20 Burst results for "Omay"

"omay" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

05:41 min | 10 months ago

"omay" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"My Marty doc brown autograph. I've got my Batman and robin the adam west and soyuz forgetting the words named robin character. I can't remember his narrow so bears but The old tiny one I've got some souvenirs from my different films. That i've been in. I purchased a home about ten years ago and it had a trophy case. Now thought going to. I know exactly what i'm gonna do this now. Omay movie memorabilia. Undecided lit mirror cabins. I remember that. Because i remember coming to your house for something and you walk in the front door and there. It was a good for him. I'm usually hiding this shit. My podcast room. Because i try to prove to everybody when they come to my house. And i'm a fucking adult look. It's a living room. There's pictures of there's no posters. there's no figurines. just don't go in the podcast room or my office or maybe downstairs but other than they haven't even moved in the same house okay. We're we're still vehicles by. That house is sort of like a cabin. It's sort of like a castle and it's sort of like a treehouse. Yeah it's kind giving us has adventure written all over. I do love. I'm always thinking you know 'cause during this time. And i don't know what's going on getting this phase run mike i want. I wanna get away. I want to like people are certainly leave and i'm not saying like leave. La i'm just more like i need nature. I've been watching that show alone on the history channel and had a guest on here. What are you looking for each your mountains. I think i want like you know. I like to have you in the back or trees. Maybe a lake in the back of some water like i was going to big bear. Actually because it's like it's somewhat reasonable and you go out there and it's nice maybe snow in the winter and you know i don't know i just i. I wonder if it's just all midlife crisis. Should you gotta get out. You're not and i think part you don't think so. I don't think that is. I have been eyeing property in canada for years. And now i'm actually seriously resilient it's it's like it's time it's time i'm going to look down with some serious and It's something i've always wanted to do. I don't think i'll retire and live in los angeles. I don't think i will. I think i will retire. Live by summers in western canada. And a winter's somewhere warmer. That's my i hate to be that guy and i don't think i am but i don't know how healthy la may be is from me I've got my own kind of thing. And i you know i'm able to write into you a podcast. You could write you. Put yourself on tape and go to meetings. You can do whatever you want. You can come back into flying. You can zoom if you you know. Maybe it's maybe my health. I'd feel better if i was just around nature more. I know that was. It's probably true. We have two. That's i mean for some people. I have a friend who just absolutely abhors nature. He wants the city. Life he wants sky rises it's variations of urban is what he can handle.

Marty doc brown robin character Omay robin mike La canada los angeles la
"omay" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"omay" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Like a week later two weeks later, and then I started working for that guy to. Working on that venue. So I was working at at the bus thing. Yeah. But I was also doing all these citing. And then. And I was also doing studios. Maxine you know. then I started writing. Jingles my my wife got into voiceover, which was still do. And Yeah. And one day my boss, the bus thing. The right he knew that I, really missed. Mixing Ben Because at that point I was only working there. And and it's only you know stomp in the show stomp Yup yeah. They're they're looking for new song. So I send my resume. And then started working I for stomp. Right, IT'S A. Nationally known show Yes we are my word for. So I had to quit the bus thing because I couldn't I couldn't do it anymore in a stomps like six days a week. And yes or started working for. stomped during into staffing, and then I, went to do the tour with stops. So I. I quit the new. York show. and. I did the tour, the US Canada tour. Else scrapie. Dallas that was. A lot of work you know set sending up that thing in tearing down every day it's not fun. Are you guys by bus to? So boss playing planes, trains and automobiles, everything everything, but then we. We had a really hard time my wife and I because you know she stayed along here your whole. which is nothing and we were just studio was was just like taking off too. So I, I can't I have to be here. So. The tour ended I wasn't sure if I was going to do the next but. Before it went from tour said I'll go but I Promise if I have my job here when the toys over. And they said yes. So the tour ended I came back to the shore here in New, York. And I decided. Not to do the tour bud sometimes, I still going to help out on the floor And I'll. So the less new year's I went to help on on the tour to. Show you sound guy you know how to do everything. And I was going to go back on for Omay, but it got cancelled because of And also, March Fifteenth Sixteenth on remember that those are less show. So Obviously every theater closed. So that's stop working..

York Maxine Omay US Dallas Canada
$9,000 Bitcoin Cleared, Here Is The Plan

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

$9,000 Bitcoin Cleared, Here Is The Plan

"On a really good mood goes on a really really good night. Why am I in really good mood? I hear you US health. Thanks for asking Good trying to say now I put a great trade out on tasers natural following me either on twitter facebook. Let's Craig called on Facebook by the way and you would have seen that video video out showing you how to use. Fta to raise a breakout. I also got video full. The breakout occurred that bracket went on to be profitable. Well done to anyone who took it now. I know the strategies Madonna. Expect you to take it because the last thing I will never want anyone to ever do is to follow someone blindly. That's why he tried to call. We have focused on making you the best trader. You can be hit empower you to make your own decisions so that you don't need someone like me kind of like when you go to university and you study something and then when you finish your studies you don't keep going back to university because you go to find a job usually in that field that you studied in and you continue to grow and learn until eventually you moss that skill set as well. It's the same thing with the education I provide. It's just a damn saw shaper added doesn't take as long. So what are we seeing across the markets will? I can tell you right now that Once again equities You know the ESPN and the why am will sort of the the the. Dow who hits pain all over the shop. It's pain all over the shop. Which is fine because lots of gaps and lots of lots of all sorts going on. It's not a market that I would have any interesting. I mean on the Intraday Charts. And they just hideous. That's why I'm focused on whip though we're above nine thousand now on. Bitcoin beauty beautiful. I can tell you right now. We've got some great trading opportunities. Today I mean you know. Bitcoin pushing above as a bitter resistance down there at rand on thousands actually seven one each depending on which exchange you looking at but It's a doozy and whiting for that. Oh my goodness and my wedding for that yes. I am a moving average incorrect. A really nice fanning. It's got a lot of what I need to do to try and look this week from a cell phone and is the that have come through in there in the community in the cloister committed to their education It's been a big wake of emotional control way. We really worked hard on that emotional control. And that's why we've got live trading floor. You can see this gains each day. That's what the communities there and that's why even if you don't allow trading floor the community but there's a huge section of the course of these specifically about how to manage that emotion how to shape your emotions in check because I know the people slip on that I mean we all do we all do it. It's big part of becoming a good tried and that's why I put so much emphasis on in the court so if that's the thing that you think you`re. Wakeham is emotional. Control Vote Dougie. Sit there and gave little sad sack Little Omay. Dondi something about it because we can help with that. 'cause we can definitely help and we also have one to one mentoring once you've done the course you know if anyone wants to do that his up so bitcoin looking really good now. We're not thousand one hundred ten dollars. Full percent absolute theorem rotten nesting at two-thirty full. Sort of the resistance at two thirty four nine tain it's up two point four six percent. I'm actually stalking that for long as I am on X. Pay which is sitting at twenty three point nine cents one point nine six percent. Bitcoin cash. Look it's not. It's a looking that guy but it's had a good day. I mean let's be honest. It's up five percent at three thirty six. Twenty five to forty to seventy one four point six two percent right now looking that grind. Not Looking tried somme anyway lot. I'd love to save pushy. Bit Hotter Fan moving averages out in the mid tie fighters but we're up three percent at sixty two dollars. Twenty one cents may belong to yours which has continued to be a little bit higher net of lot coming up four point five percent. Three dollars and seventy six cents is what you'll find. Their ball had a pretty good diet. Some keeps pushing on and Mugabe's moving averages fanning beautifully well for Christ if it was to pull back a little bit. We're at twenty dollars and eighty five cents back above that round number twenty good four point six one percent up Kaduna. Now I am looking for a trade here. I certainly am against perpetual contract on. Fta by the way if you wanted to get that if Dick's count please use my link because it does help us and it also helps. You negotiated to give you a discount. Ten percent you get a ten percent discount on trading face so it's It's in the emails to jump out of the jump onto the The mailing list though dig up my post from yesterday and you find the oldest amount admit try to COPE DOT COM. Kodama five point one four point eight percent theorin classic up three point one percent eight dollars and twenty cents on the Tronto random. Talk Ten currently up one point. Six three percent of one point eight cents and that is the top ten right now. Those web developers and social media advertising experts plays at email Adleman at try to call dot com. And you know if you have another closer than you want to. Perhaps that's the way to do you scratch our back. We'll scratch yours. Have a fantastic day and you know things are looking good guys just. Cape focused For those of you do know what you're looking for abstract Trading Strategy Wise. Just stick to your checklist guys. Stick T. A. CHECKLISTS. Were just today. The patience of the wake has been rewarded. A good profitable Did get days off. And today's lining up to be a day where we could potentially get some very good fill. Potentially on some very good moves that weekly candles looking very strong there on bitcoin. At the moment we still got a few days to guy but is applying at the plan as I. Thanks for taking over the last few wakes case. We've been talking about that pullback on a weekly back into that cradles on we're in that we have a bullish candle. Excuse me so far and we've got a few more days until it closes. We are looking a lot better positive. Big smiles take

United States Facebook Twitter Craig Espn DOW Stalking Mugabe Whiting Dick Adleman
Cabinet reshuffle: Chancellor Sajid Javid resigns –

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:49 min | 1 year ago

Cabinet reshuffle: Chancellor Sajid Javid resigns –

"In Britain a cabinet reshuffle. When the prime minister reorganizes the key figures around him or herself can be dramatic messy even humiliating but most expected. Boris Johnson's first major reorganization. Yesterday would be modest. The economists prediction the night of the short knives. Instead there was an unexpected moment of high drama from such Javid the Chancellor of the Exchequer the Treasury Secretary and Keeper of the National Budget. He resigned coming out. Mr Java might have stayed but he would have had to fire all of his own advisers and replace them with a team appointed by prime minister. Boris Johnson and his chief aide Dominic. Cummings I don't believe any self respected minister would accept such conditions and so therefore I thought the best thing to do was to go in addition to a shakeup in other departments yesterday's people represents a significant erosion of the Treasury's independence. A cabinet reshuffle starts with those ministers. Who are going to be ousted being told by the prime minister that their services may not be required and mckelway a senior editor of the Economist and frequent hunter of Westminster's halls of power. And then those who will get the jobs Invited in one by one and if you remember the fear of being cooled into the head study when you were school I think it feels a bit like that even for seasoned menaces that walk of delight or shame up Downing Street who Press Bank of cameras watching. You can't be an easy one and Mr Java's walkout of that look Saya Javard. The now ex chancellor looked actually pretty confident. Think he was making a point that he was not prepared to take the deal on the terms that was offered by the prime minister. This was such a clash and seems to have taken place will come to a head so quickly that he was. I'm out of here and that was the walk. So the deal that was on offer was that she could stick around only if he basically got rid of his whole team. Why why was that? The deal that was on the table. Boris Johnson elected with a big majority very frustrated. I think in the last parliament by not being able to get on with the business of government as he wants to shape. It fell the Chancellor and the chancellor's team was somewhat in the way so having guaranteed to Mr Jovi that he would keep his job very publicly The end of last year he said well you can keep it. But you can't have this team of advisers around you and I think the underlying tension there is that they had different views about spending. They had different views about some curious of economic policy and that Boris Johnson was affectively. Trying to grab hold of the decision making process. If you don't have your advisers is very hard to put together a strong policy. Perspective could differ from number TANS. Mr Javert Simi said no you lost one adviser on the whim of Downing Street's he wasn't going to lose anymore and I think that will as the store that goes back as he say. So you say this. This was openly down to differences overspending economic policy. How so sergey of it comes from traditional you might call austerity light. He would accept some listening of the course on spending but he would still. I think want some constraint and you would see some risk in splurging splashing the cash. I think Boris Johnson thinks that everything is really changed. He's got this big majority. He can take more risks and the austerity years really needs to be put behind him and he wants to spend money particularly on the north of England in in the places where the Conservatives have made gains because he thinks that will nail down those gains and keep him in power for longer. Vaz's being around that is bubbled between the two of them. The danger here is that the treasury and number ten being too closely aligned has some risks of its own in prime ministers are more interested in short-term political goals rather than longterm fiscal ones and that balances often being a bit up and down in British Political System. And there's often been a bit of a competition but in this example it's happened. Very brutally very swiftly. The power has moved to one end of the soul to Boris. Johnson's view as has happened before with Mister Johnson. There's a lot of talk about the the power dynamic between him and his chief. Aides Dominic Cummings the Some would say power behind the throne. What does this episode to tell you about that dominate Cummings sometimes called the dark Lord around Westminster only home for Jokes? I think is very powerful. Figure had also clashed with Mr. Jarve it I think this decision to be so tough on the chance. That was primarily the prime minister's probably driven on Egged on by his adviser. They've been other arguments. That Dominic Cummings has lost recently so as power is not absolute. But I think if. Boris Johnson Dominic Cummings have a vision of direction? They want government to go. You put yourself in great dangerous administer. If you lie down in the road they will seem irrelevant. You so is that to say then that will end up with the government that is entirely made up of of loyalists of of yes. Men of people living in fear. I'm not sure that will also be yes. Men and women. But it's very clear that you kind of have to get behind the Boris vision of what is important and what is less important. Has He left enough room for independent advice. And for those who think of it differently. Omay send up a warning message. Things that could go wrong. I think that is the great risk. That he's taken here with essentials ation of power over the key decisions which brings us neatly onto Mr Chavez. Replacement. Help Tony me more about him. Richie soon act mid thirty s very trusted by Boris Johnson. Dominic Cummings but also the very interesting backstory is. He has also got a absolutely classic Oxford to banking seavy but as a small boy. He helped his mother who run a pharmacy to to do the adding open and the accounts. He's very good and gifted with numbers that you could say is pretty good going for chancellor always the case it would be. I think unfair to say to someone who's very far already in life and politics. He's only there is a naughty dog. The difference is the constraints are drawn. A kind of course it has been placed the work that he can do the budget's due in four weeks time. We don't know whether it's going to go ahead. But the country needs stability and I think number ten will not want to do it for very long. I think you will differ in some ways from the budget that Mr Javid would have given and in effect it will have to authors one will be the chancellor but the signature very prominently underneath. It will be the big spoiling hand of Boris Johnson. And all of the attention has gone on to to this this this debacle with Mr David and not so much on all of the other Reshufflings within the cabinet. Take a whole. What does that that whole story? Tell you about what Mr Johnson and indeed. Mister Cummings was for Britain. The overall message of the reshuffle is that Brexit is done that those wounds can be healed and that Britain get on selling itself as global Britain in the world. That's confidence not front foot feeling that. Boris Johnson often does exude isn't really particularly balanced left and right cabinet and conservative terms. And that's probably a bit of a difference. He has the majority. He's got the team. He's got the power and now he really wants to go. And that's the feeling it's been put behind this. Let's see where that ends up. And thank you very much for joining us visa.

Mister Johnson Dominic Cummings Chancellor Boris Johnson Dominic Cummings Prime Minister Mr Java Britain Treasury Secretary And Keeper Mr Javert Simi Treasury Mr Javid Mr Chavez Mr Jovi Mr David Westminster Press Bank Saya Javard
"omay" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

14:05 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

"Welcome to another episode of just a tip and advice podcast. It's equally about its tangents as it is about. It's tips. I'm your host Megan between and today to help me help you. We Got Patrick Star in the studio low. You're here we're here. You Look Beautiful. Thank you you told you once but I will tell you. I got dolled. Lashes contacts booties uh-huh. I never looked good in a wig. What's the main. Will you're already naturally so beautiful. Online emperors viewers out there like she has a face for everything not just podcast radio and I have. I have a nine maker face for radio for her. What am I doing wrong and putting my wig on though well you don't need hey you're just so stunning ever since I've seen you grace Internet beautiful okay. We're starting on such a positive lower your okay you guys. Omay Novacek as one of the best makeup artists on youtube but after a quick Internet stock I found out that used I used to be a private piano teacher my gosh. How far did you go yeah. I'm Filipino and yes grew up Super Asia Asia no cable no Internet no too expensive so we just agree learning piano at a young age and I think that was like my form of like gaming at the time because my parents allow me to get Nintendo or playstation Sega. If we want to go way back yeah yeah. It was just just a piano I I looked at music sheet music like a game and I would just decipher those notes and try to play the piano so that was kind of like my game controller whereas was an instrument and that's how I learned you. Have you taught yourself well. I had formal training but then it was just it was just a fun thing to do. At a young age wow oh and then you taught other people how to play. Yep Yep and then I think when I was like sixteen seventeen I started taking piano students so I would teach middle school and I was a piano accompanist. I I so one on Samba for band students for choirs go middle school so how tough was like teaching kids that are kind of bratty ready. We'll see I talked privately so it was like random student so it would be people that actually wanted to share show up and really learn yeah. Were you like at thirteen graduate was crazy closeted gay watching America's next top model Miss Universe and all the above and yeah it was that was just super shy about Asia. When did you feel like you broke out of the shyness because I feel like I was shy until like dance. Is there something that we've been when was that that was like what what year late that when I was seventeen seventeen yeah same. I WANNA say about like junior senior year. I kind of came into my own yeah because I think with every grade when you're younger is kind of like a reset. You feel like you're starting new. There's new classes. There's a new school route and for me I I was like maybe I think I got it because 'cause I kind of like started to shape and mold my identity. I was in marching band. I loved the arts. I had friends that was comfortable with and I was coming into my adolescence and I. I knew what I liked by that time. Yeah boys so same. Let's learn a little bit more about okay. This is a game. My call bursts averse. It's one one round of rapid fire questions everything from your first job to your first concert at Cetera. I Yell Stop. You have to explain elaborate or tell the full story. Okay okay here we go. What was your first job panerabread the era. What was your first cellphone. Oh.

Asia Megan Patrick Star Omay Novacek youtube Nintendo America
Rights on Q: same-sex marriage in Japan

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:13 min | 2 years ago

Rights on Q: same-sex marriage in Japan

"Every year in Tokyo a pride parade winds its way through the city. There are people waving rainbow flags on floats dancing all around, but it's not a very big parade. And civil rights for gay transgender and queer people in Japan are still in their early stages. Same sex marriage is not recognized. Some people are trying to change that. I would like to fight this war together with sexual minorities, all around Japan. Pitted. The but he don't eat mini got ninety this is activist Kenji on Valentine's Day. He and his partner joined twelve other same sex couples across the country suing to demand the right to marry their cases continue. They hope Japan will follow the example of Taiwan, which recently legalized, same sex marriage, the only country in Asia to do so their cases continue. Other activists are using next year's Olympic Games in Tokyo to pressure businesses and the government to change. We have to use their own become probably games to change society. More friendly to energy btcu, people Iannucci is an academic who focuses on gender and sexuality in sports and advocates for rights for LGBTQ people. That's lesbian gay bisexual transgender and queer. And also these kind of the moment of people to know what is happening. What these issues on the feet or edgy TQ. So we can take action to change society as well as pressuring politicians to make changes to the law. She wants businesses to become more welcoming to different sexualities, and of course, for athletes to feel they can be open. Yeah. It's still conservative. I think that the why defiantly don't many obsolete who are all coming awfully coming out, because society still have the conservative plastic over GDP to especially older h. People doesn't lead understand the station of AGP last month opposition parties submitted a Bill in the Japanese parliament, the diet, that would legalize same sex marriage, but for the conservative ruling party that would have been a big step will the diets ended it's official business for this. The current session having failed to pass a Bill to legalize same sex marriage. David McNeill reports on Japan for the economist that was considered a blow to activists wasn't unexpected both many activists had hoped that Japan might follow Taiwan. So why is that a trickier proposition in Japan? Well, I mean, I guess it's partly social party political, liberal, Democratic Party is conservative. They don't invest a lot of time. Ranji in my call. Progressive causes, there are hardline conservatives in the party who feel very strongly that they don't want a gay marriage in Japan, most famously last year you had an ally. The prime minister Shinzo lobby who called gay couples on productive meaning that they don't have children. And so how does that play out for for people who are gay in Japan? Do do you know about what it's like to be gained Japan? You know what surprised me is that in many ways, Japan is very tolerant towards gay people. There is one of Asia's, if not the ages biggest gay quarter niche, Omay and Shinjuku it's a one square mile. Muscling kind of Warren of gay bars shops and clubs for forget, and as being people, and it's pretty racy, and I think the attitude is that there's tolerance for the gay lifestyle. But there isn't the same kind of political activism, if you like that you have another parts of the world, there isn't a strong push from the political world to change things. I think the other Jude is basically don't ask, don't tell in many cases, it, it sounds if there's some level of keeping key. Keeping this quiet. I mean what what about in popular media and TV shows and movies. And so on are there popular representations of gay people, there are a lot of gay people represented there. In fact, there are gay stars on TV outwardly gay stars, they tend to be exalted sized if you like they're there for entertainment purposes there to be to be golf out and so on. And I think that angers some gay people here because they, they want to be normal. They want to have a normal lifestyle and in some ways this depiction of gay people on TV as well run helpful to them. And you mentioned Taiwan being the sort of example country. The only country in Asia to, to legalize same sex marriage, which, I mean, now that puts Asia very much out of step with much of the rest of the world Europe North America, even conservative places like Latin America. Why is Asia different? Well, that's very big question. You know, if you if you look on parts of Asia, for example, Malaysia, Indonesia, there's. There's that would repression of gay people and arguably, it's getting worse, and obviously, that has to do with the governments that they have their boats on the parts of, you know, most notably Taiwan, but also India, Bangladesh, governments there at tend to take a don't ask, don't tell attitude, and I think it has to do with the politics of the region has to do with history of repressive, governments, it has to do with a very traditional notion of the family part in some countries that has to do with Islam. And also, you know it has to do with the lack, I think, all of political activism, from the ground, which was slow to start up some of these places, and how do you think Japanese people see see this situation with the conservative government, but, you know, with some, some gate presence in society in entertainment, the, the whole works where where does where do the people stand on average? Do you think, well, that's probably the most interesting part of what's happening at the moment? Because if you look at the disparity between politics, what's happening at the end the diet at the top of society, and the rest of Japan, it is growing quite star mean nearly there was a survey by Dentsu the advertising company recently. We said that eighty percent of Japanese in their twenties to fifties in favor of legalizing. Same sex marriages, there, are there's a lot of pressure from the business community now to on the government to change the laws because what they say, is that repressive laws or just even not allowing people tomorrow? We'll we'll work against Japan's attempt to bring in foreign talent. I'm embarrassed Japan as the Olympics nears, so what you see around. Japan is sort of local governments to change the rules about two dozen now have allowed people to. To have these certificates which showed that the game, which you can present, for example to, to real estate agents to prove that you gay will stop the hope is that, that will stop discrimination against them. So all around I think you see pressured as momentum building to change the way things are as just a question of how long that's going to take David. Thank you very much for joining

Japan Asia Taiwan Tokyo David Mcneill Democratic Party Bill Kenji Iannucci Partner Prime Minister Warren Olympics Jude Shinzo
"omay" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"That's gonna change the world and improves some many things were just old cruelty in so. Yeah, when you get on that tame, you just feel pot or something very special, and you are and you probably movement it's gonna sooner or later takeover the wowed and that is not a bad thing on. So it's very exciting. And look a lot of could pus benefits as well. It's not just for the animals here. Eight and it does contribute to a healthier world physically. Also, you know, more compassionate RAV N for our environment. I mean, the environmental benefits are limitless. There's so many different reasons. Go in. It's unbelievable. Another good one is that we fade animals six to fifteen times more food. Than what we what they do. So we give them all this food. We take back this tiny little bit. Because that's a particular flavor that we that we like, and meanwhile, twenty thousand troops die every single day in this world. So if we just redistributed a portion of that food because they so much grain and sewing things if we redistributed a portion that could end vote Honda over and over and over again, if everybody just went figuring, that's what would happen to have this surplus of food, and we'd be out to find ways to get into these hungry mouths that raisin alone. Forget everything else. Said today that reason lotion bay arrays while we all just band together as a as the humane society and psyche. Let's do this. Let's end weld hung up foam like that we just late plants instead have plant bug as and you know, vegan spaghetti bowl in is in. We're just do that. And that's what we can achieve ashes one thing Sony. The. The amount of can you actually explain this to the amount of grain and soy that takes to feed say one cow that we is like upset, right? We give them a huge amount of food that I ate, however long that law is and then then when kill them we take back. Let's say a tenth of the of the amount of calories. So so is so wasteful. It's inefficient it can it can take two thousand times more water to produce animal products than does to produce plant products. You know, it's just highly inefficient takes up so much more land cry so much more water pollution and so late in cause of greenhouse gas emissions more than every single plane train in transportation boss on climate is a leading cause of ocean dead zones deforestation on enough. So yeah, it's really at the core. So many problems and the shift doesn't happen when a government says do this do that it has to be an individ-. Shift because all can shoot him as of this. So it has to be us making better choices, and then helping others make those better choices. That's how it's only way can have econ- expect somebody else to do to the jug foyer. It's a happens on individual level from the ground up. I we'll some final thoughts. What are what is your last hitch to any omnivores listening, whether their physician or whether they are a nurse practitioner or they are not medicine at all any omnivores through last pitch for why they should really consider going Sembene? Will I will congratulate you for listening so through this. Heavy Judy on that animal rights message. I think that most things, but I guess at this point just knowing about it is one thing and taking action is the really important thing. And that action that you tight today much as Fe outta vegan meal once a week. All you have died that you go vegan every week. All you just try going into twenty two days doing challenge. Twenty two Omay be vegetarian all may be by soy milk instead of cow's milk. Next time you go shopping Omay be coli being in front of NAS for a few tips. Whatever it is. I would just say take a step whether small big preferably big, obviously, I would like it. If everybody listened to this win Fagin overnight spend, the two thousand take to line with need to learn. And then boom tomorrow wake up again. But you know, what have I any step forward is good and every step brings with it momentum towards the next step on the next and that really on that many steps so I'll just record..

Omay Fagin Honda Sony Judy milk twenty two days
"omay" Discussed on Political Party Live

Political Party Live

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Political Party Live

"Not this way, you either direction, but we have some major choices on our hands. Okay. I'll leave it at that. I said before I'm Steven Willis spoken word artists of rigidly from Chicago, Illinois lives. What is virtually my entire adult life in the New York City area and our? Hawkeye? So that's amazing. Good now, it's many cyclones in a room. That's good. I won't be your way long. I'll just perform to particular poems. The first one that I wanted to perform is super super important to me. And for anyone who, you know, grew up in the black church you'll you'll get it. Especially with Easter coming around. This particular piece is really close to my heart. And I couldn't go anywhere without doing. It's called no black boys. Dial mother's day. In their the church. Mothers go again. Hurting their grandbabies into church pews like a shepherd preparing for a storm. The oldest is bribed by the promise of dinner. Of its greens. And it's pot lick. The youngest purses. Bottomless pit of peppermint candies. But hey. We all here. Now, I don't know what the CME in Bethel temple CME church stands for. But I imagine it stands for Christmas mother's day Easter. The holy trinity of black religious celebration. The only days that we the biological descendants of this churches mother's force to be here. And today is mother's day. The most sacred of the three. The only day the black matriarch can get even her grown son's dont hot pink and a blazer. Loafers in slack. Saw tall order. She knows. So she'll settled for him in white sneakers, and jeans if you won't wear a belt, hopefully, he'll hold his pants up long enough. So they don't fall during altar call it doesn't matter what you wear. She says just come as you are. All that matters. Is that you're here? And we are all here under a watchful eye of the Lord in grandmother in the choir stand, we the proof of our grandmothers blessings we that evidence at the praise of the righteous availa much. We the barrage of belligerent black boys who stand on your street corners, and tote Ben data's and Beretta's Omay second Saturday only two bibles in BOTAS Omay second Sunday a mother's day. We will come as we owe would no street credit, but that of our grandmothers last time, we will come as we are with no reputation, but that of our grandmothers less testimony and not grandmothers will pack the congregation with us as if the say, look what the Lord has done how he's been faithful how he's kept them alive and aided just like a black woman to have a day dedicated to her but spended praying for somebody else in today. Nobody gets jammed up out west. St- Notre f- wars happened over east. No police go acquitted of north today. The block is quiet today. The mortgage emptied today, the Joe how sadder has fallen into a sweet mutter of mama Costa truth is no black boys die on mother's day. We are all here among saw grandmothers. Hymns hats in hollow louima's are blunt blissed lips touch cheek turn kiss before heads bowed to pray, and I know mum. I know with all that's going on in the world, it gets harder and harder to get us all together like this. But you manage to this year? We are all here. We are all here. A group on the south side of Chicago, a place that unfortunately has become synonymous with violence and a few years ago. I was in Boston Massachusetts on on tour. And I was doing a set that I call my culture said I wrote an entire list of poetry based on.

Chicago Bethel temple CME church New York City Steven Willis Illinois BOTAS Omay Boston Massachusetts mama Costa Joe
"omay" Discussed on Big Blue View

Big Blue View

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Big Blue View

"There's no need to try to teach them a new position on the right side to move all of their technique over to the opposite hand, and the footwork and everything. So I just that. I don't understand. I think we're getting better at that. But there are still some people who are going to come out and say that. Oh, yeah. You still hear it that x player is a right? Tackle only because you know, maybe he's six five three thirty and might not have the hip or knee fl. Exa -bility that you would ideally like to see from a starting offense tackle. Well, in that case, maybe he's more of a candidate to slide inside guard, assuming he has the strength in hand technique to hold up on the inside. But just because he doesn't have. Mobility, left tackle doesn't mean magically going to develop it at right tackle. And then you have to confront the problem of getting them to learn the swap their technique over from left to right, basically, holding a mirror up to everything they know in trying to get them to learn how to do that. Successfully. That's why I think maybe the best smartest move. The giants made on their offense of line. Last year was not touching will Hernandez. Just let him be where he was a first round talent. That was something where Hernandez talent just did show through because he was getting snaps on both sides of the live. And there was some thought early in this season to keep Omay on the left side in plug Hernandez in on the right side. And it is a good thing that I think Hernandez talent just kind of one out, and he was the clearer best option at left guard. A so they moved over to the right side who did have some experience playing on both sides. So there was that. But trying to make the west side of the line more important. It's just not eighty six anymore. No, it's not. And I think a lot of what we're going to be talking about. And a lot of things just kinda stemmed from a lot of this old school. School thinking, that's what run the ball in play defense is that's what the left side of the line being premium is the the game has just changed so much and with that just these thoughts need to continue to evolve. And I think we're getting a little better at that. Just as just as an overall group of people who analyze football, but we could still get better. And that's why we need to talk about these types of things. Yeah. Definitely football, especially the NFL level is just ruthlessly Darwinian and. It's either adapt in Volve or die. Yeah. Yeah. That's that is absolutely. The case say, so why don't we get to your offense of line note while we're here. Yes. So we'll do that mine is a little more giants specific. And it's something that we brought up on on the last episode. We did new to episodes ago. I don't know on of these blend together to yon est. But it's that the giants need a dominant offensive line to succeed in the passing game. I and that's just not true. So the giants were seventeenth in authentic pressure rate allowed per sports info solutions, so that's about average maybe below average. But overall, it's not like they had a pressure rate of a hundred percent, which if you hear people talking about the giants offense of line like they make it sound like on every snap. You. I manning was under pressure and had a second to get rid of the ball that again. Not true. And if we look at you I- Manning's ranks when there was not pressure seed, there's a whole bunch of studies that come out that a from year to.

giants Hernandez Omay football Manning Volve NFL hundred percent
"omay" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"When the Pullman factory workers went on strike, they appeal to the the American railway union, which was this big inclusive union that Eugene Debs would started just about a year earlier that union happened to be having their convention in Chicago, it exactly the same time. The strike broke out and one of the questions at the convention was. Should we allow black workers into the union and Eugene Debs pleaded with them the delegates from all the locals, please? You know, you have this is the union had been founded on the idea of solidarity, including everyone in one big union. You can't you can't draw the race line. Unfortunately, they voted by very small margin. They voted to exclude blacks from the union and the as the as the strike on folded and the union tried to help the Pullman workers by boycotting Pullman cars on the lines. It would have been much more effective if they could have had the Pullman porters on their side because they were absolutely necessary for operating the Pullman cars, but instead the black workers continued to work. They weren't allowed in the union and the the strike ultimately came to not. All right. Let's talk about the the role of the US government the federal government, and and we should on some level. You know, also, I I guess the courts, and and the sort of state and local the the attorney general at that time was a guy named Richard Omay. And he was what to say he was a. A railroad attorney. But he was. Was was he still actively an attorney railroads still? He was he was still an attorney for the railroad to is director of several railroads. And it was almost like being Torney general was like a sideline for him. And so his sympathies was you know, he was supposed to be the chief officer of Justice in the country. And instead he worked hand in hand with the railroads who wanted that they were very eager to break the strike and break the union because they saw this the industrial union as as a pretty good threat to them. And so he worked hand in hand with them all through the strike and appointed a a arou- another railroad lawyer as as as the USO special US attorney in in Illinois to handle the day-to-day fight against the strike. So that was that was a major. Part of the the reason the workers lost because they did stick together. They didn't shut down the railroad and say, they put enormous pressure on both railroads and Pullman. But once the government got in about the the were up against more than they could handle give us a sense of what that push back. Look like, I mean aside from injunctions. I mean, I guess it's, you know, this is one of those classic cases where the court does issue an injunction. But then, you know, then the question is in what army, and it turns out the basically the US army. Yeah. The the the junction really made the strike illegal and not only just legal in general terms, but individual acts of if you didn't go to work, you were essentially breaking the law. You could be jailed without trial because you were in contempt of court. If you talk to somebody about the strike, you could be jailed for being in contempt of court. So that was pretty powerful weapon against the strike. And only also convinced Grover Cleveland, the president then to send in the US army that was a very sketchy. There was a very sketchy legal basis to that. Because the army was not supposed to be involved in any kind of law enforcement as it is not also not today. But the army came in with artillery cavalry, primarily in Chicago. But also in other cities out west and and were involved in putting down the strike. And so to the extent that there was a I mean, so the strike is put down essentially the workers go back without any type of of relief. And particularly in the context of those rents I guess. Yeah. And they also had to sign a what was called a yellow dog contract which was a contract that said they would never ever again. Join a union. It was added on top of. I didn't tell us what happens afterwards because this is one of those examples of like a of. I don't want to say good loss. But the value that can come out of a loss in a political fight. Yeah. I think it's it's an interesting look into sort of the complexity of history..

American railway union Pullman US army Richard Omay Eugene Debs officer attorney Chicago US US attorney Grover Cleveland Illinois director president
"omay" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So we can give you all the benefits of server less without having to reengineer too, much or relearn everything from scratch. So when we give you support for gas or even PHP, which was the four is looks exactly like it does when you know jazz. Org or PHP net. So we're really not in the business of inventing. New A B is here were in the business of abstracting out those really innovative technologies, and you really don't have to worry about them. Too much. Let's give a concrete example here. So let's say I'm building a photo sharing app like an Instagram, and I've got a mobile client that just just a thin client for taking pictures and looking at my my feed of pictures. And then I've got a back end that accepts those pictures and does stuff like writing it to a database and maintains the user accounts and followers and stuff. And then you've of course, got a web client that is somewhat similar to the mobile client. Tell me about the difference between what this deployment would look like in the server full world versus in the service. World love it Weston. So the main and most important thing is that the question that was asked like, okay, what's the entry point to my application in the server full world. It was going to be a file or process. Let's say I'm using no jazz or ago is going to be served at go or server digests when against built for Russian that one unit is going to contain the information about every single aspect of your application, ever, single API entry points. Every single version of a every API endpoint even AB envoys that don't get access by users anymore. End up all in Walton data one unit. We can also call that a container if we wanted to so over time as you add more beyond bones in more logic to application that is going to just sort of wrote infinitely in. And there's nothing stopping you. Like, you know teams in people continue to collaborate on. They just add more file us in in more dependencies. And so on no JCL's might be familiar with projects for their package. Jason file contains hundred dependencies. And then when they run yarn or impudence still they just weighed in wait and wait until this one server sort of comes to life. And then you start having issues with Buddha time like you run node server joss in you, wait, a long time or your compilation times even get very long because you just have everything in one is that you really put your Abia implant eggs in one basket the server with now because we used to write software this way. And we learn about all its spits false would now took a dramatically different approach. So would we say first of all is that we embrace the of the Monterey? Bo. So you create one repository where you're. For example, eight the project is going to live or even your API in your front and project arguing to live. So I would start by creating a folder gold API. And then inside that I would create some folders or sub files for my APN points like images dot go for my images reception. API endpoint I would have sessions users and Omay at the end points defined there on another side, I would create a folder, for example, for my web front, and I would call it wet or WWE doubt me and inside that I would put all the files related to like, let's say big view to use gray, my friends, so great my.

Instagram Weston Monterey Omay Jason
"omay" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Conversations

"The self inflicted. We recovery new processes a lot of the auspice stretching off games and things like that the protein shakes and all that to help with their cover about certainly body is extremely soul the next day and a public today's lighters. When it's probably on its my source than. A little bit harder to get out of bed of the mornings. Let's go back to Commodore straight in sunny Bank hills. Where you grew up. Did you have your own? We shed a lot. Whether it was my younger brother on all about that used to live with us at the time Cy we had bunk beds. Pretty much I best dress. But no more often not always choose the bottom line. And my younger brother would slip up top Omay owed sleep up top Cy and more often than not we shared the room with your family saga older brother from mom's previous relationship, an older sister from dad's previous relationship, and I've got a younger brother from dad news threes younger than Mesa while new came along when I was about threes of is. But Omar hold memories from Komodo straight. We lived in a cashier previously. But yeah, kind of remember being this. I almost memories from Komodo straight. Happy house. Did you have friends and family? Yeah. Yup. Some moms one of the ring she's got non brothers and three sisters. I spent a lot of time with family. I've had cousins that used to live with us on and off throughout much olds always had people in the family Stein with us whether that Bianca lls on his or cousins. I wasn't showed if someone to play within the backyard, whether that's cricket or rugby league. Tell me that your mom. What's their role Ichi play in your family a massive row? She's a second Ellis of the family. The eldest daughter of the family, and she's like the matriarch of the family. She said only keeps the family together. She's the glue, and yes, she played a massive role in those early years of shaping me who I am today. Si-, you know, wouldn't be where I am with ETA. What would she duty? You don't often when you done the wrong thing. We'll back in those days. She just have this the slippers that she used to wear and our Crame, and then ahead this pink fluffy bit over the top of it and under NATO's, north and ribbed. And when I was playing up mocking up would certainly that across the rear end. Nice. I should grandma by the and yeah, I used to found out a why does it wouldn't hurt as much when she'd come to the top of the loj pad, and when she'd come down on move my about about two inches the impact slipper of just miss and while be screaming and carrying on when I get back to the room. I'd tell my brother, I she missed me. But suddenly mom was there when we needed a coddle as well that was the footy dodgers, you alerting early on what stuff would you do that that led to you mom getting that fluffy sleep on backchatting being an older brother, and and being made to my younger brother and anyway, possible side things like that. What about your dad? What did he do the work year? Here's a fitter turnabout by tried. They spend a lotta Tom away from high as well. I work in a way dad was always the threat of the house. But and mom was the disciplinarian and go a little gripe. Members from dia being at Hyman and plying rugby league cricket in the backyard with us I day played a messy role much Alred party. Get you to start kicking the footy when you had just full years old. Yes. I played local rugby league in the Brisbane fo- acacia ridge Heito, and he asked. For wanted to be the ball boy of that team Cy that was just getting the ball back when it was kicked out and back on the sideline side. And that was when I was about four five years of age and couldn't really care about the the football at the time was about getting, you know, four or five bucks for doing it. And then you spend that money on red frogs and video games. Yeah. Soon as the full-time sarin went it'd be getting the cash off died and making sure that spent it extremely quickly..

Si footy Cy sunny Bank hills rugby Ellis acacia ridge Heito cricket rugby league Omay Bianca lls Omar sarin Brisbane Stein football Hyman Tom Crame
"omay" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"But I'll tell you what here's how stupid we aren't on wherein if we're of wave of stupidity the charts bad. So we should sell Home Depot. Now look at us. Stock was fifteen it's now one seventy five they got a big button. I think and they got a great balancing how about buying some. And then if they slam it by more, what's the matter? That idea is called rationality. It's gotta Ryan in Michigan. Please Ryan a gym congratulations on getting Golden Gate, but I'm a Cowboys fan. All right. Well, we'll see two Sundays from now miss. Yeah. You hold up there. Okay. And that home game for me. Right. Time yoga program in nineteen and I'm currently in management leadership. And our full line RV dealerships. I think I have some insight, but I Jim I wanna get your take on shore industries and Camping World they currently fit or our aunt fifty two week low that recently at this week. Yeah. Or regionally Aymer and became a global company and also Thors very diversified. And their product offering. September interview wholesale reporter down almost twenty nine percent. Right. Right. Well, here's here's what's going on. You know, people the numbers haven't been good for a Thor the numbers okay for Camping World, but higher gasoline prices made it so that people have been buying fewer vis a higher interest rates make it so that the market is cooled. They have higher costs for Thorpe because they're making a lot assemble stuff in Indiana, all these are negative. But you know, what we have heard from chairman pal that now's the time to really start raising rates aggressively. Because we gotta try four down zero. That's the game plan. Now. Of course, he's not thinking like that. Only thinking people are thinking like that. I expect more volatility more after apple ports. But don't lose sight of the fact that the FANG stocks are backed up by the fundamental, not just some stupid acronym. I came up with that's a heck of a lot more meaningful than the wild moves caused by ETS Omay money today. Core oxes come a long way from court bottles of bleach, but can keep cleaning up four percent growth. After today's drop. The you've got figure out what's maybe it's a standing your portfolio took the CEO and wingstop headed higher yesterday after beat I don't know. But it's starting to go down. Is it the perfect time? Taking bite I got the CEO and replaced book for play that the keep the lights on during the recent data volatility. I'm talking to the American electric power. If it could pay in a market. Well, these utilities stay with. Fang and stay with Kramer. Don't miss a second of that money. Follow at Jim Cramer on Twitter. I have a question. Tweet graver hashtag mad tweets sin. Jimmy to mad money at CNBC dot com or give us a call at one eight hundred seven four three CNBC something bed.

CEO CNBC Home Depot Jim Cramer Golden Gate Fang Jim I ETS Omay Twitter Cowboys apple American electric power Michigan reporter Thorpe chairman Indiana Jimmy Kramer
"omay" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Times Square, and I had nice apartment on Park Avenue and twentieth street that is really exciting job writing on world affairs for time magazine, wonderful friends, no commitments, and I was having a terrific time. But some part of me thought, I'm so caught up in this accelerated movement. I can't even tell if this is the deepest sort of happiness and I need to take myself away. I've got a chance to be insists small corner of the world, but I need to see something from a different perspective. So and you were twenty twenty nine when I did that really? Yes. I mean something in me. You know, there's mysterious intimations intuitions we have, yes, this isn't the whole story and that I'm making great living. But that's not the same as making a life. And I knew that it twenty nine we'll I couldn't formulate it, but because it twenty nine I'm just like, I'm twenty nine. You just in it, you're just entering it. So I'm thinking I'm asking that because. There has to be something different level of consciousness about you that you had all along Omay be, you know, I had to cook foot and I won. I was in that job. I flew to south East Asia, and I had one night layer in ninety two airport near Tokyo. And I had four to kill before my plane left. So I just walked around the town of Narita wooden houses and thousand year old temple. And it was last week of October blazing blue skies, but the first change of color in the trees and something moved me and felt so familiar in this very foreign place. By the time I boarded my plane, I decided I have to come back to Japan. I have an resolved business as something about this place that feels like home, and so that made it easier when I was twenty nine to think Japan is going to open a door to Turkey different world from New York City. And it did and I was having a happy time there, but I felt the must be a deep happiness in some way, very different. So I moved straight from my apartment on Park Avenue to allow. One single room on the backs of kilter was it in uneasiness? Was it a or that feeling of something more? Something more exciting. I'm really lucky to have enjoyed this very stimulating life, but the must be something else that's going to sustain me at a deeper level, and I knew going to care, which is a very quiet contemplative place would refresh me in other ways, lead me down different part. Were you able at that time to articulate that as I need stillness? No. At that time I probably would have said I need a Japanese monastery. So my plan was to go and live radio and in a template keto and my year lasted only a week after week. I thought I found a temple in Kyoto isn't like my romantic dream of it in New York City. It's a lot of scrubbing floors and clean dishes is hard work. So I moved just to a room not far from the monastery, but now I've been there twenty eight years living near cater. And I'm actually with my wife in a much more monastic. Probably ended up finally in the life. I had a magic when I was a kid. So of course I had to go through certain obstacles to get the what your life like now wonderful pop because of all the things we don't have. We live in two room apartment in the middle of, no, we have no car, no bicycle, no TV. I can understand bidding bedroom, and one of the things I've found beautiful about that is when I wake up the whole day stretches in front of me like this. Great expanse of lawn, right? Yeah. And it's like time has become almost a cathedral, and I realized that some point when I was working for time magazine, I had all the money I needed, but I didn't have enough time and I didn't have enough space just to do nothing. Okay. So that brings us to the question because I think many people watching or hearing your night was saying really easy to do if you have the luxury of money. Yeah, you can take time off to discover yourself and find yourself and be with yourself and live in or two room shack. Or whatever, if you have the money to support yourself. So you had the means to do that..

time magazine Japanese monastery New York City Japan Narita Times Square East Asia Kyoto Tokyo Omay Turkey twenty eight years thousand year
"omay" Discussed on Talking Practice

Talking Practice

12:42 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Talking Practice

"Okay well you know one is. You're kind of retreading. So if you're mature professional national doing retreading waste of time may make you a few extra bucks but what are you doing. You always have to be in a way and find the frontier of your own life as a professional and the definition of that frontier is not always clear to practitioner who's always besieged by a million kind of requests and demands and everything from clients and jobs and all that so part of my job is to help my client identify that frontier so that they can be on it right but it seems to me the difference between. Let's say a formalized role in which you or advising someone versus the mentorship role is that you do have a stake as a mentor. You do have a stake in your men tease outcome Outcome and everything from an intellectual stake in it a legacy stake in it in there there could be many reasons why one would take on men T or or why a meant. He seeks a mentor which is quite different than the roles that you've played informal consultancy relationships but in every case it's because you value the person the practice whatever so in the case of a practice it's not just the individuals. It's what they do in the case of individuals individuals as mentors. It's because you think that there's something meritorious about them that merits that that investment in their development even more fully not just along a narrow line and I think the difference between someone who's a coach and the mentor is holding that person accountable notable too much more than a narrow band of outcome right. That's right whereas coach. Who just trying to get him to do something specific right so I mean? I've played all these different roles. I've been coach. Were just trying to win job or something but I think mentorship you're looking at the whole human being and and you kind of gravitate toward each other because you see in another person something meritorious or admirable and it's not a way way of you living vicariously through someone else that's really being a bad mentor. You also realize as a mentor. I think that if you don't do it that maybe what you value in life will disappear from the world right so part of that is also a calculation. Asian that if you don't help others what you value in life might not be there in the next generation and you don't want that to happen. Sure Yeah I also think that Many of my most favourite mentors were those who were invested enough in the relationship. Also that we could disagree with one another. It's still respect act and hold each other dear beyond any particular kind of disagreement so there's a longevity to the relationship that is very unique you know if you disagree With fire them an employee or supervisor. You just separate ways but it's quite different with the mentorship. It's a lifelong relationship. And I've been fortunate of having good coaches good mentors. I think that anyone who has a good mentor is very lucky. And how would you say an architect tech develops that today Being open and being curious. I mean you're neither open nor curious. That's it it probably won't discover a mentor. You may not discover a lot of other things too. But I think it's the ability to be to engage other people with that openness and curiosity. It's a form of discovery. Every right a lot of it starts with someone just coming to you with a lot questions. Like what about this. And then they start telling you about their life and about why this is important to them so then you find motive and you find what's underneath all of this and that's when this thing starts to write this might seem to those listening a a very strange conversation for our practice platform to take on but I think it really is very interesting particularly because again. It's this unspoken condition that lies behind kind many practices that are quite successful. They have found mentors practitioners and they've figured out ways in which to leverage that kind of advice which which is life advice often in addition to being practical advice. So I think it's it's particularly interesting to hear your take on it. Given the consultancy roles roles and advisory roles you've had for so many practices in the future there may be practices that base their entire existence and business model on on the development of Algorithms and the element of human relationship capital in terms of how that plays into the thinking maybe vastly different the group of clients that I serve but the client base that I serve value social capital very highly and so I think without exception all of my clients clients believe that design is a human enterprise. It's a human centered enterprise and therefore it's important that at the core of it is that relationship relationship with others night and that's very powerful. I'm going to ask you something that I think. A lot of people want to know about but they don't want to ask you. Okay Okay we wanna hear some secret stories. Tell us something that we wouldn't be able to hear in a lecture from you or I'm curious about for example. You know again the fact that you are involved in such diverse groups serving on the board of mass designed group to something else like Omay and you know all the firms in between between I mentioned snow head to earlier. Maybe you can't divulge but could you tell us something about a challenge that a practice having and how they're overcoming it or just to get a kind kind of inside scoop on their fluctuation of that might be typified in some things that we see today. Maybe thought a specific practice. Maybe it's something that you're seeing more. Generally or I think practices come to their different struggles. That happen at different times. So I've told my class over and over again you know. stereotypically practices go through crisis points. The first the third this fifth the seventh the fifteen th and the twenty fifth years and then then a lot of them grow through the crisis at about one hundred years so it more or less tracks human experience. There are a lot of people who just are itching to get into practice so they do it except they had no business doing it because they were not prepared so at the end of the first year they find themselves in debt they he did the wrong things. They rented an office and printed business cards and didn't think they needed any clients or something like that right or they did a dorm edition and that wasn't sufficient to so that's a no brainer. Then there are people who have beginner's luck and managed to snag a few things and and go along and do things and then by the third year there Oughta because they actually didn't know how to continue to attract and acquire opportunities and so then the crisis is that you did a good job on your first commissions and then you forgot that actually actually you needed to have continuity. Is that fear that third your third year okay. Then the fifth year actually you have to move out of your garage and you have to start making major investments if you are successful you can't work out of your apartment anymore right and you have to actually start making real investments like you have to put down one hundred thousand dollars for a real infrastructure cetera et Cetera and normally at that point number of other people that you didn't expect to appear start having to appear Devon accountant all that stuff and they're unable to manage your affairs that shows up in a negative way on the positive side of it at that point. You're probably pretty good at doing work. And you're starting to learn how to manage your client based CETERA and the seventh year. I call it the founders trap. which is that if you're doing great? You're almost dying because the the only one who has any authority are the founders and so any problem that happens in your firm. It's got your name on it right and too many problems and you haven't been able to delegate or find someone to delegate them to and therefore it's a the founders trap I call up being caught in the propeller which is the overlap between representation and production and the enterprise functions of how you keep things infrastructurally surely going accounting. Hr All that. The founders are caught in the overlaps of all those domains. Because they're the only ones with any authority to actually cause things to happen at that point. If you don't understand how to structure your practice you'll live in chaos than year fifteen your practice is mature. It's crystallized you own your own face as a practice and at that point if you aren't able to reinvent yourself and fifteen years. The market's changed. The basis of practices changed if you were coasting along doing retreads reds for the last five years you won't make it and at that point alive of merger do other things and then there's twenty five years in one hundred years but most people who are listening sending those podcast aren't worried about twenty five. But you get the idea there canonical kind of issues of growth and development that afflict flicked people who found practices. This is pretty standard and I get phone calls at each of these disjuncture you know. And there's certain people all I can help and certain people I can't. Why are there certain people? You can't what is it that that distinguishes that group because they don't get it because they can't get it and they don't have the talent I see. They can't find ways for example to get out of the propeller or they don't have the talent that's worth saving the enterprise and maybe they get absorbed by another project. Go work for someone else. It'd be a principal with another firm dumb around with it. It's too much trouble staying right. What you find is that in many cases it's not a lack lack of talent? It's really just a lack of insight into how to organize your affairs properly right. That's very interesting. So it's Kinda like massive executive functioning issues and I think a lot of designer whereas a badge of honor that they're always on the verge of bankruptcy but I mean that's no no way to live in the world and actually I can honestly say that the best designers I work with are also decent business people not good managers necessarily really right there good leaders and they have good business instincts. They may not be able to manage things they need other people to help them manage the enterprise but as a leadership leadership function. They're not naive. They certainly know how to deal with difficult interpersonal and political situations. They know how to strike a deal. All right they know how to bargain. They know it in negotiating and so these kind of core skills that particularly with designers if a designer oh has those skills it's dynamite because actually they're the ones who can make things move right right. That's that's right. Well I wanNA thank thank you so much for joining us today to talk to us about practice from your perspective you know again. It's one of so broad and so fascinating you've seen so many different types of practice and you've been able to really think through for example even the milestones of practice which I think really quite interesting because there's no textbook on practice and yet from your vantage point. Uc All different ways in which practices have emerged and what makes them successful. And why and I think that this is an important part of how not only what we teach but how we might learn from this kind of great body of knowledge that you have. So we're really lucky to have you as part of our faculty not just grateful that you could spend time with US thank you thank you.

Omay supervisor Devon principal executive accountant
"omay" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

Whimsically Volatile

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

"You can sorta hear the echo of the show the very cheap and they're very portable. Yeah. Yeah, totally question for you. What was it like doing Larry? King Omay was so excited? Do like corn, corn, corn on the cob corn lacob? Yeah, on the cop. I like cream. I mean, when you know, I mean I'm dry clean. And so whenever an opportunity comes my way, I think what's the catch. Larry, Larry King wants to talk to me. I'm like, okay. Are they having forty queens? Do like a nine hundred ninety? S Maury? Like is it a hero? She's sort of wind up not to insult him because he has like Peabody awards and stuff. But he was so nice and respectful eighty five believe. Doesn't use a teleprompter, doesn't want him. There. Sat down recited my career from joking. It did not someone a word. I've never seen anything like that. You know, we worked on on Trixie and Caccia. We had promise tell this bitch, this bitch can't read or interesting. They would just put a pictures right, gifted teleprompters. They would have to give her hieroglyphics. Oh my God. King was so nice. He obviously before I went in, they were like, he's very interested because he asked me by name to come in, which I was knows. I'm better life. That's incredible people. Very nice. And everybody worked for him was like, he's amazing. We love working with. They were all like, he's so nice to work for entry was like, just see. They really just, you know, he's older and so he might have questions that he really liked just might not know. Yes, sir. Right, right. It's newer generation and he was very respectful. He asked me like, you know, like a few times if I was transgender. Have you ever wanted to be a woman? He's an. How long have you dressed like a woman? I'm like, wait in excess Jackson, your woman because I'm in like this extreme cowboy. And I, whenever I'm nervous, I put on a lot of makeup. Sear, I just have black girl. I'm honeypot actually in the picture in the video mazing and he was so nice and ask questions about gender and drag and why people like it and. Never missed a beat. Never use a teleprompter and never stumbled. Incredible. I can't believe you didn't use it was so nice and phenobarbitol. Was there Ryan from Boston? Yeah. And he was like it green hair at the time, and he was like her green. I think it's charming to have someone who sort of so divorced from the world that you is also forest. The soda wars. Eight, divorce showcased wife. That's right. God does alimony payments. He's he's older Jewish thinking king. I think he is also had some kind of check fraud thing earlier in his check. Kiting scam got a busted for that long time ago. So nice informed. That I just I was the back page of New York Times last week. That is crazy. Crazy. Damn, I know I started doing drug which was like for free, drink tickets on Wednesday in Milwaukee. What was the first place that you did drag at rocky horror picture show in Wisconsin, rocky horror picture show is the greatest sort of guiding light for so many of us right? Because especially for drag, they're not women there. It's kind of all about gender, bending, and rock and roll. In contrast, it's about looking like a man just up like a woman, and that's maybe why I like to look like a drag Queen. Sure. And this one likes to look like Penelope and Weller. Iraqi. I mean, I was eighteen so I was doing drag for years before I even turned twenty one, which was great because I got to develop Maya. De of drag before I met club, drag queens will I also worked in makeup for five years. So I ate transfixed with like beauty ideals meets like dolls and stuff, and the extreme. Where do the fascination with dolls come from? I wasn't allowed to play with girl to a kid. Okay. So it's just like, I've just setting me. I wanted pipe pockets in my little ponies and you had sister. I read sister. You did. She have girl toys. You could play with just rakes. No. Gem? Oh, yeah. Jim von story about the gem doll was being released. Intel heard about it and they had an inside spy who was like the new dolls coming out..

Larry King Maury King Omay Ryan Intel New York Times Wisconsin Milwaukee Sear fraud Jackson Boston Penelope Weller five years
"omay" Discussed on Dispositivo Sonoro

Dispositivo Sonoro

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Dispositivo Sonoro

"Acoustics zone, proven Jamir propose. This isn't movie ma'am. They quad plaza Halen, dodge. You'll catch command tham Bayik can we the mice too key, Catherine today? It was hit on Cebu ashamed company aim to eleven digestible, said though. Donna goes, does that with the EPA failing loss still not so more events non-fox semi kilkare into Dutch gathered Collins adore you quote a quirkier Omay mammoths could avoid g. inch condos of Exeter faith of filming of liquor on Jaffa, Lhasa, invasion, Madame h fulfill. Nadia that same as l. at dawn e by CPI that from the sound he does just though. That's the city Modell Aji Nagorski who are eleven and them with mice ki ki. Trivia d'humieres partic- victory of I. Veges song who's wide by comply with the big vegetables by Landon. As far was. Calico Mooney dodge genius, Astro participate, Jimmy municipal woman mayor. But just on the side, Jimmy news that I pursue, what invest not to. Fullerton as as the people into this notch was gone ahead. Implement ball photo? My own mobile genetic. Academia, yes, this is is not homo diligent garden. It was as Dan these Devi than my formative e them in from the city's major mall agos decisional achieving. I found us cheese, donde, garage fitness. So briquettes don't do that. The rue with doc is on the of the mortgage deduction he should yet. It is more than one a coma king versus owner artists don't come care complex versus start with Lange's most emirs by his card. Wedge donated dommage Dario -ssume that. I mean, you got a half union nessa got her father had said I n the continuous in with the achieve. Tell me therm. Karaka Masuda valley. Anymore. Strive Khimki as his own than you do my my kitchen with mice. Them provide the dodge, but most rap assume Kellogg the Fenian Aleta myself am I sell dive at my Woodham then put it out of a demo, former dues on my itchy mice, food or gala mice. Subroto if you get up persona Mi's the sow, I trouble the minke an imbalance. They will say they was buys them on. Monta as foreign to today's. When he was that amount today, our to our, it says it said anymore. Mmj Jewish lodging, which is the former, but they transfer my s I wouldn't put name on each Vamba lucrative you key after I assume the fissile was fog, Geico terrified, Chidi scorned. This scores e Bracken. Bratcher. Go into this process from tramonte.

Monta Modell Aji Nagorski tham Bayik Kellogg Karaka Masuda valley Cebu Calico Mooney Jimmy Geico Catherine Nadia Landon Fenian Aleta nessa Exeter Fullerton quirkier Omay Chidi Lange Donna
"omay" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"A year in little rock and then the years we don't play in there we're going to have the screen game but then there's also stipulations that have to be met i think forty seven thousand tickets to be sold in order to keep the games literature but i guess my question is do you think it's still a good thing for us to play in two sides and also do you know win auburn alabama quit playing like in birmingham and when mississippi state and i'll miss quit playing jackson just so i want to keep you still there yeah good good good because i want to ask you know full disclosure i have not been to womam morial stadium in twenty five years and i can tell you this twenty five years ago it was a dump like i did a story last year for you spin magazine if he's been calm about punishing the visiting team for terrible like vistors locker room conditions and i had on polling players i have multiple players in the sec say omay warble memorial stadium demarcus speier says only time it's ever taking a shower with socks on because he just didn't want his feet touch floor so has it improved i mean as a naive question but i don't know because back in the day i felt like they've already given up on this place yeah i mean there have been improvement it's certainly nothing like to really brag about but they have made improvements to the locker rooms they they they built a basically a brand new press box that they probably within the last six or seven years but i mean it's old it's just an old stadium i mean there's there's not really much you can do to dress up like an old concrete bowl stadium i mean you know it's it's kinda limited but i think what people especially for me like i saw my first race about game there in nineteen eighty eight against the pacific tigers who no longer play division rival but there's just there's kind of a mistake to it when houston was here you know people say what they want about him but he was almost perfect and litter off and.

alabama birmingham mississippi jackson sec pacific tigers houston womam morial stadium spin magazine omay warble memorial stadium demarcus speier twenty five years seven years
"omay" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"omay" Discussed on About to Review

"No it's insane i'm sorry i'm not gonna make any mentions about anything just because it's just i haven't had the options to really look at enough things is inciting four hundred pluses is crazy it is pretty crazy about the on the day of the stop the festival itself and when you have the brochure at their omay seventeen seventeen so may seventeen that's wanted officially kicks off june the tenth yes through june tenth huge huge festival i will be covering it for the next few weeks so definitely follow the podcast on social media where i will be doing some capsule reviews because i m allowed to do those i just cannot give a full review real weird with embargoes especially when some of these films are making their world premiere and unless they have a us distributor we cannot fully talk about them it gets pretty tricky but another film festival that is coming up in the fall the doctor andy has been involved with since the beginning yep pretty much yeah so right now this is a social justice film festival the seattle social justice film festival say that quickly settle social justice film festival excellent excellent so that's gonna be held in this is i think the gosh she's just a fifth consecutive year i get i love about right yes right now we are going through this submission phase and i have started doing some of the programmatic stuff looking at some of the movies i i only get to see a handful of these in comparison to all of this submissions i what it is like being one of the program is at the seattle international film especially she's they i don't know how many submissions they get but oh my gosh well considering they narrow it down to four hundred hundred.

us andy seattle
"omay" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"omay" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"It's hard but is not hard because us gaming condition you know why you up on this like that it's like you up this one arm is not there so other people look at it may be is hard but in a this is gaming condition you accept what what of his experience do we see in this new film his experience been seeing as nu why i met in the refugee camp i'm mad solvents per about vet meetings of them i see so there i they're all human beings vis very dignity and they proud of themself but same terms that being putting into a condition which it would narrow imagine they will leave their home under the of gold who some locations where the it'll speaks same language that will have a new financial support whatever they have it's all gone and all they want is to have a peaceful shudder under to give their children some chances in all that's all they want hinault their life destroyed the no there is no past home no religious believe is no neighborhood nobody than normal but only hope there is formed their courage to provide some possibilities for their children but we all know this is very very dark in a average refugee so stay with us kanda status for twenty some years that means their life for generation of that life is totally wasted i was reading story about when you were living in new york and you would carry a camera around with you ever where you and always with you all the time always documenting and when i was watching this documentary human flow i noticed you always had your phone with you all the time now before we started this interview you to get your phone we took a selfie together um what does it mean for you now to have a device in your pocket that can capture everything you're seeing what what does it mean for you to have it with you all the time i think the communication and documentation of powerful tools and in omay always struggle as human or practice always struggle between are in now wallowed under the reality and the reality in own happened technology made it so much easier for recording us do.

new york omay