot of people struggle with that so as produce an interesting dynamic. One of the things that.

america two years ten lawyers microsoft three years eight lawyers six months google One twenty five years ago three hundred million one twenty two today internet explorer three servers Four hundred baud a year first language
"omer " Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

08:22 min | 8 months ago

"omer " Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Programming throwdown episode one hundred and fourteen code documentation with america. Rosenbaum and tim post. Take it away jason. Everybody this is an awesome show. You i think code documentation is extremely extremely important. It gets more important as you move along in your career so if you're just starting out yoka kind of catch you by surprise. It might seem like if you're just programming a high school project that you you're turning in the next day you might not realize how incredibly incredibly important it is but i can tell you as someone who's been programming for a long time i go back and look at code that have written. Let's say five years ago. And i have a bunch of documentation and it feels actually really good. It's easy to jump into it. And when i look at coda wrote. That was a more junior engineer. I have no idea what's going on. And it's a total rewrite. So i tell you. I handset extremely important. It's also very difficult to do kind of efficiently and to make it kind of party routine. So it's a great topic to really dive deep into a lot of time talking about and we're here with amir rosenbaum tim post almeira's a cto of swim which is a company that really focuses on the documentation ecosystem and tim is the principal dev around advocate for swim. So thank you both for coming on the show. I really appreciate it to be here. Thank you for having us coal so before we jump into it. Let's talk a little bit about your background. So what is kind of your journey that led you to either found or come to swim. And what's that story like maybe mare you go first and then tim. I love your stories. Woah yeah sure. So miami's omer based in israel and basically the first time. I got really amazing. Training experienced was in. The israeli military is israelis. We go through the military to Here and i had a really amazing experience learning a lot. In a very short period of time how to program and many other thinks and i got actually fascinated by how efficient teaching and learning can be And how much of an impact. It could have and i also got to teach a lot and train people in various places them in a program called israel challenge and i also get to lead a security academy checkpoint and to train a lot of people in many places and then i got to see them many times when they succeeded and also when they struggle when they get into new positions and they always shared with me the experience of on boarding at i to their new jobs and being thrown into the deep end of the pool. People telling them okay. You need to get going really fast. Learn a lot really fast and ever since then. I always had that in mind that someone needs to tackle that pain of people trying to get familiar with code bases really fast and really efficiently. Yes it just a unpacked i will. I've a friend who's from south korea and they also have. I believe it's a year or two years of military service and i guess you as someone who grew up over here. We're we're in the us. Were we all have that. I always thought that that was kind of like they. Teach you how to hold a weapon and they teach you and you kind of walk posts in the peel potatoes. Like just stuff like that. But it's actually really interesting to hear that as part of this service you could do a lot of really cool tech stuff and yet keep dive into that a little bit. Because that's something think is really fascinating right. I think we'll military is big. There are many different positions there. I was very lucky to have a meaningful technological service. I feel and i think one of the very special theory is that the military takes people who are eighteen years old. They're young without much experience. I mean how much experience can you get when you're eighteen and they need to train you very fast and effectively. So after three or four months you are already productive and creating a lot of value even if you haven't had a lot of experience beforehand so that is one thing that i think is very special also in the army because they get a lot of new people all the time and people get out of the army very frequently so there is a lot of knowledge sharing and new people coming in and going out to all the time cool so in israel is also a year. I know for south korea. It's a year. But what is the length for israel. So it's three years obligatory for men and two years for women placed. He used to be so and got for most people doing technological servicing gets longer to even five six or more years. Okay so that is definitely more time. Yeah you're right me for say three years or even two years you know if someone takes a year to ramp up then you've lost half of utility get from that person so yeah i could see. That's an environment where ramping up and good documentation is is really really important. Detract cool and so from that did you. What kind of took you into the private sector so actually it was a gradual for me and get to go to university after the military service as happens quite frequently also israel and i got to into mainly training programs because i really like teaching even when i started in the army so i was commander of the same course that i will do the student in so he got to teach in many different programs and i got to mix hands on experience with teaching and training experience in various places so at first it was a bit scattered so i taught in various programs before it started to i decided to focus and found my own initiative trying to really tackle the domain of in general cool. It makes sense and so you're kind of learning so. Was it more of like a gradual. Where you doing kind of some part time kind of consulting or what happened. That took you from the military to swim. You just jump into founding a company like how did that work okay. So at i i was doing part. Time in many training programs and one of them was called israel tech challenge. It's also worry. I met the other. Three co founders of swim which is an initiative that took a lot of people who have experienced from other countries then israel mostly and we taught them a lot of data science and computer science stuff but also cyber security and we help them come to israel and get incorporated with industry in israel So my there was to start the cybersecurity track and train. A lot of people there. And i did that in other places well. But specifically in israel textual every person who went through those programs went and started a new job at one of the companies here in israel and then i got to see in person. How many really talented people with a lot of experience. Who start a new job. Always get to feel the same challenges of starting a new position with a lot of existing code and how hard that was and they always talk to be a tourist. The difference from the experience of a training program like we held at israel tech challenge or everything was organized than we had held them and help them understand the learned a lot of things in a very short period of time and then they were just as to start working on tasks without a lot of guidance and i kind of felt that challenge through them a lot and then together with the other co founders of swim. We all work dic- together. I also worked with other places but they worked. I see most of the time so we all got to feel that challenge and we all got to feel that this is something we want to tackle together at some point. Yeah that totally makes sense. You know we have the saying where i work is very common called imposter syndrome..

south korea israel three years amir rosenbaum jason two years Rosenbaum eighteen tim three five years ago a year four months miami imposter syndrome one thing both eighteen years old one Three co founders
Code Documentation With Omer Rosenbaum and Tim Post

Programming Throwdown

01:45 min | 8 months ago

Code Documentation With Omer Rosenbaum and Tim Post

"Let's talk a little bit about your background. So what is kind of your journey that led you to either found or come to swim. And what's that story like maybe mare you go first and then tim. I love your stories. Woah yeah sure. So miami's omer based in israel and basically the first time. I got really amazing. Training experienced was in. The israeli military is israelis. We go through the military to Here and i had a really amazing experience learning a lot. In a very short period of time how to program and many other thinks and i got actually fascinated by how efficient teaching and learning can be And how much of an impact. It could have and i also got to teach a lot and train people in various places them in a program called israel challenge and i also get to lead a security academy checkpoint and to train a lot of people in many places and then i got to see them many times when they succeeded and also when they struggle when they get into new positions and they always shared with me the experience of on boarding at i to their new jobs and being thrown into the deep end of the pool. People telling them okay. You need to get going really fast. Learn a lot really fast and ever since then. I always had that in mind that someone needs to tackle that pain of people trying to get familiar with code bases really fast and really efficiently.

Israel TIM Miami
"omer " Discussed on X96

X96

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"omer " Discussed on X96

"Summer of hard Seltzer's Omer Center fact since we've been talking about it so much, apparently there is now a hoarding going on of hard sell people. I hope there isn't a shortage. People are worried that they're going to run out of it. All right, go ahead and hit that. Well, let's go. Following is a sponsored feature. It's getting nurse to Cole on the phone. She's here. I think the cold lamb, are you there? I am here. Are you guys were doing OK? You know, had a lot of hard seltzer this past weekend. We didn't How do you know I didn't The summer of hard cells are nice to got to got to jump on it. We'll know what it's not good for your dive, diabetes. Exactly thinking fact. Same thing. Yeah, that's true and cold. Let's talk about diabetes, but I notice you're using the word. Key toe and ketogenic diet and taquito diet. I've never been really quite clear what all that is either. Can you talk about that? Um, so cute, isn't it? Diet are where a person consumes a very low amount of carbohydrates and they to consume more fatty food. And high protein food. So the diet's essentially about 70 80% fat, so that could be like oily fish off a cut of nuts, speeds, olive oils. And then 10 to 20% protein and then really like 5 to 10%. I'm card on and what it says. Is it, um it crosses Causes a few things one. Your brain consumes the most glucose of your body. So it consumes about 120 g of glucose per day on because it can't get that from the body and the food anymore. It starts having the liver convert. And then as your body pulls this extra glucose out of your level liver, then your blood insulin levels start to drop. So, um, it decreases insulin levels. Um At last blood sugar levels. So so it Z good for the diabetes. If you got the diabetes to try and eat that sort of a diet. If you have type two diabetes or insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome? Yes. Take one. Um Hasn't been studied as much in Type One diabetic s O. I would definitely check with a doctor before doing any of that. Um, but ketoacidosis is where type One diabetics get into real trouble. But that's not what a kid summit diet stuff so everybody naturally goes into ketosis overnight like a mild range ketosis only fast for You know, 10 12 hours overnight. Um, that's why I get up in the middle of the night and have a snack. What are you doing down in the kitchen? Billet? Skeeto, sis. I'm in the budget to get it. Yeah, uh, I'm having bread. Huh? Interesting pride. Keep doing a ketogenic diet is that it's been shown to help people with places six ovaries, um, Alzheimer's disease, A SWAT, um, decreasing risk for cancers, and it's pretty interesting what they're learning more and more about. City Genesis. You any idea? What are the theories? People seem there. There are more and more cases of diabetes in the world. Um, why would that be happening? Um, e think there's a lot of different theories, um, from right, Just being more sedentary. Two more processed food. Um You know, I'm not sure we have the exact answer on that thing. I mean, I have more anecdotal things. And yes, but it is, But it is true that there is more diabetes now than there has just gets it works every year. S O. If you want. Go ahead if you want to find out about it, But Nightingale College has some resource is Yes. So we put up some information on increasing your fiber, which is a really great way to decrease insulin and blood sugar as love ketogenic diet. And counting carbs. So all different areas that you can look at in controlling blood, sugar and insulin levels. Okay s so just go If you just go to Nightingale College got Video et you. Thank you. You can find all that information and thank you, nurse Nicole Lamb. Yeah. Great game. Thank you. OK, Wei will.

Nicole Lamb 10 5 Cole 10% Nightingale College 20% Alzheimer's disease about 70 80% about 120 g six ovaries one 12 hours seltzer Two more processed food Wei will Seltzer Omer Center glucose per past weekend
"omer " Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"omer " Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Omer. However, the Food and Drug Administration has yet to approve vaccines for Children and at the moment older adults are having problems finding available shots found, he said. Getting Children vaccinated is a necessary step to securing widespread immunity to the coronavirus. Great Clugston, The White House. Meanwhile, the Biden administration has hit the brakes on a plan to vaccinate terrorists before Americans. The decision comes just days after was confirmed. The president had okayed vaccinating 9 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, along with nearly four dozen other terrorists being detained at Guantanamo ahead of US citizens. Announcement drew swift rebuke from New York firefighters along with families of victims of the attack and some GOP lawmakers. A Pentagon spokesman says the postponement will give them time to review protection protocols. Get most shots were scheduled to begin Monday. Rhonda roster reporting thousands of people on the streets of Russia again today, demanding the release of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. This wave of nationwide protests has rattled the Kremlin as many chant slogans against President Putin. The authorities have mounted a massive effort to stem the tide of demonstrations after tens of thousands turned out last weekend. It's the most widespread show of discontent Russia's seen in many years. The Los Angeles Times says one of the biggest current virus vaccination science in the nation temporarily shut down yesterday because dozens of anti vaccine protesters blocked the entrance, stalling hundreds of people waiting in line four hours more on these stories of town hall that calm This is the entertainment answer. The critics Choice Association announced their TV series nominees for the 26 annual Critics Choice Awards. The winners will be revealed Live on the CW. Sunday, March 7th, with Taye Diggs, returning to host for his third consecutive time this year to Netflix.

Russia Food and Drug Administration president Khalid Sheikh Mohammed President Putin Taye Diggs Biden administration Alexei Navalny Choice Association Los Angeles Times GOP White House Pentagon Netflix Guantanamo New York
interview With Sana Saeed

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:36 min | 1 year ago

interview With Sana Saeed

"Welcome to abuse congruence. The american muslim experience episode one. Oh wait. I'm sorry you're codes and as usual. I enjoin by. Hey welcome back listeners. Welcome back We this is our first episode of twenty twenty one but it feels like a lots already happened in this very short year or short lived year. So far we've got a lot but here we are on good to be back and get you back with. You are things i guess. All things being equal These k- Have some family members were affected by cove. Unfortunately so bring them Just distracted long. I mean china. Try not to get distracted by polit political stuff and keeping on it super interesting but other than that just getting back in the swing of things in life and that of course keeping the family members who who were in their situation some. Yeah i mean interesting about the political stuff being kind of The least of all adjectives as you describe it but anyway we're super excited to have our guest on the show today and omer if you wanna honored as long as marquess. Absolute son is the is the host in senior producer who has been with. Aj plus since two thousand fourteen hoping. Watch the channel. She's a canadian so most of her life in the us and is interested in politics. Religion culture end She works to stay out arguments on twitter as she has a background in media critique and analysis in has had worked in appear in the new york times the la times courts the guardian salon. And of course aj so. Hey thanks so much for having me happy to be here. Yeah it's great and so you. Avoid twitter fights that that that defeats the whole purpose of revenue on this show. I mean usually told us that when we were booking. I'm i'm jay. Try to successful at avoiding twitter fights. That's right. I'm relatively new to twitter and I've unfortunately gone up on the deep end and But which is some of the stuff. I'd love to talk to you about as someone who obviously studies media is involved in media and I i i'm sure as social media being a part of that so But yeah i guess before. We get into that meteors stuff on not to say that Will be what i do want to start off with is not me but i'd love to kind of talk about your background in as we like to call it the origin story. So tell us about says aids origin story and We we'd love to hear that. I know that you did spend some time in the bay area. So i'm i know that's where our paths crossed on. However i know there's so much more to the story we love to hear that and you could start way back as a as you'd like sure yeah So i was actually born in pakistan. I was born in lahore and My family background is kashmiri And we're lake whereas a lot of kashmir's inbox on her infant job as well. We're like the pajama fight. Kashmiri's but like my family is extreme has actually retained a lot of kashmiri customs and identity. It's been that's always been really interesting. The way we kind of have balanced those two identities very strongly And like my family also emigrated from kashmir basically at like a little bit before and during the the petition. Yeah during the partition. So yeah i was born in exxon. And when i was about like four or five months old. My parents My dad had already moved at that point. He had moved to the united states. Kind of like take the family business there And my mom. And i filed suit and in nineteen eighty eighty seventy eight. We were in In new york. So when i was in new yorker basically up until the end of ninety nine early two thousand so grew up in initially flushing queens and then eventually to Moved onto a long island. Washington long island which is where i grew up And your basic so. We have citizenship. The only person in my family who has us citizenship is actually my brother. Since he was born there so we then applied for canadian citizenship and ended up in canada and moved to vancouver. I was there for up until i had to go to college then. I moved to montreal. I went to mcgill where i did. I from my undergrad. I studied political science in italy studies. And then i continued on ethicon decided. I'm like don't wanna do law school. Do i want do grad school. I ended up applying to only one loss one one grad school and because my french fluency at that point was not that great. I ended up not getting into the mcgill law school because they do require french fluency so I went to grad school. And i did islamic studies and that was To be honest it was the greatest blessing and it was the greatest blessing. Not because oh you know. You're studying islam except it was a blessing because Doing that masters program really kind of set the stage for i would say my approach to

Twitter Kashmir La Times New York Times China JAY Lahore United States Bay Area Exxon Pakistan Ethicon Mcgill Law School Mcgill New York Washington Vancouver Montreal Canada Italy
The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:31 min | 1 year ago

The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

"Hey everyone. This is diffuse congruence the American Muslim experience episode one, hundred, four I'm sorry and as always I'm joined by my co host Hey. Welcome back listeners I know we've been Nakanishi episodes out without much lapse, which is great on. But we wanted to have a very special show. I know we've talked a lot in the past about the election we've talked about Covid, but this is sort of the the the sort of ruminations of men Omer, who by no means experts, but this time. We are joined by a very special guest who is an expert in this field and so he is a political consultant and so omer. Why don't you tell us who we have on the show and we're super excited to welcome our guest to shout absolutely and we are T. minus twelve days from the election and honored to have most of the knees on the show. Is Outreach strategic founder and president you began his career New York using corporate clients. But after moving to Texas, he shifted to advising successful campaigns for state legislators, mayors, members of Congress in public institutions. The is a national opinion leader with over six hundred appearances on CNN and Fox News Msnbc and CBS. News. The Atlantic names as a top democratic consultant in Texas and Texas monthly person as one of the top Democrats to watch most of is the chairman of the Transportation Advocacy Group board a director of the Texas Lithium a member of the Unity National Bank board among other civic and business affiliations. He's also provide extensive consulting for the Department of Homeland Security End must've wasn't the show you'll have to educate me on the pronunciation of lithium. Texas likes you. Okay. Got It. So, welcome A. Twelve days away from the election. There's a there's a debate tonight you must be very busy. Yeah it's you know almost fifty million Americans have already voted. and as you approach selection day, you know by the time we reach election almost seventy five percent of voters have already bought it. So it election is a season more than his day and this this particular election cycle people are really taking advantage of it across the country we've seen record turnouts and so yes, all of us are are enthralled with it in our busy with an it's an exciting time. To be a voter and as a Democrat is in. I. That's the that's that's the understanding I have of your background in your take. Early voting is a good thing. Correct. Voting a whole is a good thing. I mean, I think fat I, mean Tetris. We became a majority minority state in two thousand, four, sixteen years ago But the the the representation whether it's in Congress with the State House or. At a state level is that reflective of the state's population and that's because Texas not a republican state or democratic state for years Texas has been a nonvoting sick. And as voter participation goes up. In the cycle, you're gonNA start seeing the faces and the backgrounds of those that we lack mirror more of the population of Texas and as as we see that across the country. Yeah. One of the things that we. I know at least a couple of weeks ago was kind of a new story was the governor Abbot kind of restricting where people could I think drop off mail in ballots rate I think it was sort of like Harris County, had the same number as any smaller county in West Texas somewhere. So has that has that improved any he he has made that decision in because of it. It again, it's it's an attempt to create. Chaos is an attempt to make it harder for people to vote. Right. Now the just like while we're on. The Texas Supreme Court just ruled that we can have drive thru voting in Harris County. This was a a contention and and literally just as I was getting on the court just ruled which is really important that if you make voting easier for people if you give people multiple options to vote. UC's turnout go up in this what we've seen in Harris. County. Turnouts going up everywhere around the country including Texas. But especially in Harris County because we Harris County has become a democratic counties of the last election cycle and because of that the leadership that's there. Wants to be inclusive wants to hear the voices of people that live in this county. And made many things easier including having drive thru voting like if you can drive through and do a banking transaction if you can drive through and an order the the best fast food. which we have in Texas because we are. Right. We should be able to vote. And I think that that's important. You know the this cycle I wanNA thank cove nineteen. People were given a task for covert ninety blood tests while they were in their cars. So we can do all of that white. Canton.

Texas Harris County Texas Supreme Court Consultant Omer Congress West Texas Covid Founder And President State House Canton New York Department Of Homeland CNN Harris Unity National Bank CBS Chairman Transportation Advocacy Group
Man In US Illegally Charged In Houston Police Officer’s Murder Could Face Death Penalty

Houston's Morning News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Man In US Illegally Charged In Houston Police Officer’s Murder Could Face Death Penalty

"Since 1989 with a rap sheet, now charged with capital murder of a Houston police sergeant and attempted capital murder against a second officer. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against 51 year old Elmer Manzano, a longtime criminal who gunned down Sergeant Harold Preston an officer Courtney Waller during a domestic violence call IRA Mehlman, with the Federation for American Immigration Reform, says this is the result of sanctuary City policies. You have local government officials who are making political decisions because they are yielding to demands from special interest groups and not protecting the interests of public safety. Chief Aren't Azevedo disputed that claim? Omer Rolando Manzano is solely the person responsible for a cop. Murder of a police officer. Despite Manzano's previous interactions with police, the chief said he did nothing to prompt officers to ask for his citizenship papers, Nick Cranky bitch. NewsRadio, 7 40, Katie ar e. All right, So he is solely responsible for the murder who is solely responsible

Omer Rolando Manzano Murder Officer Federation For American Immigr Ira Mehlman Courtney Waller Newsradio Harold Preston Azevedo Nick Cranky Houston
"omer " Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"omer " Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"You're usually going to hit for average doesn't really matter about your exit velocity, which is not hi. Hard hit rate is actually above average. Well, just fine. Dr Stroke will serve him very well. Miguel Cabrera. My goodness, the 32 off the plate inside. That's a good advance. He's learned even without an increase in walks. He's definitely taken. Jimson closed Tuesday. Pitches in at bats that have resulted in him that you have been saying, Listen to me. He is recognizing pictures. He started recognized pitches a lot better. This year, and you don't see him go for many bad pitches he will once in a while, like everybody That's just part of the deal reaches for the third time today. That brings up Jonathan scope. Smeltzer Works third base out of the rubber flips over the first two. Dr Reyes back Omer, fifth round pick of the Dodgers. Four years ago out of Junior college in Houston, Texas, and then traded to the Twins in the Brian Dozier deal two years ago with the trade deadline. First pitch to Jonathan Scope, changeup low in a way 87 Tigers in the eighth, and they'd love to add on a couple more. McGill boy was waiting on deck scope is one for four today, double last inning, and he scored A big two out hit from Jamir Candelaria. Smelter sets takes a long look at Reyes that 10 swinging to drive into the left field corner. That one's deep on that one is one hop up against the wall over the wall. It'll be a ground rule double. Otherwise, Reyes almost surely would have scored from first, but it jumped up over the wall. Ground rule double puts runners at 2nd and 3rd for Miguel Cabrera. Another good stroke. I'm telling you, you pick you pick up this game in the sixth, and you see what the Tigers have done when they were trailing great at bats. Great at bats. Jimmy, get there! Get there pitches. Not missing it. They get hangers. They hit him. Maybe some good pitches. They hit him. There's another. A slider. Looks like it's supposed to be a slider. Our half of the plate got to extend your right if that ball bounces in there, there's AH doesn't bounce in. There's a run and he's at second base. That's just too bad. But you still got an opportunity with a big man coming up in another good swing. Late in the game. You love to see the swings get better, and that's what's happened with the Tigers all started with Cabrera's leadoff single in the sixth. So now Jim the last 18 batters, starting with that single, the Tigers nine hits, plus a walk in the last 18 trips to the plate with two home runs. Brera at the plate. Chance to break this thing. Open a little bit ground ball to the right side of the base hit into center field. Let's go to score. Two races in scope is in and the Tigers now with a 10 7 lead over the Minnesota Twins. That's the Hall of Famer. Swing, right? They're all speed pitch away. They knew how they were playing to the left side..

Miguel Cabrera Tigers Dr Reyes Jonathan Scope Minnesota Twins Jimson Jimmy Dr Stroke Jamir Candelaria Brian Dozier Dodgers Smeltzer Houston Texas McGill Jim
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

07:22 min | 1 year ago

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

"Welcome to episode Ninety Four. Congruence, the American Muslim experience we are very excited to have Mahmoud Abbas the roof on the show today and when I say we it's Preveza and and Myself Omar and sorry co host of the show. But we're super excited. We've been waiting for this episode for for a while. Now as you all know. My who roof is a NBA veteran. and he's got a lot to a lot of great things to to talk to us about. His experiences in the NBA his departure from the NBA. His experience as an American Muslim. And everything all the cool things. He's doing right now on the circuit and the big three and and helping out young kids get healthy and fit, and so on, so we're going to learn all about that. We're going to hear a little about his youth. His NBA experience his life after the NBA in the US abroad all these things I want to cover, and I am excited because my mood of the roof was a childhood hero of mine. I grew up in small town. Watching Washington play? And this is really exciting for me personally so welcome to the show brother Mahmoud. We are really excited. An Omer sorta wasted no time bearing the lead as it were It's been a minute since we've actually been on this show. We had a little bit of a hiatus. as I imagine most of. Most content providers out there just trying to sort of make the most of these sort of. Challenging Times of trying to secure people in trying to find the time in the space to record, so we are really excited and and especially grateful that ma'am. Louis was able to take the time out of his demanding busy schedule to be with us on, so thank you again as an I. Echo, everything, immerse, said not growing up in a small town so much, but you were also sort of NBA hero of mine. I came of age in the nineties when I came of age I. Mean Terms of sort of my My my my obsession with the NBA was back in the nineties I lived in Houston Texas. Texas, so you can imagine memo Ta I. Was Huge Rockets Fan huge Chemo Lodge Fan and was fortunate enough to be there when they want those back to back. Championships way back in the nineties, so certainly your era of the NBA, and as closely as we looked at looked up to a Hakeem, being a local on sort of hero of you're sort of the the other Muslim in the League and so is equally exciting, so but like I said we have a lot to sort of unpack as we like to see on the show but where we like to often like to begin is kind of your origin story so. Maybe tell us about you know Chris Jackson and his life, and you know in and you growing up in the south, and in those experiences were like yeah, and I'm really really interested in hearing first time you touch the basketball, and when you really felt at home with the ball in your hand, and all those things I'm going gonNA. I'm going to be jumping in and asking questions because as you can see, I'm pretty exciting go. Numb note will your Ford. Remind me of missing anything Actually I. Can you want to? Start with that verse. First Time. Just the basketball really was. I was nineteen years old Nights to play Vassallo. My brothers Some reason always ended up playing with. Older older guys in now. When I look back I, said you know that's that was a huge plus for me, because those are the guys issue are fast strong when you finally get to your age group. It becomes easy play. John Age because you've been playing with older gasps. But I remember one day I was outside. Central Elementary. In I was playing game twenty one and this lady. Her real name is miss. Cookie or miss asa letter. What we call him is cooking and she was strong African American women like she. She didn't man screaming at you getting on your back in those days, even spanky. At all be playing and she said listen, she said come in Chris come in. Of course you go over there and I went over there, she said listen try out. I didn't even know that right next to me in the gym. It would try elementary. Right. Of Fourth Great in. I said Miss you'RE GONNA have to ask my mother, she said. Don't worry about it just going out. And because she saw something in me when I was playing I win in. Playing Street Ball I didn't know anything about organized while I. Mean I'm taking it driven through people and I'm making my shots. Coach added me listed son. You, gotTa pass the ball. And make a long story short. My first game in elementary school I remember. This guy named Aaron Ross. I'm nervous. Right man would i. do you follow me? By the end of the game. Of the game coach was giving me ISOS telling him get out my way. I ended up with twenty one points, my first game, and just to see the crowd, and the excitement man I was like man I love this atmosphere. is feels especially a little. You a black kid coming out of the ghetto. You know, mother you. Know File Right A. Grown up in poverty surrounded by drug addiction, mother had an eighth grade education. So you're looking at something, and you get this attention from a skill that you have. And now it's dawning on you the May. This could be something. Right. This could be a way out and so that was like really for me the beginning. That moment when they were screaming and yelling. And it wasn't it wasn't. It wasn't like pure. Not like. Your College College Teammate Shaquille. It wasn't like you were this massive. You know massive Guy Hulking Guy. You're probably based. There probably saw your quickness in your your agility new shooting right that that they that they liked yeah. I was I was born with. Vast which muscles being quick and explosive, but until you meant after that moment. I began to wake up. My regimen was four o'clock in the morning. Then I would wake up at five and for years. My Mother did know this was happening. Because I'm not about down a mother her to cut it off. Work to I mean at. And so I would wait until she left I. Heard the call. Crank the not get up. Get myself written. It's still dark outset at the attack. And I decided at that age of of Nanan Jianye said man. This is what I want to become. Be The best. and. I knew that I'd have to come up with a strategy because I'm small to give myself the best opportunity to do that something. What can you do that? Nobody else or not, too. Many people don't dawn at this aid. And I, just decided man. You GotTa Get Earth.

NBA Basketball Chris Jackson Mahmoud Abbas Texas Omar United States John Age Aaron Ross Nanan Jianye Central Elementary Ford Vassallo Washington Houston Louis Hakeem ASA Shaquille
Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

Beyond!

03:56 min | 2 years ago

Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

"Did mention sort of the one substantial actual bit of PS Five News. We got inbetween shows of course covered Mark Sunnis in-depth tech talk about the PS five. From last week that was originally meant to be. Gd Talk so if you didn't check out that episode you go listen to last week's to figure our thoughts on that a very complex discussion but after the fact. Sony updated their playstation blog. Post about this not once but twice to clarify some of the backward compatibility confusion that stemmed from was unclear about mark. Sunni's fifty minute long explanation. What could possibly leave room for clarification? Of course no. It was very buttoned up into the point and nothing uncertain for fans know there was some Scuttlebutt even having Turnley about whether or not cerny was discussing the fact that all of the library would be backward compatible and only one hundred games would be available launch or if only one hundred games would be available in the PS fives boost mood from ps four or some other combination of. Maybe we'll only actually get to play. Twenty Games backward compatible The update that the playstation blog actually put out was with all of the amazing games. Npr's catalog we've devoted significant efforts to enable our fans to play their favorites NPS five. We believe that the Omer overwhelming majority of the four thousand. Ps Four titles will be playable. Ps fought were expecting backward compatible. Titles will run any boosted frequency on. Ps five so that they can benefit from higher or more stable frame rates and potentially higher resolutions were currently evaluating Games on a title by title basis to spot any issues that need adjustment from the original software developers in his presentation. Mark Cerny provided a snapshot into the top one hundred most played ps four titles demonstrating. How well are backward? Compatibility efforts are going. We are have already tested. Hundreds of titles are preparing to thousands more as we move toward launch. We will provide updates on backward compatibility along with much more news in the months ahead. Stay tuned. So that's kind of worrisome. Honestly we dug into it a little bit last week but it it sort of makes me think that That fans are going to be finding problems in these games that weren't caught initially by Sony's in house developers and testers because the if they're going through on a case by case basis. I don't know if that's how the xbox hard works because their message was very clear of just like all the old games work here now whereas playstation they're like what we it seems like they basically prioritized that most played once the most popular ones Which is good. It's a good start Indefinitely better than the complete lack of backwards compatibility. We've had them. Ps Four but It makes it seemed like to me. You're going to play some like you know. Sort of niche game two years from now and find a bunch of technical hiccups in it. And then you're GONNA ask them the patch amount and they're going to say we don't. We can't justify the time and resources to do that. Like I have the playstation now APP. I don't know where I might have stuck that in the folder that might be just like pushed all the way down the train from other games of playing before it Because it's something I don't really use a lot but it's also like they. They've changed up the languaging on that a little bit when it started it was just like a streaming thing and now you can download some games and so I think they really need to scream from the rooftop sue and not just for people like awesome people listen to show but like you know con. Consumer Carl or whatever like the guy walks into a store. Yeah I mean like right now. You can download. Ps Four NPS Games and play them off line. And that's not really the thing that I think they're shouting about enough because I've thought about man. I would love to revisit some. Ps Two games. I don't have the chance to. I can download these re masters of the final fantasy games. When they're on sale but game passes get literally every remastered final fantasy game from the past like two generations. So why wouldn't I just wait to play

PS Mark Cerny Sony Turnley NPR Carl
Trump downplays coronavirus threat, notes ‘common flu’ kills thousands every year

All Things Considered

03:54 min | 2 years ago

Trump downplays coronavirus threat, notes ‘common flu’ kills thousands every year

"The World Health Organization now says the threat of a pandemic is very real because the virus has gained a foothold in so many countries president trump has been tweeting a different message the president claims the concerns are overblown he's even suggested the media and Democrats are trying to inflame the situation NPR's White House correspondent Tamar Keith reports president trump has consistently keyed in on the number of cases in the US even as the lack of widely available testing meant there was no way of really knowing how many cases there were he has talked about the positives and downplayed the worst case scenario and consistently the ground has shifted beneath him on February twenty sixth president trump took the rare step of going to the White House briefing room to update the public on his administration's response the first case of coronavirus not link to travel what's known as community transmission had just been diagnosed but trump suggested without any scientific basis there was a chance it could all go away where the low level as they get better we take them off the list so that we're going to be pretty soon at only five people that we could be at just one or two people over the next short period of time he was wrong very wrong trump frequently inflates numbers to make himself look better from economic indicators to crowd size and with corona virus he has garbled the science on how soon a vaccine might be available and repeatedly pushed the idea that those critical of the federal response are just trying to hurt him politically this comes at a time when it is very important to be clear with the public says Saad Omer director of the Yale institute of global health and these kinds of public health emergencies we need to be able to trust our leaders be it public health scientific or political leaders it matters he says because there could come a time when Y. spread quarantines are required to slow the spread of the virus and then you need the public to believe the people telling them what they need to do so over suggests politicians stick to basic messages like encouraging hand washing and let the scientist handle the science people understand if the president or any of the political leaders are not exports and everything and they said look this is my guy or my gal who is in charge of the scientific aspect and they will tell you what is happening and what we need to do and what our preparations he says elected leaders shouldn't play armchair epidemiologist but that just isn't trump's style on Friday he claimed to have a natural ability to understand the science trump was at the centers for disease control and prevention wearing a red campaign hat with lab equipment whirring around him as he held court with reporters for some forty five minutes as of the time I left the plane with you we had two hundred and forty cases you've got someone's workers on a very fine network known as fox news front batted down questions about potential measures to shore up the economy and falsely suggested that everyone that wanted to be tested for corona virus could get tested asked about the grand princess cruise ship with sick passengers on board trump said he would rather the passengers stay at sea I would rather because I like the numbers being where they are I don't need to have the numbers double because of one ship that was our fault the numbers doubled over the weekend and it had nothing to do with the ship which docked in Oakland today this morning on CNN Anthony Fauci the infectious disease specialist helping to lead the national response had a message for people who are older or have underlying conditions like heart disease and diabetes stay at a crowds don't do travel above all don't go near a cruise ship don't go on a cruise ship it was a stark warning that came even as president trump tweeted quote nothing is shut down life in the economy

World Health Organization
Powell scores 34, No. 12 Seton Hall beats Georgetown 78-71

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Powell scores 34, No. 12 Seton Hall beats Georgetown 78-71

"Miles now scored thirty four points while Jarod Rhoden chipped in with twelve as number twelve Seton hall got a big early then hung on to beat Georgetown seventy eight seventy one the pirates got off to a sixteen nothing start to the name of the holy as methodically chipped away cutting the pirates lead to three on two separate occasions with the win the pirates moved to seventeen five overall and in first place in the big east at nine and one pirates head coach Kevin Willard was happy his team held off the whole is charge I was glad that we got off to a good start and you know we've we've we've battle on the road to finish awesome games on the road so I was I was kind of confident once we kind of got under the five that we have some guys make some players the lawyers were led by Omer York seven with nineteen points and fifteen rebounds cry Christ Washington

Miles Jarod Rhoden Seton Hall Kevin Willard Omer York Washington
Measles, Los Angeles And Los Angeles County discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Measles, Los Angeles And Los Angeles County discussed on Morning Edition

"Martin health officials are racing to contain the spread of measles at to college campuses in Los Angeles, more than two hundred university students and staff at UCLA and Cal State LA have been ordered into quarantine after potentially being exposed to the highly contagious disease. This comes after thirties declared a measles outbreak in Los Angeles County earlier this week, according to the CDC there are now currently six hundred ninety five reported cases of these those in twenty two states that's the highest number on record since measles was declared eliminated from the US back in two thousand sought Omer is an infectious disease specialist at Emory University in Atlanta, and

Measles Los Angeles Los Angeles County Emory University Ucla CDC United States Atlanta
"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"We're leveraging them we're not co editor from visual studio code, and we're trying to tackle some of the big problems step production bugging brings with it. First of all put up bugging, his very costly. Right. When you think about the cost of every software bug when you find the bug that you just made a minute ago. Okay. That has some cost, but it's pretty negligible. If QA engineer finds a problem, and you have to fix it. That's slightly more costly because you have to think fun with them, and they have to verify that you actually fix thing. But of course, when we get into production debugging, that's when everybody feels like the whole building is burning and we have to fix it right now because customers are being dissatisfied with our product, and we're potentially losing a lot of money and production debugging has a lot of technical challenges to so the as someone who's done a lot. Consulting in big very successful enterprise companies. I've often seen that companies fail at production debugging at the very first step of figuring out. You know, what our PD files in? How given that? I have a dump file how do I even find a version of the source code that matches the binary that were in production at the moment we failed, and we got the dump file you gotta be test for days to figure that stuff out creating much. Yeah. But also bring up the point that used to be the only place you would do this visual studio, right, which you you need to pay for. Plus, you know, maybe how the odds go plug in or any other number of things like your ops. Guys. Don't have that stuff. And they don't want it. Right. Exactly. So we're trying to bridge the gap between Devon ops here because we feel that having set up a CIC deep pipeline doesn't end when you have a big button that says deploy on it that actually. The software automatically. I mean, that's great. But when you actually hit that button, you're going to break things you're gonna bring some new bugs into production and going to cause some customers some pain because of that. So we're trying to add that aspect of production debugging into Azure, DevOps where for each deployment inside release management and for each separate environments so QA staging production. You'll be actually able to see what are the new exceptions that occurred starting with this release. What are the exceptions that are happened before in are still occurring in this release? And what are our regressions? What are the exceptions that have already supposedly being been fixed because we have had a work item tracking them, and we resolved it, but have somehow crept back into the system and the main volume proposition is just one click to the bug. I want to have a.

QA engineer editor
"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"And let's let's stick a little bit more new exceptions. Because you know, when when an exception happens thirteen levels deep and then by the time, you get to it you've got this huge stack. And you have no idea usually I mean, sometimes you can look at that and say there's the root causes of that. But you know, a lot of times things happen that you don't you don't really know by looking at the stack. Right. How do you? How do you ameliorate that problem? Right. And I think that what usually happens when you have that problem for me, at least is that you click on the little button individual shooters as you details. And then you go to inner exception, Andy inner inner exception, Andy inner inner inner inner except Jack and he tried to. Narrow find out the call staggered anew. Probably copied pasted into notepad just the that you can find the line number where that original exception actually came from. So we would go to this is the feature that you know, at conferences makes people gas is that we just take that away by giving you a single button that opens up a the exception trail window, which gives you a breadcrumb view into all the different inner exceptions. And then you can go through a full interactive stack trace in click anywhere on it to see where the exception pass through the really what you really care about. In most cases is just you wanna see the innermost frame of the innermost exception. Right. You wanna see where the exception came from originally? So we just added a button that does that in that makes all the people clap. Yeah. We've also added a feature where you can would just one button go in Google or stack overflow like a good developer. Would of course, come to see what that except actually means. And because we've been showing that them a lot in Microsoft conferences. We now have a fabulous new feature. You guessed it, a Bing. So don't worry or you know, that we're correct. And you can also search being I gotta give a little love here because I don't think Google maybe I just can't find a Google doesn't have a way to sort by date the things that come back in being does. Oh, that's true. Actually. And I don't wanna I don't wanna see a solution to a problem that somebody had that I'm having and they had at ten years ago. You know, I wanna see something in the last year. The only problem with being in that is that every time you change, the the query what you're searching for you also have to change the date doesn't stick. So big team. Listen up make that date, stick and fault mode of always give me the latest. Exactly. Yeah. Anyway, that's being attaching to processes is something that is painful for me, usually, and I just don't do it. I usually find another way to browsers, especially. But usually find another way to attach to a process. What do you guys do to help that? Well, we have a nice feature called quick attach which basically allows you to very easily attached to the same. If you're constantly attaching to the same process. We'll just give you a list of here are the process, you probably are wanting to attach to and if you're a keyboard guy, like I am we'll even give you an option to attach a shortcut to that particular process. So nice for me, I'm constantly attaching to visual studio ride because I'm constantly debugging debugging that sometimes debugging other debugging because story of my life, and I have shortcut in quick attach shift out one will attach to the events to visual studio. So I can happily debugged the bugger with just one piece. Oh, Heo Mark. You wanna give us a little bit the backstory where did Oz code come from? Sure. So it's actually an interesting story. I think also was originally born on my very first job as a software engineer where I was working in the medical imaging industry. So I was actually working on the software that the doctors and the conditions at the hospital all used to operate a CAT scanner and as junior developer I felt very anxious in that job..

Google Andy Bing Jack Microsoft junior developer Heo Mark software engineer developer ten years
"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"It's it's the small things in debugging. There. We spend the most time on trying to their it onto the case. That matters. Exactly. And I think that. To me, the the real challenge in debugging is is equal parts, intellectual and psychological. So you're trying to reason about the program in a very rational clear thinking way, but the thing is is that when we're debugging were often trying to solve the same bug for an hour and yet another hour and yet another hour and sometimes days, and we keep failing at it. And that's where we sort of brush up against how we as humans deal with failure. To me. There's only two ways of using bugger one of them is a complete and utter waste of your time. And the other is what I call having quality time with the bugger. So, you know. Seeing that somebody's wasting their time using any buggery is really easy. If you walk past them, you just see them sort of staring blankly to computer street, right? And their finger keeps tapping that F ten button. And if you walk past realize that person has no idea what they're doing anymore. They just really frustrated, and they really wanna go home. Whereas having quality time with the the bugger is what I call applying the scientific method. Religiously. So if you make sure that by the time your finger goes for that F five button, you already have clear hypothesis in your head of what your theory is of wide code is not doing what it you expect it to behave, and then you to prove or disprove that hypothesis and then move onto the next office. That's the only truly productive way to do debugging. It's just that as humans, you know, were fallible, and we get really frustrated, and that's why I think that these depowered of being productive by knowing all the small nuts and bolts of. The debate is really really powerful. Because oftentimes that's the thing that makes the difference between narrowing down root cause of a bug bugging. Just a matter of minutes rather than spending days on the same issue. So you talked about no reference exceptions early on..

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"All right. And we're back. We're talking Omer, AVI. We're talking about time travel debugging, traveling to the future us code and all the cool things. It does I'm curious about how is code enhances some of the debugging tools that we already have in visual studio. You are adding some new features. But you're also enhancing things like well. Let's just start with breakpoints. Sure. So we'd break points Osco gives you a better ways to use trace points, for example. And for those of you who are familiar traits points of visual studio feature that's been there for decades. But when I talk about debugging around the world, I find that most people aren't familiar with it. So with trace point is just like a break point. Except every time we hit it. We don't break into the debugging. We just write some logging. And that makes it a really great tool for wilty, Fresno debugging because if you try to debugged the a multi threaded application than normal way, you know, how to. Bug which is just hit a ten and then theft undefinitive denniston. That just breaks down. Right because what will happen invariably about one hundred percent of the cases, his you hit a fan or a five and suddenly you get an exception on a different Fred. And then you'll hit a fence more. And you get a break point on yet, another Fred, and it just quickly becomes a problem of trying to juggle too many balls in your head at once. So trace points is a great visual studio feature that allows you to add to your program while you're debugging it and also just gives you a much nicer editor for that. And a fully featured logger to see those love inside of of visual studio in a much more convenient way. So in a lot of the features we just embellish or complement what visual studio what features studio already gives you another example of that. I guess is the data tips window where you know, if you hover over some variable, and you look at a long list of of of customer objects for that matter, it's sometimes really hard to find what you're actually looking for. You end up spending a lot of time just peering through trying to find this particular property or the particular field that that matters to you. So we do a lot of work to allow you to customize the way an object looks like in the bugger would just a couple of clicks. Like, I want to start this these property the first name and last name in the ID are the ones I really care about. And then whenever you look at those objects again until you bugger ause could rule remember that those are the properties that are important to you also give you a very fast search feature. So we sort of if you know, what you're looking for, you know, what is called or, you know, the value that you're looking for we give you a Google like experienced just instantly blazed through all different properties and find that that one property that you're looking for. I also like conditional breakpoints can you talk about that? Absolutely. So when you're trying to, you know, find a particularly terrain of a loop where the one each ration- out of that two thousand eight to rations that actually matters to you what I sometimes on myself doing is just being an ten monkey, you know, then then if then if incentives because I get a bit frustrated with the act of writing out, a conditional breakpoint, I always get them wrong. Somehow so Oscar has a way where you can from within data to window when you're actually looking at an object. You can just do a few clicks on the Fulton properties that you care about. And also will write out the conditional breakpoint for you. So it's just a nice little touch to give you a faster way away to move fast. At if I was in that situation. I would put an if statement, you know, on on the data, you know, if if customer equals forty five thousand nine hundred. Seventeen break, right. But it's a pain to do that. It is it is often really much opinion..

Fred Fresno Osco theft Google editor Oscar one hundred percent
"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Give you an experience where the more you use link and more functional more beautiful stylish our programming. It will actually be easier to debugged rather than harder. So one of the ways we do that is we actually give you these numeric indicators that show you how many items came from each part. So the select operator give you one hundred items and after the where clause we filtered it down to only twenty five items, etc. Etc. And then after you actually, click a button, it actually a blows up to show you a link debugging visualization where you can go to any item in the in the link pipeline in actually visually how it passed through each operator how it was transformed and so forth. Wow. That's reminds me of a query, by example, to a we, you know, same thing, you writing sequel statement outside of visual studio 'cause you're trying to bug it understand how it's going to behave before you embedded. So say, you just can't do that with link sounds pretty cool. Thank you. Yeah. For me, one of the things that worms, my heart. The most about Linke bugging is that I'm actually seeing people use it as an educational tool. So a lot of people used to learn link using the one hundred and one link samples documentation at Microsoft put out and nowadays, if you will a visual link lexicon, you'll see that a lot of people are using this article that some guy I'd never met on the internet wrote that actually teaches you what each link operator does. And by seeing the odds code visualizations. I always used link pad for that. But it's very much. They query, by example solution. Absolutely. I'm also a big link pad fan. I think that that's a. Very good.

Linke Microsoft one link
"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"omer " Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"So it's it's pretty good. It's not based they're not nickel and diming you. They're just charging a flat fee per month. Which I thought was good. And you know, their DOC's are great their videos are good. I just had a really good experience for me to integrate it into an app. So three o'clock this morning. I was like. Yeah. So. Middle of the night successes. Yup. Good job guys. All right, Richard. Who's talking to us grabbed a common dovish show, fourteen sixty eight when we did with Dina Goldstein back at NBC Oslo twenty seventeen and that was talking about event tracing for windows, which turned into quitted long discussion about logging in debugging and so forth and her air extend all said this. He said, I think Richard touched on an important point. We as developers need to talk to the ops guys about logging too often I've seen in done logging that serves the purposes of developer, but not the support staff, we could actually start by talking to them about anything would be a good start gap. That would be a good idea. How about that? Can I actually help you? It starts out as a debugging tool. But what mostly makes sense of developer could be completely useless to ops. My company sells devices that run complex software, and our customer expects our product just work, which of course, it doesn't. Always do you know because it software as we sell more device. Sport burden increases, it becomes more and more important to manage that officially since customers cannot be relied on to give useful advice. Besides it doesn't work. You have a good story like that. That's JD w technology. Right. It just doesn't work right? Doesn't work the logs become a more important tool for our support staff to fix problems. Having good logs saves money..

developer Richard Dina Goldstein Oslo NBC
Why Ecuador Uses The Dollar?

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:56 min | 3 years ago

Why Ecuador Uses The Dollar?

"We didn't have to change the currency before. And after they have soup gray as their type of money now, they have dollars. How did they get the money for Ecuador without causing inflation and doesn't affect the money supply here in the USA, and how did they get the money there? How in how come they don't do it for other countries like them in the Republican Mexico into lumpia Omer gosh younger for president Sunday. Right reheard this super question. And after we listened to station I were like, we'll get back to you mean research. It's not that we don't know the answer because we do. It's just that you know, we want to care. Care something special for you. Right after the break. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from season two of choice. Allergy in original podcast from Charles Schwab, hosted by Katie milkman choice. Allergy reveals the hidden psychological forces that can lead people to make expensive mistakes. Listen at Schwab dot com slash podcast. Support also comes from pay pow when it comes to grow in your business. Pay pal is your trusted payments partner for today and tomorrow processing over twenty five million payments per day, set up your business account for free at pay pal dot com slash growth. So bianca's question. Now, there are a few parts to this question. So we wanted to break it down. So we could answer it properly. The first why does Ecuador use the dollar now instead of its old currency the sucre second where did Ecuador get all these dollars third. Does it affect the money supply in the US, and why don't other countries use the dollar to answer all of the parts of this question. We wanted to go to an expert. So we called up in a communist was studied Latin America. And in fact, just got back from a trip to Ecuador Sebastian Edwards on the Henry Ford. The second professor at UCLA. Okay. So Sebastian first of all that's a pretty smart cookie. Isn't isn't she? Amazing a nine and a half years old. That's how I wish my MBA students ask that kind of question. So we started by asking Sebastien, why Ecuador started using the dollar back in the year two thousand. Mean just before getting rid of the domestic which as Bianca said school, the sucre? There was a handwritten percent evasion within this country that three percent four percent is pretty high percent. So just think what it is a hundred percent inflation. That's amazing. That means prices were doubling every year Ecuador had a big inflation problem. And this was not the first time. The problem was that. This was recurrent it happen. Every so many years back in the days when Ecuador's currency was the Suka these inflation problems just kept happening. Remember inflation is when prices go up, and when prices go up by too much, people get worried because it means they cannot by as much stuff with the money. They make it their jobs, and it's just really unsettling and Sebastian's is a big reason this kept happening was that the country's central Bank was not doing a very good job. The Ecuadorian central Bank had the ability to. Print money like any other central Bank. And when it printed too much money that meant there were too many sucrose this flowing out around in the economy to be spent on the same number of goods. So the price of those goods went way up that is inflation. So would Ecuador did is that it central Bank could not discipline itself and more than that pretty much responded to the will of quality, which is very different from what we do in this country where the Federal Reserve is a independent entity. And where the members of the fed kind of be fired at least not easily by the executive the president. So that wasn't happening Ecuador. So they were printing too much money, and they were abused a central Bank was abusing its power. And generating these burst of inflation. Every so often Ecuador wanted to end these bursts of inflation. So it's politicians looked at another Latin American country that also uses the US dollar. Panama and Ecuador's politicians noticed at Panama did not have these inflation problems the way Ecuador did. And they figured we can do that too. So they did now beyond also asked us how did they get all the dollars down there? That is a great question. Remember Ecuador cannot create US dollars only the US can create US dollars. So Ecuador had to bring US dollars in from the US. Here Sebastian that is generally done through an agreement between the local authorities and the Federal Reserve so the dollars are shipped in and they are put into eighty ends and into banks, and then people have a period of time when they can exchange at a given ratio their local currency the sucre for dollars. Yeah. But there's another important question here, which is doesn't Ecuador have to. To pay for those new dollars. The answer is yes, when you don't have guarantee of your own, and you use the dollar you cannot print dollars. If you're Ecuador quitter so in order to get more dollars, you need to sell to the US more bananas or more chocolate Ecuador has wonderful chocolate industry that it's being developed now or you have to sell more oil than would import. So you have to run a surplus in your international trade in order to get in more dollars than what you're paying out. So that the economy can expand and have more dollar liquid. In other words, Ecuador gets these new US dollars by selling its goods outside of the country in exchange for US dollars things like oil mainly, but yeah. Other stuff like chocolate and bananas. And you know, what dollarisation? Has mostly worked out for Ecuador inflation has been low and stable ever since Ecuador made the switch and as Sebastian told us he learned from his recent trip. Ecuadorian seemed to be pretty fine with it. I asked to everyone I met waiters and waiters in restaurants taxi drivers, everyone whether they wanted to back to the Sukree, and I could not find a single per node one, and maybe a couple of theoretically collumnist, but common people in the streets of Ecuador. Just don't want to do it. They are happy with the way the system is working. They like stability and predictability prices are not going to double overnight or in a year time, I say did in the past younger also asked if Ecuador having dollars affects the money supply in the United States and the short answer is not that much. The Federal Reserve is supposed to create an appropriate amount of dollars for the US con. Emme and some of those dollars do end up in Ecuador. And then they stay in Ecuador, which does make the federal little trickier. But the US economy is almost two hundred times bigger than Ecuador's economy. So in practice, it just doesn't make that much of a difference. Finally, Bianca asked us why other countries don't also switch to the US dollar. Now, remember using the US dollar. Now means that Ecuadorian politicians cannot print more money whenever they want. That is what led to all the inflation. But win their economy is in recession that is when you want to be able to print more money to get the economy moving again like we did in this country during the financial crisis Ecuador can't do that. So it's recessions might be deeper and might last longer when things start going bad other countries did not want to give up that option to fight a recession the way Ecuador did. So it's a tradeoff switching to the dollar can bring more stability, especially to countries with bad central banks. But it can also mean sacrificing the ability to. Your own economy when things get bad, and that's it. That's what we found. So we wanted to call Bianca up and give her our answer. Hey beyond Bianca. Hello. Hey, how's it going? Okay. So did we answer your question? Yes. Was there? Interesting and we had so much been looking for the answers innkeeper answering. My question.

Ecuador United States Bianca Sebastian Edwards Federal Reserve Allergy Mexico Schwab Dot President Trump Latin America Ucla Partner Sebastien Professor Panama Charles Schwab