20 Episode results for "Oliver Wendell"

Need a dose of inspiration? Enjoy this week's podcast on The Digital Vibe Podcast

The Digital Vibe

09:58 min | 2 years ago

Need a dose of inspiration? Enjoy this week's podcast on The Digital Vibe Podcast

"Hello. Do you know what? Today is. Today. No, we'll not just today, but it's the day for inspiration. Right. And I don't know what today's Friday though. Right. So here you are in your car on your way home or you're just happened to be listening at home or in your office. Or on wherever you happen to be in this world. This isn't that? Of course. But in catch you at a bad moment because I wanna be able to catch you at. Precise right time. Oh, gosh. Life is good. You know, the only way I believe. That the only way that we really can make a difference in this world. There's only one way. You know, you've heard that saying there's only one way to skin a cat. Well, there is only one way that you can make a difference in the lies of other people. Can you guess what that one way? It's. Can you guess really? By empowering yourself. The only way that you're going to make a difference and empower anybody else other than yourself. Is by empowering yourself. There is you cannot do it any other way. There is no other way to do that. Before you know, people take this the cart before the horse and what they do is. They start talking a lot. They they talk a lot. But they have nothing to back it up, and you ever see people that when they talk a lot then not really making a difference in that, really. Changing anything and making you know difference. 'cause there's so many people out there. That when you see them either, they're not making any difference. You hear about them years later that they did this and the that they messed up, you know, they did this or that it wasn't really productive and worthwhile. And the only way, you know, it's like the only way that should really can do this is by empowering yourself. So so many people are talking about. Yes. This this and this, but less until you actually decide that you're going to impound yourself and work on yourself and do yourself and hold yourself accountable and take one hundred percent responsibility for you. There is no way possible. You're going to have the power the influence the passion desire. To change anybody's life. Because you didn't do that for yourself. It all starts with you. So before you can impact our anybody else for you want any change. You have to power yourself. And then the thing is you have to do that on a regular basis. Because as life. If all as this world is universe changes constantly. You have to be able to evolve along with it. But empower yourself by empowering others. So here's his quote. Many people die with their music still inside of them. Why is that? Too often. It's because they're always getting ready to live. Before they know it time runs out. Oliver Wendell Holmes. I want you to think about that. Because time this thing all time. Is always going by minute by minute day by day month by month week by week. Year-by-year time time is a commodity. We could never get back. But when I hear so much of. That's the whole thing about having these dreams. Inside of us desires inside of us because it all starts with a dream. And if you don't do anything to tap into that if you don't take any action on that do nothing about that. You are merely what they call a. Person who lives in sideline if you will. You're not doing anything, but you can only do anything. That's why so many people are still in the sidelines. Their dying inside while the living. They have these dreams, and desires, and hopes and passions and things they want to do. But they haven't taken any action on anything. So they can impa they they cannot possibly empower others. You know, and I say this to people who are doing that. How can you possibly make a difference in somebody else's life? When you have yet to do that in yours. And you wonder why? They're not changing. You wonder why that scenario not changing, let's say, for example, your own company. Your leader. And nobody's listening to you or believing in you being influenced by you. Why is that you think? Is because you. You have not empowered yourself. And I have said this before sometimes those that follow actually the leaders. You know, we inspire each other to succeed. But when you as a leader, you don't empower your team. Then. You know? I mean, it makes me really ineffective, and that's like like followers. I call him like, you know, different like sheep who don't have a leader or something like that. They don't know whether going and she by don't for some reason something about them. So if you're lead if you're talking about leading something leading organization leading this leading team doing this doing that you have to I empowered. And if you're not you can you can't possibly lead. So many people call themselves leaders, but they're not. So many people call themselves Leers. But they're not. I call him pseudo leaders, and that's not offensive leadership. Is pretty plastic. It's fake. And then I fault those that follow that. But again, you remember the lies true like attracts like. So when you have these mindless sent senseless this empowered leaders. In different capacities. You wonder why nothing ever changes because nothing changes unless that leader or that team of leaders besides some power him or herself. And change from within an involve from within. Nothing else is going to change the dynamic does not change. Because remember this the leader. If you're a leader. Or if you desire to be one you the core. You're the fulcrum. Everything else that goes on outside of that. Either you are influencing it or it's influencing you. So. That's the importance. If you have, you know, sit just not doing anything. There's a difference between fantasy leadership and that which is not real. Look at look at what what goes on take any leader. And look at what that look at what how they're affecting people. That'll tell you a whole lot with that leader is effective or ineffective. So I got this quote. Oliver Wendell Holmes. But I got it from one of my greatest mentors, Jack canfield. His book chicken soup for the soul. I know you've heard of it. But this book is a success principles of Jack canfield, the gold addition. And if you wanna purchase that book. Visit branch up network dot com at WWW brand shopping network dot com. So I thank you for taking the time to listen and may be. You will stop look. And less than see next time on the digital vibe. See you.

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jack canfield Leers chicken soup one hundred percent
The Self-Reliant Entrepreneur Reading: September 4

Duct Tape Marketing

06:51 min | 1 year ago

The Self-Reliant Entrepreneur Reading: September 4

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct tape marketing podcast. This is john chance and i am going to do an an episode. That's gonna turn into a series of episodes related to my new book called the self reliant entrepreneur so i'm gonna about once a week here through the launch in october of twenty nineteen. I'm going to bring you a reading from that book and the way the book is organized. It's the three hundred sixty six daily entries so i'm going to read for example today september fourth entry because that's one of publishing today's and that's how the book is organized. <hes> i'm going to read it verbatim right out of the book if i can and then going to end with a challenge question should because that's how the book ends and then i will just discuss kind of my thoughts on that a little bit as well so it's really kind of a a over and above what's in the book but i wanted to give you you a feel for it <hes> as we're getting ready to launch here as i said this'll be a series. I'll do it about once a week. What i've done with this book is i've taken readings from literature of the mid nineteenth century. I happen to believe that some of the best entrepreneurial literature was written by people like henry david thoreau and mark twain edgar allen poe and margaret fuller and louisa louisa may alcott and of course ralph waldo emerson so i'm taking reading from folks like that <hes> during that era and then i kind of give my thoughts and wisdom i suppose hopefully wisdom about kind of how to apply that to an entrepreneur's life in each day at ends with a challenge questions so give you a little bit of format of that over the next few weeks. Hopefully you enjoy it. I'd love to hear your feedback. The book will be available pretty much anywhere you can goodbye books but you can also check out some information about it at self reliant entrepreneur dot com. It's a mouthful are dispelled google it. You'll find it all right so for today's reading september fourth in to silence. What are the great faults of conversation wanted. Vitas wants of words. One of manners are the principled ones. I suppose you think i don't doubt it but i will tell you what i found. Spoil more good talks than anything anything else long arguments on special points between people who differ on the fundamental principles upon which these points depend oliver wendell holmes senior the autocrat of the breakfast table eighteen fifty-eight defending one's position is a clear signal of a lack of trust. The person subjected to your defense but in yourself assuredness in a point of view sounds a lot like silence. Yes today's as call is to be still and listen. This isn't a knock on your ability to share or even the fact that you have brilliant ideas to share. It's just that when we choose to listen more some beautiful things can happen in conversation the economy of our words give space for others to feel heard and valued it invites people to find themselves and see you as a source of energy that allows rather than prescribed listening draws i dea relationships stories information and clues that you better understand the impact you have on others for most particularly entrepreneurs this advice requires biting your tongue and raining in your natural inclination but if you can allow yourself to embrace this habit and practice it. You'll never give it up today. Try to speak only when spoken to and then listen with your entire body observe how silence let's fields and take note of your urges to burst out talking but more importantly bask in the transformation of those who experience you're active listening. If you have a latching need to say then write it down of course the sneaky little trick in this advice. Is that writing forces you to listen to yourself and observe. You've just what you sound like. You're challenge question for today. Who will you listen to today and now that word from a sponsor room for idle chat and business so if emails you're only moneymaker make room for something. New intercom intercom is <music> only business messenger that starts with real time chat thing keeps growing your business with conversational bots and guided product tours take intercom customer unity in just twelve months. They converted forty five percent more visitors through intercom messenger. Make room for new revenue channel. Go to intercom dot com home slash podcast. That's intercom. Dot com slash podcast so i invite you to think of on that. What i just is read. You may have to go back and replay it. As i said every day starts with a reading from a literature mid-nineteenth century then you heard me talking about that reading reading and applying it to hopefully your entrepreneurial lifer at least my entrepreneurial experience and then your challenge question for i tell you this one of silence and and listening <hes> is certainly a tough one for me. <hes> and i think most leaders of businesses we come to depend on on the fact that people look to us to tell them what to do to have the answers and a lot of times. We want to share those things. I will tell you. There's a a great book by <unk> greenie steiner that is called the coaching habit picked up something from that book that i try to apply every day and that the the realization that when a lot of times when people ask you your opinion or ask you your advice or ask for the answer. How do i do this. They're not always looking for you you to give them the answer cases. I think they're looking for you to invite them to have the answer to validate what it is is that they think rather than give them the answer so that's something to think about today. Who will you listen to today all right. I'll be back in a week in another episode that contains reading from the self reliant entrepreneur to.

oliver wendell holmes Vitas google john henry david thoreau ralph waldo emerson louisa louisa edgar allen poe margaret fuller mark twain alcott forty five percent twelve months
How Joe Biden Is Positioning Himself as a Modern FDR

TIME's Top Stories

06:05 min | 5 months ago

How Joe Biden Is Positioning Himself as a Modern FDR

"Presented by Raytheon Technologies, our nearly two hundred thousand engineers, researchers and people with purpose are building the future today we're pushing the limits of known science to go deeper into space advance aviation and build smarter defense systems that protect all of us here at home. That's the future of aerospace and defense learn more at RT x dot com. How Joe Biden is positioning himself as a modern FDR BY CHARLOTTE ALTER. For President at a time of record unemployment and economic despair with democracy itself. In apparent retreat around the globe, he overcame tremendous personal hardship and promised to heal a battered nation. His friends thought of him as a unifier, his enemies call him a socialist. If this sounds to you like Joe Biden you'd be right. If this sounds like Franklin Delano Roosevelt, you'd also be right with just a week before the election Biden traveled to warm springs Georgia. Tuesday to deliver a speech on national healing and Economic Redemption and wrap himself in FDR's mantle. The venue was laden with significance not only because Biden is making a late push for victory in Georgia. But also because warm springs was where Roosevelt went to convalesce from the paralysis that followed a polio diagnosis in his thirty s roosevelt had a little White House there and the place became both a second home to him and a symbol of his. In the face of illness. This place warm springs is a reminder that though broken, each of us can be healed Biden said that as a people and a country, we can overcome a devastating virus that we can heal a suffering world that, yes, we can restore our soul and save our country. In the closing weeks of the race. Bein. has sought to link the two major themes of his campaign unity and healing to the great presidents of American history three weeks ago he delivered a speech in Gettysburg about the importance of repairing a house divided invoking Abraham Lincoln's famous words. But Roosevelt, more than Lincoln or even Barack. Obama may be Biden's closest presidential parallel. Both Biden and Roosevelt were underestimated early in their careers. Roosevelt was called a lightweight by critics. Biden was mocked for his frequent gaffes. Roosevelt was a mediocre student and an unremarkable lawyer. So was Biden Supreme Court justice. Oliver Wendell Holmes once famously said that Roosevelt had a second class intellect, but a first class temperament Biden has little of Obama's. But his famous for his easy way of building connections Roosevelt's new deal aimed at draw America out of the Great Depression through massive government programs. Biden's build back better plan promises to put Americans to work helping the country recover from covid nineteen Roosevelt's bout with polio. gave him empathy for American suffering Biden's loss of his wife and daughter in nineteen seventy, two car crash followed by his son Bows fatal cancer in two thousand fifteen has made him a political translator of American grief. Perhaps. Most importantly Biden seems to share Roosevelt's believed that the federal government should be relied upon to help ordinary Americans in times of Need Roosevelt created social security and the National Labor Relations Act to protect the elderly and workers his civilian Conservation Corps the Works Progress Administration put thousands of Americans to work his vision was a new type of social contract between the American people and the federal government the idea that if you're old and sick or out of work, the government would have your back. It's also true that these. Nineteen thirties programs perpetuated the racial inequality of the day while the improving economy benefited black. Americans, they were excluded from many new deal protections and opportunities. Something Biden has attempted to remedy in his plans. Biden's build back better program includes racial equity proposals to close the racial wealth gap new family leave protections a public health jobs core and investing in millions of jobs in manufacturing infrastructure and clean energy. It's in the same vein as Roosevelt's vision. When Americans fall down because of global pandemic, the government can help them get back up. There are other parallels Roosevelt tried unsuccessfully to pack the courts in nineteen, thirty seven partly in an attempt to ensure that his new deal would survive in the aftermath of justice. Amy Barrett's rushed confirmation by his under similar pressure from the left to consider adding justices to the Supreme Court. If he's elected, he's declined to take a definitive position on packing the court besides saying, he'd appoint a commission to issue recommendations. Detractors hurled similar insults at both men. President trump has wrongly accused Biden of being a socialist many times. Roosevelt was called a socialist not a Democrat by one critic while a GOP congressman called the new deal undisguised state socialism former New York governor Al Smith said his government had the stench of the foul breath of Communist. Russia Biden is well aware of the similarities in several reasons interviews. He has cited the Roosevelt presidency as an inspiration for what he hopes to achieve and how he wants to do it. There's no such thing as guaranteed democracy. He told Bruno Brown on her podcast explaining how writer Walter Lippmann had encouraged. FDR To impose a dictatorship in order to pull America out of the depression and FDR had resisted the call. There is nothing automatic about this. Biden said, we have to earn it every single generation. Both men are more practical than ideological. When asked about the philosophy behind the Tennessee Valley Authority Roosevelt said, it's neither fish nor fowl, but whatever it is, it will taste awfully good of the people of the Tennessee Valley Biden has embraced and elastic style of politics. I'm kind of in a position that FDR was told The New Yorker in an interview in July what in fact FDR did was not ideological it was completely practical. At his speech in Warm Springs Biden repeated an old legend about Roosevelt collapsing in grief when FDR's funeral procession passed. Did you know the president somebody asks the man? No the man says, but he knew me. Seventy, five years after Roosevelt's death representative. Jim Clyburn echoed those words in referring to Biden I know Joe, we know Joe Claburn. said in a speech endorsing Biden ahead of the South Carolina primary but most. Joe knows us.

Russia Biden Franklin Delano Roosevelt roosevelt FDR Tennessee Valley Authority Roo President Supreme Court Warm Springs Barack defense systems FDR Abraham Lincoln Raytheon Technologies America federal government White House Oliver Wendell Holmes The New Yorker CHARLOTTE Jim Clyburn
Simple, Practical Changes with Real Results - Part 7

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

14:28 min | 7 months ago

Simple, Practical Changes with Real Results - Part 7

"Welcome to enjoying everyday life with New York Times bestselling author Joyce Meyer. On today's program, Joyce will be teaching from her series simple practical changes with real results. You ever started your week thinking that it was going to be bad even before it started, we've all been there, but God wants to help us make every day better and enjoy our lives regardless of our circumstances in this series Joyce teaches how to lean on God for his strength. And Support and challenges us to dream big no matter what situation we find ourselves in. It's important to think beyond where we are now and not get disappointed or discouraged by our current situation remain confident in God and in the gifts he has placed in you God has so much more in store for you. Now, here's Joyce today series simple practical changes with real results. I know when I was raising my kids. I can really get a martyr's syndrome real quick. Everybody around here just expects me to do everything. Watches Barton and he goes and plays golf and the kids make messes and I just cook meals and people eat them and I do the dishes and I do the laundry and what I want to know who cares about me. But. Here's the thing. Let's go back to the end of Hers Twenty. Four Komo go slow today. Well, want you to get this. The one, whom you are actually serving is Jesus. You're not a slave to your family your servant to Jesus Christ and you do everything that you do with a smile on your face unto the Lord and when you help somebody else unto the Lord our when you're raising little children, you're doing it unto the Lord. It's a tough time in life but Lemme tell them you raise those kids right when they get grown. They're gonNA, take you. You. Better maintain some good relationships with them. Now, we've got four grown kids that are good kids and let me tell you something. We're getting on the other side of life now it's like. Come on over I. got some things for you to do. Try to find something good in everything play the glad game I was stuck in traffic but maybe God is protecting me from an accident that I would be in if I were traveling faster. When you're in that traffic and you're tempted to have a bad attitude this is when you have to say Okay God there's gotTa be something good that I can see in this you gotta look for the good. You don't have to look for bad in life, but you have to look for the good. Well my friend really disappointed me. But at least I learned to put my hope in God more than people. I've been sick for two but boy has it ever reminded me to pray for others when I hear that they're sick. I lost my job but now I'm going to have an opportunity to watch. God Get me a better one. So we're going to just dare to be defiant against dread everybody say no more dread. Now. Another way that you can make a day better if it's not going to good. Are Actually, you don't even have to wait for it not to go good some of these things if we would do them on a regular basis, we wouldn't experience as many bad days and have to fight them off how about doing something new that will keep your life from being stale and stagnant because nothing has changed for the last twenty five years. I'M GONNA. If you don't like change well, get ready for. Boring. And then. If, we stop learning and growing were breathing but not truly alive. Joyce Meyer said. Oliver Wendell Holmes said a mind stretch by new experience can never go back to its old dimensions. Now, I believe that learning. Can actually add a little exciting element. To our life every day maybe the biggest thing we need to learn is a new way to respond to old problems. So here's a little story for you. Once upon a time complained or father that her life was miserable and she just didn't know how she was going to make it. She said I'm tired of fighting struggling all the time. It just seems after one problem is solved. Another one comes right on top of our father who was a chef took her into the kitchen and filled three pots with. Water placed each one of them on a high fire wants a three pots began to boil. He placed potatoes in one pot eggs in the second pot and ground coffee beans in the third pot it then let them sit and boyle without saying a word, his daughter, the daughter Moan and Groan complain and she was impatient wondering what was he doing after twenty minutes? He turned off the burners It took out the potatoes. Put them in a bowl full the eggs out, put them in a bowl. Then he ladles some of the coffee out into a cup turn into her and ask his daughter. What do you see? She's potatoes, eggs, and coffee look closer. He said touched the potatoes touched the eggs, SIP the coffee. So she did in noted that the potatoes. were. Soft. Go take an egg and break it and after pulling off the shelves she observed that it was hard. He Nice go to sip the coffee and it brought a smile. The rich aroma brought a smile to her face. Father what does this mean? What are you trying to teach me? He then explained that the potatoes, the eggs and the coffee at each face the same adversity, the boiling water however. Each one reacted differently the potatoes went in strong and hard and came out soft and weak the egg one in fragile with a thin outer shell protecting its liquid interior. But when it was put in the boiling water, it came out hard. However, the coffee beans were unique after they were exposed to the boiling water they change the water and created something new. So when you have. Problems and you know we do have problems and. I'm well aware that some of you have some serious problems going on in your life right now. and. If you're not in this building, surely many watching TV I've gone through. Terribly difficult times in my life, but we have to be so careful that our problems don't make us. We can win be where we don't just start having a give up attitude. and. Then we also want to make sure they don't make hard and harsh. Leave us with a bitter attitude. What we WANNA do we have problems is let God use them to change us and then let us change the world around us because of what God has taught us are you a potato and egg or coffee beans? Which Warner you? The moral that we want to learn from this is n. life things happen around us some things happen to us but the only thing that really matters is what happens in us. Ideas of new things to try in case you are really a bad case and can't think of anything new. Which I would have been in this category at one time I'll tell you try a new restaurant or a new dish it your favorite restaurant. You know I'm not too big on eating stuff that I don't know what it is I'm like. No. But. Then I'll complain about eating the same thing all the time and time I know I I'm over and over and over day will sell. We'll try something new. Well, what if I don't like it? Anybody with me on that so. You know nothing new can ever happen in your life if you're not willing. To try something and maybe you will find out you don't like it but you might find something that you absolutely love. After watching a good movie, Go online and learn more about the actors. I find that how many of you ever do that? See a few of the we're giving you a new idea now. owner. Okay. We'll stay boring. Watch something on television that teaches us something at least part of the time. Don't just let it eat your brain. And I watch movies I'll watch all kinds of shows but I love to watch stuff that teaches me something last night I like to. Watch a little something after meetings to Kinda. Get me chilled out and ready to go to sleep. Get my mind off of things and so last night in my hotel room laying in bed on my computer I watched a documentary about. And I found that to be quite interesting safe. There's something we feel better about ourselves. When we're learning something, we'd like to learn things now I, don't know if I'll have a chance to read it I. Doubt that I will want him here. But in my hotel room, there's a book about all the ship bricks that have happened in Lake Erie and I thought I bet that would be interesting and maybe you'd like to learn things. I like to watch the history channel I. Liked documentaries. There's a show that I watch a lot. Especially it kind of helps put me to sleep and by that I don't boring but it's just it's kind of like that level of show where it's not like so interested that you're just like. Can't go to sleep at all. But you just kind of. Want something. So it's called mysteries at the museum. Anybody ever watched any of that mysteries at the museum I mean they're not all super interesting but a lot of them are just really it is amazing. The stuff that has gone on in life. Now, I'm not trying to tell you what to watch. On TV I'm just trying to give you a few ideas make a new friend. Animal. Childlike that one to. Really good. The seventy two cute animals on ours come on. We could get into this way. Really. We could start a new movement here I man. Another good one is. Strange animal friends. Animals that make friends with each other that you would never ever think would make friends a the horse. I mean when I watched that kind of stuff to be honest for me now this may sound goofy but it makes me feel closer to God. I'm like, God. You are so awesome. That is amazing. Some people are like that are like a horse, the duck. Here's another new thing for you. Let's get back to business. Learn something new about yourself. Think about that. When you have an unusual reaction, the something are, let's just say what it is. You're acting kind of weird. and. Instead of just saying. I wonder why do that? Are Somebody else saying, why do you do that and you're like, oh Why not I ask God why do I do that? Stop and have a conversation with God. You know I grew up with extremely angry father and probably one of my greatest challenges in life has been to not live my life trying to keep everybody from getting angry don't have to deal with it. especially if it's within the family I became the peacemaker always trying to keep my dad heavy clean. My mom happy and problem was I. was miserable nobody was keeping me happy. But I was busy trying to keep everybody else happy and you know what I'm talking about. And It's a shame but when you learn something and it gets so deeply rooted in you as a child. I'll be very honest with you guys delivers us from all kinds of bondage is but being free from it doesn't necessarily always mean the disappearance of it. What it means as you now know how to act in a different way toward that thing. Then you did before and I think a lot of people that will free from that I still bothers me well see I still feel fear but now I don't let it stop me. So I am free from fear. Thanks for listening focus on the positive leave worry behind when you order today's offer get results package, which includes three CDs and twenty ways to make every day better hardcover book. This package is available now for a donation of thirty dollars or more in US funds, and we do accept all major credit cards. You can order today's offer from our website at Joyce Meyer dot org or you can call toll free at one, eight, hundred, seventy, nine, zero, zero, eight, nine, again, the number is one, eight, hundred, seventy, nine, zero, zero, eight, nine. I am committed to bring you the word of God on a regular basis and I need you to be committed in partnership to help us continue bringing you the programs we bring you and sharing the love of Christ and the word of Christ all over the world as a thank you to anyone signing up for convenient automatic giving for the first time. We'd like to send you a special gift for your donations. Join US IN PARTNERSHIP AS WE SHARE Christ and love people contact us right now at Joyce Meyer Dot. Org, thanks again for listening to enjoying everyday life our mission here at Joyce Meyer Ministries, supple sharing Christ, and loving people remember together we can do more.

Joyce Meyer Joyce New York Times US Joyce Meyer Ministries Joyce Meyer dot Joyce Meyer Dot Komo Barton Lake Erie Warner Oliver Wendell Holmes boyle Moan twenty five years thirty dollars twenty minutes
Seeing Children Like God Does

The Point

15:04 min | 2 years ago

Seeing Children Like God Does

"Great point, we strive to make the proceeded living for God, it's clear possible. But sometimes still left wondering, what's the point? And it can be frustrating. Children. They're very important part of the church. But why are they so? What does God have to say? And how are we supposed to treat the church? We're here. I'm Pat strange, and this is the point. Low and thank you for joining us here at the point today. We're going to be talking about children this week was teachers appreciation week and here grace point we made a point of appreciating all of our Sunday school, teachers and everything that they do to pour into our children's lives here, grace point. Now, if you don't know the history here, we didn't always have a lot of kids at the church and few years ago, we made a point to revamp our Sunday school program. So that we can start attracting more children, and I like to joke around that now on Sundays after church, we have this little heard of children that circles, the building constantly, and you have to watch where you're going else, you might get run over and trampled on. But that's a good problem. Some would say, oh, you need to control that the honestly I love the fact that we have so many kids in our church because a church with kids in it as a living thriving church. You know, too, many churches today are failing. Ding and dying off simply because they don't have any young people or any children in their church. And when I say, they're dying off literally their members are growing old and they're passing away and the church is slowly shrinking because of that. So a church with children is a thriving church. And I want to talk about why children are so important to the church if you'll turn with me to I Samuel chapter sixteen verse seven it says, but the Lord set on the Samuel look not on his countenance or on the height of his stature because I have refused him for the Lord. See it not as a man see for man, look on the outward appearance, but the Lord look on the heart. Some parents in today's age did not feel that their children are important or worth much time and effort often parents occupations, take priority and many children never reached their God or deigned potential because of it. God's word gives clear direction about how he views everyone, including children. He looks. At the heart. One of I learned when studying this about children, well are key verses taken from the story of Samuel choosing a new king for Israel and the prophet in pre-stockholm God asking for direction, but he still looked at the situation in view, David the way adults normally look at children as small and insignificant dotted plan for the shepherd boy and God's plan has always included children. He designed children to be a blessing from him. Not an aggravation to get in the way of important adult plans. See God's plan takes this most innocent gentle and vulnerable of his creatures. And he molds them into his big children into adults that he can use. He wants them to follow his word and do his will and living. According to his purpose. He often uses these tiny creatures to get the attention of bigger folks and show them how they need to act if they want to. Enter his kingdom. He desires for them to be a part of a family that loves him in loves each other dearly. He plans for the family unit to love those around them enough to share the good news of his word, and he wants everyone including children to enjoy an abundant life. In his enjoy life series John Maxwell in the lesson. When you follow a star and find a stable he relates the following story. The year was eighteen nine the whole world was watching and waiting to hear what Napoleon Bonaparte self proclaimed emperor of France would do next. He had already won the great naval battle of Tressler gar. And was marching through Europe, conquering every nation seemingly with nothing. No one to stop him. History reveals that eighteen nine wasn't important year. Not just because Napoleon was marching across Europe. But however, it was important because of the babies who were born that year William Gladstone became prime minister of Britain four different times. He was a great politician. Alfred Lord Tennyson became an English poet whose profound effect on literature continues. Even to this day. He was a great literary figure. Oliver Wendell Holmes became an American writer and medical doctor who helped advance the use of sterilising techniques that remove bacterial infection from surgery in the birthing process. He was a great doctor Charles Darwin, though, we may not agree with his theories, but he was born that year, and he grew up to be a British scientists and father of modern of Lucian airy theory, and his theory changed the thinking of scientists and modern society in general, he was a world renowned. Scientist ABRAHAM LINCOLN was born February twelve same day is Charles Darwin in a log cabin in a small village in the United States of America. He became the sixteenth president and preserve the union of American states abolish slavery in the United States and influence many other people's to do the same. He was a great leader. And lover of equal rights for all humanity and Felix Mendelssohn was born in Germany, the grandson of Jewish philosopher, he became a musical Judy. Of the early nineteenth century. He was a great musician. The accomplishments of these men touched the whole world and had much more effect on humanity than the March of Napoleon did but in eighteen nine it didn't look that way. After all these were just babies being born the whole world looks at babies as special but overall unimportant at to the affairs of men. Carl Sandberg is quoted as saying a baby is God's opinion that the world should go on. So when we look at God's children God's word. It's full of stories about children Cain was the first baby ever born. But he did not follow. God's ways. He grew up to become the first murder of his own brother Isaac was God's promise baby. Born twenty years after God spoke to his father Abraham with the good news that he would have a son Joseph was the first baby born to Rachel Jacob's. Favourite wife, we see God's hand in his life through many difficult circumstances, and he saved his family and the nation of Israel from starvation. Moses inspired many to trust in the God who protects and preserves his own. He grew up to lead entire nation out of slavery without fighting a single battle overnight Samuel was dedicated to the Lord before his birth and God gave his mother five more children after him. John the Baptist was a miracle. Baby. Born to parents who were very old and the bible talks about baby John while he was still in his mother's womb. And Luke chapter one verse fifty. For he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and he shall drink. Neither wine or strong drink, and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost even from his mother's womb. All of these stories in many more show us the importance of ordinary babies born into ordinary families. When actually no baby is ordinary every child is God's vehicle in a potential beginning for new and great things. George Bernard Shaw in on raising children said life is a flame. That is always burning itself out, but it catches fire. Again, every time a child is born so knowing all of this. We have to consider how the devil sees children looking at different times in history. It's interesting to note that the devil knows where to begin the destruction of enemy kill the babies pharaoh ordered the killing of all newborn babies to stop the growth of Israel. But Moses was preserved in ended up growing up in Pharaoh's palace. Herod ordered the killing of all babies under the age of two Ye. Years after the wise men came looking for the baby Jesus, but Joseph obeyed the instructions of the angel and took his family into Egypt to escape the slaughter today. Children are the primary target of the devils attack on you Manitoba. Today, we're dealing with abortions that are out of control deaths throughout mount attrition, desks to know immunization kids are killed in wars constantly in today's age. It's amazing how the devil and how the enemy has come against our children. But how does God see children Matthew chapter eighteen verse one through six at the same time came the disciples onto Jesus saying who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven and Jesus called a little child onto him and set him in the midst of them and said fairly I say onto you accept you be converted and become as little children you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven who so ever therefore shall humble himself as this little child the same is greatest in the kingdom of heaven and who social receive one such little child in my name receive with me. But who so shall offend one of these little ones with relieving me if it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck and that he were drowned in the depths of the sea. See throughout the synoptic gospels. Jesus gives us a clear understanding of his view of children, the greatest in his kingdom are those who are changed from their adult attitude to have the character of a little child eighty one who harms or offends one of his little children, whether an actual child or a believer with childlike character is in serious trouble with God those who receive little children in his name are receiving him. Heaven is going to be full of people whose character is childlike the disciples tried to send away the little children who were brought to Jesus they thought the master was too busy with important things to take time for such small children Luke's account caused them infants but Jesus made a point to bless them and remind the adults that children are important as kingdom. Mark chapter. Ten verse thirteen through sixteen and they brought young children to him that he should touch them and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. But when Jesus saw he was much displeased instead under them suffer. The little children to come unto me and forbid them not for such as the kingdom of God. Very I say to you who so ever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child he shall not enter their in. And he took them up in his arms put his hands upon them and bless them. It's interesting to note that this account of blessing of the children immediately, followed Jesus is teaching about marriage and divorce. And this is there is an important connection between a lasting marriage and children who are truly blessed and touched by God his plan for their blessing includes a home with both parents involved in their daily lives and growth, and the early church, obviously understood the lessons Jesus taught about the value of children when Paul wrote to Timothy giving him instruction for the church of Ephesus. He spoke of the importance of saints taking care of their families and providing for their needs. I Timothy five and eight says it, but if any provide not for his own, especially for those of his own house, he had denied the faith and is worse than if infidel. So how does God see children will psalms one twenty seven three three through five says behold children are a gift of the Lord? The fruit of the womb is a reward like EROs of the hand of a warrior. So are the children's of one youth? How blessed is the man who's quivers full of them. They will not be ashamed when they speak with their enemies at the gate. Jovan are priceless. Treasures there. A heritage or inheritance from the Lord he does not take lightly anyone who would harm one of those precious gifts. He does not approve of parents who do not properly love and nurture their children together as a family. His disapproval includes anyone who does not take time to minister, the minister to them spiritually. So throughout history nations have been conquered by the destruction of children usually through the downfall of their families. But God has always had a plan time. And again, he is used the tender gentleness of a tiny baby to bring a savior into a hopeless situation relations for versus four through five. But when the fullness of time has come God sent forth, his son made of a woman made under the law to redeem them that were under the law that we might receive the adoption of sons see Jesus did not have an earthly fodder, but he began his life the same way as you. And I as a baby that meant he had to grow and learn and follow the normal process that all children go through to become adults. He did not hurry the process he did not skip over periods of life that we all face infancy toddling, poverty, puberty at leci-, teenage and young adult. He went through the whole process and became a victorious mature, man. Luke to I forty and the child grew in wax, strong and spirit filled with wisdom and the grace of God was upon him. Even though armies have tried to destroy children and kings of tried to stamp them out. God's babies of deliverance have always survived babies. Grow up to be children children grow up to be boys and girls than men and women and without them. The blessing of hope will not continue don't see the seed of their beginning. But see the tree of their maturity as it gives joy and supplies the needs of the future. When you look at children's see leaders of vision, fathers and mothers of courage and faith, a new generation of believers carrying the torch of truth until Jesus comes again. John F Wilson quoted as saying we must train for the future ministry to the present. And that's what we have to do with our. I'm past ranger. Thank you for listening.

Jesus Samuel Luke Napoleon Charles Darwin Israel Pat strange ABRAHAM LINCOLN Alfred Lord Tennyson Low Joseph Europe devils Oliver Wendell Holmes Carl Sandberg Moses Tressler gar United States William Gladstone Felix Mendelssohn
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

10:47 min | 10 months ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Today's episode is brought to you by capital. One capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they created. You know the capital one assistant that looks out for surprise credit card charges like duplicate charges or potential fraud, then sends an alert to your phone and helps you if you need to fix them, it's another way capital one is watching out for your money when you're not capital one. What's in your wallet? SEE CAPITAL DOT COM for details. Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey Brain Steph Lauryn. Bogle bomb here. Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding. In states famously there was Oliver Wendell Holmes, who was a physician, but is now much better known as poet who wrote a very elegant essay, called the contagious us a pure borough fever in eighteen, forty, three, a year before vice even completed his MD.. Another misunderstanding is the doctors of his time. Outright rejected demo vices ideas about hand washing. They didn't entirely. They just attributed coming down. Child fever to arrange a variables such as predisposition, environment and many other factors. To the said because people already had such a long list adding cadaveric or decomposing animal matter really wasn't a big deal to them and lots of people some of them pretty big shots did add this to their list and started disinfecting their hands, so it's just not true that that part was universally rejected. Later in the eighteen sixties, Louis Pasteur started working on what would eventually become the theoretical explanation behind vices observations, and in the eighteen eighties, thanks to the pioneering work of Joseph Lister and others, people started using antiseptic techniques in surgical and maternity wards, which is when mortality rates from child bed, fever really began to fall along with many other in hospital mortality rates. But even after scientists realized that some of ice had been right all along about handwashing. This simple act still remains a challenge threats sidey. That's partially because even though we now know that, just are there. We human beings still sometimes trust what we see and. What we can't. January twenty twenty poll found forty percent of Americans. Don't always wash their hands after going to the bathroom. Even doctors and nurses may rationalize that behavior has nothing to do with spreading disease. MILNES and said. Patients get infections for many reasons they come into contact with many people and many objects and have compromised immune systems, and by definition. Those who forget to wash or don't do it properly. Don't know that they forgot or were ineffective. Melanson points out that there is still no requirement that hospitals reach a certain threshold on hand hygiene only that they have a program in place to improve it. He said. Almost as bad the US Centers for Disease Control doesn't monitor and national hand hygiene rate in hospitals, which often hovers in the ten to forty percent range on average US healthcare providers clean their hands less than half the times that they should to the most recent CD study which was eighteen years ago. It's too soon to have numbers on how the COVID nineteen pandemic has affected hand hygiene in hospitals, though anecdotal evidence suggests it's put healthcare providers on high alert. During this time televises, even seeing a resurgence in pop culture, choose honored with a Google doodle in March, twenty twenty and an opera about him, which premiered in two thousand, eighteen was live streamed in May of twenty twenty. Finally there's this bright spot. Millan quipped I liked to tell provider audiences. The good news is that we've made significant progress sympathizes time we no longer people who insist on doctors washing their hands into an insane asylum. Today's episode was written by Nathan Chandler and produced by Tyler claim for more on this month's of other topics. visit how stuff works. Dot Com Breen stopped production of iheartradio for more podcasts, iheartradio heart radio visit the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by vantage. If you need business communications US bondage, they've got unified communications, contact, centers and communication. API's little figuratively. Blow your mind and literally make your mind explode from sheer joy, but that's it. They're great at all those not so great at explaining why we get morning breath, what fracking is and making short snippets of smart that satisfy the inner nerd, and all of us for that kind of stuff. The person reading this is way better so to recap vantage for amazing business communications brain stuff podcast for daily servings of smart vantage. Now we're talking.

fever Zamel Austria Michael Melanson Zimmer Vice fraud Steph Lauryn Bogle Vienna US Oliver Wendell Holmes General Hospital Hungary British Medical Journal Zimbabwe Zuma Purdue University Dot Com Breen US Centers for Disease Control
Imminent Lawless Action

Make No Law: The First Amendment Podcast

33:44 min | 5 months ago

Imminent Lawless Action

"On. The evening of June eighteen, nineteen, sixty, four, twenty men gathered in a field in Hamilton County Ohio. Most of them were hoods and robes. Some were armed. Most were clansman. To those men. Were reporter in a cameraman who recorded the scene from the clan had invited to attend. The local leader of the clan man named Clarence Brandenburg gave a speech. Organizers. Meeting we've had quite a few members here today, which are we have hundred hundreds of members throughout the state of Ohio I can quote from a newspaper clipping from Columbus dispatch five weeks ago Sunday morning. The clan has more members in a state of Ohio than does any other organization? We're not a revenge organization but if our president our Congress are Supreme Court continues to suppress the White Caucasian race. It's possible that there might have to be read vengeance taken. There was more to. Ugly stuff clan stuff from the crowd. There were racial epithets, scurrilous lies and rhetoric blaming African Americans and the Jews for the KLANSMAN's imagined problems. And suggestions that they be sent back to Africa in Israel. But there was no violets. Not then. Not. there. Nobody was there but the clansmen and the journalists they'd invited. And after the clansman burned the cross, and after one of the KLANSMEN repeated the same speech inside a shed with his hand on the Bible. Everyone went home. The journalists took their footage and ran it on the local news. Was it a crime. Was it a crime when Brandenburg spoke those words about revenge it's Was it a crime for the other Klansmen to be there and applaud it. Was the decrying for the journalist broadcast it. The United States Supreme Court wound up answering those questions. In, doing so it changed nearly fifty years of law and set a standard that survives today more than fifty years later. I'm Ken White, and this is make no long First Amendment podcast from the legal top network popat. Dot Com. This is episode thirteen imminent lawless action. The state of Ohio thought that Clearance Brandenburg committed a crime in that field. They charged him with criminal syndicalism. Statute that in nineteen fifties was frequently used against communists and. Communist. Ohio's criminal syndicalism statute broadly prohibited speech that advocated breaking the law. The law said, no person shall by word of mouth or writing advocate or teach the duty necessity or propriety of crime, sabotage violence or unlawful methods of terrorism as a means of accomplishing industrial or political reform. Hamilton County Ohio prosecuted Clearance Brandenburg for breaking that law. It was very simple trial. The prosecution presented only film that had been taken in the event and the testimony of a journalist who identified Brandenburg the man giving the speech under the hood. Brandenburg argued to no avail that his speech was protected by the first. amendment. But the trial court rejected that argument the jury convicted him and he was sentenced to between one and ten years in jail and a one thousand dollar fine. CLARINS Brandenburg's problem was that he was fighting uphill against fifty years of mostly bad First Amendment Law. I. World War One cases like Schenk versus United States that we covered on this podcast, which emphasized the government's right to punish speech the created a clear and present danger to the country. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes articulated that test in Shank the same case that brought us the infamous phrase fire in a crowded theater. Here's how he put. The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent. Now, Justice Holmes viewed the clear and present danger test as a means of protecting speech. No doubt. It was somewhat better than the earlier test which asked only if speech had a bad tendency to produce results, government didn't like. But in practice over the next forty years American courts applied the clear and present danger test in a perfunctory way. The did not protect speech and deferred to the government's fear of what speech might inspire. We can see some of the best examples in the anti-communist era of the nineteen fifties the red scare that used the clear and present danger test to permit broad punishments of suspected. Communists. Here's what Justice Fred Vincent said in the case Dennis versus United States in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, one. They're conspiracy to organize the Communist Party and to teach an advocate the overthrow of the government of the United States by force and violence created a clear and present danger of an attempt to throw the government by force and violence. They were properly and constitutionally convicted for violation of the Smith Act put another way even though the rule said that the government could only punish speech that presented a clear and present danger of harm in practice courts use the word clear present and danger quite flexibly. The Supreme Court's theory was that you could punish a couple of ink stained wretches making handbills in some basement because if they succeeded in persuading enough people to try to overthrow the government that would be bad even if will be doomed to failure immediately, here's Justice Vincent again, obviously, the words cannot mean that before the government may act, it must wait until the putsch is about to be executed the plans have been laid and the signal is awaited. If government is aware that a group aiming at its overthrow is attempting to indoctrinate its members and to commit them to ecorse whereby they will strike. When the leaders feel the circumstances permit action by the government is required the argument that there is no need for government to concern itself for government is strong it possesses ample powers to put down a rebellion. It may defeat the revolution with these needs. No answer for that is not the question certainly an attempt to overthrow the government by force even though doomed from the outset because of inadequate numbers or power of the revolutionist is a sufficient evil congress to prevent. That was the rather unpromising status quo that Clarence Brandenburg faced when his case reached the United States Supreme Court in February nineteen, sixty nine. Fortunately, he had a formidable litigator in his corner, Alan Brown and ACLU lawyer. We don't know how Clarence Brandenburg Virulent Anti. Semite felt about being represented by Mr Brown who was a Jew? But Mr Brown was aggressive fearless and not afraid to defy convention. There's a story of him picking up a giant Dildo. The prosecutors had put into evidence obscenity case and wagging it the faces of the jury and saying this disgust you disgusts me but this is not obscene. Brown was the man for the job. But. The course of litigation liked the course of true love never did run smooth. Brown discovered that the film of the nineteen sixty four KLAN rally had disappeared. He hoped that it would be found and delivered the Supreme Court in time for or argument. Is An exhibit. I. Alas Mr Brown's prayers went unanswered. The film did not reach the court in it had to rule based on descriptions of the film. Fortunately, Mr Brown was still equal to the occasion argument. The justices were concerned with whether the government should have to prove that Clarence Brandon Burke intended to incite people to act on his racist rhetoric. The government argued that you could just infer intent from the circumstances but here's Justice Abe Fortas with question to the government's lawyer Leonard. Pose can be said that there's no question that he. intended to advocate whatever he advocated here. But the next question is The have to have some my. Crew to the effect that he also intended that steps be taken to. Carry Out this program with respect to. The negroes in the Jews and so on. Scribe let the cards permission and it's my humble belief that you do not have to have anything further. If I were to go. And I use this as an extreme statement. But if I were to run down Harlem shall we say. And say very the Negro sent back to air forget you wouldn't us that long probably so That's Thurgood Marshall the first African American justice with Aleph Line. Leonard Kirschner government's attorney was on the horns of a dilemma. On the one hand he wanted to avoid standard that imposed on the government. The heavy burden of proving that Clarence Brandenburg intended for violence result from his speech. On the other hand he needed an explanation for why there was no charge against the television station that ran the film that same rates as speech because of just saying the words is enough didn't they broadcast the words here's just as Ford, Fordis- again. Those. Words. On the network I was done violation of your low. That's question started as I indicated with the Courts Commissioners Mile. Belief that in addition there must be an intention to causally violence. The. Terrorists. Oscar. So the government conceded there had to be some sort of intent to cause unlawful action through the speech. But what about the likelihood of that happening the justices wanted to know what surrounding circumstances supported the idea that violence might result? What was the context? Here's Justice Potter Stewart. Questioning. Kirshner. Lot was the. Contemporary. Context in Cincinnati community those. Those riots Avondale came in the spring of Nineteen, sixty, six, six I believe was sixty, six, sixty, seven if I'm not mistaken and sixty eight. There was at the time. Unrest, there was a marcus at the time I believe in the south there were the propositions specifically I believe the Birmingham situation was at or around that particular time, and there was civil unrest and dispute going out through the entire country and I don't think he'd be just limited to the south as such. It was played up by the press and the news media but there was no particular local situation and having county that time guest you riots. That kind of unrest racial unrest. Dramatic form. There were both civil There were protests March within the concepts of legal protest. Demonstrations, picketing of that nature at that time in Cincinnati. But in nature of riots that nature no, you're on the this was not part and parcel or response to anything specifically that was going on in that country that her it was basically a feeling I believe throughout the entire United States however limited as such to the community. Justice Stewart seemed to be asking, how can we know if this speeches dangerous if we don't know the context, it's a fair question and as it happens, we now know quite a bit about the context particularly with the benefit of a half century of historians looking at it. I talked Professor David. Cunningham at Washington University at Saint Louis. He's an expert on American extremism and the author of clans, Ville, USA the rise, and fall of the civil rights era Ku Klux Klan. I asked him about the nature and activities of the clan in Hamilton County Ohio as of nineteen, sixty, four and weather in that time and place they were seen as violet. One of the things I learned was that the media savvy displayed here inviting reporter and a cameraman to get the rally on the news was not unusual. Yes. I think by and large. It's fair to say that they were quite media savvy there there were certain clan organizations and probably the best known and most notorious of those. Would Be the White Knights of the KKK and Mississippi that really saw themselves as underground organizations and those sorts of groups would definitely avoid media coverage would avoid outreach of that. Sore. But many of the largest clan organizations during the civil rights era really do the opposite. They saw themselves as having some sort of a public function solder ability to build members, gain resources and things like that as predicated on their public disability and so reaching out to reporters would not have been unusual those kinds of cases. Part of that media savvy was a kind of plausible deniability about moreover calls for violence. Tactic. We saw here in this speech where the speaker was a bit more Polish and the more explicit epithets and calls for violence came from the crowd was intentional. As you say, the speakers would certainly be outright racist. They would be saying outright offensive things but they often a fairly savvy way towed a particularly sensitive line when speaking about violence and they knew that militant claims and often claims that at least hinted at violence were a large part of their appeal and they knew that that would be something often that would stir up a crowd gained some energy allow people to feel like they should contribute to the group whether. It be financially or otherwise, and so they would often tow align. That would be encouraging of that sort of talk but also know went to back off as a speaker but that would often encourage back and forth in a broader dynamic that really did talk about violence speak of a desire for violence the acceptability of violence with the speakers oftentimes were I, don't know a step ahead is the right word, but they had a broader sense of how they could strategically sort of nod towards violence but allow that energy to kind of come from the crowd. oftentimes in fact, the clan strategy may not have ben to inspire immediate violence. The strategy may have been something closer to long-term recruitment and sort of bigoted team building I. During this period, there was less of an emphasis within the clan of encouraging lone wolf action which does become by later in the nineteen sixties and moving forward more part of the clans repertoire. During this period I think the relationship of speech at a rally to. Committed clan violence is actually an indirect one. I think the clan oftentimes is quite strategic about the violent rhetoric that they would incorporate into an event like a rally as a way to build a following in the actual violence that they would commit because of the reality during this period, and basically every other period with Glenn has been active as if this. Is a violent terrorist organization however, that violence was not committed through stirring up a crowd and having people go out typically and commit acts of violence. But rather to use that rhetoric to connect people to the clan, and then the violence that could be committed subsequently would really be more strategic violence it would be organizationally produced it would be targeted in A. Way that allowed for plausible deniability and the clan oftentimes would not only look down upon but would in a genuine way sanction members independently would go out and commit violence and it's not because they were against that violence per se but they knew how vulnerable the organization would become if they didn't tightly control when and where and at whom violence was directed. On June nine, nineteen, sixty, nine, the Supreme Court reversed clearance Brandenburg's conviction. The court was unanimous. The court's opinion was per curium. That's a legal term that means that it was attributed to the entire court not written by any particular justice. These later decisions have fashioned the principle that constitutional guarantees of free speech and free press do not permit a state to forbid or prescribe advocacy of the use of force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action. As we said in Noto v United States, the mere abstract teaching of the moral propriety or even moral necessity for resort to force and violence is not the same as preparing group for violent action and stealing it to such action. The Supreme Court said that because Ohio's criminal syndicalism statute allowed punishment of speech for advocacy of lawbreaking without requiring the advocacy to be directed at producing imminent lawlessness. Survive. And that for more than fifty years ago is still the standard deciding whether speeches unlawful incitement outside the protection of the first. Amendment incitement is protected. Unless. It is directed to and likely to incite imminent lawless action. For such an important and enduring principles. The, courts procuring opinion is quite short. The court treats conclusion is self evident from its most recent precedence? As if the outcome is obvious but. Was it wasn't really? Justice William O Douglas didn't think so. He wrote an opinion concurring with the courts procurement opinion that is either agreed with the result. But in a magnificent screed, he explained how the court had only gotten to the right result after fifty years of pursuing the wrong one. Douglas brought the receipts. He blasted the World War One era Supreme Court and its justices and decried the flexible and unprincipled clear and present danger test. Explaining how the court had used the specter of war to excuse infringement of rights. Those then were the World War One cases that put the gloss of clear and present danger on the First Amendment with the war power. The great leveler of them all is adequate to sustain that doctrine is debatable. The sense in Abrahams Shaffer and pierce show how easily clear and present danger is manipulated to crush what brand is called. The fundamental right of free men to strive for better conditions through new legislation and new institutions by argument and discourse even in time of war though I doubt if the clear and present danger test is congenial to the First Amendment in time of Declared War I am certain it is not reconcilable with the first. amendment. In days of peace. But Justice Douglas didn't just point a finger at the wartime supreme court. He also blasted the Court of the nineteen fifties, the era of the red scare and described how the fear of communism had led the court to ignore the distinction between acts and ideas. The drawn the court between the criminal act of being an active communist and the innocent act of being a nominal or inactive communist mark the difference only between deep and abiding belief and casual or uncertain belief. But I think that all matters of belief are beyond the reach of subpoenas or probings of investigators, the line between what is permissible and not subject to control and what may be made impermissible and subject to regulation is the line between ideas and overt acts. The key part of Brandenburg as Justice Douglas suggested is it tried to separate out acts and ideas It did that by requiring proof of actual. Danger Hypothetical. Danger. It ended imagination based limits on free. That is it stopped the half-century trend limiting speech if a judge could imagine how the ideas and the speech might eventually lead to violence or harm. Instead, as a standard for incitement that still prevails today, it asked for cold hard facts. What is this person trying to do now and is there a real chance? They can do it that change was crucial to protecting very wide array of American speech. But the Brandenburg Standard is not without its critics. Most of those critics aren't saying that the government should be able to arrest you for advocating ideas that might sometime somewhere lead to violent things. Instead critic suggests that Brandenburg's concept of danger is to rooted in the technology and group dynamics of nine, hundred, sixty four. Ice spoke with Professor Richard Wilson at University of Connecticut. He published a law review article called incitement an era of populism updating Brandenburg after Charlottesville. To be clear the vast majority of academics questioning Brandenburg Professor Wilson is a fan of how it does protect important political speech. The Standard was so well stated in Brandenburg that it stood the test of time. There aren't that many decisions by the Supreme Court that last over fifty years without any tinkering at all and so one could say the Brandenburg by virtue of its taciturn nature and it's well stated test was just the perfect decision for the time and it stood the test of time another way of thinking about it is that. Courts have not wanted to touch inside. Incitement is is it's not been charged frequently by by district attorney's. And by federal prosecutors, it's it's just something that maybe a cultural explanation of good for just culturally we want. To allow freedom of expression as Americans, and we're very concerned about the government repressing speech, and so maybe it's both maybe it's the the the wealth stated nature well-conceived Nature Brandenburg combined with this sense particularly coming out of that era of civil rights would be more that when the government gets involved in suppressing speech, you're on your your onto a losing track. But Professor Wilson points out that we don't even really know what imminent means in the context of online speech and courts having given us the tools to define it. So Brandenburg was created at a time when there were just a couple of TV, stations Sarah. Four TV stations cable TV. Hadn't been invented yet. We primarily got our information through the six o'clock news and the Walter Cronkite said in there was the times and the post and the globe the L. A. tides. So there are a handful of prominent influential newspapers and there were gatekeepers there were gatekeepers and all those places who exercise their judgement about what could be stated it's a completely different environment. Now, everyone has been handed the megaphone and an individual can generates thousands or hundreds of thousands or millions of followers on facebook or twitter, or any of the social media applications, which presents particular challenges for implementing Brandeburg. So. If we look at the imminence probability prongs the Brandenburg how would a police departments or a district attorney think about the possible offline effects of online speech given that online speeches is very new. We've we've only had maybe six or seven years of lots of Americans being on social media. So we don't have a lot of evidence and Kirkland's about whether online speech advocating violence or advocating harm against particular groups can have offline affects. The evidence that we do have much of which is still unpublished indicates that there is a correlation between. Online at Saitama and offline harms. So we have to take that seriously and I. I wish that the courts would elucidate these elements in their judgements more carefully more explicitly and give US war guidance on how they view. Evidence and probability in a new social media online discourse environment. Because right now we're flying blinds put another way. We no longer have a shared understanding of what it means for speech to be intended and likely to cause imminent harm in the modern technological context. I like Brandenburg. Brandenburg a lot I, like it because it gives us a focus on the content and the intense. As well as the context around it. I think it indicating that a speech action matter how reprehensible? How offensive matter? How awful they're lots of them on social media that we ought to tolerated if there is a very low or no chance that it's going to cause any any subsequent harbor? And Brandenburg presents us with a tomb elements of context here imminence improbabilities, Brandon works. I. Think. We ought to keep it however as you've participated just now position is that we need much more guidance from the courts. We need much more in the way of explicit statements about the kind of risk assessments accord Oxfam make in about probability in thinking about immigrants. In my article that you read I I made clear that with immigrants we don't really know what imminence is is that now now is it tomorrow or is it in six weeks? That's why we're still arguing about legal standard that's been mostly static for fifty years. Legal rules about free speech are often very enduring but social norms technology and historical context are always changing. Sometimes those changes are built right into the legal standard for instance, when the test for obscenity asks us to apply contemporary community standards. But sometimes they're not that creates a recurring free speech dilemma. Do we keep this Brandenburg Standard for incitement written at a time when the biggest extremist dangers were from face to face speech and pamphlets in the mail and the occasional radio or television. Or. Do we weaken First Amendment protection saying the Brandenburg Court could Nevin -ticipant at flash mobs and incendiary tweets and. Posts that could drive angry loners violence in a way that's very difficult to police. There's always a temptation to fall back on the old cliche that the constitution is not a suicide pact and to say that the people who wrote voted on the First Amendment along with the Brandenburg justices couldn't have anticipated the payroll face now. But is that true? The Nation's founders laid out the constitutional framework based on their experience with government suppression of Rights. When they wrote about the right to speak and assemble and petition the government they were thinking about how tyrannical government had suppressed those rights the justices of the Brandon record knew about censorship too. They have seen the World War One era of prosecuting people protesting the draft they seen the persecution of people for advocating communism. They might not have foreseen twitter, but they had seen tyranny. And they foresaw more of it. We should be cautious in assuming they would stand by their firm protection of speech during times like these. In this series of podcasts, I'll be telling more stories behind important first amendment decisions. If there's a case you want to hear about or a First Amendment question, you'd like answered on the Podcast, drop me a line at. Ken At POPAT DOT Com. Thanks for listening. If you liked what you heard today, please remember to rate us an apple podcasts or follow us on twitter or facebook. Lastly. I'd like to thank our participants, Voice Actors Producers Audio engineers for their participation. My guests professors, David Cunningham and Richard Wilson. Are Voice Actors Conrad Psalm as Clarence Brandon Burke John Telfer as Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Evan into Sherri as chief. Justice Fred Vincent. Jordan O'Brien reading the Supreme, court? Tom Mile as justice. William Douglas Producer Kate nutting executive producer Lawrence collective and last but not least music sound design editing and mixing by Audio Engineer Adam Lockwood. Audio of the oral argument, and Kranenburg, versus Ohio is provided by Oh. Yeah. A free law project by justice. And the Legal Information Institute, of Cornell Law. School. See you next time.

Clearance Brandenburg government United States Supreme Court United States Brandenburg Ohio Ku Klux Klan Alan Brown Clarence Brandenburg CLARINS Brandenburg Justice William O Douglas Clearance Brandenburg Hamilton County Ohio Congress reporter Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Ken White
True Money Show-Self-Sufficiency in Close Quarters

CRUSADE Channel Previews

05:41 min | Last month

True Money Show-Self-Sufficiency in Close Quarters

"So in my state. Louisiana right louisiana state university as an agriculture mechanical cause huge asked center there and i did get there. It's a hugh. I mean it's a pdf file. But it's a beautiful book on. What can we planted in. Different seasons With the best souls are would you mentioned soil so the so you're university could be a great resource and in more locally You made me think of this. To every time i go the feed and see The guy there a well. He's a wealth of information. You ask him anything in the world about you know the local Shrubs what you're trying to grow where the flowers or or a plant food you know of vegetables in a light. He knows everything. And so two most of the workers there so those are two good resources for some information and then way i kind struck originally so if you live in you know you live on new york apartments. You know your your. Your bathtub is underneath your kitchen table. Because back a turn of the century they may. I think they still exist. They mandate in the city every their own toilet and and and and and bath didn't used to be like that until about the turn of the last century. So what did they do. Well we had to put it somewhere so they put it into the room bathtub. They put a table over. She flipped when you wanna take a bath. Tub you're living those kinds of things that you know obviously far markets and stuff but i mean we talked about. Gold cassivi trades and labor with a farmer. My my My my good friend. Heather lives up massachusetts with my intern. When i worked up there. I don't see her very often but She has a local farm and and she And just just kinda work only pay much. They give her stuff but you know she works with them. You see what they're doing Join join a csi community sport agriculture. There's many models of that you got the cell model you know a lot of them by subscription you. Basically you're buying shares. Some of them are just you know while you buy your share. They call us trains ready. And i'll come your string beans. Some of them. Are you actually work. You pick your own and you can get involved with it There's there's no better learning than when i used to four h. What was the motto. Learn by doing and he's with these are the people you can seek out you. Can you can do things like that. And and get involved with them and then you know then you can take that knowledge home and try to do a little bit on your old as well and there's two dan those those things you know. What was that stupid little You know infomercial about that thing. You hung your tomatoes upside down in some bag and it's not limited. Basically the pitch was you'll live in apartment. You can still grow tomatoes or whatever those things the last and can you use them year over year a year or is it like a one time. You've done their their annual. So they're you know they're they're they're going to need to be replaced every so often get you get an extinction between an annual and perennial you know i mean. You can plant strawberries blueberries. They're perennials. They take up a small space. You wanna get into you know. Call they call the square foot gardening For some of those kind of things certain herbs. I mean i i. I love the i love to get on herbs. 'cause i mean one of the big things the recently is you read about all the city. We're the old buildings recommend world micro greens that a little bit of green and you put off the side of the offer. The i actually. I actually eat it. But i mean that's all that's all cute and good. That's not kinda sustain you but but there are there some herbs that our annual summer that are that are perennial there and some good medicinal qualities. You know all the things you could do. Hey i'm gonna make oregano oil. I'm gonna get you know. I'm gonna buy some olive oil and got some of these herbs and mixed infused herb thanks. It's a tradable good. It's good for you. I mean you you you can get into a lot of that stuff Number of years ago The patriot nurse. She's been brought up number times i did. I'd i know her Taking her courses she has a new one. That i've not been able to pick which is on medicinal herbs. You know being able to to help yourself. So those are some good things and they don't take them a lot of space oliver wendell. Douglas mercer haney with master godless. What was his first darkness for guard. Was i always his pot out and bought park avenue. it was funny. It was all a joke. But i mean you know you can get into a lot of that stuff you live in an apartment and i mean i it. Talk to your landlord or on the roof. Now he's not gonna let you bring ten tons of soil up there but maybe you got some space up there if you heard about people vacant lots and starting to community gardens and again this is where people could start learning from each other as well and a little labor Those are all good things. I think people get into you mentioned your host and you mentioned the the common grazing land in town. They even have the village green anymore. When i sit there and say like know thirty gardens or allotments or the common. That's actually british in more of an english thing. I throw that in there. The good law aka the good life you know there was a time in the lower now they they own their property they own their their. they had their serve. They did their work. But we're common grazing lands. There's still called the commons when people go to the english city of the common. Well the commonality park sure. But we don't but we really day there there were people could bring it on. I mean when. I and i did a little business traveling and you go over to europe and it was much more common in the middle of the city. Looking back on people like me. I'm i'm looking at weird things. You look at chickens backyard. I land in milan. Italy and right next to the airport kind of got like fifty rabbit. Hutches these white asparagus for dinner that night when we rabbit and white asparagus. They're not afraid to have that kind of stuff on top of them. you know. it's a totally different lifestyle. But i mean i. I i don over here. We don't call it the commons but some of that stuff is starting to crop back up again.

louisiana state university Louisiana oliver wendell Douglas mercer haney Heather massachusetts new york europe milan Italy
Should Facebook and Twitter Censor Themselves? A Debate.

Reason Podcast

1:26:07 hr | 2 years ago

Should Facebook and Twitter Censor Themselves? A Debate.

"Welcome to the reason podcast. I'm Todd krainin should social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube remove only those speakers who make true threats or incite violence, or do they have an ethical obligation to hold their users to a higher standard. Those were the topics of public debate recently hosted by the SoHo forum pitting, Thaddeus, Russell, author of a renegade history of the United States against Ken white a defense lawyer and author at the legal blog Popat dot com. Russell argued that corporations that except tax breaks and public subsidies should be more accountable to the public white held the social media sites deserve the same set of speech rights and limitations as ordinary citizens. Both speakers agree with the broader libertarian point that private websites had the legal right to do what they want this debate hinges on a broader point, what should the culture, free speech, free expression. And ownership look like on our social media platforms. The debate was held November. I twenty eighteen at reason studio in Culver city. California nNcholas be moderated. The SoHo forum is a monthly debate series held a Manhattan that is moderated by Jeanette Stein and co sponsored by reason it features topics of special interest. The libertarians in the series aims to enhance the social and professional ties of people within the New York City libertarian community. Thanks to Tom st-. We are trying a west coast SoHo form here, so hopefully, we'll have that same experience. So as many of you now were celebrating fifty years of reason this weekend, and I will let me start by thanking you guys for your sport and interest over not just the years. But the decades we can't do what we do with that your help was at your interest without your readerships. A please give yourself a big hand. And what I'm going to do. Now is I'm going to explain the proposition under debate the participants the rules of the game. And we'll go from there. I I want all of you to pull your cell phone out and go open your browser and go to SoHo vote dot com. We're going to take a second here. So ho- vote dot com. You can vote. Yeah. Please vote and you're going to see when you go there. You're going to see a screen that says it has the proposition. And it's the pre debate vote. This is a what is called an Oxford style debate. So we pull the audience before and after the proceedings, and the winning side is the side that has pulled more people to its position. So that the proposition is like universities social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube should only remove speakers and participants who were making true threats or inciting violence take vote. Yes. No undecided. And we're going to let those tabulate for a little bit. And while we're doing that. Then we're going to close the voting. I'm we'll come back to it afterwards. But please do go to SoHo vote dot com and enter what you what your position starting out. So we are debating whether or not social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube should win. Should they remove speakers the two speakers tonight who I'm about to introduce both agree with the broader libertarian point that these are private platform. So they have the legal right to do whatever they want. What we're actually debating here is I think something more important in many ways, what is the culture of free speech? What is the culture of free expression? What does the culture of ownership does tolerating knocks not just annoying speech? However, you define it of jerks ruin and things for everyone or does excluding people easily and often lead to more problems than it solves the bloody events. Have just the past few weeks suggests this is a topic vital relevance for how we think about social media how we think about political discourse. And how we think about the real world. We've got two great debaters tonight defending the proposition. So is Thaddeus. Russell the author of a renegade history of the United States. He is right here. And the host of the unregistered podcast raised by what he calls professional revolutionaries in Berkeley in the nineteen sixties and seventies that earned a PHD in history from Columbia and has taught at among other institutions Occidental college here in Los Angeles. He's the founder of renegade university through which he gives lectures and talks and has seminars checkout his site. Thaddeus, Russell dot com. He's also kind enough at various points to have credited reason for helping him move beyond a kind of conventional right left ideological divide that he grew up thinking was a given opposing the proposition is kind of white an attorney at the firm of Brown, white and Osborne. A former federal prosecutor turned offense lawyer Ken is also the proprietor of the popular legal blog. Popat who subtitle is a group complain about law liberty and leisure. Check it out when you get a chance has an incredible Twitter feed as well Ken host the make no law podcast. Available via the legal talk network. Any also appears regularly on KCRW talking about is it all the president's lawyers. Yes. So like that can also as a reason connection when the federal government subpoenaed reason and gagged reason for asking for information about some of our commenters Ken brought this act of government bullying to the public by writing along brilliant piece about one of the actual, I don't know for sure. But one of the apparently somebody who got the complaint leaked to Ken. And then he wrote a story and it took off from there. Here's how things will go tonight that will speak first for about fifteen minutes Ken will respond with equal time. We're gonna have a five minute mutual rebuttal period where the debaters savage each other and ask each other questions and pretend that they can standing in the same room with them. I'm going to ask a couple of questions we're going to open up to audience Q and A for twenty or thirty minutes. They'll get five minutes to kind of conclude their cases, and then we will. Vote and then we'll finish ransacking the taco truck outside. So without further ado, take it away that. Voting is now closed is that right? Jim. Okay. So voting is close but remember to vote again as always vote early and vote often. So we didn't cover all the ground rules. So I just want to Nick if you could clarify a few things for me. That'd be great first of all curse. Okay. So that's that's that's one question. Can I curse my allowed to curse the second? Question is would you like to curse? So that's your culture of free speech right there. That's the one that you chose and you can and we agree on that. Let me ask you another question about ground rules in here. This is getting a little heavier. That's not me. It's pretty crowded. Can I yell fire? I see two exits and I see about one hundred people in front of me. Can I yell fire in a crowded room? According to the supreme court, right? Oliver Wendell Holmes and the very same. As one thousand nine hundred shank case said that that's the thing that you can't do in our society. You can't yell fire in a crowded room. Right. Why do you remember this? There's a great Harrison Ford movie because it constitutes a clear and present danger to the civilization itself. Well, that's a really reasonable, man. Isn't he Oliver Wendell Holmes? That sounds utterly reasonable. It'd be very dangerous of me to actually yell fire in for you to believe in and start rampaging and trying to run out the doors and everybody would get Stanford. And it'd be terrible things happening. Do you actually know it Oliver Wendell Holmes was referring to what was the fire? Do you know what that case was about? You know, what it was about as a man named Charles shank who spoke Yiddish who was a socialist living in New York City who was passing out flyers urging young men not to enlist and to dodge the draft during World War One. That's what that was about. No one knows that. So Oliver Wendell Holmes in my opinion, not the greatest thinker in American history. Certainly not somebody who's really interested in liberty. Why on earth am I talking about this because I'm having a debate? But this guy about free speech. I'm having I'm telling you this because it's become very clear to me in studying the history of this that it is actually always earliest always has been a foreign policy question. So as civil libertarians, and I'm sure this room is full of them. Right. What are the four worst times in American history for civil libertarians when we're civil liberties in this country, most severely restricted by the government historians, generally look at four times when when do you think those are I mean, you can have your own? So they all have a couple of things in common, you'll notice so civil war. Abraham LINCOLN what suspense habeas corpus and arrests thousands and thousands of people simply and he said this for the crime of diss loyalty, he said the time this is necessary because secession is not it's not bad because of slavery and racism secession is bad because it threatens American civilization. We must preserve the union. It was an existential threat the south. They believed that the south would take over the north and bring their slaves with them and destroy what ABRAHAM LINCOLN and the Republicans thought was American civilization World War One. Basically the first amendment went into the toilet. Shank case was one case of that shank went to prison, by the way for advocating that young men not enlist in the military that they dodged the draft. So Wendell Holmes was saying, yeah, he should go to prison, but other people shouldn't World War Two. Right. Franklin Roosevelt is effectively took control of all of the major networks and told them that they could only say certain things favoring the war. The New York Times was a propaganda wing of the federal of the federal government during World War Two. Then we have people often call the Cold War as being a Nater of civil liberties, it was really the Korean war was during that time when there was the fiercest restrictions of civil liberties in this country. So in all four cases, we have a war. We really have world wars in a sense. And in all four cases, and this is really the nub of it. We had to enslave much of our population in order to fight those wars now when you have to go that far where you're enslaving your own population to go fight and die in a place. They've never been before you need to make it really really high stakes. So you can't allow any loose ends in those times. So those are the moments when the first amendment went into the toilet. I think everybody agrees with that. Those are the worst times in American history. Is it just a coincidence? That in every case there was a war and conscription necessary to fight that war. I don't think so. Why still am I saying this? Now, you may have heard of this thing called Facebook. You may have heard that just last month Facebook deleted, permanently thirty-five accounts, some of which were major accounts with millions of likes and followers. Does anyone know how Facebook chose those accounts? Facebook in April was brought before congress. You may. Remember this sucker Bergen company? Went up to Capitol Hill and grilled by the senators, and basically weren't they warned that if they don't start censoring someone else might have to do it for them. Okay. Now, Mark Zuckerberg is an engineering geek. And he's about five years old. He knows nothing about politics. And so what he did was he said, hey, oh my God. The Russians are apparently have taken over our election and our country. They constitute a threat to American civilization. I've been told and he said, well, I need. I don't know anything about this stuff because I'm just a jackass from Harvard. Khoder who do I who do I how do I know which sites are actually Russian working for Putin? Well, I'll just ask the experts. So he. Entered into a contract with an organization called the Atlantic Council. Anyone know what? The Atlantic Council is. Oh, yes. They are. They know what's best for you. They were founded they were founded in nineteen sixty one by the RAND Corporation from just down the road ran famous for coming up with much of the tactics and strategy carried out in the Vietnam war things like pacification of villages mass murder of civilians etcetera and mass bombing carpet bombings. It was the organization's purpose was to support promote and expand NATO always has been people who sit on its board today include Henry Kissinger, Madeleine Albright, and every single person who's made a major foreign policy decision of the last forty or fifty years. I'm not kidding you Facebook and Atlantic Council have a partnership in which the Atlantic Council tells Facebook. Which accounts which pages are threats to national security, and those were the accounts that were taken down my Facebook. Do you think the people on the Atlantic Council, all of whom pretty much were former members of the White House cabinets of various presidents democratic and Republican? Do you think it's there's a chance that those people expect to be in leadership positions in the future? Sometime. Do you think that they might be preparing the way for that? Right now. Do you think that they would like to have less criticism of their foreign policy aims right now in the public sphere? Because what they have said publicly is they want NATO to be expanded all the way around Russia. They moved it all the way to the borders of Russia. But this is public, by the way, I'm not making this up. They've said no you need NATO to expand to the south of Russia. And then go all the way in circle both Russia and China to make sure that they don't do bad things anymore. So free speech. And war have never been friendly to each other. Right. And they're always joined and this is something that civil libertarians. And I people often miss is. That's the one carve out has always been the one carve out you are not allowed to advocate anything that gets in the way of American foreign policy in the world. Especially if you are attempting to discourage our boys from signing up to go fight in Vietnam. Or Germany or Alabama. So that's what's at stake. Here. This is not just about what gets to be said on college campuses. This is a I'm sorry if I sound like a conspiracy theorist it's a conspiracy. It's a conspiracy. Here's the great thing though. It's all open what I've told you. I learned from these these really radical fringe organizations called time magazine, wired magazine, Reuters this is in the news. It's right there. Apparently, no, one cares to look it up. Okay. That's one reason. I would like to encourage social media platforms to allow free speech. That's not to me. Even the most powerful argument against kens position, though. The most obvious easiest way I think to demolish that position from civil libertarian perspective is to simply points out. Another fact. Facebook Twitter, Google all of them have received. Billions. It's be billions tens of billions of dollars in direct subsidies and tax breaks over the last five to ten years. Billions and billions of dollars. They've also been given land on which to build their new headquarters and all even noticed. There's a Twitter headquarters in Google headquarters in a Facebook headquarters in apparently every pretty much every city right in many of those cases the land the property was given to them by the local government. So are those are those still private entities? Should they be treated like you and me in our living room? They're taking our tax dollars. Big time. And then telling us what we can and cannot say on their social media platforms. So what I'm calling for is two things. I'm calling for a culture of free speech. Generally, if you're a civil libertarian, you need to be calling for it all the time not imposing on any of these platforms or entities on sort of this bullshit egalitarian thing where you have to allow free speech. I don't want to impose anything on the Catholic church. They know what they stand for. I know what they stand for their totally honest about it. There's nothing secret. We know who they are fine. Do your thing. I'm not imposing free speech on you. I don't want to do that. But if you're going to claim to be a social social media platform, and you're taking my tax money. Either you giving my money back or you call yourself something else. That's it. Call yourself what you are Twitter and Facebook, which is we are centrist globalist imperialists, we support the center of the Republican party and the center of the Democratic Party. And that's who we are. If you say things that are concordant with that you can have a blast. You can say racist things you can say sexist things on our on our website. You can do whatever you want if you differ from that in any way, by the way, the thirty five sites were taken down thirty five pages that we're talking about Facebook. Guess what they were some of them. Some of those people are in this building right now, they were left wing communist antiwar people, and they were right wing libertarian antiwar. People all of whom are questioning this narrative about Russian Russia having taken over our country and constituting a threat to our very existence. So I want honesty, I want you to say, Twitter and Facebook what you actually will allow and want to allow in terms of language, and ideas. And if you do honestly believe that you are running a, social, meaning, including all people media platform, then. Yeah, you better have some free speech, and we should always be encouraging them in those moments in those places to welcome cursing and yelling fire, especially yelling fire. Because yelling fire now, you know, really is about saying, let's not have World War three. That's all we're trying to do. And they're not letting us say that. And they're taking our tax money or they're rigging the game. So that they win, and they have these isn't amazing how they have these monopolies Facebook and Twitter these incredible Google. He's incredible. How did they get that? Because San Francisco and California and Oregon and Washington in Washington DC and New York state have given them billions and billions and billions of dollars in tax breaks that I don't get. I have a business. That's in tech. That's in media. That's an education. I don't get that none of their competitors. Get that or have gotten that. They are wings of the of the federal and state and local governments they are acting as their propaganda wings. That's that either. Give us our money back or be truly what you say. You are. The honest. Let's know what's going on here. And let's always be interested in speech, rather than advancing particular foreign policy agenda, by the way, I'm not saying it's necessarily a bad foreign policy agenda. I would just like to be able to talk about it. In public. But they're not letting us. This is dangerous. I've always worried about war. I never in my adult life until now, and I'm older than you think. I am worried that the first amendment is truly in jeopardy until now. And I'm not a conspiracy theory guy. I'm always the one saying al-qaeda definitely did it guys. Calm down. I'm not the one saying oh my God Trump one oh Jesus now Nazis. Now, we're all on the opposite of that guy. This is the first time in my whole life. I've been doing politics my entire life. First time I've been worried that the first amendment is truly in jeopardy quickly twenty twenty seven seconds to other pieces for you to be panicked about panicked about. Why this is so urgent? Polls taken by the fire foundation for individual rights in education. Correct. Show that support among college students four. For sorry. Fifty percent half of all college students currently believe that the first amendment should not protect hate speech. Okay. So some people say the people that Ravi Swabi writes about oh, they're just kids. Don't worry about it. Robbie stop writing about the ice to be one of those people, by the way, he's a little irritated reason in Robby for writing so much about those kids on college campuses. Now, maybe you're not reading enough because guess what? Now, we see it. We see that language. In the United States Senate. Right. That was a full on attack on all civil liberties that hearing that said of hearings. So they're going to be in government big time, and they have no sympathy for the first amendment. It's an entire generation apparently number one number two. And I'm then I'm done the ACLU is no longer the ACLU. You know this. It is no longer a Civil Liberties Union. They now have basically announced that they will no longer defend. You is defend your speech rights. If you have the wrong, politics, the ACLU. No longer exists in this country for all intents and purposes. This is this is urgent. And I urge you to vote. Yes. Well, let me start out by repeating our proposition that like universities social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube should only remove speakers and participants who are making truth rats or inciting violence. So let me start by quoting my favorite philosopher, Hannibal Lecter, quoting my second favorite philosopher, Marcus Aurelius for each particular thing ask what is it? What is its nature? What is the social media network? It's not a university isn't as a lawyer. I can tell you that if you go onto Facebook or Twitter hoping to learn the law. You may find yourself arrested or otherwise inconvenienced as I nearly was earlier this evening long story when we go into it. Now. Doctors will tell you you certainly should not take medical advice. You get on Facebook or YouTube or Twitter these are places where people speak freely and speaking freely often means speaking foolishly in wrong. What is the social media network? It is awful, not the state isn't. It is not the government. A social media network is a function of a business. It's a thing to make money for the Twitter's, and Facebook's and YouTube, and it is a form of speech to quote, someone who's not a loss for so long as I as far as I know Mitt Romney corporations are people, my friend, and they are corporations and businesses. Whether it's your brother-in-law's one person startup or the biggest company in America. Also, have speech rights. Those rights include deciding fairly broadly what business to be in what to sell deciding how to market and deciding how to run something like a social media network and running a social media network. The way they want to run it is a speech act. If you don't believe me I'd like to tell you about club penguin. How many people remember club penguin so club penguin was a fun little online half social media network half online game for kids? It was a very popular way for many of them to communicate. There was the periodic fear that al-qaeda was using to recruit all the normal online. Social media stuff. It was aimed at twelve year olds it had twelve and below. I should say it had very strict rules. No, yelling obscenities, no running around waving digital dildos. Whatever what have you because it had a vision for what it warrants to be awarded to be a safe and happy place for little kids that was their speech and the speech of the people who went there, the parents who let their kids hang out on club. Penguin was part of it too. That was their speech, and there are free free association their decision that this is the place. I want to go just as you might decide to come here tonight to hear debate rather than someplace else debating someplace something else. Disown you might decide. Which bar or restaurant you go to based on the atmosphere? What we say when we say that social media networks ought act like the state and only punish things that are outside the first amendment is that social media networks ought to be speaking the way, we want to ought to be associating the way we want to we want to dictate the way they operate. So in effect. We're no better than the people who are dictating to them, you need to ban, this speech, you need to ban that speech, you shouldn't allow hate speech. You shouldn't allow these types of threats you shouldn't allow mobbing or bullying all of those arguments aren't a continuum the all about us saying how other people should associate and speak. The this is heresy in this building, the culture, free speech. Is bullshit. Okay. The culture of free speech. The culture of free speech is a way to elevate. The argument you shouldn't say that you should say this. It's to pretend that when you're saying that you are a free speech champion rather than a sensor. The culture of free speech is telling people how they should associate or not associate how they should speak or not speak who should that allow in their living room or not because after all who you allow your living room and who's living room, you go to is very much a part of who you are. It's a part of your free association, and your expression. The culture of free speech by no stretch of the imagination should require you to say, well, I really don't want to. But to be pro free speech, I need to let Ken white coming into my living room every night in rant for a few hours about how terrible fourth edition dungeons. And dragons was it's creepy. It's weird. I'm really not interested. I think he's a little harsh on it. Actually, it had some really innovative ideas. But I mean, it's the culture of free speech. Of course, you wouldn't say that because you recognize that how you order your lives as part of how you identify yourself. It's part of who you are. And it's part of your expression. It's the same with Twitter or Facebook or YouTube the companies are deciding how to brand themselves. So are deciding how to sell themselves is it mercenary, obviously, it is. But how much human speech isn't mercenary on some level or another? Mcdonald's is mercenary and how they. Market themselves, and how they portray themselves every business is. The market that we talk about the marketplace of ideas that we trust to order things rather than having the government order it. Operates on an individual level. What I mean is that we don't say you have to let me into your living room to rant because of the marketplace of ideas, we say that if people find my ranting, entertaining, then they'll let me in to their living room part of the marketplace of ideas is that businesses like Twitter and Facebook and YouTube will in the long term in the long run rise and fall with whether or not their users feel they're giving them an experience that they want whether or not they feel that they are being unfairly suppressed whether some point of us being suppressed in it's unacceptable. Whether I can't say what I want. I can't meet the people I want or not. And if you buy into the idea that you will never overturn the Twitter or Facebook juggernaut. I have some words for you GO cities. My space yahu. We are in this age where we have ten or twelve news cycles day. So we think in very short term, and it's impossible to think of something like Twitter Facebook, not being the dominant social media entity, but time passes and things changed no-one says the marketplace of ideas is going to be instant, no one says that you're going to build the social media network that works the way you want it to overnight that it won't take time to persuade people to get other people to come with you to patronize that business does things the way you want. If you like fried chicken, all you have in town is McDonald's you're going to be disappointed for a while. But sooner or later, you'll get a KFC. So the marketplace of ideas says that you've got to work and gather people together and persuade people not to do the same thing not to only talk or debate or socio the way you want to but enough together to form a critical mass. So that you have a platform. So you have other people who will like you have maybe gab is your thing. Or maybe Twitter is your thing. Maybe you like that it's a little harder there for them for people to attack you with racial slurs. You will get the platform that you want. Eventually that's the idea of the marketplace of ideas, not that we will put social pressure on every platform to be the same to have debate the same to approach. Life the same. The other reason it's important to know that we're dealing not with the government or universities. But with private businesses is that understanding the way speech works is crucial to protecting it. I join one hundred percent the concern that many college students don't seem to understand free speech. Appreciate it or support it. But here's the thing. A crucial part of supporting and understanding for speech is being able to separate the public from the private to separate the obligations of the different components of our society, some of the same the same studies that recently found that fifty percent or something of students said hate speech should be legal also found that a very large percentage of student said that if a university brings a controversial speaker than the law should require that they give another speaker with. The opposite side the same amount of time. That's a fundamental misunderstanding of the role that institution. Right. It's kind of a hearkening back to the old fairness doctrine that we've been done with for many decades, it's crucial for people to understand the difference between the public realm and the private realm and the different rules that apply, and I think we confuse them when we start to try to impose public realm norms public realm laws things like true threats or inciting violence as touchstones to our private sector businesses that are expressions of our freedom of expression. The other fact is frankly, there's no way that these organizations can do it. Right. We all know that the moderation on Twitter on Facebook on YouTube as train wreck telling them. Okay. You can now we'd like you as a social norm to let everyone on, but you can keep out truth threats and incitement, you know, how that how that's going to go. I mean last week Twitter was leading threats from a guy who is sending mail bombs to people across the country because it didn't detect that that was the threat while at the same time banning people who are saying very innocuous things Monterey. Sean social media's always going to be a disaster because it's never going to be profitable for it to be good. It's always going to be done by bad. A is or disaffected workers, and it's going to be terrible. So a vision where it Hughes to some sort of principle first amendment idea as an example is always going to be. A pipe drink. It's always going to be in effect. No moderation. Or random moderation, and it's not reasonable to expect much more than that. There's another reason though, I think and that has to do with support for the very concept of free speech. As that suggested. The support is not as strong as it could be. And maybe it never has been. We like to believe in this idea that there was a golden age when everyone supported first amendment values, and I've looked at a lot of first amendment cases and a lot of first amendment history. I'm not sure when that was based on American history. I think that public support for the right to say unpopular things has always been tenuous the bargain that we offer to people is that when someone says hateful things when they shout racial slurs at you or your spouse or your kids that we're not going to jail them. We're not going to allow you to sue them. But we believe in more speech, and we believe in freedom of sociation, you can stop going to that place. You cannot associate with those people you can talk back to those. People that's the bargain. But if we start to tell people, okay, not only do you have to allow these people to shout obscene epithets at you. And you know, say what they're gonna do to your kids and use racial slurs at you all these things that have happened to me on Twitter regarding my kids. Not only are they not going to go to jail. Not only is no one's going to be able to sue them. But you know, what we've decided they the social norm is they just get to do that here. They're not going to be moderated. They're not going to be kicked off suck it up. And no, no, reputable, social media network is going to do that good social media networks. Let that happen. We're not going courage you as a free speech value to go. Find a different living room to go fine. The social media network that has yet and this fear that you like the one that you choose to choose to subject yourself to that sort of speech or not to associate with people like that or not. No, we're going to have is a social norm. Not only do you not punish it. You got to just sit there and take. Are people going to take that bargain? What's the impact of that on the support for the more fundamental norms? The legal norms of free speech. If we start trying to sell people on the concept that well, sorry, if you like Facebook, you have to like people shouting racial slurs at your kids does just the way it is. Do they start to rethink a little bit? Their support of free speech is an entire norm. If they think this is kind of bullshit because why don't I have free speech? Why don't I get to choose a platform? That's the way. I like it. What am I going to associate with who I want? I think the bargain is essential the bargain is we allow terrible things we allow terrible offensive speech. We don't let the government punish it. But we have to allow just as broad responses, and the broad response might be to be unreasonably standoffish to be unreasonably censorious in your personal voluntary interactions to associate yourself in a way that other people might not agree with to be too broad in the people you think our offensive and avoid them. Because there is no rational theory of free speech. I submit that says, you shouldn't judge the Nazi Shouters, but you should judge the people who don't want to hang out with them. Thank you. Thank you. All right. So now, we're going to have a couple of minutes of back and forth here, and I'm going to take the moderators prerogative before they you guys. Give your rebuttals just ask quick question. Then we'll get to you guys said should Jewish mingle allow Catholics. First of all it my still allowed to curse. Yes. You're now. You're actually forced this is the contractual obligations. No, no, no. I thought I made that clear deny that I want I want people who don't take my money to do what they want in terms of their own internal rules. And in fact, I want I encourage that because kens point is actually a very important point at think, it may have been missed to that. I I learned this from him. Okay. That imposing a culture of free speech on universally is is something I really don't like it's called imperialism. Right. So I'm completely with you on that. And I don't we don't disagree on that. Go back to you here. One of the questions, you one of the things you are arguing about is that Twitter Facebook and many companies like tax breaks or incentives should show up at a certain place. They stop being a private entity. And there's something different going on the Catholic church, which you said, you don't wanna talk athletes. What to do they take a lot of Catholic church is the biggest tax break operator ever. Sorry. So why wouldn't you ride imposing that? The Catholic church offer sacraments for Nick, I was wrong. I take it back. The Catholic church that imposed through have a pure first amendment rules throughout no, we should stop giving them our money. Right. I mean, it's like it's the same. It's similar to the immigration debate. Right here about libertarians is like, oh, we can't let the immigrants in because of the social law. I I'm like, why don't you just let the immigrants in and not let them take the social welfare or maybe attack the social welfare state instead. Right. Because if you're for liberty, you let people cross borders, right? Sorry. I mean, I don't even know if anybody in here has position, but I've heard among a lot of libertarians. So it's very similar, right? Or barking up the wrong tree or something. I think often, but yeah. Back to you. We'll let me finish the thought. What what is what's the one question you want? I mean. I love you, Ken. And you're a hero. But I think you missed you alighted that I don't know. I mean, you lighted that major point. I was making about what do we do? And it's a tough question. I'm not saying it's easy because the Catholic church is a great great example, they take huge amounts of tax breaks cetera. What do we do with that? What do we do with these corporations that take not a small amount? I'm talking about billions and billions and billions of dollars. Look it up. Facebook Twitter all of them. What do we do when the government here? It is guys when the government grants, essentially, a natural monopoly to the people. They like politically you understand. That's exactly what time that's very clear. Now, this is not some wacky fringe theory here. This is very very clear now that that's what they're doing. What do you do when the government gives all these subsidies and land and buildings to these to these corporations for political reasons to put forward, a particular political point of view are those still? Just private entities like your living room. You solving the wrong problem. So if you're going after the problem that we're subsidizing too much. There's too much government and private entanglement the way to solve the problem. Pro liberty is not therefore make all these private entities act more like the government, it's to reduce the subsidies and the government backing and that type of thing maybe it's to enforce antitrust law more. Maybe it's to really challenge the tax breaks, which are all the time completely ludicrous. And you know, so she'll media start talking about sports tax breaks. I don't think though that we increase liberty or free speech by letting the government by subsidizing control more of the way that private enterprises and private people are I think I just happened upon a brilliant libertarian strategy going forward. Right. Every time we come across one of these entities say, hey, do you take my money? You do. Okay. So here's the deal. Now, your public you do what I say. Or you can give me my money back Catholic church Facebook, whoever it is. I mean, I think in other words, I'm not this is not a practical program. I'm putting forward hair. You know, the sent the great senators in Washington DC are not gonna take this up anytime soon, I'm talking about a cultural movement, which is what we all are about here. That's what reason is about. That's what I'm about to your about. I think we should start calling. We know not should I think we need to or they're literally going to kill us. I mean, that's I'm not kidding you. I think they are driving us to World War three with Russia, which is already going on by the way. That's what it's about. That's why it's so important for them to control Facebook. They are deadly serious about it. Facebook is this year? The number one funder of the Atlantic Council. Ken. Let me ask you a question. What? You take a sometimes we make these distinctions between a platform and a channel. So Twitter YouTube Facebook these platforms, we don't call them as specific channels. What about something like the daily Sturm or storm like a Neo Nazi website? Should they what if they cannot connect to the website? What if they cannot register through any company that allow that does registries for the internet is that a problem? I think it is a problem. The question is how will you dress? Why is the internet than different than Twitter YouTube or Facebook? Why think you're talking about internet backbone type functions so hosting I think is more in the middle. It's not quite so much crucially backbone, but if you're talking about like domain name type stuff where it really the that controls the entire internet. The tells things were to go you can tell them not technical in the way, I'm describing this. There's a real difference. I think there's a spectrum between my blog on the one side and the companies that. Dr where all internet traffic goes on the other. I think that the common carrier arguments that you hear that some entity should be regulated like the phone company or the electric company or something like that are probably strongest for things that are completely non-communicative. It like, you know, just the or the address of the address maybe maybe not even a Neo Nazi? So let's say, you know, what their actual Nazis. There's nothing new about it, but a Nazi site. Right. So I think there's a better argument for treating as a common carrier in regulating the way, you would the phone company or trains or things like that. When you're talking about the genuine the equivalent of phone lines. Right. But I think the closer you get to entities that have a message that have speech, and that's anywhere very much. So on my blog, maybe a little less arguably on Twitter to some extent, something like blue host or dream host or one of these branded themed hosts than I think the further you get down that way, the more. They have a first amendment right themselves decide who to socio with what I want to ask people to do. If you want to ask a question we. Have a microphone set up in the back. If you could form a line, and you will our our tech people will help there. So you can either come in from the cold or stand up and go sit or stand in line. And can do you have a question for that? Or a point of rejoinder. Sure. That let me ask you this. Do you think all speech is equally speech encouraging? So what I'm what I mean is this do you think that the sort of speech that some platforms like, Twitter and Facebook are banning? Encourages speech or is. Is part of the culture of free speech to promote discourse. Okay. So. Does the culture of free speech include yelling racial slurs at someone on Twitter? Does that encourage speech? Does yelling racial slurs. Encourage speech. Yup. Oh. Obviously. Yes, I mean because we've had just an absolute volcano of speech in the last two years haven't we whenever when anyone says anything even slightly racially insensitive. What happens we get a torrent of speech in response? Well, does it encourage the speech of the person who's being Yelda? It depends on the person. And as people are lining up. What do you make of the fact too though that I mean has your experience ever been marred by stupid people on Twitter? I mean, you're myself the moaning nNcholas b by the way, I think it was yesterday tweeted wouldn't life be better without Twitter? Yes. So just just just for the record to say. No. But what I'm saying is it's very easy to block people and to mute people in to ignore. I I never encountered in Alex Jones video on YouTube unless I went out and sought it out. It's so why are we getting so hot and bothered about all of this ugly speech when it's like one button to get rid of it forever. I'm not sure it is one button. But. Yes. There have been occasions when there have been enough swarms of people coming at me. One of annoyed white nationalist groups like that where it is genuinely degrade the experience, and I've taken a break, you know, after they talked about used racial slurs from my daughters and said how they were going to rape them. Then. Yes, that impairs my experience and. We're still talking about club penguin. This that was Twitter. And so yes, I can block them one by one it takes a long time. But the way I see it part of my freedom of association, and my choices consumer is finding a platform that has a moderation scheme that I can live with and one Twitter. I mean, they they blocked me for stupid reasons, they blocked people for stupid reasons. But out of a ton of terrible ones, maybe the best. So I think that I like my freedom to choose platforms that have a particular moderating style that I like. Okay. Let's let's ask a question. Please. Make sure it is a question at least, you know, have intonation rising the you're on my best. And if you would give your name as well, I'm Darren thanks for having this thing. This is great. My first time here. I'm generally pretty big free markets guy anti-regulation guy, but I feel like in this day and age the biggest threat to the free market is is our monopolies. And it seems that's where we're heading, you know, Disney swollen up every film studio. These social networks, I feel it yet. My gut instinct says. Let you know let them do what they want their private companies. But like, I really don't know your name, but not not canon. My name's Ken. You're non what is your? What's the question? I just saw it seems that like you even brought up Ken brought up gab. You can go to gap gobbled shutdown just this weekend. For having non non-conforming believes end because possibly was too far. Right. So I'm just wondering what you guys think. Like, I I it seems to me that these other companies Facebook and Twitter Instagram, it's not so easy to make up your own company more because there's so much money and the other thing so what? How do you? How do you think? Do you really think? Do you really think it's that easy to make up a new company to fight that these day? No. So so gab and mine's guess what? They don't get. They don't get tax breaks. They don't get free land. They don't get anything from the government. So again, I'm sorry. But please after this just Google just Google Facebook to pick your company and subsidies and you'll see I'm talking tens of billions of dollars of tax breaks. They don't in the city of San Francisco. Facebook pays zero dollars in payroll tax? I would like to have that as a business owner. Thank you very much competing with them. I am competing with them. Right. Gab is competing with them minds is competing with them. They don't get those tax breaks. They don't get to have a fancy office in downtown. San Francisco for basically free right Twitter opened their headquarters in downtown San Francisco three years ago. Same deal, huge tax breaks. No payroll tax. Right. So it's completely Rick. So like if you're going to take my money rig the game. So that I can't enter a market. And then tell me what meet what I can. And can't say in their monopolies that were created by the government. Right. That's the issue. Okay. So I would say again, we're we're solving the wrong problem the right way to solve that problem is by looking more at antitrust law. Whether they are actually monopolies to go vigorously after all those subsidies and question why people are getting them. But I don't think it's to turn them into something that is government. Like, I don't think that that promotes liberty. I also think you have to ask when you say you it's not easy to just go out there and start your own company. You have to ask compared to what what point in human history has it been easier for someone disfavored by the government unpopular with unpopular views to reach more people has there ever been a time when it's been easy for that to happen. But that's exactly why what's happening is happening because they understand this. This is the free moment, and they're making sure it will no longer be this free. Okay. Next question. My name is Thomas just was wondering about. About you're talking about my space. Do you think that's a? I think that's a poor comparison because they didn't have political power at the time. The TAC was in its infancy. How are they going to convince the city to give them that much subsidy and on top of that you have intellectual property rights, which is another sort of Damocles that they can hold over there. Get Petters heads where they can say, hey, you infringed on my idea what what's the question? So my question is isn't that another layer of collusion with the government to keep out competitors? In terms of intellectual property where they can say, hey, you infringe slightly my idea I can launch a lawsuit. And now, you don't have the financial means to then defend yourself against this. So essentially that just puts you out of business as well. I want to address that or the idea of a large corporation having a legal weapons at its disposal, or or is it really it's really about IP. Yeah. You want to go. No. I don't. I mean. Yes. Obviously restricts trade. Right. I mean, it's it's obviously you're handing a monopoly to an entity business entity. It's the same deal. I mean, let me elaborate really quickly on this. I I meant to mention also another fairly important entity or institution in our society. That's gotten even bigger subsidies than Facebook and Twitter have Google, which is higher education system. Okay. So right. When ABRAHAM LINCOLN was throwing people in prison for being disloyal at that very moment. The federal government was hand giving free land to missionaries Christian missionaries who wanted to start colleges. And now we we completely fund all the colleges and universities in this country except for about two to the gills with the federal student loan program. If we if we took away all the federal subsidies and state and local subsidies for higher education. There would be about four colleges left in this country. And I can't wait for that day, by the way. But I also it's the same. Question. Right. So my son if he goes to college and his we'll be going soon. I will I will be. But he has go lovey. Lovey. I know. I know. That's that's another debate. You know? So I'm in the position of paying lots quite a bit and taxes right for these colleges and universities to support the federal student loan program, which by the way, do you know that it makes a profit for the federal government? It's a profitable, and we still pay taxes to support it. Matt Taibbi wrote a great article in Rolling Stone about this. I highly recommended so I'm paying all this money for these places where they tell my son, he can't say certain things. I'd like my first amendment back or I'd like my money back. Do you agree? Then that if you get a dollar through a student loan which goes to the student that then goes to a particular university that university whether it's private or not should have to abide by the same rules of speech as a public universe. I'm sort of thinking through this. I think it's a great question. But yeah, basically, I think at least they have to answer to that. Don't they don't they? I mean, come on. I mean. Yeah. I think that won't go back to the question that the reference to my space and in the others are not to suggest. They were exactly the same. Of course, they're not times of change or last ten fifteen years. The idea is that I don't think we can assume that something it seems like a juggernaut now is still going to be one in the next ten or fifteen years, politics changes dramatically tech changes dramatically, and I think that when you're thinking about having an aim of starting new things to challenge the current juggernauts, you'd have to take a longer view. And so even if Twitter or Google seem unstoppable now, I'm not sure that's going to be the case in fifteen years. And actually there is evidence that Twitter and Facebook at least in North America or starting declines and average daily users or the duration way. God's be a sign that they are not competitive were that they've become susp polls. But let's go to the next question. Hi, my name's Tommy. Everybody's had almost same question as I have. But. I will go a little bit further on a couple of these things for Thad. You had this idea your public? Now, do what I say the I is always going to be the government though, because they're the ones that are making the rules yet. My preference is always to get my money back, by the way. Right, right. That's our preference is always. Yeah. I get to say, whatever you want in your church or your school, or your social media whatever platform, but give me my money back. I do think the subsidies point demolishes, the idea, or at least puts a big dent in the idea that we don't know what's going to be there in fifteen years because it's a huge advantage for Ken would the government prosecute. And even recognize a monopoly. That's created by the government. Because of the subsidies only demand it only if people it's a lot. A lot. Require it. So antitrust prosecutions have gone all over the place. I mean, look right now, the subject of going after Twitter or Google or Facebook on antitrust grounds is popular in some circles for political reasons from the right because they are perceived as on the left, and indeed I think a lot of the talk about how these social networks are improperly restricting speech is politically driven. So that has views that they are assisting one spectrum pro-war that type of thing I think the way it's being spun now, at least in congress is very much a right versus left, the notion that to fight against the liberals, and all these people we have to take these back for real Americans who, you know, don't don't live on this coast or the coast but live in the middle. So but to go back to your question. Antitrust prosecutions have come and gone with the political winds that could change again. And if you make enough of an issue as some people are trying to do on this specific issue, then yes, you could have more. I say one thing about so an another warning flag. If I haven't scared you enough tonight, the the response by the few people on the left who are interested in this who are just as outraged for the same reasons that I am unfortunately there their answer is what do you think? Make make social media public utilities. Which is a great way, of course, to open up speech, and, you know, expand the Overton window and everybody can sit right? It's the exactly the worst possible idea more government control. But so be warned that that's coming down the pike to so an antitrust real real quickly. And I really I'm done. Being story. And again, the great great, great Marxist. Historian. Gabriel cocoa showed pretty definitively that antitrust was a scam. Always and that without regulation by the governments and Marxist talking. Okay. Competition flourished, and it was actually intervention by the government for in anti-trust cases at the turn of the twentieth century that caused the consolidation of capital. So it is far from clear that antitrust will get us anything we want and think about the people who will be wielding those lawsuits, that's the thing. Right. Did you watch? I mean, have you watched you know, who the senators and stuff are recently? Right. I mean, that's who would be doing this. Do you think do you think Cory Booker and camera Harris, and that jackass from Alabama really are just going to be neutral, and let us have our free speech, and they're not gonna use it for political purposes. Gimme a break. Let's go to the next question. Hi, everyone. I'm jack. And so this question, I guess is primarily for that. But so in the case of say someone like Alex Jones who sort of who blatantly and openly disseminates false information and harass like encourages harassment against multiple groups of people, what obligation do social media companies have to. I don't know. Like do. They have an obligation to keep that to keep that sort of speech in the interest of free speech. Or is there a line that can be drawn at all in terms of what like social media companies they need to kill Alex Jones, clearly because he constitutes a threat because his words hurt us. So this is another thing we need to talk about right? Why on earth why on earth does even does hate speech hurt? Anyone? Why does it need to hurt? Anyone? One must. We be hurt. By other people's words. I submit to you know, we don't have to I submit to you, even if I were a sandy hook parent, I wouldn't need to be upset by what the stupidest person in public. Life says about my child's death. Right. Alex Jones last time, I saw him was yelling literally at a pile of shit in Texas. Okay. That's all I know about the guy. I mean, literally literally you've seen the video. Yeah. Okay. So was available. So I I whatever Alex Jones says about me or my son or anything like it's just hilarious to me. And you don't and I've been so for I was gonna say for about a year and a half. Now, I've had a bout a m- one point five million men screaming at me because I said that I don't believe in truth on a podcast once. Okay. It's every single day. They called me pussy. They call me faggot faggot faggot pussy pussy faggot fag. Cut cut. Cock back at pussy pussy fat. Twenty thirty one hundred times a day for a year and a half. Okay. I know it it's like it's like these people are NATs to me. It's annoying. When there's a thousand nets around you. But that is a net. Right. And we need to interrogate. This thing about why we're necessarily hurt by certain words, said by people can I ask what about something like a dachshund, or if people were sending stuff to your address, if they were telling people publicly are you live, I kill them. That's yeah. So kind of mean that like I mean, I I think. Personal. It's that's a matter of personal safety. Right. And I'm kinda for privatizing personal safety and security. Frankly, aren't we kinda in this room a little bit? Yeah. So if you docks me good luck with that, good luck. With that Ken. I'm just going to hand you might card now in case. A defense lawyer. So how about the now I can I respond to that quite nicely. Thank you. Can. I will be dating it soon. My answer us. I think that my opinion is that social media has a moral obligation there, but not illegal one as long as they're keeping within the bounds of the first amendment and section two thirty which is the one that generally makes them invulnerable losses for the content of stuff like that. That said I want a system where I make moral choices about which social media use based on how they make moral choices. I want a system or I choose or don't choose Facebook or Twitter or anything else based on them doing that. Just like everyone else and our collective moral choices make different approaches rise or fall, and I have to argue a little bit with that on this whole thing about why do words hurt us. Hell, I don't know. But to me the idea why do you let words hurt? You is no more of an apt question. Why do you feel you have to use those words? I leave that up to people I decided I don't let the government regulated through criminal law or through defamation law or things like that. When it's words like that. But I don't want to tell people how they should feel about words. And I generally don't wanna tell them what words to use. So I don't think we should order society that I'm clearly right? I did not say how you should feel. I'm just saying you don't necessarily need to feel particular things about particular things. That's all let's next question. My question is a slight extension of your debate question. But I think there are a lot of similar arguments on both sides should pay pal and companies like that stop processing payments for websites that host hate speech and all kinds of bad speech. Or should they have a neutral policy? Who wants to take out? I sure I mean, this is a question to me. That's you know, is pay pal. Mo what is it? Like, what is it? Is it more like a Bank? Do we let banks choose who to do business with or not do business with this is actually alive question some banks or deciding not to do business with gun manufacturers? So the NRA because of their political beliefs. So do we want to start regulating that I don't think? So do we want to have a social norm that banks or pay Powell or any of those don't make decisions based on politics again rather than abroad, social, norm? I like us voting with our feet and saying pay pal pisses me off because they start processing something I like, then I stopped using them. And I encourage others to stop using them. But I don't think that you can have. Have a universal broad social norm that entities like that should never decide to stand up for what they believe in. I mean, I think it's just an extent. Will you sort of said, it's an extension of the question. But it's also an extension of the answer. I think right. So yeah, I think I mean, I kind of want to know what where pay pals offices are in San Francisco and exactly how. But I'm sure that they've got more than there. I'm sure that the very studies. The very friendly with the board of supervisors up there. Yeah. But that's so great next question. Whether my name is Erin. Hi, how are you? So I'm wondering I had another question that I heard an answer a minute ago that no had quickly change the question. 'cause anyway, so I'm wondering what what actions do you think? Individuals can take to move closer toward a culture of communication and listening. And as opposed to censorship. Whether it's self censorship. Censorship of others. What actions can we take to move closer toward that? And for example, could some of those actions be to proactively Eskin engage in conversation with people of different views. Great question. And it's something I it's something I deal with once a week. You know what I mean? So not once a week, but many weeks on my show podcast. I have I've had many many people whose politics are radically different than mine. And what I what I try to do. I don't know. How successful? I am always. But the my intention is to model the behavior I would like to see others, take, right? Which is to simply be open to the ideas. But here's the important thing. Here's the important thing that liberals don't do. And civil libertarians often don't do challenge them be comfortable in conflict, be comfortable with intellectual and political conflict. And that's where Americans are just babies were just tiny little babies when we have the littlest conflict, we start screaming and crying and freaking out. And we gotta run away. Right. That's twitter. That's that's political discourse in this country. So what I try to model is that, you know? It's like, no, I think what you just said actually is racist. But let's talk about it. Right. Or that sounds an awful lot like fascism. What you're advocating are g do you really want to nationalize the television industry? You know, talk about it have the conflict state exactly where I stand on this. But here it out here it out. See here's the thing. Beqiri ass- about your enemies be curious about. Enemies. That is one hundred percent, right. I couldn't say any better. I think what we're lacking a lot is the combination of worthwhile discourse stunt, just screaming obscenities each other. But really genuinely challenging the ideas on the other side, and I interact with a lot of people I strongly disagree with on issues. And I think I learned the most and get the most out of it. When I have that kind of discussion when I when we genuinely argue about, but you know, in a friendly civil way up to a point about the points that we're making. It's actually it's actually patronizing I think and disrespectful to not challenge people. Okay. So I've been in college campuses for my entire adult life. And this is ask a black person who's been a student or faculty member on a college campus. I'll betcha anything they will tell you. They patronized all the damn time. Because that's what goes on. Right. If they say something that the rest of the faculty disagrees with they don't get any pushback. I've seen this happen. A thousand times a black person gets. I know that there's disagreement and no one contradicts them because they're scared to do that. Right. That ends up treating the black person. Like a child at makes puts us in a position to be in their parents are taking care of them were worried that they're going to be hurt. Their feelings are gonna be hurt. So we take it upon ourselves to protect the poor vulnerable black person. Right. And that's the way I think political discourse generally operates. It's the baby and the adult so the baby starts screaming and crying and oh and half. The adults wanna take care of the baby and half the adults wanna keep yelling at the baby. Right. That's what I saw. I just wanna point out. I think you just figured black people as babies then that's kind of racist. Wait not. I'm not I'm saying that's how they are. Yes. The last we have time for one last question, really, really quick. You cannot I'm sorry. Now, you cannot thank you. This is our platform. But thank you. Okay. Final. Just yell fire. Everyone will leave name's Heidi. I have a question for Ken. Can you hear me? I shook in. So my question for you is that the problem with your argument is that it's a slippery slope. And that they're going to decide what where hate speech ends. And then it might end up, including all all conservative speech in all the -tarian speech, and that that's kind of dangerous, and there are a lot of impressionable minds on Facebook. And that's kind of scary. Sure, they might because people are idiots, so, but that would be their speech that would be their freedom of association, and the whole point is that we don't regulate people's speech and freedom of association one. We have this model where we vote with our feet. Where we go to different platforms at a run the way we like that have the type of atmosphere we liked that how the moderation style that we like some of the would be absolutely terrible. Some that. I'm going to be terrible in the other direction will allow you know, there's a whole lot of very scary stuff that comes short of truth rats, inciting violence, some of them are going to be I think some people call them, you know, care bear worlds, where only the most completely ineffective, say speech is permitted. But the marketplace of ideas is always gonna have bad results and suss pools various types, and I think the way you deal with that is not by creating this norm or everyone should deal with speech the same way, everyone should moderate the same way. But you know, let the thousand flowers bloom, and let's choose the platforms that have the moderation approaches that meets our individual needs. Okay. We are going to go to our final summary statements and Thad would you like to you have the podium for five minutes to sum up, your your ideas? Wow. Totally unprepared. I want your questions. I want your comments. I don't know. What do you think that? I do it. Did it win. Like what I mean? No. I think I think I gave you everything I got here. Do you want to hear more about subsidies that sexy? Do you want dollar amounts? I don't have them there in the billions. I can tell you that. Yeah. It's a congress. I guess what I'm saying is here that I am trying to introduce a new conversation. Okay. I don't have. I don't have all the precise answers. I have a lot of answers for myself right about my money, and my rights and all that stuff. I don't know if you're in. I don't know the answers for you. But I do think we have to start asking different questions and thinking about this differently and having different conversation. So I interviewed Nadine Strauss into great great civil libertarian hero Nadine Strauss. And former president of the issue as good as it gets on this. Right. She did not know she did not know the direct connection between wartime conscription and restrictions on speech by the supreme court. She didn't she wasn't aware that history. And then I started looking into it. And I found out that a lot of very famous civil libertarians like her are simply unaware of that very important thing that that's the one thing. The government will not allow us to say that is always been the only thing Yates nine hundred fifty nine seven gates decision. Fifty eight right mcmocha, bracketed it. The decision left. The clear homes is clear and present danger doctrine in there. They didn't touch that part. You can't say when we go to the next one we're at war with Russia and they've calling for a draft because they need that many troops on the ground to take over all that territory. It's a lot of territory in Asia, right? We will never be able to say, you can't take my son. They've never allowed us to say, you can't take my son. That's the fire. That's the fire. I don't know. I'm pretty it means a lot to me, right. My son's seventeen right going to college. And you could be going to somewhere else pretty soon. So this is urgent for me. And I want to have a different conversation. I got nothing else for you just vote for it. I'm going to push back on what they are going to allow. We are in terms of the law. It just about the best place. The first amendment's ever been the last couple of decades in first amendment law have been more free speech protective on the law on what the government can do than any other time in the first amendment's history time and time again, the supreme court has pushed back against the idea that the government can regulate things because there are offensive even very offensive that the government can set the terms for what categories are protected in every way, the government has steadily attempted to censor more. The supreme court has pushed back you even heard a lot of complaints from the left that I think the term is weaponising free speech that now this is straying into areas of the economy, and that's not right. We only wanted to do it for you know, the stuff we wanted to talk about. So I don't share right now. The concern that the law is going to get more censorious because the trends in the other direction there are none of the signs and those decisions suggesting that it's slowing down or going. Yeah. The way I mean when the supreme court says eight to one that you can stand outside military funeral and say, God loves dead, marines and things like that. Then I think we're getting pretty far along the way. What we do have though is a continuing debate and disagreement about what I called bullshit. The culture of free speech. How do we want to deal with each other? How do we want to interact with each other? What's right, and what's wrong? And how should we regulate? It socially. And would I'm trying to say is this that the best way is always going to be that marketplace of ideas and voting with your feet, and deciding not to shut down that person, you can't stand. But maybe not go out with your friends when they're part of the group. I think that we have to take a second. Look like that says at what we think is speech, or is what we think expression is or isn't you might notice that there's this trend toward saying all these people are against free. Speech when they do things that are very much, free speech. You get that with the government since states trying to pass laws making it legal to run over people who are blocking the roads during protests, you see it in a spate of laws. They're getting struck down with state government saying that you can be kicked out of school. If you Hackel a speaker. These are things that are trying to reclassify dissent against dissent dissent within the discussion as being illegitimate. And there is a philosophical attempt there to to say that when you say, you know, you're a racist asshole that somehow that is on a different speech level than being the racist asshole. I don't think that it is. I think that our decision to speak out with more speech to call people out for things, we think are terrible. To decide not to associate with them that that is just as core to free speech as what they are saying in the first place. It's what I call the first speaker problem this idea that we're only concerned with the first person who starts speaking and whether or not the reaction will deter or chill that person. What about the second speaker? What about the person who reacts? Sometimes these social media networks are that second speaker. They are making decisions both I think mercenary and heartfelt about what kind of many societies they want to be running and making money off of. And I think that that speech that association act is just as legitimate as the ones the people who want to speak on thank. Let's give a big extra round of applause for about that and Ken. That I want everybody now to go back to SoHo vote dot com. To do the post-debate vote. And I'm what we're going to have some uncomfortable moments of impromptu patter, while we calculate, but so the proposition has like university social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube should only remove speakers and participants where making truth threats or inciting violence. You can make your your final vote. Forgotten what I voted at this point. Yeah. Okay. So while we do that Ken. You were almost arrested today. What what laws the debris? I discovered that I had accidentally collected driver's license. It's discovered that when the police pulled me over and so do cops go after years with special pleader, they do. And that's why you genuinely do not want to tell them, you're lawyer. So I I did the things that I've been trained to do which is put my hands on the wheel ask for permission to reach from. My wallet doll the things that cops told me make them feel warm and fuzzy and safe and at the end of the encounter since I had acted deferentially to them. They let me off with a ticket and didn't tell my car. Have you? When's the last time you were arrest? I've been in handcuffs. Three times a road. We're not talking about your personal. I thought that was just between the two of us. But anyway. I put it up on. It's okay. It's okay. Okay. I'm a little bit of a leather. Boy anyway. So that just went went, right? What was the question? The last time you were arrested. The last time we'll have never. Oh, okay. Arrested. I was put in handcuffs seven years ago. But I was arrested in nineteen ninety one. Guess why? Gulf war for running onto the bay bridge to block it to protest the Gulf war as stupid, but I cut myself a little slack as the cause was just, but yeah, that was the last time that was a very popular war. And it was not in San Francisco, though, not too popular there. Yeah. We'd call caused a lot of trouble. So now, we are getting the final results to the proposition. Again. The proposition was like university social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube and club penguin should only remove speakers participants were making true threats or inciting violence. The original vote. Was fifty three percent agreed that they should only remove speakers who are. Making threats or inciting violence and the no vote was twenty five percent afterwards. The yes vote went to forty three percent, which is a change of minus ten and the no vote when up to forty six forty seven percent. So that means that Ken one by gaining twenty percent of. I wanna I wanna thank you all for coming out. So the first west coast SoHo forum, thank you.

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Three Approaches to Asset Allocation

Money For the Rest of Us

25:19 min | 9 months ago

Three Approaches to Asset Allocation

"Welcome the money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and had live without worrying about it. I'm your host. David Stein today's episode three Oh six. It's titled. Three approaches to asset allocation. Ono is a Japanese chef and owner of sukey of Ashi Hero. A Japanese Sushi restaurant in the gains area of Tokyo. There's a documentary on him. They came out in two thousand eleven. Erotic Dreams of Sushi. Here all know is ninety four. He was in his mid eighties when this documentary came out. Working closely with his son in other Sushi chefs at his small restaurant in a Tokyo subway station. He's been making Sushi for decades. He said I do the same thing over and over improving bit by bit. There's always a yearning to achieve more I'll continue to climb trying to reach the top, but no one knows where the top is. He continually tries to get better at what would seem like a fairly straightforward task to make Sushi. But it's not. Thought about investing in the same way. One of the first investing books I remember. Reading was a paperback book I've found on the shelf in our basement by Howard Ruff. It was titled how to Prosper in the coming bad years. was really kind of boring. I remember very little about it other than he talked about inflation and buy gold. But then I went to business school. A finance Undergrad I was introduced to modern portfolio theory as a way to go about asset allocation. I went to graduate school and got an MBA with an emphasis unfinanced I used to wonder the library and would actually sit and page through financial journals. Trying to absorb that knowledge. I spent sixteen years as institutional investment advisor and money manager. Allocating assets for university, endowment and Foundations and other not for profits. And then the last six years, I've been teaching individuals how to invest. Had allocate their investment portfolio while also managing my own assets. Former Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell. Holmes referred to finding the simplicity on the other side of complexity. I've always tried to do that it investing. Investing is incredibly complex. Are there rules thumb or principles that we can follow that simplify things. So I've spent a number of decades thinking about investing thinking about the approach to how we save and invest for retirement, and then draw down those savings as we live in retirement. Those are really the two investing stages saving for retirement and retirement living. The first. Stage saving for retirement. There are five key aspects. The portfolio objective is growth. Growing your retirement portfolio. And as you continue to save, there's a natural dollar cost averaging that occurs as you systematically invest in that retirement portfolio on an ongoing basis. During the saving for retirement phase. You have time to recover from major market losses, because if markets fall fifty percent, you will continue to add more savings and be able to buy lower valuations. In saving for retirement, you can be a more aggressive investor with a higher allocation to stocks because you have time to recover from losses. The underlying question to saving for retirement is how much do I need to save? Before we continue. Let me pause share some words from one of this week. Sponsors net sweet. What do companies like ring? Hint and Tacomas all have in common. They all use net sweet to accelerate their growth. Successful companies know that in order to grow faster, you must have the right tools. Whether you're doing a million ten million or hundreds of millions in revenue net suite by Oracle gives you the tools you need to accelerate your growth with net sweet. Get a full picture of your business finance inventory, HR customers and more. It's everything you need to grow all in one place right from your phone or computer. Net sweet will give you the visibility and control. You need to make the right decisions and grow with confidence. That's why net sweet customers grow faster than the S. and P. Five hundred. Net sweet is the world's number. One cloud business system trusted by more than nineteen thousand companies. It's the last system you'll ever need. Schedule your free product tour right now and receive your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits at net sweet dot com slash David. That's net sweet dot com slash David. Net, sweet dot com slash David. We can contrast that with retirement living. In that stage were accessing our retirement per folio for expenses. We're worried about sequence of return risk. which is the devastating impact market? Losses could have in the first few years every tournament. The pattern of returns in a retirement portfolio makes a difference. If, performance in the first few years, retirement is very very strong. Your money is much more likely to last then if performance is poor. In retirement living, we typically have multiple sources of income. We have income from our investment portfolio. Sometimes we have a defined benefit pension plan. There are government retirement schemes such as social security in the US. And there's annuities. These are guaranteed sources of income. The degree of portfolio aggressiveness depends on to what extent we have. Those guaranteed income sources to cover most of our retirement expenses. The underlying question is will my money last? That is. Longevity risk. With each of those stages, there are three primary approaches to asset allocation. The first is a role based permanent portfolio. The second is a strategic portfolio mix. And the third is an adaptive asset garden. Let's take a closer look at each of these approaches to asset allocation and the pros and cons of each. I roll based permanent portfolios. By role based we mean. Each asset. In the portfolio is expected to do better under different scenarios. There's a portion in stocks that performs better during periods of economic growth. There is an investment in long term bonds and cash that tend to perform better during recessionary periods. There's holdings of gold and commodities. Dad tend to do better during of higher inflation. And then during periods of deflation, that portfolio also holds long-term bonds in cash. Because of these different roles, there's an overall lower allocation to stocks about twenty five to forty percent. And because of the allocation to long-term bonds in gold, which can be as volatile as stocks. Not, all the volatility in the portfolio is driven by the stock market. To more diversified. There are different names for permanent full ears. One is permanent portfolio, but there's also the all seasons portfolio and the Golden Butterfly. The allocations are slightly different. The permanent portfolio has a twenty five percent allocation to the global stock market. Twenty five percent to long term bonds. Twenty five percent to treasury bills. And Twenty five percent gold. Golden Butterfly has twenty percent in the global stock market, and in additional twenty percent and small cap value so a total of forty percent in stocks. Twenty percent term bonds twenty percent, short term bond and twenty percent gold. Finally the all seasons portfolio is a thirty percent allocation to the global stock market forty percent of long-term bonds. Fifteen percent intermediate term bonds. Seven and a half percent to commodities. And seven and a half percent gold. The benefit of this approach is is it's simple. There's only four to five holdings. And historically it has had a very low maximum drawdown, which is the amount of money that is lost during major selloff. It's been about eleven to sixteen percent. The Golden Butterfly. The worst loss was eleven percent, and it recovered over three year period. Permanent portfolio, the worst loss was a fourteen percent, and it took five years to recover. And? The all seasons portfolio. The worst loss was sixteen percent in. It took ten years to recover. So that's definitely a benefit. The CON is that it's just not stocks that are volatile. Volatility in the long term bonds and gold now that's a feature, but it's also con. Because oftentimes investors aren't comfortable seeing the significant volatility in different aspects of the portfolio. Now it happens at different times, hence the role based so that the overall portfolio has only fallen low double digits. But it still takes some getting used to. The other con- is the low expected return. Particularly now when bond yields are low. I went ahead and. Some return estimates for the different asset types to figure out what what is a reasonable expect to return for these permanent portfolios over the next decade. I assumed a four percent return for gold her year. Historically since the sixties, it's been five point seven percent, but we've had a very strong run of gold recently. Gold is speculation. There's no real way to figure out what gold will return, so let's assume four percent. The current yield to maturity on thirty Treasury is one point. Three three percent will use that as our return estimate for long term bonds. For Stocks Let's assume seven point one percent, which is estimated ten year annualized return for global stocks money for the rest of his plus. Short term bonds is zero point. One percent that's the current yield will use that for short term, bonds and cash. Commodities that that's also a tough one. If we look at the Thomson Reuters Continuous Commodity Total, return index, going back to nineteen seventy-three, it's only return to percent annually before taking into account, any interest received on cash that was held in the margin account. This particular commodity benchmark is made up. Seventeen exchange traded future contracts. Crude oil heating all natural gas agriculture, such as corn soybeans, precious metals, gold copper et CETERA. Two percent per year. Now with cash earning close to zero. Let's just assume two percent. Finally for intermediate term, bonds using the Bloomberg Barclays. Aggregate Bond Index that yield to maturity right now one point three percent, so that will be are estimated returns by Asa Class. If we look at those weights in those various asset classes for the permanent portfolio, the expect to return is only three point one percent over the next decade. Golden Butterfly is three point nine percent. Reassume the same rate of return for small cap value as for the global stock market. And the all season per folio is three point three percent. So the returns are low and in the CON is every portfolio is the same, so there's no adjustment based on your age based on your aggressiveness. It's simply this is the allocation and you keep it. You can look at all kinds of statistics on permanent portfolios in the different portfolios, risks and return at portfolio charged dot com. It's incredible resource to look at these different portfolios types. Before, we continue. Let me pause and share some words from this week sponsors. One of the great things about the great courses plus streaming service is you get to learn from actual experts who know how to teach the great courses plus has real professors people who have spent years studying their field. And most importantly know how to teach and engage with people. For example there's a fascinating course titled Cooking across the ages by Ken Aballah. In twenty four lessons, he goes through different food cultures such as the Aztecs with their use of time. And chocolate it's a course that combined history and cooking. It's an example of the vast selection of subjects on the great courses, plus there's truly something for everyone. Learn to become a great writer, practice mindfulness or delve into astrophysics and with the great courses APP, you can learn anytime anywhere. Join me and see for yourself. Sign up for the great courses plus today it right now. You can get a free trial of unlimited access to the entire library. So. Don't wait and sign up using my special eurorail. Start Your free trial at the great courses plus dot com slash David. That's the great courses plus dot com slash David. The second asset allocation approach is a strategic portfolio mix. Where you have a formal target and do periodic rebalancing. The simplest is the Bogo head three fund portfolio where there's investments in your home country stocks through an index fund or an exchange traded fund. Non Home Country Stocks and bonds. It can be a to eat. Jeff per folio on money for the rest of US plus we have some static mono- per folias with to ETF's. Global stocks and bonds. Her younger investors, these strategic portfolio mixed tends to be more stock heavy. There's an opportunity to add value stocks, growth, stocks, small cap and Mid Cap. This strategic portfolio mix is an outgrowth of modern portfolio theory. Where for each asset class, you develop an expected return. A volatility assumption and then correlation how the different asset classes moved together. The goal is to select an asset mix that has the maximum expect to return for a given level of volatility. To earn sufficient on the portfolio to generate a positive real return. A return that the portfolio still grows above. It is an approach that we include some models on money for the rest of US blesses well as an asset allocation spreadsheet to help individuals decide a strategic mix. In our case we have expect to return for numerous asset classes, but instead of volatility we look at maximum drawdown. How much could you lose the average time to recover? The benefit of this approach is there's more options. There's not just one per folio. You can have portfolios to focus more on capital preservation. Then you can have aggressive per folios, and they very generally based on how much is allocated to stocks. It's model based, so there's an asset allocation model run. There's an optimization run, so it fits well with traditional financial planning. It's the approach that I used with consulting clients as a investment adviser. You have a target and you can follow a revised schedule rebalance on a periodic basis on a certain timeframe or balance when a particular asset class in your portfolio breaches some threshold, it falls below a minimum often, times there's a target and then there's ranges around those targets. The CONSTA- this approaches is, it can lead to an over reliance on expect to return in modeling. Every asset class has to have those three assumptions expect to return volatility and the correlation between other asset classes. Some asset classes just don't lend themselves to that private capital commercial real estate. That doesn't trade every day, so it doesn't have volatility like you've seen the public markets. So you end up making up volatility numbers. I did that as an investment advisory needed an assumption for every asset class have historical data or some way to determine the volatility. Then we just came up with assumption. That's this is how volatile venture capital would be if it was a publicly traded investment. Another con is as expected returns falls such as very low yield for the bond market. It tends to push clients to want to be more aggressive. To try to reach that target return as opposed to adjusting spending and expectations based on the current environment. We want to figure out what's that mix to get us to that target without having to potentially reduce our expectations, and that has led to tickly institutional clients to invest more and more in alternative investments. And other it can be a struggle to make portfolio changes because we've run a model and it's optimized. We don't want to necessarily change that without rerunning the model. So I've seen clients become heavily invested in that target, mix and reluctant to make any changes. The final approach is an adaptive asset. Garden, approach, Oregon. You have multiple asset classes. It's highly diversified with both public and private, but there's a less formal target. It's an acknowledgment that different assets have different roles, but rather than have a periodic timeframe for rebalancing re. We balanced portfolio. We add new asset classes and reduce others as conditions change. I like this approach because it's not focused on optimization. Former Bank of England chair, Mervyn, King said the language of optimization is seductive, but humans do not optimize they cope. They respond and adapt to new surroundings, new stimuli and new challenges. So the goal with a acid garden approach is just a variety of asset classes, just like a landscaper that's planning out of Gardiner's guidelines. There's rules of thumb, but there's tremendous creative freedom to build a garden in our case investment portfolio that aligned with our knowledge, interest and values. The initial building blocks are cash and stocks, but then we can add additional asset classes. The pros of this approach it's just greater flexibility. It's easier to make changes as conditions change because we're not so emotionally invested in one target. It's an approach that lends itself to a greater variety of asset types. We can experiment and learn about an class at a small position. See how it behaves. And then increase that allocation without having a rerun our optimization model. Now the pros it can still be role based. We can separate out our asset types by rolls. This does better with when the economy's growing this better during periods of inflation. The cons, it is more complicated. You're likely to have more asset types. It can be more time consuming because you're spending more time just learning about new investments. Neither of these three approaches is necessarily better than the other. These are just different ways to go about it. And, we can use a combination of them. Consider. The different roles maybe have more rough targets. We can experiment. As I mentioned. I did this episode because as part of finding the simplicity on the other side of complexity I've been redoing the videos on money for the rest of US plus and the tools to help individuals build out for folio in the video on there for asset allocation was it was several years old, and it just didn't really get to what I want to have to help. Individuals make the selections to show the different asset allocation approaches, and to provide some examples of each. I'm putting together this specific example holdings if someone wanted to implement a permanent portfolio. There's some portfolio examples for strategic portfolios and models to help individuals develop that. And then for the acid Gardner approach I share my portfolio. That's how I invest as well as discuss different acid types and conditions is part of the monthly investment conditions report. But you don't have to invest like me. You could have a simple to ETF portfolio. Global stocks and bonds. Done. figure out your target rebalanced once a year, and it's a minimalist investment approach very very valid. I hope you found this overview of the approaches to asset allocation helpful. If you're in the retirement living stage. You can still use these three approaches with the part of your portfolio that separate from the guaranteed income portion, or if you're saving for retirement, you can use these three approaches also. Sometimes. It requires us to look at what's available within our defined contribution, plan the options there and then compliment that with investments outside of the plan. These are the three broad approaches to asset allocation, the pros and cons. That is episode three six. You can get shots at money for the rest of US dot com, and why you're accessing show notes, please sign up for my free weekly insider sky. The sign up box there on the website now just email you those links each week along with an essay on money investing in the economy. Some of the best writing I do each week just goes through your inbox. You can sign up for that at money for the rest of US DOT com. Everything I've shared with you in this episode has been for General Education. I'm not considered your specific risk situation of not provided investment advice. This is simply general education on money. Investing. Economy Have a great week.

US Tokyo Howard Ruff Japanese Sushi David Stein Ono Supreme Court Ashi Hero General Education Oliver Wendell advisor Foundations Holmes Tacomas Oracle Asa Class
When Choice and Disability Collide

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

When Choice and Disability Collide

"Nicoli is one of Australia's leading disability rights advocates a spinal cord injury when she was young left. Nicole de pro-choicers it seems well back choices of women with disabilities as long as they make the right choice for the Colson Center I'm John Stonestreet this is break sorry but in many countries the laws that authorized these reprehensible violations of our humanity are still on the books even in America Remember Bucks Sern instead she writes no one blinked and I know counseling no questions no support offered afterward looking back she sees just how differently she was which has eliminated Down's syndrome by eliminating all babies with down syndrome or at the end of life as in the Netherlands where dementia patients are euthanized against the treated compared to non disabled women at the clinic because of her disability people saw the decision to enter pregnancy as unquestionably the right one the report expressed concern about the nonconsensual administration of contraceptives and abortions four and sterilization of women with disability article describes her three pregnancies at age eighteen she had her first child when she found herself pregnant again at twenty two she decided to have an abortion something she right to choose and the disregard for the rights of those with disability come from the same ideological place both reject the sanctity and dignity of every human life hi how are you going to take care of a newborn baby this even though she was happily raising her first child Lee wants to know why wasn't I asked about my ability prizes when societies and movement already committed to abortion on demand advanced trampling the rights of other vulnerable groups whether at the beginning of life as in Iceland describes as a difficult decision while she expected the people at the abortion clinic to agree with her she also expected counseling and to be treated with empathy and not is not only legal it's an ongoing practice between June thirty two thousand sixteen in June thirty two thousand seventeen at least ten disabled also worth sterilized in Australia's northern territories the sterilizations occurred at the request of the guardians not the adults themselves a recent United Nation ability face one of the most daunting challenges she says is getting people who talk so loudly about the right to choose to actually respect their choices in the versus bow in which justice Oliver Wendell Holmes infamously declared that three generations of imbeciles are enough with not google it you'll discover it three now her concerns are valid and her experiences are not unique in Australia as in other countries forced sterilization of those with disability will once we divide human life into categories it convenient and inconvenient anyone who falls into the latter category will be vulnerable for breakpoint from the moment of conception to the moment of natural death both to borrow the title from Edwin Black's history of eugenics are part of the war against the week so it should never cope after having an abortion. Why was no-one concerned about my welfare then what least part of the reason she suspects has to do with eugenics there's fear of pendant on a wheelchair for mobility but as she revealed in a recent article at courts dot com accessibility discrimination aren't the only challenges women still the law of the land in the United States lease account is compelling and shocking but her explanation still misses something vital the so called teas and their concerns included Australia for sterilization and other eugenics practices might seem like a throwback to a much darker period in recent human if you think Lee's overreacting the story of her third pregnancy proves otherwise when sharing the news about the child in her womb she was often asked how are you going to cope with being pregnant followed by basing on a genetic defect there are doubts as Lee put it about whether or not disabled persons can live a good life and remember lease disability was caused by an injury.

Lee Australia Nicoli Colson Center google United Nation John Stonestreet Edwin Black Oliver Wendell Holmes Nicole de United States America Iceland
What Up Holmes?

Radiolab

50:39 min | Last week

What Up Holmes?

"A radio lab is supported by the crisis. A new podcast from vice news bringing you stories from the frontlines of the climate crisis. The crisis is available now on spotify or wherever. You listen how this is jeff master from kalamazoo michigan. Radio lab is supported by forward waiting months for ten minute. Doctor's appointment healthcare's backwards. Luckily forward is here to clear things up with on demand access to great care backed by the latest tech and top-rated doctors learn more go forward dot com. That's go forward dot com listener supported w nyc studios. Julia chad chad. This is radio lab before we get to the podcast. Part of the podcast. I wanna introduce you or reintroduce you to someone from the radio lab extended family. Who has a great new project that is just out you may remember her from the rpg episode ran. When you'd ask her question there would be silence. Silence to make a person nervous and start trying to help her answer the question or you might remember her from a mind. Bending trip she took to american this is the only place in the world that is us soil and people who are born here are not citizens. We're just generally from more perfect for our series about supreme court. Julia longoria is so great to talk to you again. It is so nice to hear your voice. Julia has a new project. Is a collaboration between wnyc studios in the atlantic magazine and it is called the experiment. It aims to be a show about the stories we tell ourselves as a country our ideals and moments when those ideals can feel far away and this push and pull of like believing in the ideal but pointing out when we mess up so you guys have been out for a few months already. Been getting amazing response Tell me about some of the stuff you've worked on that you're working on that that's exciting. Yeah one of the stories. I'm most excited about is Actually about a supreme court case It's about It's the first case where spring court looked at vaccination like basically forcing people to vaccinate and its legality. So there was this pastor a guy named henning jacobson who he was living in the us and ninety four and there was a smallpox epidemic then and massachusetts passes this law where People are required to take the smallpox vaccine so the pastor refused is like no. I'm not doing it. I'm not gonna pay your fine. It was it was a it was a fine that they had to pay and the supreme court basically said like tough luck. Like you're going to have to pay the fine. And we were just curious about this case in this moment So one of our producers gabrielle. Hi is this. A swedish lutheran church in cambridge. Just cold called the church. We haven't been that in a very long time. But yeah we're the pastor used to work and the pastor who's there now pastor lucianne picked up the phone i'm sure this is about vaccination yes and was just the best character. He had thought so deeply about this man and was not an antibac- ser and he describes this portrait of faster jacobson. That's sitting in his office. He looked like a wild hare. Wild beard kind of you. Kind of fire and brimstone preacher dignified dignified asking me. And i'm like i don't know i don't know man the pastors kind of looking at them and being like what do we do with you like as our like kind of founding father of this church that he's now a part of in cares deeply about like how does he think about the legacy of this man. Do i get. It's like a microcosm of a question. We're all asking. I mean Does he. he says that you know. He has this reflection about how he's kind of glad that jacobson has this kind of complicated past because he was human and he doesn't like they don't have to make an idol out of him they don't get this pristine founding father and it and it kind of allows him to preach humility one of the beautiful things about about that. I just speak personally about radio. Lab is watching people leave leading part. Is that sucks. That's the talkie part. But then after the sake part there's like that moment where new thing comes into the world and here you are with new thing and you're making it also with catherine wells who another mo mo perf alum and radio level. I'm tracy hunt is working with you. So it's cool. I mean do you. do you feel like i. What's what's the not self surfing way to ask this question. I'm curious like where do you feel. How do you feel like the the spirit of this show diverges from something like a more perfect radio lab. Yeah i think I mean you know so many of the questions that we thought about together while working with you were really the you know the origin story of the show in a lot of ways. More perfect is is a show about the supreme court and the experiment is a show. That really zooms out from there. You don't have to be a plaintiff in the supreme court to collide with the big ideas that this country claims to be about. So i think we were getting bigger and weirder cool. That is juliane. Gloria from the new podcast experiment collaboration between your public radio and the atlantic. It is an incredible podcast. I and subscribed. I hope you subscribe and you can do that. Wherever you get your podcasts now for the show you're Listening to radio at from wnyc. I'm jaboomer ron. And i'm lucky nassir. This is radio lab and you have something for me today. Yes to what i wanna do is i want to tell you a mystery shopper. A mystery that is centered on what makes america america. Well yeah it is the mystery of the first amendment congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech or of the press right. That's the thing right. But that's been only one hundred years or less than one hundred years that we've understood free speech the way we do now before that. I describe it in my book as a largely unfulfilled promise. So that's thomas healy author legal scholar professor of law at seton hall university school of law. Thank you so much for for coming out to talk to us. I talked to him a couple of years ago. Actually but that conversation that we had has stuck with me because of the way he talked about free speech in this country and this is really shocking to me that kind of before world war one the first amendment was a completely different thing is at am. I getting that right. Absolutely the time that the first amendment was ratified and huey says in early days of our country like say you wanted to open up a newspaper or print some pamphlets the big thing that the first amendment did for you will say that. You didn't need to get a license to do that if you wanted to. Publish something you wanted to have a press. You didn't get licensed by the government to do that. You don't need to pay for license to print what you want which means the press was free in third of the most boring literal sense of that word but it also meant that the government couldn't sensor you buy like charging you too much or not selling you a license which was no small thing. That was a big advance for freedom of speech. Wow there was no licensing system anymore. You could say whatever you wanted but it was unclear at that time whether it offered more like whether the first amendment would protect you after you said whatever you wanted to say and there was an early test of this In seventeen ninety eight. The federalist government passed the alien and sedition act and not long after that there were actually newspaper editors who would say stuff against the government and just get tossed in jail. Yes and the courts upheld it you kind of did fail the test and like you see after that like a hundred years of failed tests right every time. This bream court this variation on the same question. Are you allowed to save offensive or subversive things without being punished afterwards. Every time they're like no which kind of stands in stark contrast to what we see around us today like even just in the last six months right people online lying about the election on facebook lying about vaccines during a pandemic Lies that even. That led to the insurrection at the capitol right. So how how do we get to where we are now where it just seems like the understanding is you can say whatever you want against the government and it's fine what turns out according to healy. Those views came a basically. We got those views because of one guy all wendell. Holmes is your word for oliver. Wendell home regarded as the greatest supreme court. Justice in our history. Ariza story is patriotic red white and blue. He essentially laid the groundwork for our modern understanding of free speech. And who was he actually. Maybe i should start there. Well all the homes. He was born in eighteen. Forty one comes from this old establishment intellectual family in new england. He's kind of like like what you would imagine of a early twentieth century supreme court justice. He's from very prominent wealthy. Boston family is names oliver wendell and home. They're like fancy schmancy name. They all could trace their lineage back to the seventeenth century. You went to harvard. He went to harvard law. School fought in the civil war on the union side of course And by the time he's sitting on the supreme court he's in his seventies and sort of a unimposing figure the had this military bearing about him. This very like upright posture piercing. Blue eyes had this sort of shock of very thick white hair on his head mustache right. He has a great mustache. Great mustache that expanded out the edges of his face. But the most important thing to know about oliver wendell holmes is that he was stridently. Anti free speech as we know it today. And that's kind of what's interesting here because the mystery of how this country switched how it's all free. Speech is actually the mystery of how this one man switched how he thinks about free speech and his change of mind became the whole country's change of mind and it happened. That switch happened at a very particular moment in his life. So nineteen seventeen world. War one is happening in washington. The draft is president. Wilson draws the fest number and congress was worried that if people criticize the draft then they wouldn't be able to raise an army. Congress passed something called the espionage. Act made it a crime to say things that might obstruct the war effort part of it had to do with spy stuff but there was another part that made it a crime to say things anything that was critical of the form of the united states government or of the president. Anything that was disloyal or scurry us with covered. Pretty much everything. It made it a crime to have a conversation about whether the draft was a good idea about whether the war was a good idea and so all of a sudden people were getting thrown in jail people who forwarded chain letters that were critical of the war people who gave speeches against the draft or people who said that the war was being fought to line the pockets of j. p. morgan and several of these cases actually made it all the way up to the supreme court so in march nineteen nineteen three different cases. Come up in quick succession. Shanked versus the united states fro work versus the united states deb's versus the united states and the court. Appel these convictions. Saying first amendment does not apply here like espionage. Act lock these people up and homes in all three of these cases. He actually writes the majority opinions. They're pretty dismissive of free speech. like look we are in the middle of a war. You cannot shut your damn mouth joke around. Shut your mouth. Otherwise you're going to prison absolutely He saw a sign. That said damn man who ain't for his country right or wrong and he wrote to a friend and said i agree with that wholeheartedly bumper sticker exactly now. Homes had his reasons for believing that a lot of them going back to his experiences fighting in the civil war that experience that had a huge effect on him like he had these kind of too complicated feelings about one was that it was a war to end. Slavery was a righteous war but at the same time it was a brutal and barbaric fight. They know he watched a lot of his young friends die. He almost died himself. He felt like he was an accidental survivor. He was part of the twentieth massachusetts regiment and birds. The vast majority of the officers and his regiment were killed. It was so devastating for him. Who was unforgettable. Sort of forged him and made him who he was and really influenced the way he thought about the world. I mean the the the war was like fifty years earlier but he was still thinking about it he still had his uniform hanging up in his closet and it was still stained with his blood and so when world war one was happening when people were out on the battlefield risking their life. That wasn't too much to ask people at home to support that his argument was basically that the good of the country mattered. More than one person's right to say what they want. He made the analogy to vaccination. If there's an epidemic which for them like us was probably top of mind. Because the spanish fluid just happened and you think that vaccination might stop the epidemic you force people to get vaccinated against their will you infringe on their liberty and you force them to get vaccinated for the greater good for the greater good and he thought the same thing applied when it came to speech later on in his career over rental homes took the same argument to a pretty disturbing please using it to support the practice of forced sterilization in buck v bell. We actually did a whole episode about that case but going back to speech these three cases come to court that's in march nineteen nineteen right. Then i some reason. Eight months later in november there's another case the abrahams case very similar circumstances of the case and he switches sides. Almost all the other justices are still agreeing with the conviction but here to dissent right So here here's a quote. We should be turnley vigilant against attempts to check the expression of opinions that we loathe. And you're like wait. You're the same guy that nine months ago was like everybody had. He said this sort of thing ever no. This is no. He hadn't what hafid right exactly. Why did he change his mind. Between the deb's case in march and the abrahams case in november why would this nearly eighty year old heterosexual sis gender white privilege powerful wealthy man like what made him in. Those eight months changed his mind so radically so quickly. Too right so really. The question is if you boil it down into three words to three where dr what up with so in a way. It's like it's a mystery of one man but it's it's a mystery that has this ripple effect into the the what is now perceived to be like the quintessential freedom in in the land of the free because that descent that argument he made after he changed his mind. It's the reason why people like healy say homes laid the groundwork for our modern understanding of free speech so this one eighty in homes as head over the course of eight months. This is one of the biggest mysteries in the history of the supreme court. And healy gets obsessed with this very specific question. Like why did. Holmes changed his mind. Yeah absolutely and i basically tried to reconstruct every day in his life for about a year and a half time period. You're laughing but i did. I had a spreadsheet with every day in this spreadsheet. Healy tracked doing each of those days in that year and a half around those eight months right and he microscopically pores over homes his life including what homes was doing and the letters. He was writing the books he was reading. He kept a log of every book that he read lau even reads. The books that homes is friends are writing and reading just in case. They had a conversation with homes. That's great like what possibly they could have said to homes. That would have made him change his mind. Wow so d- d- did he. Did he find something. Was there like a little smoking gun or something buried in all of that data. Well one thing. He notices as. He's digging into the daily doings of oliver wendell. Holmes is that became very close with a group of young progressive intellectuals in washington dc yet a group of very young friends these brilliant progressive legal scholars among them was future supreme court justice felix frankfurter the editors of the new republic magazine. Herbert croly and walter lippmann this young socialists named harold laskey who at the age of twenty four was already teaching at harvard. And this group. They all gathered in this house in washington. Dc called the house of the house of truth. Wow house of truth. It was a townhouse like a little like clubhouse for young. Progressives and homes was a frequent visitor there he would stop in on his way home from court and have a drink and he would like play cards with them and debate the truth with them. So take like a kind of a funny pairing this nearly eight year old guy like hanging out with these like young whippersnapper and like yeah just like laying down truth bombs homes love to talk to people and he loved to be challenged. He loved debate and as he got older. He found himself not really having anyone to do that with any more like the sort of intellectual friends that he had his contemporaries. Those people were all dead by this point. Homes was homes was pretty old the other members of the supreme court. He didn't really care for. He thought they were all sort of. Stodgy didn't think they were that smart. On your daddy's yeah and all of these young men. They worshiped homes. They would write him fan letters and they would write articles about him in magazines and so he sort of found a new group of friends. They got so close that when it was homes is surprise. Seventy fifth birthday party. His wife fanny snuck a bunch of them in through the cellar for the for the birthday party and he felt like some of these young men were the sons that he never had. You know he would write letters to them and we will call them my dear boy. My dear lads need write letters back to him seeing stuff lay yours affectionately or yours always and they would talk about how much they loved him. How did they feel about his stance. Okay on the lila's speech stuff. Great question they were not fans this group essentially engaged in a kind of lobbying campaign over the course of hell year year and a half to get home to change his views about free speech so in may of that year so remember march when he has those first opinions in may they publish an article in the new republic criticizing his opinion in the deb's case which again was one of those earlier three cases. So they're knocking him. Publicly and homes was so worked up by it that he sat down and he wrote a letter kind of in a huff to the editor of the new republic defending himself. Essentially saying you know again look. There were lives on the line. There was a war happening draft happening and he's like about descended to the magazine and then he like pulls back and he's like no no no. I'm not gonna do it. He thinks maybe it's not such a good idea to be commenting on this issue. Because he knows that the court has another case coming before it in the fall the abrahams case so in october of nineteen nineteen this case the abrahams case has oral arguments at the supreme court. Now let me kinda hit pause on home for second and tell you about the abrahams case. So it was a friday morning in one thousand eighteen and some random men who were on their way to work see a bunch of pamphlets on the sidewalk. They were all scattered around summer in english. Summer in yiddish. 'cause it's like it's the lower east side so there would have been at that time there were like a lot of Russian jewish emigrants like in that area. The pamphlets basically say workers wake up. The president is shameful and cowardly and hypocritical and plutocrats. And right now. He's fighting germany whom we hate but next after that he's going to go for but newly communist russia where you guys are from and so if you don't stop working those of you who are working in factories new making bullets and bombs that these weapons that these people were making we're going to be used to kill their loved ones back home so quit. Go on strike in some detectives get. On the case they find the culprits. They were russian. Emigrants who anarchists. Three men. one woman. They went on rooftops in lower manhattan and through these leaflets from the rooftops. They're convicted under the espionage. Act and the case ultimately makes its way to the supreme court in the fall of nineteen nineteen eight months after the earlier cases had been handed down by the court. It's a similar case to the ones before. And you'd imagine that homes just had that same old argument like you know in his back pocket ready to go. But healy discovers that. Something happens right. As the court is considering the abrahams case something happened to these young friends in particular to laskey and frankfurter one of homes is young friends herald laskey. Who's this socialist. Twenty four year old teaching at harvard. He comes out in favour of a citywide police strike. So the police in in boston are going on strike and to the conservative alumni at harvard. this was just anathema. And so there was this effort at harvard to get laskey fired from his job. There was a fundraising effort going on at harvard. And a lot of the alums were saying they wouldn't give money as long as last Who were there is like. If i had if only i had sort of a prominent harvard. Alum who could stand up for me right now and so he goes to homes and he's like homes. They are about to fire me. He's like please. Can you write an article saying that. I should be allowed to say this and in doing so you will save my job and my reputation right so homes is in this really tough spot because on the one hand should he writes this letter put his neck out but he's already as a judge said the opposite as a soldier he believes that no like laskey shut up or should he stay quiet and stay consistent but then he's going to let his friend debt publicly stoned basically. So he's in this spot and what he does. I think i know what he's going to do. He's going to write the letter. he's going to help out laskey so he does not write the letter. No he does not write the letter supporting lasky but instead that same week he writes this paragraph dissent to the abrahams case. The abrahams case is about young socialist. Do you know what i mean like. It's like last bo. Young radical getting punished for something he said and then at the same time. He has this case in front of him of young radicals who were getting arrested for something they said. Oh he doesn't step in for his friend but then he does step in for abrahams and company so seven members of the court. voted to uphold the convictions. But holmes dissented. Here's what he wrote a short. It's twelve paragraphs through the first thing he saying is that we should be skeptical. That we know the truth when men have realized that time has upset many fighting faiths. We've been wrong before and we're likely going to be wrong again. The ultimate good desired is better reached by free trade and ideas in light of that knowledge that we may be wrong. The best course of action. The safest course of action is to go ahead and listened to the ideas on the other side. The best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the competition of the market. Those the ideas that we can safely act upon he says every year of not every day we have to wager our salvation upon some prophecy based on imperfect knowledge that at any rate is the theory of our constitution. It is an experiment as all life is an experiment. Wow that's really beautiful. Yeah absolutely and and the other justices on the supreme court. They went to his house and they tried to talk him out of it and he said now it's my duty and over the next decade or so course. When other free speech cases come up homes continues to write very eloquent passionate defenses of free speech and gradually the other members of the court. Start to listen great. Legal journalists anthony lewis. This is the way he writes it. Those dissents and in particular. The abrams said quote did in time overturn the old crab view of what the first amendment protects. It was an extraordinary change. Really a legal revolution and in particular. It's because he wrapped it in this metaphor the marketplace of ideas that it caught on so quickly and widely. The idea of the marketplace of ideas has exploded. The first amendment was about the marketplace of ideas not just in the corner school supposed to be the ultimate marketplace of ideas but also beyond the answer is more speech not less but as soon as you scratch the surface that is not how the marketplace of ideas words and start to think about how the marketplace actually worked no matter how offensive repugnant repellent language or image. What it lets in the room with us. We should defeat them in the marketplace. Or how you even find it. I don't really know where that is. The metaphor that is propped up our notion of free speech for the last one hundred years just starts to fall apart. And we'll get to that right after this break. My name is rachel. Mellon nna and i'm calling from alice springs. Northern territory. australia radio lab is supported in pot. The our peace. Sloan foundation enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world. For more information about slain at www dot slain dog science reporting on radio lab is supported in part by science sandbox assignments foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science rehab is supported by armrest american on the global pandemic do shortage of ppe in the us armrest american built their very own state of the art manufacturing plant in texas already. Put millions of medical grade masks in the hands of frontline workers and now they're fda listed ast m level three p. p. e. can be shipped directly to you from their factory in austin go to armrest dot com to find out more stay safe and use code radio lab to save twenty percents off your order. The suggestion radio lab is supported by monday dot com when your team joins forces. It's amazing what you can accomplish. But when you're spread across tons of different tools it can be difficult to know who's doing what and easy to spend more time managing the tools than the team. 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I do think that there's something so beautiful about the fact that this came out in a dissenting opinion that his fellow supreme court justices tried to. That's in a way. It's its own argument. It's like the most persuasive evidence of all for the marketplace of ideas is that if homes hadn't descended exactly we wouldn't have the free speech we have today. I love that what you said. I think that beautiful the way in which his argument one is proof of the very thing he saying right but the problem with the marketplace of ideas is that it expresses an ideal that is so much more powerful and beautiful than the reality will. So what's interesting. Is that homes his argument. It's a functional argument. It's in the barter right in the marketplace that the truth will rise to the top this role function as a way to sift out the good ideas and the truth. So it's actually a measurable thing like we have marketplace's of ideas like twitter is a marketplace of ideas. right we're things get you know shouted down and shamed and down shamed or spread and and celebrated and the amazing thing about twitter is that you can see that happen. There's there's real data there about re tweets and likes. And whatever else they did you could actually use it to test homes idea like does the truth. Do the good ideas actually rise to the top. That's exactly right. I mean as we started to see fake news on twitter and on facebook. We realized we had the data to study this kind of question so i talked to this data and marketing researcher. Sin on all professor. Mit a couple of years ago. He and some of his colleagues at mit they took a quantitative. Look at this exact question. Like how do truths and falsehoods fair in the marketplace of twitter every verified story that ever spratt on twitter since its inception in two thousand and six. We captured it. They started by gathering up stories from a couple of fact. Checking websites slopes politifact truth or fiction. Fact check dot org urban legends and so on and so forth and and they just listed all the stories that those sites had fact check like about anything politics business all kinds of stuff science entertainment natural disasters terrorism war and of all the stories. They looked at some were true and some were false. Then we went to twitter and they found for each story. The first tweet basically it's entry into the marketplace and then we recreated the tweet cascades of these stories from the origin tweet to all of the re tweets that ever happened and so for each story they ended up with a diagram that showed how it spread through the twitter verse and when you look at these diagrams They look like trees spreading out and the height and width of each tree would tell you how far and wide the information spread. Some of them are long and stringing with just one person retweeting at a time some of them fan out tons of people retweeting the original tweet than tun's more people retweeting. Those three tweeted lots of branches on top of that. They could see. Just how fast the tree grew. How many minutes does it take the truth. Or falsity to get two hundred users or thousand users or ten thousand users or hundred thousand users and synon- says that when they analyzed and compared the breadth and the depth and the speed of growth of all. Those different tree diagrams. When he got was the scariest result. That i've ever uncovered. Since i've been a scientist the trees of lies spread further wider faster than the truth tree. It took the truth approximately six times as long as falsity to reach fifteen hundred people so falsehood was just blitzing through the twitter sphere. We're in a state now where the truth is just getting trounced by falsehood at every turn so in this marketplace of ideas the truth does not rise to the top that does not surprise me not even a little bit But well okay so now. I'm sort of coming back to homes. Yeah i think he's wrong on twitter right. I think he's wrong on twitter. I don't think that's the marketplace. He was in envisioning right right or any of us. Frankly but i think it is possible in fact. That's exactly what i'm trying to recreate in my little microcosm in my incite newsletter in my little counters in my own personal life one of the conversations. I had recently. That has stuck so deeply and my head was i spoke to And scientific chit writer blogger. I am associate professor at university of north carolina. I think she calls herself an expert in techno sociableness osceola g. Because i didn't have a name. I made one up so that the intersection between technology and sociology. That you got a lot of press recently. Because she wrote that first article. When president trump was challenging all of the election results a lot of people are seeing this as trump being trump. This is before the capital direction. Yup she basically wrote an article that said America how are we not taking this seriously. Like let's stop having nitpicky discussions because people want to call this a coup. This is a coup. i'm turkish. I've seen all kinds accused. This is a coup. So i sorta wrote that when it will see almost like a historical thing to say. Look he's actually trying to steal the election and maybe you don't have the right word for this but if we ignore it will soon develop the kind of expertise to have the exact right terminology which is not good. Which is how it is in turkey. Where i'm from 'cause we've been through so many so she was reading this article which got a lot of tension. Potentially she did a thing which it's so simple and it's so basic but it feels beautifully deeply originally homes ian wright so At article you mentioned. I had published in the atlantic. Branch publishes in the atlantic gets a lot of attention but also some pushback so she brings on this guy. My check los scare. He's a friend who disagreed with her. Like this is not a coup. After the election we started really like having this divergent view of it. I just sort of saying like you're exaggerating. I'm like you know what i have. A newsletter called insight huge following so instead of just sort of disagreeing with me here and there. Why don't you write that. Coherence argument so she got him to come and write a lengthy down of her article. She asked him to write it on her blog her newsletter to her audience and then she did a lengthy counter to his counter counter and then people can comment and she said the whole reason to do it. You try to strengthen your argument by having somebody poke holes in it she said. I wanna make sure my argument is baller. I wanna make sure my argument tiptop strong and tall. And i need him to come at me with his knives out. And not only is a part of my newsletter. It's paid part of my newsletter literally. Paid him to disagree with the whole idea of free. Speech is to let ideas battled to get to the better version of. That's what makes your own thinking sharper. And so she was basically like if there's a way to make a marketplace of my own to resurrect that dynamic hell yeah. I'm gonna do that and so i launched. This and his was the first one i've had other one. Says she keeps doing him. Bringing people on who. I think can write a really good strong version that counters mine paying people to try to take me down and she created a little marketplace in her microcosm. It's a small little corner. But i thought if i'm gonna have my little corner i i am going to recreate the battle of ideas in a good way. And maybe that's what we need to do. Mean the marketplace metaphor fails us on social media in so places. But maybe the solution is to recreate it in thousands of microcosm where the marketplace can exist for. Okay so let me. Let me counter that now. Okay please like as nice as zane ups little corner is it works that way because she controls it right like she's sort of like a benign dictator. But she's still a dictator. She has the power. And that's that's that's kind of the fundamental problem with all of these little marketplaces people. Don't have the same size microphone in the marketplace of ideas. I talked to a friend of mine. Her name's nebi know. How are you good. This is work. She's a media lawyer. She was one of the lawyers for buzzfeed when they were like evaluating that trump dossier to release a steele dossier. Yeah i'm the president of the markup a nonprofit news organization that investigates spectacular and one of the first things. She told me was that one of the problems with the marketplace of ideas is that there's no reckoning for the fact that some people have bigger platforms and others meaning. Their ideas heard i. Their ideas also get hurt more often. Their ideas are also you know surrounded by joiners that ideas popular. I'm going to join it and part of it. She was saying look like as a muslim woman who grew up. Like right after nine eleven. You know not that all things american listen experience. Boil down to a single day in two thousand and one but to the extent that like the aftermath of nine eleven was determinative. It was because i felt like there was all of a sudden a narrative about who i was that was playing out in the media as we all know. It's like the muslim terrorist bubble up that bore no relationship to my orange county. Back is tiny lake kardashian. Ask life. I was i who these people who that. And she's like an. I never my people. Never got the mike. It's about power. It's about megaphones. But here's the thing to remember. The marketplace of ideas was one theory right. It's the it's the idea that we glommed onto an idea that really took off because a variety of social platforms like yep. That's the one because it was this sort of idealistic metaphor but also because it was the most convenient lay say fair set it and forget it sort of model for free speech but it's not the only one historically there be a bunch of other models and metaphors that People have used to talk about free speech some of which take the view. Not so much that you know argument and dissent lead the truth but instead That like there's a truth out there in the world and that people have a right to hear it you should know is the well in your neighborhood poisoning you yes or no like what are the facts that you need to know to live your life and operating society. That's not a subjective. Set of opinions like is water poisonous. Yes why and what was interesting to me about. This view is is unlike homes as argument and for that matter. Unlike the attitude of this is america. I can say whatever i want. This view the rights of listener not just the rights of the speaker. The way we do things now. We focus a lot on who gets to talk right. And everyone's talking somehow blah blah magic happened. We don't ever talk about the listener. Like if you're listening to all these people talking to you have a right to accurate information. And you see glimmers of that throughout american history so for example in nineteen forty nine. The government actually set a policy. Basically a rule saying if you are a news broadcaster you know you have to present both sides of an issue you have to provide back on these different sides of issues and so nwabisa's feeling about all of this is like if we're gonna rethink the marketplace exists. Now maybe we should incorporate some of this other kind of thinking we should start from the vantage point of the facts and information. You need to participate in democratic deliberation which could be local which could be national. But we're going to focus on information health. Not just the right of someone to speak although it's interesting like it doesn't negate the metaphor. The problem is the metaphor is so beautiful. It distracts you from those key. Questions it but those questions can be used to repair the metaphor into something. That's actually functional. Can't you just say say the marketplace of ideas asterix and then in the asterix. It's like assuming that everyone has access to the marketplace assuming that each voice is properly waited assuming that truth and falsehood or somehow taken into account That i mean what we're talking about is a regulated market of ideas. Yeah i think that's good. But then the question is who regulates. How do we regulate right now. The people whose regulated like we have the courts with like citizens united as being like we. Don't yeah and now it's going to be facebook. Ceo of twitter is the one regulating. It doesn't make sense. Who has that power. And how do we negotiate over that power. Which sort of just feels like. We're back at square one right like like we're back to the original problem like who should regulate speech and then and then so i went back to healy. Tom put all this in front of tv. Any thoughts yeah. I actually do and the first thing he said was okay. Yes the marketplace idea the way it works. now it's broken and it's in general. It's just it's an odd way to think about speech. Just kind of weird. You know commercial understanding of free speech. What about thinking about us all as as scientists. 'cause you're not you're not buying telling potatoes truth absolutely right. We're not buying and selling potatoes. Were testing the theory of relativity. Yeah but he pointed out to me something else. That oliver wendell home said in that abrams dissent. It turns out that homes relied on another metaphor in his abrams. Santa's as well there's a thing. He says right after the marketplace idea. He writes that at any rate is the theory of our constitution. It is an experiment as all life is an experiment. And so he'll he says what he thinks about. Is that one word experiment and what home could have possibly meant by that. And he's come to the view that that over wendell. Holmes was probably acutely aware through all of his experiences that reckoning with free speech when you're trying to build a democracy doesn't end we don't we don't win the game right. The whole point of free speech is not that. Oh we've got free speech now. Democracy is easy. No democracy is hard and so two homes. The point wasn't to get to some definitive moment of triumph to keep the experiment itself. Going for you know as long as possible and one of the ways to promote the success of an experiment is to build in some flexibility when the experiment doesn't go the way that you expect when your initial ideas are challenged you adapt you come up with new ideas even new metaphors and so. That's that's another way to think about free speech that we constantly have to be rethinking. We even mean by free speech. Okay it's constantly tweaking thing like it's a thing that we it's it's never set But it's something we need to kind of keep tweaking as we're going and and keep refining marketplace of ideas has been such a beautiful idea and it served us for about a century and maybe it's time to think about what a different theory could look like. So what's the better theory. I mean now now is the time for you to kind of lay down this bombshell this new theory. What what is yet no. I don't have it yet. But working on it speaking of which. What is it better metaphor. What is a better way to think about free speech in a modern society. Email us at radio lab at wnyc dot org. Yeah email us tweeted us. Maybe don't tweeted us given what we've learned but let us know what you think if you want to keep tabs on the wonderful nubia sayid You can find her at the markup dot org obviously this all Episode started with thomas. Healey's book the great descent And he actually has a new book out called soul city. This episode was produced by sarah. Cari thanks to jenny. Lawton soren shade and kelsey paget. Who actually did the initial interview with thomas healy with me back me more perfect days. I'm jaboomer i'm lot of nassir dick's listening hi. This is meghan more calling from kansas city. Missouri radio lab was created by jad album rod and edited by shorten wheeler lulu miller and lexus. Nassir our co host. Susie lechtenberg is our executive producer. Dylan keefe is our director of sound design. Our sanath includes simon adler. jeremy bloom becker pressure. Rachel cusak david gable. Matt kilty mcewen. Sarah cari aaron wack pat walters and molly webster with help from shima oli sarah sandbox and karen. Leon our fact. Checkers are diane. Kelly and emily krieger.

supreme court abrahams laskey harvard oliver wendell healy wnyc studios america twitter Julia chad chad smallpox Julia longoria atlantic magazine henning jacobson jacobson swedish lutheran church lucianne deb Holmes catherine wells
AR glasses, Google likes Sign on with Apple, and the problem with Mac Pro

AppleInsider Podcast

47:08 min | 1 year ago

AR glasses, Google likes Sign on with Apple, and the problem with Mac Pro

"You're listening to the apple insider podcast. This is the apple insider podcast. I'm victim. And joining the is that Wiley person that, that will full individual that wonderful William Gallagher. Okay. You've just I mean, you're often drop in the out thing after that, but that was all. And listen is that to make up for the fact that last week, I sat here on my own took into myself about WW DC just because you had done on live from the venue itself. Yes. Right. Those shows are you. Well, eighty I am. Well, I you've been events events and things you get your fill them, but not w w d say that's one. I'd love to go hearing from Dan, right there. So that was really interesting episode. What's interesting is that we all know that, that's not a consumer hardware event. Yes. Right. It's an event for developers to get an understanding of what's coming in the future. And yet, the keynote is used as an opportunity to talk about hardware and to talk about where things are today, right? Yes. And you and I had discussed whether or not there'd be something introduced there. What was that because because I think I placed bets that we were and you'd said, no what happened. I, I was putting money on swift. You I coming with dot name doing exactly what it does. So could chain think I won that or do you mean the MAC pro which I was certain they wouldn't show and I had asked them to do that, right? I was I was saying, I really wish that they would and here not sure enough, we got something didn't we? I mean, let's split some hairs here, but I was sure they wouldn't. And you wish they would. So the for they did your taking that as a win for you. You were right. But you weren't right to wrong. You were just wishing. I was definitively wrong. I own my role. Nece all I'm saying is not whether out, I was right. What I'm suggesting is that when you wish it makes no difference, who you are. Okay that come true. I wonder if that's not I think of people who could wish for things, and then afford to get them. Okay. All right. Right. So talking about things that are futuristic and cool. Apple has been looking at different ways to display pre rendered three d video in a stereoscopic method where do you think they use stereoscopic views for traditionally, what will use those for traditionally for pictures of ancients New York in those little read is way too. Feted graphs plus onto three Dame. It's brilliant. Yeah. The two lenses side by side with the photograph mount to two photographs mounted a couple in about foot- and a half away. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Both stereoscopic vision. When was that stuff invented? I wonder. I'm guessing probably roughly alongside photography eighteen seventeen. Really came into tone in the mid eighteen hundreds, stereoscopic view stereoscopic. I'm not exactly sure I think I have a book called New York stereoscopic photographs from early nineteen. Hundreds what I'm, I'm Mr. you're right, just as early as photography came into vogue, Steria scopes, which is what those things are called came into popularity from the eighteen fifties till about the nineteen thirties. Funny. How three D comes in with the bang and then wimp away and comes back with the Bank. And with still doing that today. We're not post the latest three day thing, let's get ready for the next one. Yeah. No. So the earliest stereoscopic was eighteen thirty eight and the, the common one that you and I are thinking of it was Oliver Wendell Holmes invention and came around in eighteen sixty one. Well. And we're still talking about it ten were spill talking about it, and we're talking about it. Because apple has been looking at ways to do that for what we suspect would be a virtual reality augmented reality headset. I am. Less excited by this, because until it looks like a holiday. I'm not that interested, but I have enjoyed our Apple's done over into reality with the reveal of its new products. I put the new apple pro display on my desk. Virtually it'll never be on there really. He was fun to see just how big thing is I mentor examine the new MAC pro politico of them's really clever use of technology. So good on I took a cheese grater and an ipad mini. And I put them next to each other and ice, quoted real hard and pretended. Which of us is this is. True. But you win. 'cause you got the cheese at the end. Okay. Right. Yes. Yes. Gromit. So, so Apple's cheesy finding everything in pretty much. How much do we actually know that, you know more about this denied do? And I imagine apple isn't saying anything. So what do we know? What we know is that apple has purchased in the past people that make micro displays that is micro LED's that are very, very small on the order of microns and. Those tend to be based on on gallium nitrate or Gan technology, because that's the only way to get a small enough and the benefit is that you get a lot of power savings, and they're very bright, which is what you need for augmented reality. So it's, it's pretty sure bet that Apple's working on that this idea of stereo Skopje that they're working on only adds fuel to that fire. So they filed a patent they've got an application that says stereoscopic rendering virtual three, d objects, will they showed us at W W C about ACLU's in so people can be a clued by three d objects which makes it that much more, realistic that you're working in three D space? And so if you can do that, and you can put up three d rendered objects pre rendered objects in front of him in the glasses, then it's just about making it that much more real that much more engaging. The other day in court was to at the statue of liberty app. And I got that ages us we fascinating. I just place it in your living room floor and walk around and inside, it examined the construction. They seem a genuinely useful and the three Dennis of it is actually becoming real. I don't sound cynical. But up in surprised the have good these experiences have been, yes. Good on, let's render stereoscopic -ly everything we can, you know, it's interesting. You mention statue of liberty because I've been up to the crown of the statue of liberty, but no one has been up to the arm of the statue of liberty unless you work for the National Park Service in decades. No, the arm has been closed, and that's been over worries about things like this ability of the arm under stress from not many people walking up and down it or it's been about weight or it's been about the idea that you just can't, you know, there's, there's no real safety because you're up there and you go over the ledge kind of thing, but it's interesting to me, because if we have the sort of augmented reality, that's truly immersive then those experiences that are off limits to most of us could be ones that we could live through vicariously. Yes. I still would rather go there than say it this way. But yes, I did exactly that same year on couldn't get into the torch before. So I did through this down among fool. Would. Silence of the beds around me, which actually I wasn't expecting nutso touch detail there for it felt like you could hear the wind is very nice really. Nice. You know, they're all kinds of problems that have to be solved around this, and they aren't all things like serious copy or people clues. It's as well as thermal regulation. Right. Or just the weight of the headset, because if you have something, that's big, and bulky, or you have some doesn't fit well or it gets hot. It takes you out of that immersion. It makes them uncomfortable where there are a lot of problems to be solved here, but we are fairly certain that apple is working on it, and worked on it for years. I just went how they're gonna solve the wallet stealing option. I mean, I think Apple's very phone, fat wallet. But they with this headset on, and you can't see was actually around ju-. So you, you get mugged. No, no holiday reality means that you see what's in front of you as well. Right to Rheinland J, virtual reality is, is your blocked off viewing only projected, but, but augmented reality or mixed reality is where anything that has a headset though is going to affect your view of the actual Ranjit. William is you put all of your wallet, an apple while you don't have to worry about this. News. An unser. Get there. Now, you know, we, we know that this is the kind of thing that's being worked on not just from the ACLU Zhan that they showed us WDC. But there are many changes in air three Niles thirteen. Greene's styles tax, you know, that that's kind of big without needing a Chroma key background. I've gotta try that X. I did green screen stuff at baby just very basic stuff, one of the websites and remarkably hard today. Trying to get the green the actual green screen some Mark on it to get rid of it completely was a right. Right. Hey light on the screen or, or reflection of the green onto a person's clothing standing in front of it, or the all of these kinds of details matter, and I have a green screen here at the house, and it can sometimes be a little difficult. If you haven't got it lit correctly, so that postcode you sent me for MAs fake. Don't you know, we're going to skip the moon and go straight to Mars. That was, it was real. I was there man is warm, unseasonably warm K brush. They don't call it the red planet for nothing. No believe you have to pay anyway, every time you say closure say this. I am thrown back twenty years longer. The longer is the do forty years to recurs of equation in doctor who Castro velva, if you, you'll probably, so young name say that underpaid that's Tom Baker episode. Peter Davison, his, I didn't say it knows Christopher bid Mance Roach it yet. Decastro Valvo, pace on the Ayrshire print look at the sort of level of detail I can give you about things interested in. It's a skill. That's so true. Thanks. He's funny. So now. But they've also had motion apple apple this is a podcast about apple. They added motion capture capabilities so the movements of a subject can be analyzed interpreted real time in the application. So you divide the subjects down to a skeleton joints and bones. Determined monitored for changes in those movements trigger animations. Or or they can be recorded for customer segments of characters, which is cool. It also impacts face tracking. Which is cool. You know, face track concurrently, because used for emoji, Snapchat, kind of thing, but it's been expanded to allow to work with up to three faces at the same time. Didn't know that. And other key components. Of course freezers to be able to collaborate within the same environment. So by letting the same items in the same environment in a single session, you can enable multiplayer games. And of course, we're looking at that Minecraft game they displayed because that's super cool. The ability to try track the user's face, and the world using the front Moore cameras at the same time detecting up to one hundred images at the same time and estimates of physical which sizes more bus, three d objects, -tection, improved plane detection, all of these things are, are leading us to a future where reality can be mixed where reality can be shared can be augmented, that augmented bit can be shared. That's a big deal. Overwhelmed by the amount of things. I'm not sure. I just got back to waiting the holiday, but it sounds like it soon. So, okay. Please your questions, one holistic. I mean, we haven't really talked about the uses, but there have to be uses beyond just the IKEA catalog or apple pudding, the MAC pro stance that you're never going to purchase on your desk. Right. Yes. I can think of hostile environments, certain industrial plants nuclear areas where the ability to see. I don't know what a drone that you putting their stirring to manipulate and not find it till I can see that being. Huge. Yeah. Right. And that's sort of a lame use in that. That's what who glasses? Become right? Google apps was going to be this thing that everyone was gonna wear, and it was gonna change everything. And it ended up being what the industrial worker wears. Yes. And that's a small disappointing future as opposed to one where we all get these things now obviously wearing glasses can be obnoxious, just in terms of fitness and actual comfort. And there are the same things that scared people about them with Google apps, which is are you recording me? Right. Yes. But if we can overcome those things, and the uses outweigh those, then it will work. So it's just a matter of a first building technology that we can even see and even get to those kinds of uses. Right. I know it sounds silly to try and say we have to build it first. But if you think back that's kind of how computing developed. Less deliberately. But yes, here it is what we're gonna do about it. That was the way round. Yes. Right. You're saying intentionally set it at. Kind of the opposite effect it till you make it isn't it make it. And then fake it into these tha that. Okay. Well, and the apple watch developed along that way little bit, too. Right. We had all these weird interfaces and things that you could do with the first apple watch that we later learned, it doesn't make sense to do those at all. Yes. That's true. Seems such a long time ago. Now, we're the, the history of computing was okay, so glorified typewriter. And that's awesome. And then all of a sudden spreadshee- comes along. In the next thing. You know you've eliminated a whole floor of an office building that we're doing spreadsheets on paper. Yes. Sorry about that. But yeah, yes. And you put those people out of work will know, I personally concentrated on debate about typewriters in that which appears secretaries a lot just destroyed the typing pool. That's my legacy. Yes. Unbelievable. You have. You are a net job destroyer William. Yes. Positive side. I friend producer organisms, pointing at to be recently writers went digital first, we beat everybody else, everybody else's catching adroitness because of moment, we could get word presses. We throw away everything else, and slaves to the screen ever since join us. It's true. It's true. So the headset development, I leaked in a safety report in two thousand seventeen incidents requiring medical treatment beyond first aid required for a person testing prototype device at one of Apple's devices that office, rather the injury related to pain, suggesting it was testing something vision related potentially a headset of porn. Krief. I'm just laying out the evidence for how we know apples were gonna headset around poking employees in the I it's. Yeah. Yeah. No, they spoke to a lot of technology suppliers at C S with with apple employs visiting stands pliers wave guide hardware. They have acquired companies that are closely related to air headset production. They picked up by tracking censo- Matori instruments, and they bought a koneohe hall graphics, which focused on development specialized lenses rare headsets. They picked up gosh, what was Lummus or Luma fire. One of those for. For Mike rallied is plays. Mike rolling Mike rally displace. They've picked up a bunch of these different things along the way. So it's, it's one of these futures that I feel like is coming together, and we're just seeing slow motion at this point. Low seem very obvious in retrospect, well. Of course, when it happens, they'll say, we showed you a are, and now we're bringing it to your face. Right. That's a lot with that pool. Something comes out. And you think, oh, that room are actually made total sense, five years ago. But it did the time. Yes. Who knows what the rumors will missing well, and you're absolutely right around for years and years at own side. Are we were talking about what was essentially, we're talking about tablet, MAC or touchscreen? Mac? And what we got was an ipad. Seclude I get so but Gomersall about that in two thousand six we were talking about that two thousand five we're talking about that pre iphone because they've been working on the ipad. I shifted gears for the phone. Cheapie Fateh think we were. Visionary innovators in thinking, Massen's, Microsoft tat, tablets from ninety nine two thousand some around this wasn't about being visionary and predictive. It was about going on the rumors and rumblings that we were hearing at the time. Okay. Well, twenty years later, we were right? Absolutely. Now here's another one where you're right. Tell me about what's wrong with the new MAC pro. Absolutely nothing to what could you possibly, be price? Okay. Yeah. Small thing, I'm not by the two that I was considering one for the kitchen. One for the Dan of might not do third for Angeles because you know what? You can't get them in blue. You're not that that was a bit of a below. Really? We have to talk to where we could get one maiden blue. It's not the same KOMO ticket down to the local powder coating shop and have them just. Like I don't even know you. Okay. All right. No, I party color. Only writing. So here's here's the thing, right? It's the MAC. Pro the power to change everything. Now you have the MAC many. Yes. Is the MAC mini very expandable? And is that causing me a problem? Yes, you have an imac an older one. Now is the I MAC, a very expandable machine. No. And it's quite ill at the moment. So let's that's not remind me about this. And, and there are plenty of people who have MAC books and macbook pros. And those aren't very expandable machines either. For shit their iphones. Right. Pat's. They're fine. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. So there seems to be a number of people who really wanted to MAC pro like machine, but wanted to have it at a price they could afford. Yes. I mean, you took it I've written saying that there's a gap in Apple's market. But the reason I did that one of the reasons I puff and the fact that I believe it, the reason it made me, I think of it, and then I of the process and then spots, this just in the prices giant gap. Okay. So how much does a MAC pro cost? Mac pro five thousand six thousand paths pattern sorry. Dulles it probably will be success. Parents wanted but six thousand dollars and change for the monitor. All right. And there's the I MAC and the MAC pro right? The MAC pro costs how much. John boss, bit Lewis think the quick says about a thousand stop the starting prices about a thousand dollars less than the pro and the MAC is what three and a half four thousand less than an met pro. That's the gap in the middle everywhere else that Simpson price between models comparatively small. I should say I should those arguments gun grand that apple was wrong to make the MAC pro. And either people talking about this, and it always boils down to these people would have rather. D- apple had bought a machine that they could afford. And I don't see a valid criticism of the MAC pro, you can wish something else, but criticize Tesla's roadster for not being pencil sharp seems, a little bit of a fallacy to me. Mac pro is purple sheen. Okay. Is it right for everybody? Yes. But not everybody can afford. It might be roomful. That's yeah. So the Mak plano, not, not pro. But I'm starts from thousand ninety nine dollars goes up to essentially fifteen hundred. Yes, in the twenty one inch and the twenty seven inch it reaches two thousand three hundred and price. And then the I MAC pro. Is significantly more. Right. The I MAC pro begins at a. Infinitesimally small four thousand nine hundred ninety nine. So what you're suggesting is that there's a gap between the two. I'm the I'm in the I MAC pro part of the range. There is a gap in process. Yeah, there is a cop, I think can utility you can. Well, argue that we're talking about base prices on, you can spec up all of these that actually, I think that's a separate issue because truly only do not know how many cores will it's an eight cook to be right for me or ten call. I'm pro that level of detail. I don't know how to determine apple is chosen these starting points, and they laid at this lion divisions between you've need this machine that machine and then within the GOP she can do this adjustment. So I think it's valid look at the starting points of the mole. And when you do that there is no well, it's a price Cup. But I, I offer it's a price performance gap as well. So what I'm hearing is that the product matrix, is too confusing. That's harsh. It's we've gone on long way since Steve Jobs is good of all, I think, if you are in the market, he know whether in the market for a MAC, mini, or a MAC pro you've got no doubt over which one of those you are, but in the middle there is confusion, and I think I think part of the problem that I'm thinking of is not just the number of skews, but where they fit within the consumer or pro line and helping people understand whether or not they're consumer or a pro. In terms of needs. Right. You don't know which number, of course, you need is, is a confusing problem and Rama's. Well. Well, but the. It used to be that in that, that matrix of for the I MAC was the consumer level machine. And the power MAC was the pro level machine. And that was a fairly simple division. And they had the same for laptops, ibook, and PowerBook. And. Those lines are a little bit muddied now because you have the I MAC a consumer desktop machine. The MAC mini was traditionally a consumer desktop machine. But now it's a pro machine because it's got ten gigabit Ethernet options. Not just this in, but pro consumer longer said this before is a very very blurry. One I am unquestionably appro user for certain things at certain times, and the rest of it. I'm not, sir. Give me a straight definition of who I am. That's what I need who am I? And what MAC doa needs? And can you buy it for me? Please just through that last one. I mean, it's a it's a very tough thing to try and figure out who we are as people where we fit on different spectrums. And I spent all of my twenties my formative years trying to figure that out, and I don't come to inclusion. I'm intending to spend much went to. I know you look forward to that. It's gonna be good. Yes. Yes. Look, nobody's going to check all the things that. The concern, I think is. That, that these lines were blurred. I think the MAC mini is a great machine. It's machine that allows some form of expandability and terms of using its USB or thunderbolt kind of attachment ports, Justice, people tried to do that with the two thousand thirteen MAC, pro the I MAC pro the same kind of thing. So it's, it's interesting how these lines have become a little bit more fuzzy. I, I know that people wanted a MAC pro they wanted to traditional tower with expandability with slots, and they wanted a price they could afford. Those prices are not low. An apple is known for its low prices. Yes. Yes, absolutely. All of this was Ryan to is our gap in price in desire is market something in the middle. Well logically. Yes, there is statistically, actually, we don't know apple knows who bias things apple knows very in great detail detail. We will never see of how many people who gets much of our great machines evitable to actually upgrade them. I remember Mike whether on inside a looked into this a long time ago when he had lots of data from. Various sources around the time. If the old my proud the Jill cheese. Great to one and he had were absolute Paik five percent of the owners of those machines, which change ING heavy thing so much electricity. It appeals to me and I say that there's a market for it, but Apple's probably syncing thinking, actually William not so much, but they're not people people regularly by things that are greater than their needs. Yes. Someone could argue you should with computers way they last longer for year. But. I didn't. The entry level MAC mini. I tend to try and by the middle model just because it feels like I'm getting a little bit better value. Yes. Yeah. But I had an exact budgets and it covered that one I don't regret that. I just wish I could have stretched most storage just not. It's giving me. Pom-poms daily at the moment, but. Wanna shift gears completely and entirely? Let's talk about security vulnerabilities and things like that for a moment. Okay. I was going to be a joke how vulnerable but that would just be what are you talking about? What's troubling? Honorable William Gallagher. Yeah. So Facebook, we talked about them in the past, haven't we? Facebook, Facebook Facebook, I know the name, but your finger on it Kanye. They do bad things or something. Something data. Well so they had this. They had this application, right? They had a Facebook research up that was banned in January for violating apps store review guidelines, because they were using their enterprise ticket to collect personal, potentially sensitive permission from people. Yes. Right. I remember the snap. Yes. And they gonna done it again. They haven't gone about it again. But, but they called this their project atlas initiative, publicly known as the research up. Well, they, they had to write a letter they'd respond to US Senator, Richard Blumenthal. And that letter, of course, was seen by tech crunch and in their letter. Facebook revealed that one hundred eighty seven thousand users, including thirty four thousand teenagers. Had their data collected by this application. Of the of those thirty one thousand users were in the United States and four thousand three hundred teenagers. So they were doing this worldwide. Facebook maintains the operation was driven by an Olympics. But notes that the app in some cases received nontargeted formation they didn't review it to determine whether contained health or financial data. They, they claim they've now deleted all user level market insights data that was collected which would include any health or financial data that may have existed. So. They insist that it didn't have any there or that they didn't review it. And now they can't because they're deleted it. That's good. Then. Now apple commented on this in a separate letter in March and apple said that they didn't know how many devices were running the app, which is applied using gonna price Elber certificate. And of course, that's true. Because enterprise cert- s- are developed are distributed outside of the app store, and therefore, it's impossible for apple to have a handle on who got it or not. Yeah. Unusual flap was not know something like that. But that counts. Well, it's I mean. Oh, does that mean? It's apples full. No do. No. So. So let's say that when, when we talk about security, the best security is, when something is inaccessible or unknown or unknowable. And so. Enterprise customers want to be able to distribute applications, because they want them to go to their specific users and not to the public apps store. Those applications may have access to sensitive corporate data. They may have they may contain since of corporate data, they may be proprietary. There's all kinds of good reasons why those things should be distributed without making the end users go through the app store. Besides just means of distribution. Because having your all of your ploys have to hit up the app store to download something is hard as opposed to having enterprise certificate and just being loaded on them. And so it makes good sense for apple to not be able to know this. No. I understand that. I'm fine with it. Let's just make it. It's easier Facebook who's heard of that. Let's just play map for everything to situation. Mobile. And of course, we shouldn't leave Google. Google is also running a product like that, that has been exposed now, I don't have the numbers in front of me on what their screen wise meter product saw in terms of users, but. Hundred eighty seven thousand people. Which sounds like a drop in the bucket compared to all Facebook users, but, you know, Facebook can extrapolate from those insights, and that is not in Sikkim number. In terms of the study. That is big now in good news. The head of Google account signing teams is positive about Apple's introduction to the authentication space. So apple revealed this product called sign with apple, and they are going to require people to use signing with Google or sign with Facebook in their applications to add sign in with apple alongside and someone got ahold of Google and ask them. And so Google product management director, Mark Risher reviewed on interview with the verge that it's preferable for users to employ some form of single sign on button to get into apps rather than creating users passwords, because people are terrible about users password. Right. You reuse the same username, because it's typically an Email or because you have an identity formed around using that username. Right. Putsch I hadn't thought about the size of using an Email address. Of course, they Email address in several places nuts. I'm pulled that boy the news the same to you. Yes, fix don't. Any go? That's the stuff. Yeah. So, so sorry, just a generation of nephews the same username on every Saint password. I use one password. It's great this stuff. I love it. Never entered my head that, of course, the username is very often the same for cools. But interesting. Okay. So I'm a little bit Rable there. I see the point signing convenience considered. It's also more secure Google has appoint plus a point. Yeah. And it's way, better for users to not have to type in a bespoke, username and password, or recycled password and definitely recycled username as we said and the other thing about Apple's doing it is that they have created a means of not sharing your actual Email address. They proxy it. So that you don't have to share the real Email address with that provider, which is good. I already days that I have I owned a particular websites to Maine. So whenever I saw somewhere new, I give it an Email address at that domain. So I can write agents at whatever it is. And then later when I get let's inspired address to agent at this place. I know where it came from. Yeah. And I've been using a Google trick for that kind of purpose to where I can use my g mail address and add a plus sign and then any other scripture after that. And it looks as unique. But I love. Oh, it's males that have my g mail address or very nearly mattress you. And it's always spam is never somebody you actually miss topped my dress and it's just fed up, right Google. The trouble is that the plus symbol isn't respected as a symbol of Email by everywhere. Even though it totally fits the RC. But it but it allows me to filter the same way you are, by seeing, which one of those things gave away. My, my Email address for exemplify put Victor plus BBC at g mail, then I can go ahead and see. And that's not my Email address, by the way. So don't, don't try writing to that one. If I if I do that, then I can see if the BBC gave my Email address out. Yes. Not that they would. Let's be very clear. You defending the BBC again. There we go. Okay. I'll have some problems with the cooperation, but they employed me for a long time. And. You would know this, but in Britain current getting a lot of shtick getting a whole lot about, which is totally not their fault at this point. Exact the I won't point just to threats in scale, the loss of money to be he's going to face over. This would've been the same as the entire radio budget. All of national local BBC sounds well service everything that's how much they're being forced radio amount of myself subsets me occasionally, so that little bit. So Apple's appoint Google's appoint this is right there with this. Well, so Google has for years wanted to get rid of user, names, and passwords, and Google has for years wanted to get rid of things like the URL, and so anything that people do to help them in that goal, even if it's not using their service helps them reach that aim. Right. They would much prefer people sign in with apple than sign. Ending with users and passwords. Yeah. I would if they would much rather people signed in with Google more than sign with apple. But that's that's a distinction. You know, if if you're going to do it, and you're already pick one of the good options, basically what they're saying two minutes ago. Happy now you mentioned whole you are L thing, you to send somebody Lincoln. It's not to where he thought it was because it's Google's. I just Matza told me something nicer happy, again, nicer, you want to be happy, again, Apple's, please. Just is in negotiations to purchase Intel smartphone modem business. Oh, I've been up at nights when dering about until smell modem business. Well as we said before you are a net job, destroyer over there. And until did close up shop and say the app, you know what we're putting our smartphone business under. Took it out back the they, they ended it. That's that. And pink slipped. I think is that more polite. But yes, they did that. But no comes out, pull. Yes. Apple is said to be looking very, very carefully at Intel's German operations which service the basis for the modem business. Okay. The until staff. There is comprised of engineers from Infineon's wireless technology, arm, which Intel purchase one point four billion in two thousand eleven they provided the base bench ships for iphone from two thousand seven to two thousand ten. Negotions of ongoing since last year they could fall apart, of course. But if apple successful, they will have hundreds of veteran, modem engineers. To these this has been going on since last year. So before this decision apple was nudging away. That's interesting. Because my mom goes straight to the staff who've just presumed lost their jobs, but they in a band snapping king. Do I get a job somewhere else to hang on for Upul or into redeployed people? I I'm not positive. I know whether or not the those folks were redeployed or not. But. It's interesting because if you look at it, there are a number of, of former until exacts who were brought into Intel's, a part of the Infineon acquisition who now work at apple, some were from years ago like Stephan wolf, who is a former manager of Intel's from in modem outfit came to continue within the past few months. February apple hired. Emotion car Thyagarajan, and I apologize. If I've mangled that name who was an engineer who is said to play a key role in the development of the chip maker's five. G modem. Now until as you say, exited the smartphone business in April smartphone modem industry in April, but. They could pick up this whole office, they could pick up this whole segment have hundreds of engineers, and what is quantum about this? Well, so Qualcomm and apple settled there agreements in the past. Right. They they'd settled that Qualcomm is currently facing antitrust. Prosecution in the US. Yes. So forgotten about that, too. Yes. Okay. I do like that Lewis suits Qualcomm. Yeah. Well, it's, so it's a difficult thing. Right. It's, it's not illegal to be a monopoly. But it is illegal to abuse that monopoly to act to monopoly. Yes. Okay. Well to, to act in ways that. Maintain that monopoly through force. That's not. It is well, so I mean, a classic example years and years and years ago. Microsoft. Required that they be paid a Microsoft Windows license for every computer ship. Even if the computer didn't ship with windows. Yes. Which amazing do they pulled off. Guess for them or or years and years ago when B O S was not printing system. Be OS got the deal to be loaded on partition onto Sheba's and Microsoft had as part of their license agreement, a lockdown on the boot loader so that those machines could not duel boot customers bought machines that had windows. And be OS on them and the machine could not be OS out of the box so consumers thought that they were just not getting much of their hard drive because it was partitioned. Right. Those are abuses of the monopoly that Microsoft had on windows licenses at that time, I remember Suming that Microsoft have been legally required, when you still some facial Indus coverage when it was to offer you the choice of being Google for your search, but very specifically required to offer the choice to they're not actually do it because when I would pick Google it would still set itself to being that seemed. Microsoft. This is a behavior that they do in Europe. They don't necessarily have to show that in the US. I do remember seeing the choice of browsers come up. But the search thing was a European part. Well, my own folk. So she's so Qualcomm, right? Qualcomm has several key patents on technology, especially related to CDMA in related to things like that. They if you wanna serve with the carriers choir that technology, then you end up using a Qualcomm chip, which is why Qualcomm modems were introduced in, in the first I phones that worked with Reisen in the US. The problem is our Qualcomm, abusing that monopoly. And that's partly what was going into these patent royalties questions. Right. So they got. The Pepsi just like being in course maybe it's all there who knows. But I asked you to tell me nice things did. Thank you very much. So here's a nice thing unless we'll end on this one. This is a nice one. I cloud for windows. Apple has updated. I cloud for windows. It's available in Microsoft apps store, and it makes cloud function, a little more, like, the, the Microsoft, one drive cloud storage service in windows ten so it's more convenient for use. You can use that, that I cloud storage within windows, you can have the cloud drive experienced that gives the same sort of technology, as, as one drives files on demand feature, which means that. Instead of having to manually retrieve things from cloud, you can have your cloud dry. Folders have filed sinked within the cloud, Andrew drive so that they're available for offline use. Cheek. That's Mark softer. Apple is helping each other. Right. We've just had Google technologies about apple the world is getting nicer excellent points. Thank you very much for that. See in a bright spot in dark times next time. I'll ask you money. We'll see what happens. This is this is not the first time that Apple's released products to the Microsoft store. I tunes for windows. Ten is part of the Microsoft app store, and this is this is good. Yes. But the I cloud for windows, app behavior of where has that sort of download for offline sync is very much like the behavior that you get in MAC, where we have our desktops documents stored night, cloud. So I am happy with that. Well, William that is all the time. I have I am fresh out of time. My most valuable commodity next time I will ask you for more on the apple cider podcast where can people find you w Gallagher too. It's a and William atop inside dot com, all the live long day would've met you. That is the honorable William Gallagher everybody. I'm Victor marks. I'm v marks on Twitter. I am always found at apple insider, and I want you to check out my writings at at wristwatch review. I just published an article there about an interesting thing, I've got a friend who is trying to adopt a little girl into his family and facing staggering legal fees. He has a gofundme me and all of these different wristwatch, micro brand companies have gone together, pooled number of wristwatches that they are raffling off to people who donate to him. And so there's something like thirteen different watches available to people who donate to his 'cause they've raised over, like ten thousand dollars at this point. It's fantastic. And it's all about helping a person and his family become a family legally and I like it. So go, there check that out. And, and if you're so inclined maybe even donate. All right, thank you so much, everybody. We'll be back next week. With more.

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Thu. 07/02 - The Exploding Whale Memorial Park (is a real thing)

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Thu. 07/02 - The Exploding Whale Memorial Park (is a real thing)

"Welcome to the good news ride home for Thursday July second two thousand twenty. Third Today, the full story behind America's national anthem, the other American holiday kicking off this weekend that you may not have heard of the legendary exploding wail of Oregon hits its own memorial park and NASA's four K.. Ten year time lapse of the Sun. Here are some of the cool things from the news today. America's Independence Day is coming up this weekend and anyone. Viewing fireworks displays sync with a local radio station. Will no doubt be hearing some rendition of our national anthem? The Star spangled banner, not that that's unique to the fourth of July. We play our anthem all the time. Before sporting events, military ceremonies some political events, it's pretty ubiquitous and most Americans know at least most of the words. If you live in the US, you might have even had to learn the basics of the songs origin story in elementary school. You Know Francis Scott. Scott key was so inspired by seeing the American flag at the end of the battle, of Baltimore, in eighteen fourteen that he wrote the lyrics on the back of a letter, then and there, but there's a bit more to the story, and especially our present time of reckoning with our nation's past. It's one that's worth acknowledging so while some mistakenly believed that the anthem dates back to the founding of the United States. It wasn't written until the war of eighteen twelve, and wasn't recognized as the official anthem for nearly a century after that. As a quick refresher. The war of eighteen twelve was mostly between the US and Britain, and started in part because of Britain's interference with America's trade, but the French also played a key role because America refused to pay back their debts to France. Who had assisted them during the revolution? Britain was also fighting with France at the time, so their reserves were low at the start of the war, but after they defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo. They turned all their attention on America and it was brutal. Maryland based lawyer and slave holder Francis Scott key initially opposed the war, but when the British encroached on the Baltimore Harbor, and he bore witness to the battle firsthand, he was so moved by the American victory that he wrote the now famous Paean to his country. Key had spent a rainy night watching the bombs bursting in air from a boat in the harbor, and in the morning he discerned the outcome of the battle by seeing the American flag flying as opposed to the British one. He wrote the first few stanzas on the back of an envelope, while still on the boat, after he was back on land, and finished up, he called it defence of Fort McHenry and it was printed for distribution by his commander brother-in-law a few days later. On the printing, he instructed that the words should be sung along to the tune to antiquarian in heaven, which was a British drinking song that was very popular in the US. At the time the lyrics were then picked up by the Baltimore Patriot, and by the fall, had been printed in newspapers across the nation, and renamed the Star spangled banner, and his popularity never wavered being song at all manner of events, as the years wore on during the civil war, both sides tried to claim as their own with the south, saying that belonged to them, as it had been written in the south and shared their sentiments. In the north physician and poet Oliver Wendell Holmes senior even added a stanza to make it more befitting of the north. The new stanza included the line. The millions unchained, who are birthright have gained homes version was reprinted in schoolbooks in multiple US states in the early nineteen hundreds, so they were probably a lot of out there singing his version. Bullets as World War One brought a new era of allied ship with the British. Some Americans disagreed with the Star spangled banner. For military events due to its inherent anti-british sentiment, some Columbia University professors protested its use, and others tried to find an alternative like America the beautiful or the battle hymn of the republic, but the Star spangled banner, one ounce, and was really cemented as the top choice for American public events when it was played at the nineteen eighteen world series between the Boston Red Sox and the Chicago cubs. Congressman John Charles Lynch. Come of Maryland was the one who introduced legislation to make it the national anthem in one, thousand, nine, twenty nine, and after the backing of five million petition signatures, a hundred and fifty organizational endorsements and the support of twenty five governors, it was eventually approved by President Hoover in nineteen, thirty, one, making it officially America's national anthem, but going back to the civil war, the south may have been right that the song was more reflective of their sentiments than the North's. Many of questioned the line in the third stanza, no refuge could save the hireling and slave from the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave. Quoting all that's interesting. It remains unclear today. Exactly what key meant by those words some believe that? Since he was a slave holder, he was simply delighting in the fact that his slaves couldn't escape. Others think that he was condemning the American slaves who escaped by fighting alongside the British yet others are convinced that key was using the word slave as a rhetorical device to describe the Brits themselves and quotes. New, even if that very last rhetorical interpretation is correct, it's ironic to the point of kind of offensive that he would use the word slave in a metaphorical way when he himself literally owned other human beings. Fortunately. Most renditions and sing alongs these days only include the first stanza, so many people can enjoy tune in blissful ignorance of its darker past. Though I wouldn't be surprised if we see a fresh wave of opposition to the songs role as our national anthem. But if in win, we do remember that such opposition to this song in particular is not new, and that the song itself, and particularly its formality as an anthem is newer than some may have you believe? Starting tomorrow July, third and running for a week through July ninth is officially be nice to New Jersey Week. Yeah, that is a real thing. According to a nineteen ninety seven New York Times article. The week long holiday was originally started by the San Antonio. Texas based Lonestar publications of Humor. Yeah, it wasn't started as a joke by new. York or like a weird kind of state pride campaign by New Jersey themselves. It was started by Texans specifically by Lonestar publications of Humor Editor and publisher Lauren, Barnett's who started the celebration in nineteen, eighty four after noticing that new. Jersey seemed to be the most picked on state garnering more jokes at its expense than even Texas. As far as I can tell, Barnett has no connection to New Jersey. She just felt bad for it. Suggested celebrations per the times quote. If, you have friends or relatives in new. Jersey call or write them to tell them how sorry you are for picking on their state, she suggests those who don't know anyone in new. Jersey she adds can still intone by addressing their apologies to the governor's office at the State House in Trenton and quotes. I can tell you from personal experience of having texted. My New Jersey friends about this holiday that they do not receive it well. Maybe it's because I'm also from Texas. But I didn't see anything backhanded about it. Just trying to have a nice day for an often bullied states but JERSEYANS. Just see it as an insult. As the site you don't Know Jersey said of the holiday quote. Thanks, guys, but we really don't need your gimmick. We are just fine. All the woody jabs and slurs don't really affect us. We don't take it personally. We can roll with the punches. You can keep your holiday and quotes. So Yeah, maybe just skip this one. We may be staying home as much as possible, but the summer season isn't on hold and getting fit for the summer. Should it be either fortunately you can get access to professional training from the comfort of your home with Bonnie on demand, thousands have joined beach body on demand to stay fit during the covid nineteen lockdown and they weren't disappointed with Beach Bonnie on demand, you can get access to over one thousand three hundred workouts that you can stream. Stream anytime to fit your own schedule at home. WanNa grab a quick workout inbetween virtual meetings. No Problem Beach Bonnie on demand has workouts short as ten minutes that don't require extra equipment in the time. It would have taken you to drive and park the gym. You can be finished working out right in your home. It'd beach. Body on demand has hundreds of effective workouts for all fitness levels including bodybuilding weight training cardio hit Yoga and even dance workouts. I tried the morning meltdown one hundred and couldn't believe how much more I was motivated to do. With the trainer Jericho Mc Matthews, encouragement, and the pumping music from the DJ. If you're is feeling stale, or you have trouble being motivated on your own beach, bunny on-demand will help you. Try something new and stick with it and listeners of the good news. Ride home can get a special free trial membership by texting good news to thirty thirty thirty. You'll get full access to the entire platform all the workouts, nutrition, information and support. Free just text good news to thirty thirty thirty. We expect a lot from our homes. They're more than a place to hang your hat there. Where you try your hand gardening new recipes, rest and recharge work and play, and that's why at homeadvisor we're committed to keeping your home up and running whether you need to repair an overloaded appliance, or you're looking to create a backyard retreat worthy of summer staycationing, use the home advisor APP day or night, and we'll find the local pro to get the job done right? Whatever you need will do everything to fix your everything. Download the HOMEADVISOR APP today to get started. So with America's independence. Day coming up this weekend. A day celebrated primarily by exploding fireworks. I thought I would talk about an explosion fail from fifty years ago. You might be familiar with the story of the exploding whale in Florence Oregon. If you're not, here's a refresher in November. Nineteen, seventy, a forty foot long eight ton deceased sperm whale washed up on the shores of a beach in Florence Oregon. Quoting the Oregonian. Local officials weren't sure what to do with it. And as the whale carcass began to stink, people started coming out to see it. Something clearly had to be done. The problem was as K. A. T.. You reporter Paul Linneman said in his now famous broadcast of the event. It had been so long since a whale washed up in Lane County. Nobody could remember how to get rid of one. You could bury the carcass, but waves were just unearth individually, and it was certainly too big to burn with no better ideas. Locals turned to the Oregon Department of Transportation, which decided to treat the sperm whale like a troublesome boulder, and simply blow the thing up wants disintegrated. They're thinking went. SEAGULLS and scavengers would take care of the pieces end quote. Spectators crowded to watch from a safe distance. Engineers packed the whale carcass with twenty cases of dynamite or half a ton. When they set them off. The explosion was a bit more than people were anticipating quote chunks as big as three feet square descended from the sky, forcing everyone to evacuate the area. One piece landed on a car caving in its roof. Miraculously, nobody was hurt. However, everyone on the scene was covered with small particles of dead Wail Linneman said end quotes. Yeah not greats. The incident got a lot of attention right after it happened eventually becoming something of an urban legend in the area, but it resurfaced again on a national scale in nineteen ninety, when humor columnist Dave. Barry shared the story in the Miami Herald and claimed to possess footage of the incident. His column wasn't completely clear on attribution details, so a lot of people thought the incident had just occurred rather than having happened twenty five years prior. Eventually, though the footage of the original K. T. You story by Paul, Linneman got posted online where it was shared across various sites over the years and a study from two thousand six estimates. The video was viewed over three hundred fifty million times, and that's before it was on youtube mostly before youtube even existed. A. Lot of people report that it was the first video they ever viewed on the Internet and even inspired a Sufiane. Stevens, Song in two thousand fifteen. So with the story of the exploding whale, having become such a long, lasting and completely true legend I suppose it's not entirely surprising that in celebration of the incidents fiftieth anniversary this year Florence Oregon has just opened the exploding Wail Memorial Park. The park itself opened last year under a temporary name, and recently residents were invited to vote for a new name of the park in an online poll, other contenders in the poll where Bridgeview Park and slow riverview park, but anyone who remembers boaty. mcboatface should know not to trust the Internet with naming things. Florence shows itself lucky that the worst got was exploding whale memorial park, which by the way was voted for by four, hundred, thirty, nine out of Eight, hundred fifty six respondents and to their credit. The city of Florence has actually gone along with it. The park signed features a nice painting of Happy Whale spouting water in the shape of a heart, and they even had a whale mascot at the parks opening Megan. Messmer Florence City project manager told the New, York Times that while the incident is a sore point for some residents who don't like getting flak for something that the State Highway Division was actually responsible for most residents are excited about the park's name. According The Times Job Oh drew the owner of an art supply store, and the designer of the park sign said the explosion is still a little bit of a touchy subject for residents, especially those who are involved in the blast. She hopes the part can serve as a reminder that we should celebrate our mistakes and not be embarrassed. The nineteen seventy blast was a lesson learned for Oregon there is now a policy to bury carcasses that can't be removed easily, Messmer said and quotes. If, you haven't seen the video before. I'll put a link in the show notes for you along with the Sufi on Stevens Song. The video is really something and remember that the whale was already dead. When it washed up on the shore, it might still be a little gruesome to watch if you are particularly sensitive to animals, but honestly the nineteen seventy eighty millimeter film quality makes it pretty tough to make out anything anyways. Yesterday NASA released in our long time lapse video of the sun as captured by their solar. Dynamics Observatory Sto every day over the past ten years. This has been watching the sun nonstop for the last decade, and gathered four hundred, twenty, five million high resolution images of the Sun and twenty million gigabytes of data. Here's a bit more from NASA quote with the Triad of Instruments Sto captures the image of the sun every point. Seventy five seconds, the atmospheric imaging assembly, or a instrument alone captures images every twelve seconds at ten different wavelengths of light this ten year time lapse showcases photos taken at wavelength of seventeen point, one nanometers, which is an extreme ultraviolet wavelength that shows the Sun's outer most atmospheric layer the corona. Compiling, one photo every hour. The movie condenses a decade of the sun into sixty one minutes. The video shows the rise and fall in activity that occurs as part of the sons, eleven, solar cycle and notable events like transiting planets and eruptions. The custom music titled Solar Observer was composed by musician Lars Leonard and quotes. NASA says that the images from the STO has contributed to countless discoveries about the sun and its influences on our solar system. While this time lapse was released to mark the ten year milestone and eleven year solar cycle. It does not reflect an end to the project. The Sto and NASA's other missions will continue watching the sun or the years to come, and you can watch the video at the link in the show notes. It's really cool to scrub through and just Kinda. See how the Sun Ebbs. Ebbs and changes over time especially, if you played in four K., what have you WANNA watch the entire hour-long video I mean the music they said it to actually does make it just kind of chill experience. See could put it on in the background on your TV and go and do something else just zone out to it. It's super fascinating, but also just very well produced. So as I have mentioned a few times today, this weekend is July Fourth Aka Independence Day here in the United States and like most US companies ride home is observing Independence Day tomorrow Friday the third, so that means no show tomorrow, but I will be that in your ears on Monday, so I hope everyone who celebrates has very safe, socially distance, perhaps Independence Day, and that everyone regardless has a good weekend. I will talk to you on Monday.

America United States NASA Francis Scott Oregon Paul Linneman New Jersey Jersey Texas Baltimore New York Times Florence Oliver Wendell Holmes Florence Oregon official Fort McHenry France Britain
Ep 62 The POWER of Movement w/ Dr Mike of MoveU

Strong By Design Podcast

36:03 min | 1 year ago

Ep 62 The POWER of Movement w/ Dr Mike of MoveU

"We believe that you are strong by design and you were made in God's image to have a strong body mind and spirit your listening to the number one strengthen health authority podcasts in the world. So let's get ready to unlock your potential and transform your life in today's episode. Hey, what's happening buddy? Hey, it is coach Brian here with the strong bydesign podcast. And I'm sitting in a beautiful corner law in sunny Carlsbad, if you don't know where Carlsbad is San Diego. It's awesome out here and the gentlemen, the scholar that I am interviewing. Yes. Now, I feel like I have to have a British accent now you're gentlemen, under scholar. Yes. Welcome. So. Dr mike. Hey, he's from move. You movie dot com. He's on Instagram Facebook, and I'm not just saying just him, he's got an entire business. It's, it's all about movement. And so in this podcast today, we're going to be talking about the movement just as simple as it gets a movement movement movement. So move you Dr Mike, I don't even want to call you, Dr Mike, even though you are doctor. I want you to tell our listeners I like people to call me whatever they're comfortable with awesome. So Mike, I'm not even gonna say last time you can say watts listen Lhasa, listen, so you want to wa- sa-. Listen to this podcast growing up. I always got wasn't listening because I was terrible in school. They thought I had ADHD. It was really I was so bored by their teaching style. Looking at hindsight. They don't take responsibility for their own actions that the diagnose other people because of their own faults. Well truth to that. Sadly, there is a lot of truth to that. So move, you this is a it's not just an online company, even though you guys have a lot of online offers, there's tell our listeners what is move you and how it got started in where it's going. Yeah. Move you was actually founded on a frustration that I had with the lack of success that patients were having within healthcare system. As a whole is that people would come to health care, maybe imbalanced with their body there. One leg short of another one. They have meniscus pain, hip impingement back pain, scoliosis rounded, posture, and they would go for help, but they're, they're existed so many pitfalls on their way to achieving their desired results than nine percent of people would never achieve those results, because of confusing health insurance plans outdated having to make phone calls Collins appointment waiting uninspiring environments, lack of community involvement whatsoever. Very expensive cost and many doctors who cannot explain simply what they're trying to convey to the person in most doctors, himself, honestly, not living amazing wife, not living to their potential and try. Guy people to there's, which is impossible. So bring it I left healthcare to sixty. I go this is this is not working for myself. This isn't working for the clients in there. We're going to create a program, a system, a path for people to cheat their greatest results plug up every single whole that existed within healthcare and create the straightest path, where people period, we're not going to build what people want what they think they want what insurance will pay. We're not going to. We're going to build what they need to get there. And then you know what you build it, and they will come. And we did that. And so we lost in two thousand sixteen and right before that we start making Instagram videos, and we started I finally found everyone out there. Everyone has a channel in their life to be great, whatever it is. Everyone has something in them intervux this trying to guide them and tell them where to go, and I finally connected with mine two thousand fifteen whoa, I'm good on camera. This is where my personality. Shines. It works really well. And here in front of big groups, I'm happy. Some people might be great writers write. Some people may be gracious. Straight educators, I found mine. So we started taking off their organically just by teach in what I believe is the truth. What we believe the truth. What isn't being said, what people don't know. So we help people strengthen their body into alignment. We help people transformed pain into a powerful mind in body through the movie program through body movement through series of guided exercises to help people overcome through, developing a winning mindset, the same mice that maybe your listeners used to become an expert, pianist, more to deadly five hundred pounds or achieve adopted that same mindset that they've utilized there. We just help people apply that to overcoming physical problems in it works every single term. So wait, you're saying that the mind is connected to the body. The mind controls the body. Oh, never knew that about that controls the body and it controls a direction. We move our life in no. What about that? I'm a week to send this podcast right now and just let it go with that some people what they do. I catch myself as well. Like, like right now in golf golfing again, I used to compete and a preview awful. No, so I know how to play golf. I'm not a golfer. So this purpose of appreciate routine. Appreciate routine is something doesn't matter. The crowd size that we supposedly go through. We put herself his bubble through the same routine and allows us to, to quite the noise around us. And I never really understood it even though I competed the other night. I number tune to hang out. Richard Branson founder, virgin records virgin and I was anxious. I was nervous. But, you know, I've had this same pitch. It's like my elevator pitch with move. You what we do we help you fix your body pain. We help you line, your own posture. We help strengthen body alignments. You'll need to see doctors and carrots bts in that just came out naturally with. Oh, it's a pre shot routine. It's like I just apply that to golf. Now. It's a repeated this thing. So no matter what the situation, I can just. Get that out in the point is people may not be applying this principle to their body right now. Your listeners might and ready. They hope I can apply that to my body. I had no idea. I thought people are gonna fix me. Right. What does it ever happen? I want to be an expert pianist somewhat put your fingers on mine, and play the song for me. Right. I mean it's funny because with as much free information that's out there. You would think people would be experts look at YouTube. You can learn anything you want on YouTube. But do our people masters at it. No. Because they're too lazy to put the work him. Right. I don't know. People are lazy. I just don't believe they've found their naked with what gets them go get them going. Right. But they're also not taken the initiative to find out what gets going right. And also the pieces on YouTube and everywhere they tend to be fragmented. That's true. Right. There's just puzzle pieces everywhere. And it takes it takes a while to collect them figure out or of them, just like our Instagram because people message us, and they go, we get all the time, where I go God, you move you, you help me with my shoulder. Much. How did you piece together because I was just pieces, I use it wasn't possible to fix your shit without completing the program, the program, one hundred seventy exercise with how people saying they're doing it without it didn't believe them. And that's what you were taught a med school in order to get from point eight to point B. You have to follow the entire plan to get to point b but I don't think in school, though, Cairo school. I don't think that they ever helped us develop a plan for people to lasted long enough to make a long term difference insurance uses stops paying when people out of pain. And when people out of pain is actually the start line. Right. You actually out of pain. You're actually at the start line. And that's one thing I never understood is because they said, you have pain. No, all right. You're good to go. See you later. Good luck. That's worth because healthcare incentivize doctors. It has to be about pain, if the person is not in pain, you would have to lie on their exam and lie on paperwork to get paid for that. Because. Won't pay if there's no pain. So they never helped us create a plan long enough to help people chief any success. Because the plan out of pain is usually it's a much shorter plan. Then is the plan to create be very durable lasting. Thank you so much for listening to the strong design podcast. If you find our show helpful in any way, please, let us know by leaving a five star review on, I tunes, go to strong design podcasts dot com. Your review will help us reach more listeners and continue to change lives. Let's get back to the show. How do you incorporate movement into move? You like is movement. Really that important? Are you trying to reset lifestyles like talk movement? What is movement? How do you look at movement? And why is movement important? That word movement is evolving in its, it seems to be more accepted yet. I still don't believe that, that move just to myself occurs to be a very blanket word. That doesn't have much meaning behind it. 'cause you say movement. Okay. Most people still today. A movement. Yeah. Walking jogging running squatting dead, lifting benching these are movements we teach the movement under those movements. So we teach the components that allow you to complete those movements, successfully safely athletically, all the little movements, and we break the body down in six categories when you do a dead left their sections of your body and each section has different muscles, and they all interconnect together the whole. Connected your feet to your knees, your hips, your back your shoulders, your neck, these six pieces to movement in. So when we're dead lifting one is truly aware of their body position. If they are connected all six together at once if they're actually able to know where their head shoulder back core. Hip me position. They're all checkpoints are all in alignment, then that person is in tune with their body they are able to stay aligned during the movement. If the person's counting reps, listen to music, thinking about some girl on tender doing this. They're not disconnected in in life. What we are disconnected with we lose sight of it and problems, slowly cuma. And we'll see it happening until somebody van there's big injury or something. And if you were like dead lift hurt me, because humans, they want a quick answer. What did it that dead lift hurt me? That pencil hurt me that chiropractor hurt me. But what that does when you point your finger our, there's no count ability, and there's no improvement. There's anger and resentment. And then that's the acceptance of why we can't move forward our life. Right. So the body is made to function. Well, it's just meant to go through a full range emotion. Full range motion human is designed to move the shoulder through full range, the hips through a full range to any given time safely yet. The challenge occurs with movement is where people be what we found become frozen in a position in the anterior tilt into a rolled shoulder. They're frozen in that position. And now there's that's an imbalance and that imbalance injuries can accumulate in that. So we teach people how to strengthen their body into alignment and then move around that position. And we've seen we have communication, thousands, tens of thousands of millions of people that we interact with, we found that method to be very successful, the most successful, we know of on planet earth today, but we're still volving. So who knows what tomorrow's gonna who knows? So for somebody who's listening. Right now is just completely mind blown right now with like I thought I can just go to any gym and del some work to do it. I mean, in our eyes, you shouldn't be doing that. So how do you an obviously, you've got move. You you've got all your online stuff and all that. But if somebody listening right now just wants to make one simple change to get on the right path. What advice do you have for them? The number one thing, people can do right now to make it better tomorrow is disconnect their pass from their future. Yes, they go the past. This is why on that. This is where I am. Yeah, I understand I may not be fair how I got here, understand that. Maybe there was some accidents. I did some of my body someone did something here. I've hurt myself through sports. I have these herniated this, I have these things. I'm on this pill. There's all these things I can't do this. I can like this today is where I am right here. So it's an assessment a self assessment self assessment self-assessment. Okay. So let's talk about assessments. There's everywhere you look, there's multiple assessments this philosophy. This seven step assessment program. Nobody uses assessments. Let's turn a clinical setting how can somebody know how they are. Like, how can they assess themselves, if they have no clue what they're assessing this is how we teach in clinic, I did it. I took the posture pitchers. I'd had people touch their toes, do pelvic tells document things and we take x-rays and Moore is like I've done all this stuff before would it does, though. The person mindlessly goes through these things often, 'cause they expect people, it's an extra tell me what's wrong with me. Tell me what I need. I don't have time to do all tell me what I need. And so what we discovered assessing people doing exams on people is that actually disempowers them because once again, they're continuing to rely on external cue for the problems. We've eliminated assessments. We've eliminated exams completely get straight into teaching you. How to move your body the way it was. From the factory. So we use Andrews, an example Andrews got a great range of motion. And if someone has happened back pain, we start with pelvic tilts, like why don't know him. Do. Doing this. Right. As humans we have evolve other you being a blacksmith or whatever trade. It was back in the days, you would observe somebody's apprentice in repeat that so Andrew or another similar model would through our videos is performing it in a now the person does it themselves records himself doing it or watches himself in a mirror doing. So you're learning about it and going out. I have a difficult time moving my body into more forward tilt decreeing that arch, it seems to be stuck here. They could see where their goal is my goal is to get to this position that I can't achieve. So now the person has identified the gap, right? Can see where the trying to go which you can call the top of the mini mountain for this excise and they see where they are in now they need the exercises or at least now the plan to get there. And that's what we provide. We do that through minute videos. We all the things we programs all the things so we teach through guided self-discovery dots that we use the teach because it's impounding because we don't believe anyone will understand your body, like. You will ever care about your body like you will ever. Right. So it's up to you. And when you learn the stuff there's a quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes. He says, man's mind once expanded never returns to its original dimensions me. Once you go. Wow. You're now for ever leveled up. Hence, though setbacks don't occur like people, they healthcare, they go through yoyos. I was better than I go right back because you relied on artificial external to get you there. Yeah. It's like hitting the lottery. Hey one ten million. Why does seventy percent of people lose it three years there because they didn't earn it didn't work for it. They didn't learn how money works. Yeah. They lose it same the bunny. Yeah. It didn't come from with him. So true you call your people movers. Right move. They call themselves they call themselves movers so out of all your movers. What are some of the most common issues that you deal with someone comes to you, and says, hey, I've got this issue back pain shoulder pain, the pain? And why do you think that is back pain is I believe is still the number one cause disability in the? World. Disability means the inability for you to do something you want to do. So if you wanna ski right now and you can't ski you're actually considered disabled, but the cool thing is you can enable yourself to do all this things. Again, the mind can overcome anything which is the beautiful thing. But the reason is you don't there's, I'm not a movement historian, very solution base solution focused. And so I think most of us can agree to that would schooling sitting at a desk for twelve years, then call. And then we're just sitting Pasha when we're sitting. And then when we stand is not like we return to our, we don't return to our proper balance position the body. This is actually back in the early day. The people would be dislocated elbow. And then they wouldn't cast the cast off and it stuck in that position that position in our body becomes to look like the positions. We spend most of our day, in which often sitting most people have is big, and they're low back their head for the shoulders. This is there. Outstanding version of sitting that is a reflection of what it looks like to be in a standing sitting position. So that produces in excess of curve of the low back. Yeah. Some people in those hype or lar- doses. Sway back, anterior pelvic tilt and it causes in that position throws the head forward. Balance it forward head posture in the shoulders tend to go with it rounded produces this common instead of imbalances. The curse of that with the low back itself. I don't know Evelyn narrowly can talk back to from a scientific standpoint being all fours, and standing. There's a difference. There's absolutely we haven't evolved to that yet. That's the route. The other route is that when we're standing and forward 'til what can occur big sway back. Some view seventy percent of you. We've discovered especially seventy percent of people with pain in their body, because it was the people, we tend to measure back in the day because I don't practice anyone those. People in an anterior tilt. Meaning that forward tilt it tends to compress the joints, joints by the skin, the closest to the skin of low back, you can almost touch the joints. You can't touch the disks so you're an anterior tilt in the body was coming down to put a lot of pressure on the joints people over time, but living like that SI joint pain such pain arthritis for set joint arthritis, even spinal stenosis, hip, impingement. These are all directly related symptoms to that area of low back some listeners out there from sitting they tend to be really round over when they sit. I don't know if it's from sitting this is just the Pasha the people present themselves with us. They have a flat baecker. No. But whatsoever. Those people are predisposed to different type injuries. Because when you have a flat back reverse curve in the low back, you're not compressing the front of the robe, which is where the disks are now the district press in the Quadros borough muscles are trying to tighten to keep yourself upright, but they're ineffective to do that. 'cause they're not. Designed for that. And then all of a sudden they're going to the gym and doing sit ups they're doing deadly. Now. They're lying wait to that rounded posture roundedness is ready a predisposition to injuring yourself. And then you wait to that roundedness your exceleron getting the curve to injury. Some people make it through the whole life without it. It's like people who smoke cigarettes or entire life, never develop cancer. Right. But we can only control the controllables I believe we should focus on what we can control can't control the position of our body, so we can rely on our body. We can strengthen and back into Lyman again. And whenever people do that whether it's anterior posterior till which one of my will that's something discover, like we have on our YouTube page. You can we've all kinds of free playlists Elvis. You can click it. We've fifty videos, pelvic tilt you'll go there and learn stuff yourself, I promise you, you have a massive breakthrough ever be better. Do you look ten pounds heavier and two inches shorter than you actually are find out the three best ways to improve your posture? Go to strong design posture dot com. Enter your Email, and download this special report for free. Let's get back to the show. A lot of the issues come from your lower back, your hips. And if you fix that or work towards fixing and strengthen in that, that's another thing that people they go to strength. I they don't go to movement. They don't go to stability. They don't go to stretch in the always go to strength. I so if they think they have these issues must strengthen my core, I must do more planks, because the doctor told me I need a stronger back. Yes. Then they tried to traditional back extension. Right. We hope people strengthen their body into alignment when we strength into alignment. We know where aligned is in their, we will stay at least know. And we drift out of Andrew is machine that guy is like six days a week workout causing. Yeah, I'm yoyo so I do different sports Spearfish golfing out. But I don't time to, like, currently, I haven't made time to be able to be like, ten hours a week, working out, then golf. And I just choose one usually. So if I choose golf like AM now, I could feel right now I have miniscule tear my in my writing. I screw my shoulder up into by my left shoulder. I read some razor crazy frigging nosedive. That's tweet. And I've got an AC joint injury in the same side in the longer, I go without, I could feel my body. The first thing when you were wherever body. We feel ourselves losing that align position we feel ourself falling out of alignment, in that usually precedes with two beginning feeling of pain. And if left either undetected or not attentive to that the pain will increase, so the solution, we must reverse that once again, I know that I gotta get back just last night back in the gym. Okay. I've got to get my knee. Backout termi-. Right Glueck back on big time. It also tightens up my growing thera Senate loosen it up. And I could strengthen my buddy back. It'll hold up for a while like that. You can maintain it. You can let it drift away. A little bit are you can just strengthen so far into will. I a d by yourself, this massive buffer of time that you can actually maybe take the fall. Some people are free to step off a curb what are you doing zombies? Come it's over eating, but you build up build this little durability by putting so much time in investment, into strengthening boy, into Lyman and building some strength around that you're creating this bulletproof durability. What else is the word like resilience zillion indestructible miss to your body doing, but so many people don't even know 'cause they were lying Healthcare's advice, which healthcare it only keeps you off of rock. Bottom to go look at it. Just keeps off a rock bottom, and who the hell wants to live even anywhere near rock bottom. No. And that's a problem that a lot of people, there's so much information out that they just don't even know what rock bottom is, they don't know what optimal living is, and they just don't know where to go. It's an empathetic just people just don't know where to turn. There to sell all just keep doing. I'm doing and try these things out. Push through it in many people think one step above rock bottom as good. Yeah. Because they don't yet know how many levels are above them. But I know from experience, if my in from the stories of summer successes, every level up produces so much positive. There's so much of a return on investment, east level up in so much more life that we get and so much more happiness, that comes from each level that we must continue leveling up throughout our life to live our best life. That's what we believe. Now, it's circle backhoe, quick, put your car practic hat on when the body is in alignment. It's a mind body connection when your spine is in good alignment feedback. It's biofeedback. What goes down comes back up without delay. I once you get that neural input is streamlined, then you can start achieving optimal performance. Yes. And a lot of people say, oh, this is just the way I am. I can't fix this back pain. I can't improve these strength gains or I can't jump as high as I used to it's because there's a neural delight there's a disruption in the in the line. So in order for somebody to get proper alignment. We just talked about it. You have to go through these things. You have like you said, you've got an issue so that's going to obviously pull on your ad doctors, which is going to pull in your lower back, which is going to affect your post era. Explain. It's going to affect these these things, and you're gonna be like, if I just get everything, alignment, the brain is going to start repairing itself, and move ins just going to get better. That's right. Those are the steps and what I also extracted from what you said, is that many people in pain, maybe it's knee pain. They're going to continue squatting, but Emad braces on their knees. Right. They may add pain pills, they may try to squat with less weight. And meanwhile, anytime there's pain is to simply a signal from your body that there's an imbalance. It's a signal. Sometimes it's emotional the. Oftentimes physical, we used to move you was ninety percent physical and ten percent mental now, we're like we really like fifty fifty or money, more fighting we're even joke joker. Maybe five years, it's called. Thank you. I don't even know. Well it's talking about muscle activation. How important is that for movement, we believe, and we teach that being able to consciously contract and take each muscle concert contract, each muscle and utilize that muscle and understand how that muscle takes that joint through a range of motion is necessary to achieve full body awareness in full body. Awareness equals the ability for you to build strength on top of the line frame, and build a body that lasts. Yeah. When I say muscle activation for our listeners, I'm not talking about just doing a little five minutes, spin bike warm-up to activate the most we're talking about, like can you pop? Your glued right now. Like do it right now. Guys key squeeze your right? But Sheikh can do it while you're sitting or standing. How about the left one? I know puckering up a little bit. Yeah. Puckered up. That's two of them together. Yeah. We always use the Q. I was in a Senator once magic fingers going up people like that isn't a Q everybody. Okay. Yeah. Aggressive Q, but right. That is, I believe that's what you're referring to you. Because if we're on able to pop these gluts this is the baseline. This is the fundamental pop gluts hitting the sea key, and a piano. It's like being being being if you can't do that. How do you spec to be able to play frere Jacques or whatever the easy piano songs are? So twinkle Waco hitting three keys at once. It's not going to sound good. These are the fundamental keys to make every movement of your life. And so we do teach people how to what each one, and we'll only know that once you understand what. And it's not I know is two hundred twelve or whatever how muzzle turned twelve bones, but usually muscles functions in groups, and there's primary muscles understand that can really solve a lot. So it's not really as daunting task that people might think. Right. The basic muscles, even understanding your Serena's muscle. Your trap muscles. Your core muscle, the back muscles gluten muscles, the quads the hamstrings, the calf and the feet muscles, like those right there, just that group of right there, that'll help most people achieve three levels up from where they are right now, permanently when inter stand those, and I mean, that's something we fully believe in his muscle activation is because we sit like you said, a couple minutes ago, we sit all the time muscles go door just because the body positions. We put ourselves in go dormant. Then all of a sudden the way I'm sitting right now is not conducive to good posh. Oh, hi. I mean I have to sit in an awkward position. But that's the healthiest in the most powerful position. So what people we see all the time they go to the gym their gluts returned up. They wanna start squatting left and all of a sudden, my back hurts. Yeah. Because you're not using your mind wants to do, what our body is telling us not to. Quote like that once very profound. Yeah. Learning like the difference of the connection of what your body can do your mind, connecting with an acknowledging the maximum capability of your body's current state. We won't get injured if we're in that if our mind is connected with our bodies maximum ability and acknowledges that we won't get injured unless there's a massive traumatic injury, right? Because we won't allow ourselves to step outside that boundary. That's not something that will happen overnight away. No time there arose. Avow was one of the quotes is like nothing in this world is worth having doing in less requires hard work effort, and dedication, I've envied many men in my life. But I've never envied a man who led an easy life. I've envied many men who led difficult lives and led them. Well, I've always liked that because this shit is, of course, it's hard work, but it's worth. It always is just the process of the hard work and kit in the results is probably go the gym and push ourselves and feel good and strive to get careers and into improve the way we look, it's like it feels good work for it. When we only have one life. So might as well try to make the best life possible. What else are we on your deathbed and regretting? All I probably should've exercise a little early. I probably should have fixed that knee injury, because all of a sudden, when you have grandkids, I can't play with my grandkids because my back hurts, and then all of a sudden you're too far gone. And you're like. I've got eighty five years of pain. It's pointless. It's like my, my dad right now. Very challenging sixty nine I was just last night. It was like, I don't know what Mike, I just think like eight years ago, I was in the gym, and I was like being strong, and he's at a quadruple bypass two hip replacements, and now he's having heart flutter. I just don't know what happened from a third eye perspective, the writings been on the wall. I know what happened. My dad's been three hundred pounds. He's McDonald's Burger King. His workouts are very short. He's not going through full range in their his boys. Not listening to his body. And of course, these are the results, and then they what occurs, I've seen painful see this is like one pops up, and then it's almost like put that out and then another pops up. And now it's like how can you enjoy retirement right now? And he's just once again, this occurs from him being unaware of what is bodies telling him in focusing other things, and now this stuff, because what we don't, if we don't focus on our finances. Goes crazy. Negative real quick. We move you get current. I have a better team right now a great team that's helping before if I stopped boxing, and all it would just go down and disappear. Yeah. And so that building that awareness, and that would likely allow people to see far enough in front of them to be able to take a five degree turn now rather than hit the rocks and have to go ninety degrees left in nine degrees. Right. And the people are in pain, and you know what your like knees, all screwed up? You've got your like I would need a squad. Guess what you hit the rocks man woman, you hit the rocks. You gotta take a left turn now get around that island. And then you've got to keep your course again he did this yourself. Thank you so much for listening to the strong design podcast. If you find our show helpful in any way, please, let us know by leaving a five star review on, I tunes, go to strong design podcast dot com. Your review will help us reach more listeners and continue to change lives. Let's get back to the show. Movies, proactive, not reactive more focus on solutions. We create solutions solution based empowering solution based, why our mission is to empower people to transform pain into a powerful mind and body. So that's what our mission statement is. That's awesome. Some move. You move you dot com. That's everything's on the letter you. Yeah. Move the letter u dot com. Don't why are you? We paid a lot of money to have the letter you was move. You taken ready before you know, we want to you, because the you actually stands for university, because we're move university. Okay graduation. So we just slice off everything. But we slice up that never city and there's you have. No, I like that. That's good to know. They can find you said on a website move. You dot com. Facebook, Instagram YouTube podcast typecast. Yeah. We occasionally host. We. Kasur Maly, a ho seminars occasion. That's on our page as well. Cool. Yeah. So Mike, it's been a privilege. Like I said, I followed you guys for a while. Love your content. It is entertaining. But most importantly, it's educational, and you get it, it's not just an overnight fix. It's not something that somebody can just use quickly and then expect these immediate results. It's like it's a lifestyle it starts now and continues on for the rest of their lives. Always always. We always continue improving in these these improvements. The cool thing about what we teach is many of these most of these movements that make up the bigger movements to create the movement movement. They are subtle moves, and you could do while you're line is Starbucks, while you're doing your hip flexor stretch. A lot of the exercise that people are doing, there's another layer of depth to them, that will help them to apply these principles to what they're already doing in their life. So it actually most of it takes. No extra time. It's just apply to what people ready doing. Right. And it's a level of diving inward in listening and learning. Understand body. So it becomes an inner peace as well. Like shutting out the noise external focusing inward if he was really good to do that, anyway, 'cause that's an investment ourselves. Yeah. Everyone agrees. Investing in yourself. Always pays dividends in the long run in NASA work continuing our journey to, to help make that investment. Make it simple make it fun. And we believe everybody in the world needs to understand this, and then everything all the results from an artist going to be better than what they thought they're going to be, he'll blow their minds and all of a sudden, it'd be like, wow, my life is totally different. We hear all time. Yeah, yeah, it feels really good. That's my fuel. I've never driven money. I want some things house, a couple of houses Harza boats like, like some nice, things like that most is those success stories, those testimonies, people seem in public. We successor share. Those are the real fuel. There's millions of people that don't know about this yet. Stuck thinking there's no other way there's people in line goes necessary surgeries. People stuck meds. They're just blow. They had this thing, their whole life better. So how do we get in front of every single one of them? Help them help. Connect them with the truth. Love it. So you're doing a great thing. I love it. Keep it going movie dot com. Again, you can get in touch with these guys. They've got an incredible team here in California, but they're international they're all over the place and they've got an awesome thing going on. So if you want to feel better live longer, live, happier than just not have to spend hours and hours and hours in the gym doing stuff. You don't want to do and taking crazy pills like movie guys. Right. Thank you for making the driver. You guys earn incredible. I discovered critical batch not too long ago. And I'm like, wow, this is a resource base. I mean, there's so much incredible content. You've done truly create yourself to be a massive resource database for everything running health fitness body. And in fact that you guys came out to us do appreciate that. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. And thank you for. Also getting the word out teachable the proof. It helping guiding people that best life through movement. Thanks, buddy. Hey move. You dot com. Check them out. Mike. It's been a privilege. Thank you, Brian, thanks listeners, have a great day, and we will see you on the next episode of the strung bydesign podcast. Thank you, so much for listening to strong by design podcast. If you found value in today's episode please subscribe, so that more people can find out about our show. Plus you don't wanna miss any future episodes. The amazing guests and topics we have lined up for you.

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ENZ 344  How To Launch A Profitable Event Space Business With Neo Daviso

Escaping The Real Estate Investing Newbie Zone - Make Money In Real Estate Wholesaling Properties For Quick Cash

1:00:35 hr | 1 year ago

ENZ 344 How To Launch A Profitable Event Space Business With Neo Daviso

"You're listening to escaping the REI newbies. Own podcast where you'll learn the underground closely guarded secrets that will revolutionize your real estate business. This podcast is all about helping you. Exit a real estate Newcastle and Etter Financial Freedom building up your real estate thrown this is escaping the Rei newbies own podcast and now your host Real Estate Investor Entrepreneur World Traveler and nationwide mentor. Chris Bruce Our guys welcome back to another episode of escaping. Rei newbies Once again you know who I am your host Chris. Bruce Listen I told you guys on the intro. I have a very special guests a friend of mine. You know I'll bring rockstars that are completely killing it in their business and helping employees providing tons of value to the community. Let me go away no farther than bringing our guest homey near my day going Bro. What outgrow happy happy to be here. Meh podcasts fire. I get the opportunity. Listen to so many episodes thanks Bring the umbrella Man Good man you notice pandemic stuff going on. We still shaking moving so blessed Maso. Listen anybody that may not have yet checked you out on instagram. Which I mean most Ahmadis probably should have the right and I'm a guy's GonNa make sure that I put his instagram handle on the show. No so he can make sure you follow but tell me a little bit you know. Take me back because you've been in business for prior logged in Fars as entrepreneur semi back to. Would you go before? And then how you got into become an actual. Yes so for me off allows entrepreneurs as a kid meaning hustling candy bars in like CD's and stuff like that. You know everybody had a story. Whatever was selling at that point but for me will really got me be honest with just the kind of fast four song spent too much time with my story. My Dad been in jail since I was two. I got kicked out of high school got kicked out of college. I've been fired from ten jobs so I tried. The job thing I tried. The schools are pretty much. Tried everything under the sun in order for me to make it out here in one two days ahead of fifty right now and I got a special a favorite quote by Oliver Wendell. Holmes which mind is expanded to a new concept or idea is hard to go back to those original way. Thanks when I first went to nine grave it will only fifty African Americans in the whole school out of a thousand thousand minar prior to me going to school. I looked up to the drug dealers. Outdoor success was cars clothes. I S without success was until I went. There saw kids driving. Bmw SCHOOLS USE Spend the night up several their homes. They got big mansions pop hospitals. So that was my first idea like near Mighty is actually more my second thing and this where I really had my weakening was at my job that I got fired at work that the private airport Negation in my whole purpose of the job. Our poop boy I will go on planes. Get off the plane but every single day Bro Millionaires Billionaires daily getting on off of their planes like every day in they were everyday people who had no clue. There were billionaires mocks millionaire so in my mind I believe that this could be for me and the only way to really create that life would be a business owner vast off by our job In at that moment people around me even a family members. Like you'll never amount anything the rate that you're going to go. You won't be a father cellmate. Just they were saying a lot of negative things in a problem where most people go wrong. Bruce's tell people all the time never listened today so in with all these other people say about their life and they start living their life in that. Zack say manner. So for me was my man. Maybe I maybe there right in that snapped out of in at that. Moment Brag decided to take ownership over my life and I started that business. Thirteen years ago. My first business was through trump and I made a commitment when I started the business asset at this time is only two ways this one where it has to work or has worked entrepreneurship or death for me so fast for thirteen years later. Multiple businesses later from Spaces of two immense faces vitamin store to be a company to a whole bunch of other things that we got going on on it Austin from hocine concept of it has the worker has to work and at that very moment I became mentally unemployable and actually believe more. People could be successful as entrepreneurs if they stopped giving themselves other options. Now being done to this is like an actor or actress moving to La. We'll go to La but if it don't work out the moment that you say but if it won't work you already told you subconscious mind. It will work so you subconscious mind is GonNa make that become a physical manifestation. So only told myself that. I don't know another way down Bro. Last thirteen years to a different way I I don't own a 401k is on how to fill out. A and I don't. I have never had a resume. I Dunno none of that stuff it. I just know work. Yeah you plan. B. Is still make plan a work period so so before we really get into what you actually do because of course like you say you have several business guys. We'RE GOING TO HIGHLIGHT SOMEBODY BUSINESSES. Because some of this stuff indefinitely sinking goes into real estate or the listen. Obviously most you have real estate investing business. We're going to talk about this minute but I love man anybody who I can. I can connect with debt like Lowe's first developments much as I do. You know like I. I love it because I can tell you re books. I know you like this stuff. They don't they don't teach in school. You're not gonNA hear it on the TV show. You know what I'm saying. Radio show so like for you. How did you just get into the personal development? Like what led you down this way to get. So you know what I'm saying. Invested in Educating Yourself. In just taking yourself your mental to a higher level. Rather be so crazy. I honestly don't remember what did it. I don't know if I was listening. I think I was listening to Ted Turner one day or I've got a hold of the law of attraction. Is something happened that I hold a I watched actual good question? I want to go back and retrace because this intangible gotta work work. I've been writing information for years up. Misspeaking things on insistance years. I've writing these things out the years but it started with me watching the law of attraction me Wash Will Smith as six minutes twenty seven seconds video. I used to watch three or four times a day. Where you talk about the law of attraction and alchemist just willing your way towards something in a red thinking rich Seven habits a highly active people not just started jumping into this. I didn't take it as serious as I do. You know as of the last five years but I realized that Yo everything that Iran down manifest and everything. I'm speaking on manifest and so I figure I'm only going to speak positive. Most people speak instructional beer light and then crystal me. Bro Achieve Hallway through High School. Now await counts. I cheated on everything that I did do. Now when I started getting personal development and I actually started to apply and things that I learn what I tell people all the time the more you learn at some point you remove L. Star earnings. So I'm a dictated because nobody's doing for me. Mentally I noticed is the number one reason why I haven't had a job. Most people success isn't based on just skill set. A lot of their success is really based on their mind. What you're saying is I tell people all the time. Normally the enemy is the most successful because they chose not be not because they lacked the skillset they talk the stuff out of it so realized that our mind is like a superpower is like I just have been grow. It ain't even about the money. It's just like go with our mind. We could will anything towards this if we if we if we Period would work. Yeah absolutely see you know. The thing is is like what happens because like I talked to a lot of my young entrepreneurs. Some are my older entrepreneurs but the thing we had a conversation that like you just talked about. Some of the things will hold. People back is that they're just condition for ten fifteen twenty thirty years of just you know what I'm saying is is not as not. They're not conditions of that. This can work. They're not conditioned that you know I can create anything and so I tell people I hey man. That's the reason why you have to replace Your old information. Where new information software bro? You gotta you gotTa go down your parents and people David download so much garbage in your brain with so many years you literally goal Repr- ever knew resettling you computer. You gotta go turn yourself. Oh move it old junk out of your brain and start down. I started downloading law attraction. I started downloading information. I started downloading. What successful people do? And that's the other problem bro. I feel like so many others and I'm sorry to say our parents messes up more and more than anything sometimes because they tell us. The bill wallabies things that they didn't do that. They think will make you successful. And sometimes they don't even make you successful right so I just think it's just you got to reprogram in identify. What makes you happy? And what can actually generate income now. Absolutely yeah I mean like you said it's just the condition of man. You know some people their condition because their neighborhood Unfortunately but at the end of the day what I tell people is that there's no excuse now see before we had somewhat of excuse because we didn't have access right we we'd access to get through that door now. Internet it gives access everything we can literally learn anything we want with the push from ourselves officers literally no excuses at all. Abra when I I WANNA learn a wholesale you WANNA learn her real estate these different forms. Us Guy like you can literally go get on your email lists and get gang sent to you every day. You can literally come on. Podcast in listening to the info was out here Bro. Like I put up on my pays of gruesome say. Oh I'm paying everybody. Five thousand this amazing and that were or secret society this. I put a post on my instagram. I said hey do spend our day. Listen to my podcast. It would change your world. You'd be able to start a business. Is it probably got like a thousand wykes ahead of three hundred people click it? I wrote the same post. Hey I'm GonNa pay you five thousand dollars today to go listen to my podcast and then the caption. It says. I'm GonNa pay you five thousand dollars a day to go. I'm going to pay you five thousand nine. You're going to be paid five thousand dollars. Listening to my podcast. All you gotTa do is go. Listen to all of these episodes applauded information in a will turn into cash. Now we got thirty five hundred four thousand people in the same exact thing but so many of this are only focused on money like we'll go do it but a lot of them are willing to do the work. I just said the same thing in a previous posts like you can make anything happen with access to the right information. You are doing different things that we're doing now because we have access to information and like you said earlier is no better time than now get access to information like people are giving the game taught. You're given the game right right. You know nothing to man you know is that I tell people. Be An entrepreneur. Is Like interrail Mike Tyson. You gotta get ready to get beat up around you have you have you. Hey make us hit you. You're going to get knocked down. You gotta get up. But that's the thing. Is that people you know what I like about school is that we get penalized for making a mistake. You know what I'm saying. We get we get penalized for making the error. You F Giving d given below average and so it conditions us they. We can't nail right because if we go out and make decisions we go. Try to buy a property. We'll get approved for the we go out and try to make a sale and nobody buys we penalize soaps for us. You know we don't want won't even WANNA get penalized all right so we're rather not do anything. And that's the issue that people are facing right now and that's the issue I have about school is that school is teaching people to be penalized or making mistakes. When as entrepreneurs we learn more from our mistakes than we do ourselves listeners. Abra is so crazy you will now you know we call them felon. We just call that testing. All we know is testing and optimizing. We are looking to bell so we know not to do that. Crap the next Ta and you know people start looking at failures data points. Oh crap we know not to do this next time. A Bruce told me don't do this. He fell that that before. Try It this way. Yeah yeah so that. That's the thing is that it needs to change. So let's let's talk about things like that you're doing so before we get into business to is that you know not only. Are you having a busy? Educating people but you believe in the future which is urging right. So what was the idea? Come for the for the business. Lashkar's to to educate the children yet. So I'll give you two parts while net number one. I believe everybody should develop a catalog like a lot of us. You know we hear about music catalogues and you know I think should have. Ip Intellectual Property. So one thing is created my actress. Inertia Flash cars roll because I realized that our school system is fell in our kids. Teach them old antiquated and outdated information from one hundred years ago. Why are they still learning about Christopher Columbus? Why are they even even learning about Algebra? Something for the most for our The last time you did Algebra like I can't win the last time I did Algebra. I can't tell you when the last time I did geometry still what I'm trying to do for parents and kids it's opened up their mindset to a new way in. I'll give you give you guys a prime example. Most parents this going to go to work kit. Go find yourself a good job. So they go through that Bruce at fourteen years old right so now making seven dollars an hour so a seven fourteen. Twenty one twenty only work four hours a day to make in twenty eight dollars a day. Don't understand things Sunday. Making fifty six dollars. Expended OUR GONNA work spend an hour. Coming home from work. Is Our repair work. So now networking or send fourteen hours to make fifty six bucks. Now at money is taxed now a really making thirty dollars. You divide that by the fourteen is probably like three thousand something out so now your kid has now been conditioned that this is the only way to do so. They go in another year. Get maybe a dollar raise another year get a dollar raise but they still never make enough so for me. I wanted to change their minds. Santista words like nor shit to wars like assets teast and were like employer right. See the words that that that will put them in a mindset that their bosses growth strategy investors angel investors so I specifically putting these cars the train them let them not to be business owners on the other hand going to go get the job. I teach them entrepreneurship. So for example I teach kids three things. Joe First thing you need to do is get the right mindset like you told US school was telling. Us fell fell fell. I tell them we've welcome rejection because the more nose we hear the closer we get the. Yes no means next opportunity for us. So I'm once you'd be okay with rejection because that mean you're getting so good at talking to people that you can keep going without losing enthusiasm. Bisley. We'll get to sell so once they get there right now. I'll tell them to find a product. Then they find a product. I tell them to I'll tell them to develop a sales pitch. Hey Chris Bruce. I'm a thirteen year. Just start my old t-shirt brand Moguls Would you like forty days shirts? Only twenty bucks so now. This kid is now making three four hundred a day now. Eight hundred a weekend over the course of a sixteen twenty four maybe thirty two hundred over a year over thirty five grant versus two hundred a month so create. These things is the train them like. Yo you need to be own by. You'll meet talk. All the time about people financial literacy and a credit being not right with the car works and with these curriculum show. Here's how you go get right. You gotTa beat the system before the system because it's hard to get the system once you get beat are it is hard man. And so that's why I salute you man because I think that that you know every house. Oh she had these flash cards and ROKU ME BY listening. How can they get access to this? I'm GONNA be honest. Even come out yet. They probably will come out and out funny thing. I haven't pushed him out but I don't make it my business right to give these out by the time this pocket if there's so. I think it's entrepreneurship flash CARDS DOT COM SO Desa site size man. Worked on but by the time someone listened they'll be ready to go so and everybody to free Toubro. I'm giving them away. Free APP for chronic on a people. They can get them for free. 'cause I WANNA help you. They just cover shipping. Okay cool cool guys I mean would you can also do too is just you know if you haven't go ahead and follow the Davis right neo? David L. job is to be self with us. Bob Neal Davis would own end up. There you go there you go so make sure you're out you're attacking that way again. I'm included his name on the show notes as well to. Let's let's talk about the event space so this is the me you know when I remember when I saw you before we even met at thrive and I was like Damn. I was like this is different. You know what I'm saying is a most people advertise. This is different business niche. I've never even heard about this. I didn't even I. Obviously people are profited. But I never saw anybody teaching his nobody I saw it was like Nah he owned his own. So you know I was like a name. We ran into him. At thrive are member. So tell me a little bit about. How does this business even work for somewhat? Yeah so bro. So funny because the business was actual mistake mine I was. I was doing a bunch of ending events where I'll go set up my shirts and sell my t shirt brandon. Thomas Billy I will go set up shirts at these different people bay using our sale my product. I noticed that I could sell my product When I got a hundred two hundred three hundred people in one room versus me riding around Driving China. Meet this person Start doing over and over again finding some success and I say you know maybe I'm always a guy you know most people like you and I. We're curious someone. Tell us something works you and I. We don't do too much question and we do. It can make money host on Wednesday. We like how right we is it. Will it work now? So I had my own event saw start having been at their event after Bruce and I realized Joe I wasn't really making money because the person who is making money was the personal xy all the venue. Because they're giving you the venue you're giving them cash in the owner is not even there at all and you just literally renting a open space. You're doing a whole production yourself. Meaning the person who rented it so not only. Are you paying too owner the venue? Now you pay your decorators Japan tables and whatever else you need. That's on that one person renting but no matter what no one come to Europe or one hundred people come me. He is the owner. The venue I own pay periods so I started to do this over and over and over again in mind in this. We're really got crazy. We had a Christmas event coming up in the whole era. I've been reading from this one. They wanted to grant around anyone that two thousand dollars. So that mean if we didn't cover that two thousand bar minimal may come to me like you're a need that to grant gotta drive a hundred two hundred people here. Fourteen to make financial sense go ended up happening Bro. We had the Agata charity. And I'm like man we can't use this. We looking to do a fundraiser. Because we won't make we gotta give them regret so. I found the smaller venue enact. The time he gave it to four hundred bucks in my idea was by get twenty people. A hundred two hundred people come auguring twenty bucks. They all bring three told me to peace. We made ahead as major event because every year we give a thousand kids brand new toys. A hundred of them get brain bikes here. Cuts of Moon Ounces Candy. Santa costs the whole works every year. We've been doing at thirteen years now so but I couldn't do it and I couldn't do it about a month or he. Let me use his menu row week later. I started getting all these calls. Yo Bro that you've been you know about you. Use It for this obey job. Rahmeh call after the call mind you. I didn't only venue. I just met the guy and I was just telling me eight eight eight months so when I started to do I started answer like Yo a you need. This day I will hang up. Hold on call him on other only eight available. I did that for a Year Street. Bro. Helping out is my mentor. Bilges instagram a hundred two hundred people to ten thousand followers in college. I did that for your. Outta make any money from it but I learned in tire business is someone said this again. Remember the guy who says outright you ever thought about getting your own space of Bri ended up getting my space and literally arrested history. So the reason why tell people as model was so crazy growth amis no matter what people are going to bed spaces? Every day of the week. They had a wetting bad baby showers. David Brooks time as they had seminars every event you will not go to that. Someone's been you having all these type of events so I might would have. You could be on the receiving bill and be able to make this money Ma. You had the junk removal business. I had to move in company a lot of my businesses. I have fruit trucks. They were Tom Intensive. Or It's if I wasn't there they will work couldn't afford fruit. Chuck the pay anybody because only one hundred bucks debt eight. Maybe two hundred at best. I can't afford to give us a one hundred dollars a day when I wasn't making money moving company. I couldn't afford a bunch of worker so as me and maybe one or one or two other people and it will take me all day to make four hundred dollars five hundred dollars all day eight hours. We got hope that saying junk removal it would take us in order comedic complete a five hundred dollar job growth. I need the truck I need to other workers. We need trash bags. We need trash. Can't it's a whole lot of working? At the end of the day you will walk will like uninformed so I did this use when I came across the idea that I could just open my door for you. Bruce. Lets you come in you. Pay Two three weeks prior to you even coming in the door and then I can do two of them events today and make that type of cash I was so so this is why I tell people all the time. You gotta come up with a business at some point that won't need your involvement once you get that thing. Roll like how you teach. Peak water flipping homes. Virtually would just enter all union. GonNa be in that city. Is it just access to information This is something that we let years but now we got access. I'm watching people live now so this is why Chris this place so much. August is off crazy because you know what my mom's boyfriend hit me up. I gotTa Tell You This is like I like two months ago. It was like you know so what you know about basic 'cause you know I'm a real estate. I'm like you know I'll I'll really not by lane. I said a Mommy Neil. He was on the Webinar today. A gravy so tell me like for someone because almost listening to this and they were all right. Let's make sense being able to not have to trade. My hours were dollars and trading value right but they may be having the objection Off DO I need to to get my own out what you know what? I'm saying. What they may stop me from being able to get my own so one of the things strategies that are teachers that most people not teach us on my workshop is that you can lease the location right so a lot of people like damn. I don't have credit to buy. I don't have the money to buy. I can't even get in the game so strategies that I teach you. I'm GONNA show you how to Lisa mingled show you how to go find these different locations the right size which knee. So that's one of objects Hey you are now. You are allowed to lease see so when things. It should less liability more profitability. So before when I first started bruce. I'm like Dang I don't feel like a boss I don't own the building I know real boss. That's how and then one of the record I mean did a podcast which you are literally asked Doug Baio I got the opportunity to myspace. Maybe make up to seventy five hundred dollars a month I should do it but I won't own the building. He says. Better have a bird in hand in had one at all so getting a space me not owning it years ago. That was one of the best decisions that are made. That was the thing that got me. Debt Free because I started making money without me having the beater I started being able to get an influx of cash without being tied down to a soccer payoff. I bills I can make all these other. Investments are made the money with that one space went and got another speaks so wanted. Those objections is Yo- you can go lisa so that would be one of your first step. She WanNa do act on you WanNa just start marketed. Telling everybody about what you've got. Everyone needs to space in your city anywhere in the world. Do Google event spaces in my view. We'll see a bunch of them. Come up and if you not aggressively market when show you how to market letting everybody know what you got going on? Advertising doing direct mails. Don't all the different strategies to let everybody know you exist? You won't make the money in my name of the game is out. You don't have to make ten twenty grand a month extra two thousand a month. What if you just as your office and then you make all the extra money on the weekends you just now liquidated your office is a free. You still make an extra two three grandma so me. I'm not saying I ain't tell you to get rich with this. Will your mom and get you out of your job my last job. I made fifteen hundred dollars a month. That was forty hours a week. Our going to work come home from work appearing for work fifty five hours a week. Two hundred twenty hours. I made fifteen hundred dollars after taxes. I gave my life to this job now due to events in order to make to make that type of money which I used to give my whole my whole body everything take take me off in exhaust the crap out of me but fifteen hundred dollars a month so now. I teach people that game. I just suggest anyone listening. A Yo- once you use all the strategies that Bruce Tell you wholesaling get next some cash. Go Get your spot. You won't do the first. My last my security deposit. You'RE GONNA do follow my. Mvp MODEL minimum viable product. You make grand getting started off like you WanNa get in the door so you start making some cash and you can fix as you go along so resisted is a model that I loved growing. It's just a it's a secret model that most people not even even aware as far as people making money in people been making money. Don't miss the ever Bro. In eleven eleven easy people listening like they're trying to think about. How can I get some more cash flowing right and you know one thing that I know you agree with something that always talk about is that it's not always about everybody quitting your job and become an entrepreneur right? Yeah because some people that you know. There's nothing wrong with being an Indian as long as you doing what you love but at the same time you need to have some investments you need to have something where you can generate. Income outside of your job is no longer is mandatory. A world necessity. Not this time. I mean we see that going on with the pandemic people lose jobs. Left the right file for unemployment you know stimulus checks and is like if you had an event space all two thousand nineteen. You was begging up your money even if you a whole right now. You didn't put up that cash flow. You survive these times and Bruce La Salsa. Oh you won't make money right now. Listen listening as we still booking events in a couple of months like meaning May June. We're still and guess what we have to give it. We haven't gave one refund back for the month of April all. We're doing moving into new moss and we still keep the cash so the other thing remember. We teach financial literacy so out while while money may not be come in from there. We got other foes until you owe town. One source of income isn't a luxury Issa liability. Because if one thing happened to you you're done threat. I'm not even stripping at my spots not opened because I can't control a virus I physically can't control that but I can't control I use my finances and that this is GonNa pass at some point in time and when they do pass their personal studying right now persons in a gym right now when I say in the gym studying practicing learning the game is daytime for is overweight because why everybody else chiller we work absolutely all right and so another thing you you you tap into in a little bit about this You know of course Doug you know I like the Danes which guys you you probably saw. Doug deputies on episode of a couple of weeks ago Talking about you know getting your personal property and just that casual so I like that. You know that you say you teach people other strategies not just invest pays now we can go. Maybe buy rental property right. Your skibo beings were Doug and I love I love. I get the opportunity. How bought with Doug is just is like Bro. We we like you can be free. It takes a few small things like Sony. People don't know this strategy this will be the number one thing that I would do. Right now If I if I'm working job you're too big expense too that most people have is your house. Which is your mortgage or your rent. But most people. It's rent if you have a job which most people pass. I want you to apply. I want you to go Colorado closer. Hey I'm interested in buying MIA atrop- plex a duplex acqui- De Willing downgrades. You're living for a year ears so you can get financial control and guess what happens you them having to get a trump. I'm making these numbers up. Because they all buried differences plex especially with these times. People ought to be selling their stuff. A lot of people who are renting are going to benefit in the suburbs right. So what happens what you will do. You can only go find your trump plex two hundred grade only putting three point five percent down using the fha finance. You only need it prior to. I don't know if they're going to change. But a five hundred eighty credit score the put three point five percent down. Let's head two hundred grand ten percent two hundred grand twenty grand so Timpson it has ten. You're at about seventy five hundred dollars in cover your closing costs and stuff a seller's assistance and even they don't may be upwards the twelve or thirteen grand so for seventy five hundred dollars. Let's say you can go? Buy TRIPLEX is already finished because that's one of the requirements unless you two or three kings is already finished. You move in ready units. You're going to run out the other two units the second unit you run out. It is now paying your mortgage. The third unit. You run out is now a paying your car note and maybe something else. So what? You literally just did automatically. You just killed your biggest overhead costs. Which is your home right. Which is your which is your home in your car so now. Guess what I'm going to. I'm going to stay low. I'm GonNa live like this for the next few years. Now you stacking you you start and you get in the host cell. You get an invest face truck and you know whatever you want because you are now living for free. Most people are in the whole or so as always reacted. You can never get out of it trying to do this because we were never educated so about five eighty credit score six hundred six twenty. Go Look in the SEC. Gibney because all you need is two years tax returns last sixty days of bank statements and the W. Two. You are literally one day away from if you got these things in order calling somebody a mortgage broker approving you go by yourself a property and now you could get Outta parent. Most people don't know you WANNA pay significantly less with rent. Then you are. I mean with your mortgage danger. Actual red dodgers reach out to tell people to get free Bra. And that's one of the strategies that Doug New Light you'll start with that first and then you could add on other ones but we gotta get your own income. We want you living close to free as possible and also bruce. You're not stressing. Now you and I stress right now in these times John Stressing. Yeah Yeah I mean you see people going Knoxville outfits toilet paper crazy broke and also the mindset thing so in God so y'all clear with me I'm not I'm not in a rush definitely not and I'm not we're not in a place of judge. I mess my credit up. I went to college unnecessarily. Oh this student loan debt. I checked a whole lot of stuff. Old The irs. I did a whole lot of these. So I'm telling you so you don't have to go repeat the stupid crap I. It took me eight to ten years to get out of debt debt. I was because I didn't know these principles early awesome once you get into debt. It's hard hitting no quick. Fix THE GETTING OUT OF DEBT. Getting out of bed like the difference. I WanNa right now. 'cause I in debt all day long for good that education the proper education not college education master Mayes in court. But you have to know the difference. So I'm telling you is this gruesome short. Said you all his stuff so you know. Make the mistakes we made. I don't want people to go through crap. I went through Bro. That's why gets before they mess up their credit injected up hard. Yeah Man 'cause I was just talking to Then five-hundred Band we just had a conversation and I was saying like you know the thing about us as a as as a culture where we young is that we look at credit right dead specifically credit credit cards as free money you. I remember what time man I went to Miami Memorial Weekend. With My Boys Leo. Come down here knowing then. We'll I didn't have the money and I'm like I'll put the credit card ready maxed it out never paid it off is just stupid stuff like that. We we literally have not like my parents didn't teach me out credit and I don't know your peers but pride because no one tornado. Yep Bruce row people get yo we in the same cycle. Their parents didn't teach them so they can't teach you right. So would people gotta understand. I want them to write this down. Use this information. Poverty ends with me and wealth begins with me like it's you gotta break generational curses and I'll give you guys example. Most people parents here. Bro And again I'm not. I went to college so we hear me bashed in college. I'm only doing it because I went there right. You should be going to college to be a doctor. A lawyer Accountant. Anything that requires a degree. Like you can't adopter. You need it. Lawyer yes but most of our parents go to college. Go get you a good job. They set you up for the forty. Forty Forty Bruce Biannual. Good Job Forty Hours. A week worked at good job for the next forty years. Elapsed didn't live on forty percent of your income and my weekend low forty percent of our income because we wasn't even ever educated when we would one hundred percent. We ain't me being able to live so our parents do and people do is go. Do this go do that. Go to college. Our parents didn't go. They're telling us to go do this because they heard. This is what works and I asked people bruce backwards me like do me a favor. I WANNA get your I. I'll give me your honest opinion. Everybody how many people here right now today. Want to trade places with their parents. You WanNa have the Cardi drive. You WanNa have a house. They live there. You went ahead a debt that they had. You wanted to go on trips that they go on. You WanNa work the job. They had you WANNA do everything they want to do. Right now. Row is so crazy out of one hundred people. Every time it'd be one person. Say Our trade with them listening. You got to change you. Get you gotta get. I get parenting advice from my mother. Now Business Vice. I love you. Mom Allow my grandma bruce more than anything. She passed away but she told me before. I start traveling. Don't travel baby you'll to pass for baby is dangerous out there. I'm from West Philly. I've got a better chance of getting shot. Walking down the street in Hatton into meal Ro Robin Countries. All around the World Bruce. Yami out onto about listen to my grandma zero. And that's most people they listen to unqualified. People for advice is way to kill. A big dream is to introduce you to a small MA aircraft every day. And Mom. What you think about this don't do. It are cool and CO worker. I'm thinking about starting my own business what you think about it. I want to get your 401k. So they're small modest kilt and suffocated you crap before you even got it all. That's why I only talk to people like you every day. I don't know no other conversations but how will become successful? I don't know nothing else. I can't talk about that. I can't talk about scarcely. I can't talk about gossip. I can't talk about negative. Nothing that none of those things align where I'm going and what. I'm not understand that road. Most people put themselves in their predicament. 'cause you're listening to the wrong people so they're not listened to the right info Tap into today. 'cause I'm the same way like I tell you the story like I was working at Bank of America and I started my business. You Know Flipping Bank on properties during the harder recession. Two thousand nine and I told me while I was going to leave and they was like nobody's buying real estate right now in. This is a bad time to buy. And what will world is anybody. Live it right but I I knew that I was talking to somebody small mind so it never stops even more mom. Quit my job. Mom was telling me I need to stop. You know Boxes at night at Walmart. Just half you know like not. I can't do that. That's derail from the plant but my thing is that me and you we have stronger minds of light. You know. Listen we can easily ignore someone that we fill as not qualify right. But you got people that they live with with unqualified person. That's talking estee husband. I heard who works like yeah. You know what I saw. I met you lady Bro. Went out this is before we wait. We still haven't wait. We had the medicines basically since vegas so it only been one time but I met. You Lady at a conference. Somebody May. That's the winning couple right there. They in the line and you know how important is the which you significant other? And they tell you. I don't think we should do is like draining you. My wife brought on care. What I you know. A lot of people do this. I gotta I gotta get the white but a husband permission. Why people. Hey you ready to start Your Business. I gotta ask the why. Why do you have to ask somebody about better in the family situation? I can't tell you when the last time I asked my wife good. We should do something on my mind if I notice is going better to family. Not Getting permission when outcome homebake just invested twenty grand in my education. It's going allow to do this. This sounds good to me. That was great a lot of people around those people so when I think people gotta do. I haven't been in that ridiculous I don't know but you gotta sit down with your husband your wife or your girlfriend. Here's a direction now trying to go trying to go here or no move. You gotTa keep you see duck. He gave his notice she would implore will. We're going to do a property. He said Dad. Don't you get me a rolex? I've been going right there. Bruce Arrack what do you mean this? I give him my wife me author choose Gucci Bay. I'm goal which broke row. Give people gain these protests like yours. They are giving you the game to get mentally unfree like once. You get a hold of financials in your mind you control the bornet right right right but you know some people. Math Is like in a relationship is that they may have never brought up or it might have been scared to tell their significant other drains. You know what I'm saying like I got one of my you know. He's he's one of my former students. He's now coach in mind. I wanted to shout her. Mom NOT GONNA mention his name on it but it's bizarre but he went through something and I explained to them. I listen you know the issue that you may be facing. I know you want to move for with your dreams. And keep a real. I listen if you really want your dreams come true you either have to try to ride our. You're you're you're living in other to hopefully come to align what you or if you really look like love this person and you really not like you might have to say. Forget your dreams as a hard tracy decision to make and I was proud of him because he was like. You know anything worth me. Losing my dream because then I'm always had at regret in my mind. You know what I'm saying like am I should if I would you know what I mean. So it's like it's a harder loose wrote this. I tell people this time disciplined ways regret ways. Turns you you mess around with Mike? But the next twenty years they've done y'all just never even got the where you gotta go. Now you gotta live with it. I'm cool broke regret Irish. I rather fell. I read the lose money before on that. Even take a shot at this crap just like say you know what I think Bruce. Another thing I gotta I WANNA ask you a question to school. Here's the thing with other a lot of people I forgot I lost my train though. But what I wanted to know. Was this Bro. Because you told you start Internet marketing in this in old nine. How did you learn about because we wasn't on this and Oh nine like? How did you learn? Would you had a mentor at the time? Where did you yes what does properties? 'cause I I never asked you want to know that. So yes so. What happened was about my first rental property. Two thousand six. My Dad said semi. Would Moore's broken everything about my personal property and Detroit? Michigan took out a loan. Nine thousand dollars. I have my tended in there making money. Unfortunately I didn't know he sold dope according trap house. He got killed now. I'm tenant lists you know what I'm saying. I got a property. I'm paying rent down here. Florida of Norfolk and mortgage on it. And I just couldn't afford both things lined up for close at property unfortunately for the market crash and I couldn't sell it or anything so bass board now. Two thousand seven to seventy workflow. That wasn't market was already starting to crash. Eight four below market crash. We in a recession now bass for two thousand nine. I'm on the Internet. And this dude in Tampa which city I'm in he advertising flip properties. And I'm like Yo he'd SORTA. He showed a house that he had flipped. That was literally right across the street from our daughter's mom house. I'm like does this dude as may fourteen ran across the street from us. I'm over here. Worried about Party Memorial Day weekend in Miami. He just may fourteen grass at NAS mate right to sell abroad. The money from my daughter's mom. Time sheet to invest that. Of course it was ninety seven. This was back in the day when the DVD joints coming out. It wasn't no digital. Had to wait two weeks. Dvd's workers to come here fast. Four anyway I guess I got into a mentor and With Internet marketing started to see was like a soul. I was seeing what he was doing. I was like Yo first off. It was like a Superhero Tom because he changed my mindset. I read a whole bunch of books I got my book as we're tons of blitz literally most of them from what he told me to go get and I would just go get favorable every book man for Work Week. I probably say that are worth airport at. No my top team. They live change for me so I said say Internet marketing when author. Rosales making money I was like. Yo this do is like a superhero. Like he changed my life and I was like you know if I can do the same for somebody else eventually. I want to do that and so then a year later. Two thousand ten towards the end of the year I star like study Internet marketing. I was like one day I will be home. And that's what that's what led me to Internet. Marketing manager is an education and business understanding. Listen you can literally duplicate a lot of us to other people. You know so crazy bro. You say all day in a resonated with me so much like I don't know at that time when I was telling you I was reading thinking rich. I was reading a rich dad. Poor Dad like hours reading books and one of the books that I picked up. What you said was the four hour workweek. This gotta be ten years ago in this a wish raw like I literally. This is something that I truly regret. I read the book before our work. I've learned about the new rich. I learned about everything he stands for but mentally. I didn't grasp it so I'm actually living a four hour work week now. You're living in a four hour week now. Well why did not grasp it? Then you know. I started a fruit truck. I started a junk removal. You know why started those? Because I looked at somebody said. Oh you can do that. I mean you're doing that. How do I started so model? Ben was they weren't talking about Internet. Marketing weren't talking about started. The fruit shot. Because that's what I want with at the time saying Tom. I had the four hour workweek. What because had it had no physical person. Cutler Chris Bruce on wholesaling from his south on his couch. I can't imagine how far I could be right now if I was able to. Really grasp the concept because Outta debt. I would die right in Sudan. All one hundred percents opposing me waiting eight years and then Oh wow internet. Marketing is so. I'm so happy that you had that guy because that was just your eye opener and that's that's a lot of people you have to find your eye opener like there's people out here is making these things happen if they're able to do. It is proof that you can do to like I didn't have a mentor Was Twenty two twenty three where it still an Internet space but if I had a mentor. Eighteen seventeen cm who? I can actually look at two in August. I could be. Successful is back in the day when we went to career debt. I'm sure probably saying what you. I never had an entrepreneur come in is always GRANDPA officer. Firefighter being dot out Bush. I saw somebody who resonated with like you could do this teaching kids Joe. You could do this. They're looking at example. I'm not teaching August than going back. Then Don on target shirt GONNA go to work. I'll go back and just do my thing wish from happy that you were exposed quit garage wish our now but you know another thing too man ninety bring that up that right is when you look at the fire we look at somebody you know. He's Caucasian right. He's he's Caucasian male from wherever he's from and I think the issue back in the day to for a Lotta people including myself at some times that we can't push ourselves elevating or making something happen because we don't see somebody that looked like it's right. There is less important for us. You know me you to share the will to share a people that hey listen look at the things that we have done and understand that we are just like you. We just have more knowledge and more years of experience that you say you noticed so crazy. Though Brooke people bent whoring information for years. I don't know you back in the day. You have overheads like some might say. Yeah I I won't teach somebody this. Was Doug contractor. He did like plumbing. He's fifty five sixty. I won't teach anybody how to do this. I don't want them to take my spot. Gene can do all the work in Philadelphia. Act Urine floated somewhere. I'm not coming out to go get this basis at this time. I'm not going to Las Vegas won't teach other people how to get free. Most people don't know they can be free most people. Don't the reason why there aren't more kid. Entrepreneurs Astra per noor. Their parents have shut down their whole throat. Get a good job. Get a good job in their kids. Wake up every single day. Where's your mom after they were? Where's that at work? So now subconsciously there toll. I had to go to work for my daughter. Bro. I'm not we're not they dimension. College is not even the I is not even the option unless you WANNA be a doctor a lawyer or any of these things in. She won't make way more money being an owner. This whole life growing up. You only know about owning things. You're working in the family business soon as your own metaphysics. She's running all her businesses. I'm creating or her now while she's only two months emerged not attended at your chores. This tendency your businesses that you own so now. They can't even grasp like how much our family won't have jobs. We create. You are a job. Creator Young Lady Your Job Creator Young Man. This is how we gotta start talking to. Are you because it not get a job? I'm stuck here down. Sixty five one of my mentors. They they can retire early noun cool. I I gotta wait to the pension. She don't like what she's doing what she liked. Now I'm GonNa wait to get the pension which you don't like it you don't WanNa do. Let's get out of there. Make less money. Forget the security. You could be doing what you love and you can find another way to make money right now especially with the Internet how to Internet exists then again is free bro out. Hurt me Bro. Like so many people wake up every single day. Hayden what they do broke. People don't know a thirty spent work. It just understanding you know like I always preached the concept of trade in value. Mcdonald's that are trae our out now. That was the biggest thing that I read in those books. That just opened the understanding. That is all about the value that you can try yu-nam sand and you can really get paid from it. It's crazy but you know talk about that a little bit. We had the contract that they WANNA teach anybody. Because that's the whole slave mentality right. There's a lack of not enough work. There's not enough opportunity for you to make any damn of making or you and I can't let you make me so I'm GonNa hold his mation as so that Estonia generation for generations and generations. And that's the reason why because then even lack of my set also for some reason. Some people even go into neo right. We we see something. You have advertisers. That are getting people to to be able to have the opportunity to understand how they can get their own bank scam people steal the scam. The hate to me understand that Bro. I can't bad limit your scan. I'm like Oh what they do on his scamming. Oh it's a pyramid scheme bro. Which job door like Wicca? Listen to this and again I went to college. Everybody I don't want to keep going on couch. This star row. Most of us aren't free thinkers. I went to college because my mom made send you gotta go. Here is how people become successful success to my mom at the time is making thirty forty grand a year in order for you to do that. Send you act to go to college? You have to get the piece of paper because no one will give you more than no one will give you one hundred dollars an hour fifty dollars an hour without having that me so. I go to college bro. Business one one. One of my classes was real estate. I was learning to real estate. The person that owned any real estate marketing Bruce. The person wasn't a marketer. I was learning about the allergy. By how is this directly correlated with where I'm trying to go? Is that a scam or no. You Got Me Doin Bruce. Why am I take in two years of classes before I get into my major bruce? I WANNA learn wholesaling gruesome Matin. You tell me I gotta do to. You GotTa go through two years of this before teach you also grew she t- whole southern in the day or however long it take. What do you mean I got to wait two years to get my major in? This is why the Internet is so important. Now you can turn on Google. You can turn on you too. You can turn on a podcast. Go directly to the source. Start Making brand in a day two days. Yes it is and stuff changing. I think especially with all this stuff going on. I think it's going to force people to change right. You gotta stay home now. Businesses are starting to see employees. GotTa work from home and it got still hope to get the same production a lot of marketing. The same production so a lot of people are starting to see that. Hey listen you know what? Maybe the MAS that we've been doing before you know this crazy over here like me and you know we. We weren't from wherever right and I swear guy all right now my daughter two months I was just saying to my wife. I was talking to my door. My baby we'd be. We'd be in Bali for three months soon as this thing and we out and I'll have to think what a businesses run. We work anywhere in the world. Would it can be what you say. How House of Virtual House flip computer in Alaska only my cell phone and Chop Cool. Sommese mass so now we can go hours man. But I don't want to hold you up too much so I'm good bras. Whatever you need. I'm here I'm enjoying this. People Alive Broccoli enter was fires wanted to build is one that I did it all time. Brooke definitely ain't guys anybody that is tapped in with us. Ma'am make sure you follow. Neil all right Neo Davis. Oh diesel where? We don't say Neo Davis in a letter. Oh All one word guys put that in make sure and if you enjoy his episode tag him tag him in your story okay. We'll repulsive posted the tag them. The Story Tammy Adnan trademark let us know where you checking their for but let us know that you are checking this out Last thing man is for someone wants to get started. All right this is this has been crazy interview. I'm hooked I WANNA know. How can I get my own event space? How can they go about with that with you with getting more mission about your program getting more information you can teach them? I think you started so host a free long workshop literally. I used to do it every Sunday. pulling back on that so it depends on what time you're listening to this you can go to. Www dot start my space dot com. See if it's a listing available or we're working on putting it together were owned demand training where you can go watch it any time. I break down the game for you in three steps That is a bit space masterclass dot com and you can go wash that at any time So hopefully when you're listening to it as ex- Yup and I just worked on a game for you give you a step by step blueprint enrollment dachsie allowing you to make. This happened at least more than anything. One big thing you want to get out of the All my workshops not just teach you how to find a spot but t the right mindset to be successful north because once you understand that you can do this. You get confidence once you understand that. Unlike most people's success from their mind is game over so in order for you to learn guys go to. Www dot start my events face dot com or www dot events based dot com and. I'll be kind of breakdown game for you guys. Perfect perfect and I must say it's just going to be on his by Neil. You know what I needed to come out with next year was a need you to come out with a mindset training. I think I think that's needed for industry but if our culture you noticed shame no bra and keep it all the way railway in in this ashamed. Bruce I say this they will consider it fluff like you date most. I'm on my workshop. Get to the style. Let me ask you know why. Most people are successful literally. The reason why most people aren't successful because they talk yourself out of success or or or date fell over and over again in because of the failures deflated them. So they're not even enthused even try again. That is all mine. Cramping UP IN ENTREPRENEUR. Thirteen years because this is not because of my skill set. I'm the owner of multiple books multiple flash cards. And I can't even spell like I mean I can smell but you get with craft beer beer there all my wife and my team got a gold. Edit all my captions were on more important putting out content doing the work then being perfect in all of that is mindset so I thought about I even got a retreat video mindset China but I'm like most people look at his not doing this to real game up then I think just the way you gotta position I think if you position it as like the steps of three steps or whatever the core principles that made me you got to put numbers that maybe a million dollars that they may be multi-millionaire if I think if you position it like that people like Oh this was gonna make me money. I think he asked what made you. You're right yeah I guess like like we do everything is imposition it properly in his game. Some I've got I'm GONNA be broke your arm as guys hope you enjoyed episode again. We're GONNA have both our instagram at handles on the show notes Guys if you love it makes you tack us in the Post View. Shared on your story guys. We will repulsed it and guys. You know my quote. Don't live the dream. Live your dream. I see you guys in the next episode. Thanks for listening. To escaping the REI newbies own podcast at www dot escaped the newbies zone dot com.

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1:35:49 hr | 2 months ago

Andr Chaperon & Shawn Twing - The Key Elements of a Durable Business

"Biggest fear with working andre before we work together i knew honored i- reputation and of course we all do and there was a certain persona. I thought okay. If he's really like that. I really liked this guy over it with far too many people over the years. I'm sure your audience knows where person on stage in the person behind the scenes not the same person. The biggest relief was when we started to actually work on a project together and they realized okay. This guy is exactly exactly who i thought. He was from his public persona and leader to deconstruct the wisdom of that of course. It's so much easier if we both just show up as ourselves is in this like what we're doing you're never going to have a bad surprise because there's no thing that's different later. Boom boom boom boom boom. What's up everybody. You're listening to the hustle and flow chart podcast mount wolf and joke. Fear boo wicky wicky. Welcome back to the hustle and flow chart podcast today. Our guest is another sort of legend in our industry andre chaperone and his partner shun. Ght-wing are joining us now. Andre was probably one of the first info products. I remember buying Back around two thousand nine two thousand ten. When i was i kind of getting into You know not getting into it but diving deeper into the digital marketing world Auto responder madness course kept on popping up. Everybody kept talking about this course. I don't remember exactly what year i stumbled across it. But this was like the gold standard for how to do your email marketing through storytelling and things like that. And that was andre chaperones course and that sort of helped him make a name for himself in the industry and become one of the leading experts on email marketing in the digital marketing world and so we are super lucky and super excited to be able to bring andre in his partner sean onto this episode today and kind of catch up and talk about what they're doing now. I had the opportunity of meeting and hanging out with andrei. Several years. Back at a mastermind. I think i think we might touch on that in this episode. I can't remember if we did or not. I'm pretty sure we did. But anyway Kind of stayed connected with andrei over the years and friendly brought him back around to talk about what he's up to these days and his marketing career and we talk a lot about their concepts of emergent marketing and the durable business model. That's the those are kind of big concepts that they're teaching now how to emergent marketing how to take Different marketing skills and when they kind of come together. This sort of emerging marketing thing happens. And i'm not explaining it. Well he's going to explain it way better than i could. And then the terrible business has very specific elements that they teach and so they're going to break down their concepts of emergent marketing and the durable business and and what they're working on now and then you know we couldn't pass up the opportunity wall. We had them to talk about how to become a better writer of stories how to do email marketing better. How to do automations in email better so this this kind of consider this episode. Broken up into sort of two halves right. The first half of this episode. We're talking about emergent marketing. We're talking about the durable business concept. We're talking about what needs to happen in a business how to get customers when you know when to give value for free versus winded charge. We spend the first half really diving into that topic. And then the second half talking about how to become better at emails how to tell stories how to do segmentation with your emails and we get a little more in the weeds and talk a little more about the sort of tactical elements of what makes everything. They're doing work. So we were just really really pumped to even be having this conversation. We broke out of our normal processes and a part podcast recording. We recorded this kind of earlier in our morning on a day when we normally wouldn't record podcast because we can't pass up the opportunity to talk to these guys. So you're gonna love this episode with andrea chaperone. And sean swing and you're probably gonna on the notes on it because we do cover a lot of ground in this. So if you go to flow chart group dotcom so it. Flow chart group dot com. You can join our facebook group. It's a private group just for listeners of hustle and flow chart. And when you join it it'll ask you for your email. If you decide to give us your email. We will for free. Send you the note to this episode within two weeks of it going live so if you're hearing this episode two months after it was released and you go join our group. You're going to get free. Access to whatever notes were released co corresponding with the newest episodes. But if you get them. Within two weeks of this going live over at flow chart group dot com. We'll send you the notes and even if you kind of past that deadline you can always email us and we'll probably hook you up with the not We be like that sometimes but go to flow chart group. Dotcom joined the group. We wanna hook you up. So go do that. And i'm done blabbering. Let's go talk to andre. And sean right andrea sean live. Hey guys doing today. i won't yeah. I think this is going to be a fascinating conversation. Know like we were talking about. We followed you andrea for a long time. And and i know matt. You guys met a long time ago and I think we're actually recently. George bryant basically you guys gotta have andrea on again and I think you enter interviewed andre years ago. Yeah we've been really reworking. All of our email systems based off of a lot of the principles that you have put out there. And now sean year year partnered up with with andrea teams. Like this perfect duo. You get the traffic and this whole different perspective there but the way that you guys bring it together. I'm fascinated in the perspective like the way that you actually do. Marketing and think about marketing. I think that's going to be fascinating in this conversation. Probably some storytelling and how that applies to the whole. You know block. They're the spectrum of everything here. So i guess to start. I think it'd be fascinating to get kind of the background of both of you. Combined more than individually and how you guys came together because he hasn't been doing this separately for many years. What's the story of combining forces here. Yeah i usually tell that story. We're going to have to tell the truth to get it right this time. That he's a bar in columbia and there was tiger. Maybe we'll just tell the who's getting a andre. He's not even yeah. Sean sean was customer mind. That's that's something heavy into into mouth. Moss given fluence and from the yet we just because our our interests collapse much and we didn't realize the from acid obviously because he was customizing conceiving. I think he won't admit it ends favorite flint's This this community And shores sawday in. I think that's that's how how the whole love affair started Over the course of tea is three years it was it was gradual and then at some point we got At mitchell cry clients. And i think that's that was the first time that shore not solid wept Physically actually together. It's that was an amazing experience in in terms of what we learned to each other end. And what we do in what came out of that so it was dale's The emergence of of thoughts and ideas that came as a result of the liberation. And that's that's the way we think kind of start for us. Well what what. What sort of roles do each of you play. So for instance in our business. I'm kind of the the guy behind the scenes building ads and landing pages and that kind of stuff. Joe's more networker talker speaker goes out on stages light does the podcast all that kind of stuff. So he's more outward facing i'm more inward kind of building stuff. I'm curious how your dynamic works. And yeah i think we've we've ever thought about who does well both both of us. We're we're autism so that's alla alla al-anon end said neither one of us can do the writing because it's unfair on the other win that but the thing that didn't was that when iraqi ken together What came out of that. You know that beck's that thing that we create is different embiid than than by the vessel together sunday. I think that was the moment where we thought that united this is. This is kind of an interesting to to explore and that's other help jiang sought it about a year ago. It seems like with you guys together. you have this you know so like emergent marketing is something has been talking about a lot so i want you guys to. It'd be cool to have you kind of define it but it seems like the components underneath that like three phases awareness engagement and then conversion it's kinda wrapped up with a both. Your guys is super powers in the storytelling the writing from both use your sides. Then you know sean on the traffic side which is really that awareness b-actor and maybe individually can talk about the pieces. Maybe there's three components then we can kind of splinter off into some other pieces there. I'll jump in that. Wanna give andrei time to think about saying something smarter than the thing. That's interesting about the collaboration to answer the roles question and this question simultaneously is that we both we both like to think about this stuff really deeply. We've got forty plus years. Forty founded forty five forty eight years together if combined doing this war but we are at that stage now. Where we we just we like to think about. It really really deeply in what ends up happening is. It's like improv. No one of us one of us has a thought and will share it in the other. One just naturally is is trying to see what's right in that thought and then add a little something to it and then it builds and builds in in its it goes from like this simplicity to something that becomes really complex in a sense we in a moment we sense the complexity and then we try to reverse it. We're like okay. We've gone from the simple to the complex. But now we gotta go from the complex back to the simple so that we can share it with our audience. And it's my favorite quote. Is oliver wendell. Holmes yesterday would give a fig for simplicity on this side of complexity. But i'd give my right arm for the simplicity on the far side of complexity. So a lot of what we're doing is we're starting with something simple like this know. Emergent marketing really started in pretty simple stuff. Then we make. It really is complicated. It's just a mess in the thinking is okay what what are the kernels of truth in. What could we share with our audience. That's timeless that they could rather than give them fish. We could teach them how to fish with this so that they could understand the principle that will serve them well and it's just that what what our audience sees is doing that every single day as just what we're doing constantly is complicating simplifying. Simplifying complicating in sharing. We created. We figure this out the other day we created. I one hundred fifteen thousand words of free content last year on. That's just us thinking out loud like for emails. It's free courses. It's what we're doing all the time. And the course has become polished expressions of certain ideas. Really what you described you. Emergent marketing is a set of principles as you know as are the three parts of business awareness Engagement in conversion. That was the that came from going through enormous amounts of thought to realize that that was the irreducible what lies underneath. That somebody could hear that and say okay. I understand this differently now. Yeah short question. That's the fun we have every day knowing what makes a lot of sense why you guys are partners. Then because that's how i well we don't always go from comply expected simple progressions. We will we have to go on stage somewhere in her ideas yet. Forces us at that point but the fact that you can kind of kind of ping pong back between each other seems like you have a similar brain. But you know maybe specialties. In different ways Breakdown if he can break down those three layers of emergent marketing a little bit further like each of those just to kind of set the scene. Because i think that's very important seeming. You know right when. I was digging into all the content is ball so really everything that we do is the foundation systems theory. And the thing that i bought into. I've been to two decades in this game running an agency and their thing. I bought into earlier in my career was at that. Optimization was a linear process rights you send traffic to a landing page on any get summers certain click through rate. You get something happens. That's wearing a suit. People don't know you exist now. They do so they click on something and they go there. And let's say that your click through rate on your ad is ten percent if the okay. I can make everything better if i go from ten percent to twelve percent. That's linear thinking and it and you just make your funnel and you make your steps and you do the math and you know if you think if it's double the math gets really wonky and if you doubled proves through a four part process you sixteen x your outcome and i bought into in. It's a lie. It's it's true doesn't the world does not work that way. It should looks like it should but the world actually is a complicated system. And what. Andre and i- independently stumbled on a now reinforced with each other. All the time is that there are forces collaborating with each other in different ways and those three forces in they all influence each other in none of them is sufficient on. Its own if you imagine a business. What's only awareness right so you get tons of traffic and that's it no business right so if you could have vice you tomorrow you wanna million visitors to your site and you see absolutely so cable. Here's the caveat you can opt. You can't generate leads and you can't sell anything. Just don't want a million visitors. You say well. Why would i care right so the second part is engagement. Somebody engagement is when your audience takes a step closer to you too. It doesn't have to be opting in but that's really what we think about. The primary thing is that somebody raised their hand and says this thing. I found that. I've now been made aware of is interesting enough that i'm willing to take step toward it. I want and it's sometimes the other ways to do that where it's bright shiny. Here's the pdf abbott. Here's the whatever it is. Here's the free video series. we've all seen. That's that's engagement. Engagement can just be sharing of attention so you can read your fifteen thousand word article. That's engagement giving their time then. Conversion is that moment where they become an actual paying customer. We have a philosophy of principle that we work in will reach it people. We make customers before money changes hands so we kind of violate our own rules a little bit. But that's that's not really that important but if you pull any of those things out you don't have a business. It doesn't work all. It only works. When all three are present in the thing that emerges emerges as a result the texture of those three things. None of them makes the business. It's how they relate. So if you have a really cheesy curiosity based headline add this click bait and you send some people to a fifteen thousand word. Multi-page presell site at. It's not congruent. That gets really weird. But when you start thinking about how do they all relate together so maybe belong form facebook ad. That's the first page of a multi page presell site that goes into soap opera sequence email. Now there's this emergent property emergent marketing came from emergent. Things happen that no single part of the system creates the what creates them is all of the parts of the system working together so we have that systems view instead of that. Reductionist linear view that just mainly because it matches our experience of what we've seen over the last twenty plus years all right. Andre say something smarter than who yes. What's what's happened as a result of that is is that that's that series has become an ala ala Every single prospect that comes into our world nat has to go through the sequence of emails that unpacked that idea of the world. If you are and how we believe business should be done so at the end of it either. Someone's going to be pulled towards us. In stock is amish. More of the stuff that will resonate with me. Or they're gonna take. These gosawx accumulated swear. Hell want get well. It's interesting that you say because it's true that things are typically done in a linear fashion but a world. I mean it's just like what you were saying. You go from start with something simple than it complex in the new simplified again it seems like folks mainly just understand the simple and maybe not the complexities and all these components that are actually involved in marketing. You know whereas you guys have thought deep on that and can have said no. Actually this bundle of a lot of stuff happening here But it's just been simplified. Maybe maybe that's where the linear thinking can come from in a lot of sense with the funnels and all the steps that we see out there. Andre andre i think something that we do intuitively that I think helps is that one of the questions. Were subconsciously asking ourselves all the time we get new information like the implications of this new information and going to the second third fourth fifth order consequences of it. So probably the best example. I can share. Which i think we share in the five part emergent. Marketing series is last. Two thousand nineteen was a copy. Chief live speakers intern. I got to sit next to the jackson. Which is just a tree james. Dean's just a genius and the dean was really kind of going into into depth about something he shared publicly in other places which is that when he's analyzed his clients sales performance one of the things that you discovered his eighty percent of the sales happen after ninety days. So if you can imagine on day one thousand people often of the people who become customers after that initial engagement. According to dean's research eighty percent of them become customers after ninety days so we can hear something like that. Oh wow that's interesting but it could be your love to call t be true but you start useless but We start thinking about is like well. Wait a minute if that's true. How would we change our approach to things knowing that and the reality is if you have four times the value in your list after ninety days the new to in the first ninety days so why in the world would you try to sell everybody in the first ninety days. You wouldn't do it. You would immediately. The first implication of deans research in that point is realizing that marketings along game most people by between months four and eighteen. Once you know that okay well you re engineer your thinking for the long game. You're not the. How can i get the most sales in the first ninety days. You're thinking how. Can i get the most sales period In most of them will happen later. And that's a lot of what we're doing is we're just. We're looking at something in we're asking ourselves what. What are the implications of this. If it's true what does it mean in that. Just leads us down. So many rabbit holes in. That's where all the complexity forms pop up periodically and think. Okay now something. There's something there were pulling thread. And then we figured out. What the threat is. We put some words around it in a country with likes to say we put words in front periods. And that's that's really what we do. Words periods and one of the other nuances. That we do is we're is. We'd love to to learn in public so we so we always take something simple. Make it's complex you know Make sense of it. And then once we feel that we've made enough sense of it. Will rodney mail seductive. Everybody and say what you think end debt that creates interesting dynamic where we always sharing alabama's thinking with them and then as a result of net down the lawn stuff happens so we always doing this with audience. That always this this with us. So we've had we have locked in a customers that it'd be with us full forever decade and some of them have been on this journey hall. Tom and you know it's it. It really has an impact Dial get inside. So they'll have this this emergent inside and ell shared with us and then didn't think of that but yeah that's that's cool then that'll be reintegrated into thinking. That's that's fascinating it. It's creating super fans at the end of the day. It seems like you know if they're hanging around with you for a decade. They're not the type that are going to be. Who are these two guys. Send me emails every day all the time. And unsubscribe it's like no. You're actually taking them on this journey along the whole path and in your it seems like you're i mean they're coming in probably at the right time or you've all content that allows people to kind of make a decision and like you said gonna become a customer before do a conversion conversion before actually exchanging money. It seems like a lot of cases. It makes everything easier because you're not trying to figure out if you if you try to give have content that's free content quote unquote in then you have your paid content and trying always figure out like what like what are you give people for free it just. It's so much extra thinking so we just we're creating things we're just creating at the highest level of quality. We can around a certain question so earlier that the last year in february of two thousand twenty we each did up simultaneous. We'd like to put create forcing mechanisms for ourselves. So we said okay the next week starting next week. We're going to do a ten part free series. Andre did email. I did pay traffic every day for ten days. This thursday when he threw it out. You know he's like hey you wanna do. This and i was like sure okay monday like wait a minute but we do that but when we're writing it we're not thinking to ourselves like We'll do this. And then this is incomplete enough that you'll need to buy the court there wasn't of course at that point. It was if i have ten days. How can i share as much actionable knowledgeable. Getting not getting in the weeds. But how could i give somebody enough that they could get a result shift their understanding knowing that. If we do that later there will be some consequence that we can't even predict in it happened. We had new people posting in the comments. People send us an email and say you know. I just bought the traffic engine. Because i went to your training and i added fifty thousand dollars to get my business from just these three or four things so after that i wanted to buy. The course was excellent because that that's when it was four you really should we turn away. It's it's shocking. How many people will come in. And we'll will be ready that they can tally ready to buy. And it's like you go to the free thing. I in in if mean it it it if someone looks at this as a tactic it'll fail but when you mean it and it's just an expression of how you're working it works because people sense that it's jim and that's really the reason my biggest fear with working with andre before we work together Zainul andre by reputation. Of course we all do. I knew him as a customer in there was a certain persona. I thought. Okay if he's really like that. I really liked this guy. Worked with far too many people over the years names. I'm sure your audience knows where the person behind the scenes isn't the person who's the person on stage and the person behind the scenes not the same person and that was that was a huge fear and it was the greatest thing in the world like the biggest relief was when we started to actually work on a project together. And i realized okay. This guy is exactly exactly who i thought. He was from his his public persona and leader to deconstruct the wisdom of that. It was like well. Of course it's so much easier if we both just show up ourselves is in this. If you like what we're doing you're never going to have a bad surprise because there's no thing that's different later. There's no you don't come to. We don't have a mastermind but you don't come to the mega mastermind and find out. Oh they're jerks if you like what we're doing public facing you're going to like what we're doing behind courses and other things because that's just it's the same that everything started the question. It seems like and then. Andre the challenge of blake. Hey let's go do this ten day thing next week. Let's go and it seems like it is creates enough excitement. Obviously new ideas are given to your audience. And you never know what's gonna come up but you're going to get feedback so it's probably going to turn into some type of way that you can continue giving the right kind of value is that to. What's the process. Sometimes we have to trick ourselves to actually do Because we left to collaborate on ideas in. We love to see what comes as a result of that. Snow and deadlines work. And so you know. We have to create a song Sometimes and then we surprise Credited simply because he was that this was just a short courses. The rules was each day. We need to create united this lesson over tinpot series and ivison day. Schorr needs to give me his lesson altimonte and published loss so that we will publishing it loves you manning This is the next one so we have to show up. Even if it wasn't perfect was quite as would be if we could send an extra week on a lesson so yeah. We just did that and ten ought to be. Yep that's and when we were working on joint me is difference on one of us will will civil and have ideas. Don't a cole. And richard ideas create some some road structure and One of us will will take the lead. And roberts this thing the i. I'm expression off. What we think the can can tendency with us. Nelson's and in the next and then you email sean will stick it into unisys. When when i wake up in the morning i'll see what is written and all jump in and you know asthma inc to that office and that's that just seems to be the be that crosses For us because at the end of the week will have another case. What two to happen for money wet. It's just that anything that we end up list. You know we could never predict that. That's what beginner generates ends. It's difficult to to I'm tack that way without actually doing ends experience experiencing what that's not an of work unisons. Two thousand three up until short on us started working together which was a year ago. I was always waiting silence. There wasn't a liberation. That was me sir. It's easy to progress. Nights easy to unite. Just just crichton idea in credit expression that could update but a is a piece missing on which we didn't realize until two hundred and Yes you feel the work to be crazy now. It's much better. How do you guys decide. Like what sort of rabbit hole. What sort of topic. You wanna you wanna start to dive down next. 'cause i'm on your list and there's a you guys talk about a lot of different topics one of my favorite topics you guys talk about from time to time is the knowledge management topic. You know the whole smart notes and stuff like that and there's some varying topics that he'll discuss out to your list. I'm curious how do you pick which rabbit hole you want to go next. It's a good question. How do we do we something that happened recently that it's probably a good example of it so there's again it's emergent. Keep using the same word but we had a black friday promotion. Of course that Some reason. I don't know how this happened but i heard something earlier. Thought we were approaching it entirely differently than andre. So i i was coming in reserve this weird friction in areas. I was like i thought we were coming out from certain The perspective in the original course that andrea created was based on feeling. How two thousand dollars left in the bank in start over with no lists no anything. What would he do. And then we're going to do an update to that course and i thought we were taking that same perspective and he was way farther along that he wanted to be something way better indifferent so when the conversation happened there was no there wasn't there wasn't something that we came into the conversation saying we're going to do this but it some point in the conversation i don't know which one of us blurted out that what people really want to do is to be able to make a hundred thousand dollars just got blurted out and then there's there's there's that pause really wait a second. What if this was how to go from zero to one hundred thousand dollars now late and then we could feel at. Were like oh. That's that's actually it. That's what people want to be able to go from. They have a job to this. They have this idea and they have enough money to have the lights on. Pay the mortgage put some food in her mouth and just arbitrarily called on one hundred thousand dollars like okay. Neither one of us came into that conversation thinking about that and then and then it was over and over. All these kinds of things happen to were. We were coming at it from how we would do that. In andres visual thinker and he put it in mind owed and it was circular As i was looking at fish that's a flywheel like they. Each step leads to the next and then like so much emerged from that. It was all there but isn't named in. That seems to be a. That's a lot of what we do is that we both consume a tremendous amount of information more interested in stuff. We're always curious about step. So it gets back to improv again. We'll say hey. Did you hear such and such podcast. Like oh yeah like the part about ex. Yeah that reminded me of this. That's really interesting. What if what if we took that and applied it to the next thing you know. He's got ten thousand. Emails series are ten thousand word email series because we just unpack that idea because it was fascinating because his beauty facile. Let's run with it. That's that's the truth of how happened. We should come up with something. That distract raigmore elegantly. And that's funny that actually. That's something that we do. I think is different. I was thinking about prior to this call. What's what are some real differences. But this is a subtle difference. Most people i don't know pick up on this. According people who teach which is the difference between descriptive in prescriptive. Most courses are prescriptive k. Do this student this order. Whatever and then you go see how the people actually do their work working. It looks nothing like that at all so we try to balance descriptive like this is what we actually do. This is what it looks like with prescriptive which is knowing. This is what we do. If we have a little distance in perspective we would probably make it. Look a little better would look more like this on but the combination of those two things some people just like to know what you do and they wanna do that and others want you to like. I don't care what you do. Just tell me what. I should do different. I think we find something between those two things that make sense for us in. Just damn were curious not stuff. Yeah we we kinda lucky. That audience is attracted to things that So and it's also because we get to pick who he wants us customers in base on how he shot in the world In the set in way in its various Will do and all of that is on the web soccer. It's there's the there's no secrets so that's either gonna pull people in what's going to send him away so we get to your Chris something that's that Us end it's what we use to tight with crazy ideas place that makes it easier to make sense Seven yet we just talk about some people and you know. That's that's great. I think that's really. It's really cool because it's it. I feel like that what you described. Sean is what matinee do you all the time you know it's like oh i just learned this new thing or this concept and it's like what if we did this you know it's like he kind of just take it a little step further and our contact comes out the former podcast like this so we you'd get a lot of input from guys like you And then we always had this banter section at the end of it. That's like another twenty minutes matches pretty much doing what you did. We literally figure out what our businesses through the course of podcasting with you. We do a once a month. Episode called therapy session where we don't have guests. It's just be joe talking and like most of our business ideas actually come out like while we're chatting live on the podcast and it takes people along with our journey along with the guests that we have and it's similar to what you guys have is. You're always relating these concepts or other people and you know courses. You might have solution. So it's it's really cool. How it's all tied together it. Yeah it's it's it's journey that we're taking folks on and i'm curious about like the storytelling side of things i know about you wanted to get through that. And you guys are both riders. Is there a different way that you guys approach. How you tile this together as story in a journey or you guys falling along pretty much. Same onset together this is. I can't wait to hear your answer to this asked. This is how we learn about each other's we do not. That's what's been going on well known Watching is is on means of of communicating with the whales and Specific you need because off feel very uncomfortable doing in shorts more comfortable with that. So it's just. I sit muscle early on that on your use email and and would would so. Yeah i things that's just it's a lot easier to gerard meemaw. That's a story telling a story to somebody else happens to be an audience of people Something that's that's a whole idea started and it just kind of evolved from that wasn't anything. I p meditated sir because story matters in to what we do not buy him hats Understand what we do at a at a mobile grinding naval. Because it's really easy to to just do something but what no long do things just and if somebody asks you it's not i don't know i just do it. So there was a lot of best in the beginning This note dictate frame that we to create them stories. Because you know we didn't we. Is we talking about the business. Stop in so. We do so many specific questions that we can be attacked. Here's some a little more context for you guys. So we were preparing for this interview. Today we went and read your twenty twenty email right. You guys sent an email right. At the very end of twenty twenty we read that email and then we proceeded to click into every single lincoln that email and then read like every article and all the l and it's just so damn engaging right like we just we got mine map followed later. We just got sucked into all of the emails and the various stories. You guys were telling. And i think we're we're kind of curious to try to dissect that a little bit more like what makes the stuff that you guys put out so engaging where the emails. I get from you when i get them. They're one of my non-negotiables. I'm going to open this email. Don't even the subject line when i see the from line i. I opened those emails right. So i'm curious what you guys think is different about about that than almost like everybody else. Who's doing email you go first. Couple from shrunken candidate a good step sign and no pressure thanks. You know it's it's probably lists sixty anything all than you want to believe a many times. It's just out just wanted share snow and it just expressed in a certain way that we deconstructed later on. It's something that we do so we we're trying to get from a different angle and we're not trying to figure out. What does this thing that we wanted to create other than at the end of twenty minutes. Your nets net shea links to almost valuable snuck that was that was most acidic but even then we went clock show wallace gonna and united come from that we were just gonna shake or things pointed in places when when you do that then you have a single day and we've putting stuff onto onto the website. We don't always tell people where something is and we and we don't put a seri- quits into that many system sites eating easy to on we lock next certain pieces of commission not hard to find when people find it. They haven't experienced so we pepsi crepe these rabbit holes that's That's email basically point to to license that people can. Can you conduct wimps not and seeing a nasty things to read. So i never new new questions specific. The end skin said nope no pressure. I think they're they're three th ways. I'd answer that question. I michael pollen the author. Michael pollen's an interview with tim ferriss and he talked about. He writes books. he's not trying to be. He doesn't try to write a book from the perspective of. I'm gonna thority on accent. Let me tell you the reader what you need to know what he doesn't stay. He goes on a journey that interests him in then tells his audience about the journey. Now it sounds like it's very similar but it's not at all so a lot of what we're doing is what michael palin is doing. Which is we're on a journey and then we are stopping certain inflection points the end of the year. Whatever and saying okay like what what has happened lately. That's been interesting in that pairs with the second question. Which is we use all the time which is really trying to. It's it's the who cares question in so often we'll have an idea for or i'll be working on a draft of an email and there'll be some friction at. It's not quite there. Feels like a nice site and an myself. I'm like who cares. And then all in a weird dialogue with myself where I'll answer that question. I'll ask it again. Who cares about that on her. In india you smash up against that question and finally almost Pissed which is it's hysterical. Because i'm pissed at myself. I'm like pissing. Blurt something out or write it with the pencil. Now right something like almost an anger like it's because i rated sensible bat. That's the thing that i've been looking for. And then i just go back to the beginning or we go back to the beginning and we start there because we've figured out that second most important thing which is. Why is this important valuable to our audience with crystal clarity. Like what is the value that we can create here. That's that's so important. I think the third thing we do. Which is my favourite Almost don't want sane. Hoping i'm gonna delay so secrets this is. This is a sequel. Cut this part of this out. We often will when we are explaining something. We're doing the thing that we're explaining as we do it. And some percentage of people get it and it's the craziest aha moment like. We did an email. I can't remember when it was. I think it was the fall enrollment but it was an email about storytelling and the the whole i the whole emails about how you can find ideas to create stories with examples of them but the email is. It's ten examples of us doing this thing that we're talking about so when you're reading it you're you're getting the experience of reading it and learning it but it's actually happening to you at the same time and at some point someone gets that in. It's not a it's interesting. it's an oath moment where someone gets that realization. Push back like wait a minute there. That's like i just experienced it There a couple of if if you if you want to reverse engineer if you wanna have your audience actually reverse engineer is what it feels viscerally. Two ways they can do it. They're really get one is a It's a ted video. I don't remember the name of it but the guy Seven minutes or six minutes but the guys illustrator in the video is about finding the face of leonardo da vinci. So that is. That's that is a perfect example of how to reverse engineer mohammad. Because what he does it. He goes through and says okay. We don't have any known pro paintings of leonardo davinci. So how would we find them. And then he says well or self-portraits Here's all the here all the portraits. And they say. I think we can do is remove the women than they do but he goes through this process and then at the end he comes down to a points that they made wind it down to three. They look the chronological order and he points the screen. He says i give you the master himself. Leonardo da vinci. And you're like you can feel it. Your guy like all like it all came together in another one for which others may. I don't wanna give away the punchline. But the there's a graham norton interview with. It's like seven minutes eight minutes grand graham norton and kevin costner and kevin. Costner tells the story about one of his friends who was a writer and when the punchline of that happens you'll stand up an interview. Appreciate writing if you appreciate. A good story will come out of your chair is. It's just it's that and that's what we're trying to often engineers when someone has a moment where they just go shit like that like grabs. We don't get obvious in theory that every time. But that's that's what we're aiming for and because we're always aiming for that even when we miss we tend to miss prebaked though. Were like we might get there but we still we got a triple. We didn't knock it out of the carpet. third base. So are there scenarios where like mid email sequence. But you don't even know how email sequences gonna and yet you're kind of still in the middle of it or does do the emails. I tell everybody. I love this story about. There's someone commented after the traffic engine. It was really interesting. Somebody commented for the original version traffic engine the original launch. The said like kind of deconstructed. Like it's so amazing what you've been doing. I'm ready to bite all this in trying to figure out. And she had thought she had figured out what we had done. And sometimes i remember andrea you gotta video from somebody a an email with like this long video explaining to us what they thought we had done to create this experience it. It's also. I always feel kinda bad going back to like. We just wrote it. Organically one day ahead all the halls on the magic. Just disappear all. It's like everything that you thought but you know we come in with a theme. We come in some guiding principles that it needs to be independently valuable like if somebody goes through. Emails never buys a single thing that we're leaving them. Far better off will be found him in exchange for their attention. Attention is precious. So we we treat. We treat their attention as being precious than than all. We'll just say it's an honor to have your attention. We mean it like we. We know we have thousands of people reading this. And that's collectively. That's incredible so we treat it with such profound respect that we be make our decisions around that in not to persuade. I mean we. We do crazy stuff. We give stuff away in the last day of enrollments to prevent people from buying. Who shouldn't when we did insane stuff but it's all in to that larger idea that we're we're optimizing for happy customers and happy customers. You don't have to be a happy customer tomorrow. By something two years from now but between now. And then you're in the tribe we're gonna treat you like reentry our best friends genuinely and if you buy something later great if you don't i hope we left you better off than when you came in and that's how it's who we are as who in that's who we want to be professionally this to breeds of arises donate fever. Turn pensa so you get brought and pences Off somebody lock this gilded on. jk rowling with. I will they will matt out the entire book or the entire series snuck in in huge amount of detail so they know exactly what's going to happen dates than what they need to do at some point is in new out stephen. King don winslow and his and his many many will cross olympics in. Just one on is one since one thousand hundred. And then not not rots danes that story emerges paldon does for rita. That's weaned book. It's you know it's it's almost the same. So sean enough fine. That's you know we can plan certain things loosely and then we conquer dairy detail. We conduct tiny this nieces. S just not how wide if we ourselves into these woods places where we just have to show up and rats writes something and what comes out of that in that moment each each weeden publish. It is just it's news. It's something that we didn't. We hadn't distorted other than having having said not yet. And you know does not be as for us. Many times come from a warning pages. Shorts when he does not often and more recently rights many times. I'll take photos not not wanting pages and stated the based just to shape inside op-eds in Doesn't mean on what's that. Excuse me that's up into kicking jackson you'll bust me on. What's some some crazy idea that he had on pastry money and just run with. He's ideas nine lakes at sometimes they can. Emails attended the costs to congressman. Yeah now this is fascinating because it seems like you dislike the way you guys collaborate normally as you start with something simple a concept and it gets complex and then he gets simple and it seems like that maybe the writing process as well you start with a simple concept and internally maybe it's a little bit more complex because you're working it out you're passionate through filters like who cares. Why am i. why are they. Why do they even wanna read this. Where's it gonna go and then you simplify it through the writing in it. Seems like this. I guess flywheel flywheel to like. It's got this momentum that carries itself through because you can have that traction with the writing and connection to the reader at the same time in real time and i think there's another try as as we're having this conversation. I'm trying to make sure we don't leave anything out. It's always hardly listen to somebody if you engage with the material in the and they gave you ninety percent of it. And you're like what was the other thing And i think something we may have inadvertently let out and this is just from my perspective andres perspective on this may be totally different but our writing starts like for me when i'm writing the first thing i'm writing for the person whose opinion matters most to me so that that's a factor in this if i sit down and just because of the nature of timing andre six hours ahead so often just the way. Timing will work as i need to have something for him to read in his morning where he has a much longer period of time. So we're not delayed. So i'm writing if the first draft of something even though it's a first draft and all that i'm still writing for the person the first person who's going to read it is. The audience is most important to me which that that that has a very important effect. It's not just like hey. Let's get ideas on paper. It's like well. I'm i'm getting my ideas on on paper. We've had a conversation whatever we have. We have a theme. But i'm putting my ideas on paper for my thought partner co conspirator but really for the person. I'm writing for andrei i in saying. Here's kind of what. Here's here's where i'm thinking. We use lots of abbreviations in one of our revisions. Teo l. thinking out loud so it might there might be some part Teo l. on this one. I'm not. I'm not sure about this. And then then he knows what that shorthand is which is like okay. This isn't fully refined. Or if if it doesn't say teo -ality knows this is me bringing this. This is my best. Yeah we have. We have other parts of the collaboration that are interesting. To which is another abbreviation. Npr which means no pride of ownership. Where it's i've i've written i can. I'm handing it to you. I know it will be better when it comes back but anything that you see in it anything wrong. Do go anywhere you want with it. And sometimes that means we pull whole whole stuff essence as we start over. It is but it's not. There's no ego which is really weird because we have people who care so much about the craft of writing get bumblebee right together. There is a complete lack of ego protects him. It's it's weird. I wouldn't i don't know that i would even believe it or someone describe to me. I i guess bullshit. That's not how it actually works totally how it works. It's just two guys really writings. I think writing for each other for under is going to be like. I can't stand that guy. I never got for that but from my perspective. That's the i have an audience of one for my first draft might. Can i explain my best thinking to my my co conspirator here and what's going to happen as a result or if if i read the second version like same idea like he's created something. What can i bring my absolute best to it to make to make it a little bit better onto to contribute to make something. And what's weird is when we go back and look at emails. I have no idea who wrote up. Ads golf we wrote this while answering case he contradicts guy wants where she doing this. This this week's eight. We decided that we doing a ding us data. We want to be in a new set of yet. So it's it's the end of monday for me. It's sean morning afternoon Some we've had a few days left to come up with the idea. Then rocket wrought the e mail and get ready four friday which which is winning in the send button. So that's that's the only thing that we not at the same time is also have had have third hawks of a listen for cost that we busy doing loss and we've talked. Everybody lost week that they're giving us listen on friday as well so we these things that are going to happen together. Between now and friday. Wis with an idea what's gonna yet and recalls is gonna get Signed we will do. We just might Nelson deadlines i think that is because then that night too is like if there's not a deadline if we're not sprinting. Creating these little micro sprints for each other than our best work doesn't come out. It's kind of like our podcast as well like we. We contain time. We usually record multiple in a day. Today it's just you guys but but either way we kind of and we want to prepare just enough to you know for ourselves and our audience but really it's it's us as well and it's a feel like just with enough preparation enough. We have a deadline. We know when we're gonna talk known as it's just good enough to get the moment and started and seems like the writing process is very similar. And you know it's like this ping pong and of ideas. I think that's super super powerful with partners to is not having that ego. Probably the hardest part on the outside when you're not doing it but when you're collaborating with the right person to just kind of flows think it's worth drawing attention to the fact that not everybody thinks in this way some people do some people but it's k- Way to do this. I mean certain people need plan. They lost spreadsheets luck structure and that's a k. sudan. They should protect. We think planning within the just go with its in wanting marriages at the result of next is going to be better for them for us. We just you know this is the way that that works for us with with improperly that we but we have the ideas already we just need to mix them in a way. That's going to resonate with without that audience. I've got. I've got one last question. Then we could go ahead and wrap up. I'm curious how much. How much are you doing with email automation and segmentation these days. Because so i'll tell a super quick story so One of one of the first times i sort of got introduced to andrei was when we were promoting something for brian brand. It was like a facebook ad course or something like that actually. Don't even remember what they what it was at this point but i me and my partner at the time bradley will we were number two on the leaderboard and number one on the leaderboard was andrei. And when we met with. Brian moran in in in person an asset about the promotion. I think he said andre sold about three times as much as we did. And we were in second place right so when i finally met audrey i was like yeah we were email into. I think one hundred thousand people. How many were you emailing to. And i think you i don't remember the exact number but it was a few thousand and when we asked you how you were doing it was all about the segmentation and we're like man this guy. He generated three times as many sales off of two thousand emails. And we mailed to one hundred thousand people and really the the trick behind it was you. Were just sending it to only the people that showed some interest. How much of that are you still doing in your business. How much of the is segmentation. How much is just your ideas. And let's just put it out to everybody. It's it's definitely part of allah. what we do. It's important for us that that we only share with people that all that want to hear said thing so broadly. Speaking ala audience isn't marketing. Which is why the here investments. That doesn't mean that the game every single thing that we have to save so we always made it a point office fixing the attention. And it's stop happens. You know people lose jobs. all happened in even. If somebody wouldn't be interested in that moment tom name maybe the not so instead of just presuming that everyone skinner needed. And then just imagining everybody. It's one prestige to do this. That segment license so think the A single email the demo complex series of emails that unpacked In about something. That's that's going to happen and it's always you know. If you wanna hear about the same you know raising taking Search simple wanna mason copies tonight at other than if being Intentional about austin. I having raised end. Most people say not so you know the heavier is. Is that nicks in this segment. You want to do. And then it was sentenced to those negro and then often we'll they take all these emails stop because it's so we will put on the website some way for people to to find so. Nothing's wasted no we. We love stopping credits. And nothing's ever done an oscillation. Just one one nine hundred sir. Yeah that's best version but yeah you can. You can get pretty complex with the. With the order mentioned i think the automation reflects the intent. Is what really is incredibly important to note we did have. We had a fall promotion Fall enrollment for three courses. And you know a lot of people would say we'll just let all of your customers now. Ray everybody gets soon go through it but instead of doing that And this is sort of misses a reasonably typical example but will often do like we did a friday email and said hey this. This thing's going to happen next week. We're going to there's going to be. We're going to talk about this idea. We have durable business here. What makes a business long lasting and we started to find it. We're going to do a five part series next week. There is nothing to buy in that five part series. It's just it's all value getting nor which are telling them what's coming but it's all value and by the way at the end of that series. We're going to then do another five. Parts in those five parts are going to connect the dots with courses that we offer which are going to be open for enrollment and these particular days. If you do nothing you won't get those other the extra five emails you know anything about the enrollment hoped the we're gonna give value. Only if you raise your hand. Are we gonna cross that threshold into top to connecting the value to our courses so we won five of those emails. There is no reference to our courses. You can't any chance that complete series on five elements of durable does serve the finding that it is in how parts were together and winus important. You could print it out and be better off with that but if you if you want to know more if you want to go deeper about how we specifically think about those components that's going to be timed with when we're going to be actually talking about our courses and we're going to be opening enrollment so you have to raise your hand. Sometimes we make it really hard a. It's not a like. Hey don't do anything and you'll get those emails. It's like no no. No you have to do things you have to raise your once in a while. People will reach out and say i totally. Yeah i didn't get to your emails fast enough. And i missed that promotion can i. Can i go get him now. Can you send me those fine that it's counter intuitive because if you look at the numbers of your entire list and then intake okay. I'm gonna cut this down by ninety percent wipe in only it only send promotional stuff to ten percent at a time. That can't work in. What ends up happening. Is you save your respecting the attention of everybody so often that that ten percent or fifteen whatever it is who raised their hand are so much more engaged. Because they've said this is right for me right now. it it's just. It's so counterintuitive and so impactful in. I don't see anybody else doing it. So sh- really it's true. And then that's what i was gonna save like got the megaphone right now and has had for a long time. Just yelling at everyone. And that's where we've been slapped around by a couple of email folks on this show you guys coming from like. Oh yes thank mente. That's that's britain like number one thing you know. Speak to the right person at the right time. Think about like what what's being said. It's like okay yelling loudly. Is it working well any more. So let's go louder the second like you say it out loud you like well wait a minute. That doesn't make sense. So it's like okay. Well everybody's young yelling loudly now so if you want to stand up in a room in ten people are yelling. Have you stand out. The person in a corner is being quiet. Automated people see what's different in situations. Were me anywhere pattern recognizing creatures in if everybody is yelling yelling yelling for our attention eventually. That's overwhelming but what you will notice is the one person who's not ill so now everybody will start doing a great job discipline. The guys you're saying that adding more emojis to the subject line isn't the answer might be might be the wrong question is certainly the right answer wrong contracts. Were looking for me. You'd have to get the right emojis. I guess i'm just trying to situation what would send actually honoring uses emoji. Some we don't even know maybe we send emojis. Mouse never two things. I've never done my entire life. I've never used emoji. And i've never taken a selfie so wowed you think i just laugh out all the time pretty impressive at this point. It's like a badge of honor. You can't accidentally clicked the thing and i'm nervous. Oh god don't official. It's in the universe that's right. It's out the. I'll be tempted to to adam marriage to some of the emails Deejays audet emoji by ruin your reputation. Well let's wrap. it already. Went over time in politics and andre. Thanks for being on here and doing the video thing too. Because i know it's not you chance so big you welcome end look slot slot weird locking the nuts dot side eventually. Looks really cool. Down on the lighting the whole time all these led lights that are like timed up in my house. And i'm like. I think his is changing to the time. Maybe not. maybe it's actually. It's just a reflection of his lava lamp. That you can't say is being bagged here. And his he's bringing it back. Well how do folks of in Obviously you send so much gold out there. And they can kind of go. Back in the archives mel that but How can folks start this adventure with Everything we do is published two tiny businesses com. That's that's that's the poodle vision or the coast is says nothing to it is but there's tons of stuff to read that's perfect. I dunno is probably a couple hundred thousand words of free content on there so just go poke around if you're interested in traffic stuff on traffic. If you're interested in lead gen stephan legion stuff about conversion writing grady mouse. But just go play go play in the sandbox. Were reliable while we figure out how to sell some stuff. It's a freeing feeling knowing like hey there's so much stuff out there. There's nothing for sale at the end of this and only if you choose to be maybe time so yeah definitely will link everything she people will come here. The right people will come back. We'll find that whenever weeks months years from now that that saying that they heard ready for you know we're we're not going anywhere so when a customer's ready we're going to be here. Doing our thing is crazy as it looks at how it's done i guess appreciate your time. It has been an auditor and we definitely. Yeah thank you joe. I have a question for you. What is it would you rather. Oh god where adult diapers the rest of your life or never wear underwear again. Well let's easy definitely know under. Yeah i was gonna say the same thing. Yeah come on although adult they would be nice during podcast as i was gonna say. Probably use the restroom. We hit record again but not gonna keep drinking my coffee powered water. I don't know how many times were in the middle of a podcast like from the waist. Down dancing dude. I was dancing when i came into your house to. That was different kind of dancing now. I was freezing cold riding my bike to your house. That's true you were. You were like heads face. I'm freezing his. I was blue in san diego. I know i'm a wimp. But then how many layers on her so cynical so some context around with this. Would you rather we got these things. Called pod decks who. They're they're not a sponsor. They're not. But i have been chatting with the founder of this company on instagram and in clubhouse lately and i thought this would be kind of a cool concept every once in a while. Throw into like our outros or you know with some of our interview guests but also on clubhouse right like started clubhouse room and be like. Hey we're playing. Would you rather just like start randomly pulling cards and letting people in the audience like answer the question. Yeah okay. i'm gonna read another one all right. You wanna do because the original idea for this. I was going to read one at the beginning. We're going to sort of riff on are awesome s episode with andrea and. I'm gonna say that. One for the i have one in my hand i have not read it yet so i'm gonna to wait so yeah wait for a little bit longer. Entered in other words. You rather rather it'd be think of what would you do. would you do. What would you do between adult diapers or no underwear at all. See the thing is like. I love it. I'm pretty like if the option was only wear adult diapers or no underwear it all the time. That'd be awesome because on podcast days i'd wear adult diapers halfway through interview and it'd be like. Hey joe joe louis got it is on the is right in the middle of it. Right in the middle podcast. I'm done. He's doing in the middle of an interview. That deliver matt's is if it's thirty six minutes into the conference up. That's the moment when it happened when we finally get dan. Ryan on the podcast. I'll wear adult diapers for that. One could stare in the eyes while i take a leak on dan's always asu name to be called because we have to pay royalty royalties. Well they go dan. Well royalty here. You got your shout out. And it's in the context of adult diapers relations. Go you do life. Good so under sean. All right let me go over here. Yeah you do that. Make it official right andrea and shine his matinee or so we've been falling andrea for a long time. He was leading up to this episode. This interview matinee. Were both like duke. This is gonna be fun. And i've been really excited. And and i went way deeper down the rabbit hole than normal like prior to this episode. And sean with someone That didn't really know much Really anything about too much other than read emails and stuff like that But do the blend of them and their thinking and their skills of writing and the the lack of ego when it comes to content creation but the fact that they can just ping pong ideas and actually present them to the world in this way is fascinating and they know marketing like so much deeper than most ever probably will experience They're trying to share that. We got a little smidgen out in this episode. Oh yeah no. I feel like this is another one. I i feel like i'm saying this a lot lately but i feel like this is another one where we could have gone two hours with them becoming even our jobs. We had so much we wanted to talk about. I actually had more notes of things that we didn't get to talk about. I even ask more questions. After we stopped hitting record went dammit we should have got that unrecorded. Look at my notes. I yeah but i mean i so i went a little ways. Back with andrei. I met him in in baltimore. After so i kind of told her real quick story about how he kicked our asses on leaderboard several years back. Well because i was in the top five on that leaderboard with my partner. Bradley at the time We got invited to a mastermind in baltimore and they covered a lot of the expenses for us to be out there at the mastermind and since andrea was number one he was at the mastermind to and so i got to spend a weekend like a two or three day weekend hanging out with andrei and brian and a big group of people that were all there and and then andrea and i have sort of loosely stated touch via email. Ever since. then. But sean you know i didn't know the story of how sean got involved or why sean got involved or you know what what sean brought to the table while working with andre so that was all sort of new information to me and i mean i found it really interesting. You sean was a customer. And andre and sean really hit it off in. I think andrei. I think my impression is that he likes working with other pre people and having some sort of collaborator and it just seemed like a perfect. Yeah no there's It's i'm trying to find a no because something you just said is probably hearing. Yeah it's an emergency so they talked about emergent marketing and yet others. You should really. Everyone should definitely if you're still with us in this episode. Go to the show notes page in. We should have links to some of these emails that we read And other content because mr contents and email forum but they publish it also as blog posts. Sometimes they can condense all that stuff definitely go through how they define emerge marketing even outside of what you just learned here because part of that is just Emergence as as how they define it as when multiple parts of a system come together and create something. That's different or better than the sum of the separate parts I really think. That's probably why sean and andrea working together It seems like they sean. Has this You know the traffic side the awareness which is part of their thing and yeah with them blended and the way that their relationship is. The definition of emergent marketing. Exactly perfect and i guess that's us to have never defined those types of things but like we've done separate stuff for so long but we always can help each other. Yeah but now combined we can you know sit in the seats that were really good at but also combined forces and yeah. It's just really cool. Yeah well so one takeaway and then one thing that i'm sort of envious sort of jealous of soap Big takeaway for me from this one was when they were talking about how eighty percent of sales come after ninety days. Yeah like how many people. How many especially in the digital marketing space. How many digital marketers are out there going from facebook ad to lead magnet to asking for the sale right. That's like most of us know. Yeah and like eighty ninety percent. Probably and if you're not doing that you're probably going at you know. There's a lot of that advice like you don't you. Don't go for for a home. Run on the first date right. You try to get the first base i write. Let's be honest. It's it's if they're doing it or not like they're probably just not sending emails but like a lot of people like to say like you know you're asking you to get married on the first date when you first like get introduced to most people go for the sale and then you have all of these marketers out there who say yeah. You don't go for the sale on the first day they get introduced to you and most of those marketers are going for the sale on day. Two or three right like going. Don't go for the sale. On the first day they send two days of value and then the third day's asking for the sale. It's you know if you look at the data that they're talking about eighty percent of sales come after ninety days now. So that was what dean jackson it. So like dean. Jackson seen a lot of stuff. Yeah there's a lot of merit to what that stat is coming from. Yeah so i mean like it seems to make a lot of sense to put a lot of effort into giving his much values you can in the beginning of the relationship and we cover this a lot with george bryan and we covered this a bit with the The email marketing guys Robin kennedy right but it makes a lot of sense that when somebody gets on your list for the first handful of days or even weeks and and potentially even months year just providing value value value value value value and then when finally there's an offer that's ready to be made you know you've created so much goodwill among your audience that that offers going to be infinitely more effective and there's a quote and that's when read this really fast that That was from one of their emails right on. This point is basically everyone talks about. The money is in the list And it's like now. The money's not really in the list yet. It's in there but it's actually. The money is in the authentic relationships. You build with people on your email list. Yeah yeah that's it and here's a theme so a theme that's popped up right. We talked about this with pat. Flynn we talked about this with ran fish skin. We've talked about this today. Again with andrea and sean is this beam of things that don't scale and building relationships with your audience at levels that that aren't really that scalable Right and i. i feel like there's sort of an underlying theme here with these guys in in that same way right especially in their sort of philosophy of when we do send emails were sort of drilling down to the ideal customers for these emails and then only sending them to those people and those are the ones that make you feel like you've got a a real deep relationship with these guys because of all the segmentation they do because of all of the really tailoring of their sequences that they do and i and that sort of theme seems to keep on popping up over and over and over again of like building authentic relationships but not trying to do it in a way where you're just trying to put thousands of people on your list all at the same time and then sell them something immediately and then it like most people seem to treat these email subscribers almost like disposable faceless sort of assets that they're collecting right where in reality every single person on your list is a human being who has emotions and who is struggling right now with something and who's excited right now about something and and and and by figuring out how to narrow in on the people and do the things that don't scale and segment your list taylor to the exact right people and and tailoring your content and and being authentic yourself mal of this seems to be kind of culminating from all of these past few episodes. Yeah i think it's a theme where certain experience like i'm looking over your shoulder. Yeah Of the some old writing on a whiteboard. It's kind of like what you're talking about. I wrote down connect collaborate and refine. This was like for one of the therapy sessions. We did yeah but like i really feel like that's what the theme is for this year or at least for us so far. It seems that way the three podcasts. We recorded are all about building super fans and building solid relationships. It's segmenting it's Using data that people are giving you or that you can find so you could actually speak intelligently and connect with the right people and the right time and not get them megaphone out and blair that thing to level eleven. Now you can go. What i stop light. No none of that going on. Like i really feel like this year is build the try beard. It's it's the time to connect and you can do that. So many modalities. And i think we're starting to see those trends pop up through the podcast here and it's probably selecting those people because they're coming to us at the right time and i really feel like that's probably the most powerful thing anyone can do right now. I mean you could have done it before too. But now more than ever like their whole what. What the durable business is one of their products and it's all about how to start a business right now. I mean you can't right now actually because it's not for sale no but a free email sequence breaks it breaks it down already and you should go through it for sure the durable business and again in the show notes find some links and but like with that you can it. Within a year the goal is to make one hundred thousand dollar business out of what they're teaching you and we talked about the thousand true fans concept in the pat flynn episode. You know and how if you do that. Really just put a i guess a tag a price tag on those names and say okay every month. You're gonna get paid roughly one hundred dollars per person or true fan you have and if you have a thousand had one hundred thousand dollar business. I mean apply that concept to here with the durable business and everything they put out there. It's just connecting with the right people. Entrusting your systems and your messaging and the content. You put out there that you going to be fine. You don't need a push Fish all this pressure. It's like talk to the right people and eventually they will buy you. Don't need to pressure them into a bunch of upsells all from day. One second one Dating and then like it's like worse than getting married. It's like let's just do our whole life in this ten minute experience of going through a sales funnel you know what i mean like. Let's jump to like the furthest possible experience we can do like. That's not how we work. Yeah so it's interesting. I'm thinking about this and there's actually when this episode comes out. I believe this is our fourth. No i don't remember what episode this has been this year but the so another episode that came out before this one but in twenty twenty one is the cella selo may shellac pursue. I tried to say it too fast. Screws up my My talking. I don't talk so good sometime. That's usually my my my but her episode. If you remember. We talked about facebook ads but it was specifically in casebook ads for engagement an audience and building fan not facebook ads for the purpose of getting leads sale. Very true. so that one's right in the mix from this month than this year as well. Yeah i mean she's in the mix here so that's four of our latest episodes. At least we think they're the latest. I if there's not a trend here like come on. It's yeah it's not sending traffic to send traffic which allowed people are. Click click click. It's like no those are people like Sean was talking about it and this is kind of take. It's like a mini note is like has long. He kept saying long form and this is in the emails to a long form facebook ad. He's not doing these short. You know two sentence things and sending him to an opt in page that's not their mo because that's again dating and then like probably going on multiple dates in one go. Yeah it's like now. let's just date. I guess and the speech book ad and you know if it resonates then you're probably going to click into it most likely it's going to go to another piece of content that they have where you're not going to have to opt in you know you definitely can have the option of imagine but that's yeah and it's just trusting that the right people are gonna raise their hand and you don't have to bark at everyone and potentially piss a bunch of people off or could have been the right person at the right time if you let them develop. Yeah yeah yeah and so one. More thing i i sort of opened a loop segment there was one takeaway in one sort of thing. I was envious of jealous. So the the thing that. I'm sort of jealous of you. Know he was talking about the plotter and the penser. I've never heard those. I haven't here's before but like you know. Basically one person is the person who is going to plan it all out and have like an outline and they're gonna know what these emails are going to be for the next month or whatever or in the case of book writers there they have the whole storyline mapped out. And then the penser. I guess would be the opposite. Where they're they're writing in the stories unfolding for them as the writing it. They don't know where it's gonna go right and for me one hundred percent. I tend to lean on that more. Plotters side every blog posts i've ever written. I spend probably more time outlining it than i do. Actually writing the article right. So like i will sit there and analyze it and read the like the order of events in the article i will go and collect stats to make sure on backing it up by data and add those to my outline and i'll spend probably five hours on an outline and when my outlines ready the writing the article is easy. It'll take me an hour to just frigging hammered out. 'cause i'm just following outline The thing that i'm jealous of. Is i kind of wish i was more of that. Penser style where. I could just like all right. Opened my info open my active campaign today. I'm going to send an email. Let's just see what flows out but for whatever reason my brain doesn't seem to operate that way and that's the that's the thing that i'm sort of like envious of No andre said that that's how he is. I'm not sure if sean is the same way or not. cut sounds like they have some similarities and overlap there. But like that's one thing that i wish i could be better at like. I'm reading a lot of books on storytelling and writing and things like right now. Yeah that's like a skill. I'm trying to hone in on right now. Is just being able to not know where i'm going with something. Start writing and let it unfold the way it unfolds though yes and no but yeah i mean i think you are naturally more of a plotter. I'm naturally more of a pincer and I mean you gotta think just in that inherently like we're creating a spectrum between our selves when the two of us but i think it's funny you say you you're kind of jealous that you're not more of the pincer type. I'm more jealous the are. I'm jealous that i'm not more of the plotter type again. I don't think there well not again but probably shouldn't be any jealousy is it's cool to belinda. There's a spectrum happening here. And i think it's it's they're i mean you're your writings absolutely phenomenal when you do it. But i think there's some time some hang ups on the plotters side just like on the pincers side a lot longer to get things out totally. Yeah that's why they said deadlines and you know really going real time. Piece helps them get it done and i know for us. That's kind of the same way if we combine forces we get this interesting blend of plotter and pincer when we know there's a deadline and we have a general topic we start with and then we go. you know. it's kind of like our presentations how we do those Which kinda leads me. A does lead me to appoint really fast here on something that sean said which i think we do and sometimes we don't think about it in this process and we we talked to. It's is all thing of like they start with a concept that's kind of simple And this goes for any kind of new sequence there doing attendee sequence or whatever course even Which that probably comes after the sequence and they got feedback which is really cool because all in real time again. They're not expecting what people are going to give them. They're just kind of let's but it's this simple concept and then when they start thinking about it and exchanging ideas between the two of them gets more complex and they go really deep down the well and i know you and i will have a conversation like we are here now. We're recording it but like twenty minutes. Almost it's like we'll we'll go deep on things and start asking questions and it gets super complicated will like the whiteboard will be filled up where you'll have some crazy floater. That's just like messy. And for a lot of times we would stay there in the complicated bit realize. Oh we can go to this like let's go back to simplifying now that we have this big thing Let's start refining. Let's figure out the eighty twenty or even ninety ten. You know what i mean. And then when we present it anywhere it can be more of a simple concept but it's more principal based and it shows the connections. I know for a long time. We've just kind of tossed a bunch of stuff out there and in some of the presentations we've done in the past just to wrap that backup like sometimes we give a lot of information and it's complex but i liked the fact that they go simple complex but then let's actually simplify it for everyone and also probably for them to really lock it in and it's still kind of laughing a little. I chuckled a little bit when he said the presentations. Because a lot of the times on the presentations the role is reversed a little bit. You build the presentation. You know exactly where it's going and a lotta times like the presentation and it'll be some of the first times. I'm seeing some of the slides. And i'm like i'm kind of rolling with it and improving like while we're giving presentations a lot of times. I think that actually is an issue. As sometimes i think i talked about it last time. We had this therapy session is. I'll get my head because i am. I've plotted that whole thing out. You know like. I would have shared it with you. And you've given me feedback by that point but typically i'm the one that comes up with the framework. Well i mean maybe you give me a flow in mind but in very simple flow. Think no deal. And then so i have this in my head. I'm like okay. I know what's coming up this. And then you on the other hand you say what out we just. We just get into the presentation mode and just improv. The whole thing. I'm like where we we'll. I'll be like sometimes we'll be on the next slide. I'd be like. Hey joe what did you mean by this. We've done that. He was even at the worm presentation. One of these pretty big ones. And i remember a year like all right. So what are we talking about here in the one looking at the monitor. That's like on the ground that can see who's like in my head. I'm kind of. It doesn't matter i'm just i made slides. That's why i'm on breaking rigid here. But i envy you in. That's what we know the content. I just don't always necessarily remember the order of the slider up. Yeah no yeah. I get it but it is fascinating. We bounce rolls back. Yeah well before this. This ultra goes too long. We got some things. Shout out and we got one last. Would you rather do. Let's do some shoutouts first and then we'll do we'll wrap it up at the. Would we rather we all right so last shadow. Actually i shout of the last section. Here is easy. Wepener easy webinar. We've talked about webinars a lot and we had some. We want to get some webinars folks coming back. This year moves last week. Jayson flatly and on last about webinars. We had sam bell. Cmo that's right I really wanna get joel early. Way back joel early and joe. Lavery somebody that we've been. We've been sort of circling around. I think we we booked once in. It fell through and we'd never managed to reopen home but joe lavery would be a great one to talk webinars with as well. Yeah in the point being is like eddie a lot of folks. Just think of webinars and there's like one style webinars along lebanon's that's value you build it up to story are and then we're going to sell some shit it's like well. It's not always that way. All those guys are teaching different types of webinars and Different types applications timings. All that stuff so easy webinars support all that which is really rad. As it software it can do any of these types of webinar technology. Wise you just have to create. The weapon are still but it gives you the framework and all the you know the pages structure all that stuff that you don't wanna do to track everything on active gives you all that it's like you're all tool kit for everything webinars and it's easy. It's the name so easy web dot com slash hustle. That's where you can get. That took an discount. Discount varies based on whether it's monthly or annual but he's hooking you up because you're hustle and flow chart listener so good easy. Webinar dot com hustle. And start using easy weapon or two women are stuff where the second shout. Yes if you want the notes for this episode where she's not going to be good. I'm looking forward to reading back on these notes. Myself up make sure you go to flow chart group dot com. Now if you go to flow chart group dot com. That is a facebook group. You will need to request to join the group but when you request to join the group one of the questions is give us your email and we'll send you the notes. So when he request during the group give us that email. We'll make sure you get the notes as long as you do it. Within two weeks of this episode going live that's flow chart group dot com. We wanna hook you up. Go do it and find us on clubhouse and all that stuff if you're on there and also on all this socials who find pinkas shadow us out friend us whatever. It is the second conversation. Yeah we like doing the non scalable conversations right now for now bernardi for now eventually. We're not a conversation conversations pretty soon eventually. I'll be but what is the technology gets to the point where it's indistinguishable from me. And they don't know they're not chatting with me then you'll probably be chatting with a bot. Yeah well we've got to get that technology from the richest man in the world. Now neuralink yes so and then senior days we'll start. You'll never have to talk to me. Let's get yeah eventually. You're just gonna hear us interviewing people but we were never. There was just a computer. I mean already. They're descript can do it. It's true we just have to hire some writers and throw it in descript and then they could voice it out and then boom. We got a podcast now. Now we're not gonna do that. You go maybe. Maybe we'll see maybe you would hire five writers and like the not saying five or read his bed not saying that. But you know. I'd hire the one that literally doesn't speak english and you'll go and read it like the podcast announcer will just no pronounced. It has to be machines. That machine announcer will read the script that somebody on five or wrote and it won't make any sentimental sound like me met. Sounds like a blend of these different. I don't know what's going on out of his mouth all right. We're off the rails now. We're almost half as long as our interview was itself all right. So would you rather be in shape in have a great body but a glee face or have a gorgeous space but be overweight way. Probably be a shape with the ugly face. 'cause i mean that's like sort of releif wow you just try to cover up face your ugly mug with beards big ass headphones doing a good job. Yeah i would agree with that because Yeah you could probably sell some good stuff at gorgeous face. And i want to be healthy. I like feeling healthy and Let's be honest. are mugs. Grow beard to hide the ugly back right a beard sunglasses and a hat. That's that's my day to day. Look so well. I know you sign up for bo talks. So that's coming up soon in your future. Probably probably problems as or steed on your schedule. We share a calendar injections. Like all over. You're going to have a new news pretty soon. Yeah yup totally true. Come on man Role with me here already. Well if you enjoy this episode share with somebody There's a lot of people that would enjoy this episode as well but they may never hear it and if they don't in your fault share it with the right people choose wisely. Choose wisely choose widely shared with everybody. Okeydokey matt andre. And sean what's there. Yeah because then people will listen to it and only the ones that are interested in further down the rabbit right share with the world. Get those megaphones out. Y'all yeah telling the top of the male with subject line with a lot of emojis and send it out when he's head phones and say listen to this right now all right all right. Let's go ahead and this what we're done now bank. You w thanks everybody for listening to this episode of the hustle and flow chart podcast for taking the time to listen. We want to give you something a little special every single episode that we do we actually have somebody on our team take notes basically cliff's notes version of every episode where you can go and find all of the tips and tactics that they laid out all of the resources that they laid out all the good stuff from this episode. We actually have a nice simple notes version that you can find on our website. Go to evergreen. Prophets dot com. Find this episode that you just listen to give us your email address and we'll send you the notes. Thanks for listening. Don't get it quickey.

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A Century of Free Speech

On The Media

30:55 min | 2 years ago

A Century of Free Speech

"On the media is supported by. Indeed, are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Listener supported w in C studios. This is not 'em podcast extra. I'm Bob Garfield here at WNYC Brian Lehrer host to live public affairs show, and recently he had a segment that was so up hourly decided to send it down our podcast feet. His guests were Columbia University, President Lee ball, injure and university of Chicago law, professor Jeffrey stone, editors of the free speech century the collection of essays by scholars marking one hundred years since the supreme court issued the three decisions that establish the modern notion of free speech. The fact is whether it's fake news or money in politics. We're still aren't doing over the first amendment and their book lays out the origins of the argument. Just after the first World War, here's Brian. How did modern free speech history? Start in nineteen nineteen president policy. You have a period of time in in. Which the world was really coming apart in many ways of obviously World War One was happening. But there was also the Russian revolution. There was on rested labor sectors. This was a time of enormous controversy in a sense of the modern world was coming apart. And one of the things that happens in periods. Like, this is the intolerance goes up and a lot of people were brought before courts for speeches that they gave including a candidate for president of the United States Eugene Debs leader in the socialist party, and those cases work their way, some of them few of them three of them up to the supreme court and in a series of decisions the court unanimously held the speech was not protected by the first amendment and Oliver Wendell Holmes junior wrote those opinions, but that was the beginning of what now is one hundred years of extrordinary jurisprudence just for the record and listeners curiosity. And especially since democratic socialism is back in American politics as a mainstream thing, what was it that you gene, Deb said as a presidential candidate that was deemed not protected by the first amendment. Well, fury was not about democratic socialism such he was giving a speech in Ohio about democratic socialism. And during the course of the speech, he was near a jail facility in which there were several individuals who were imprisoned because of their opposition to the draft and Deb's pointed in that direction and basically plotted them for their courage and for that the deft into World War One, right? And for doing that he was prosecuted under the espionage act of nineteen seventeen for engaging in speech lead people encourage people to obstruct the draft, and he maintained it lated the first amendment and the spring court unanimously upheld his conviction, not even lead to violence. Just. Lead to more draft dodging, right, but lead to only in a very indirect sense. It's not as if he was advocating it, he was basically simply recognizing the courage of people who had done this. And that was sufficient to say that he was essentially causing people to obstruct the draft. And yet Justice of rental homes is a hero in your narrative and largely for changing his mind. So can you tell us more of the Justice Holmes story? Well, in those cases, Holmes said, there's a classic question here when people speak an advocate dangerous, ideas are highly offensive ideas. What should be the limits of free speech and win should the government be able to step in and he announced in the course of these decisions the clear and present danger test. That's how we would analyze now. Those are vague terms. And they interpreted them an anti-free-speech way in modern sensibilities at that time, but within a matter of months, another case came before the court and homes. Reversed his position and started to say things like really the marketplace of ideas is important and seeking truth. And we want to have a first amendment that respects the rights of citizens to discuss issues and to try to ride at the truth. And so he gave a new meaning of very pro free speech meaning to clear and present danger portable. It's interesting about that is the fact that homes changes mind was self an example, free speech because what he wrote those opinions in the fall of nineteen nineteen upholding the convictions of Debs and the other defendants that summer he had conversations with a number of other individuals who criticized him for taking the position that he did and upholding the convictions, and he changed his mind. And when he came back the following fall. He basically wrote these elegant dissenting opinions, which basically gave real substance to the principle of free speech. Even though now he was writing only for himself and Louis Brandeis. But the key thing about it is. That in itself was a great example of how free speech matters, you describe the US as unique in the extent of its free speech protections. People may not realize this casualty thinking that. There are a lot of democracies in Europe and elsewhere that also have freedom of speech freedom of speech. How would you describe where the US stands alone the most dramatic? It was obvious example is on the hate speech where many western democracies have prohibited hate speech defined somewhat ambiguously, whereas in the United States Supreme court with every Justice liberal conservative for the last half century embracing the position that there's no such thing as hate speech that can be restricted consistent with the first amendment, and the court over time has come to view that the government simply may not restrict the expression of particular points of view, or particular ideas, because those ideas are thought to be offensive or hurtful or dangerous. Unless they create a clear and present danger of grave harm attest that has been applied with extraordinary rigor in the United States. And the reason I think we are different from other countries at this point is that we've learned the lessons of our own failures that are court. It's come to the view that when we have allowed restrictions of speech. And then we've looked back later we recognize that we were wrong we had done it badly. What's an example of examples to world will one cases that we discussed earlier another example would be during the McCarthy era where the supreme court initially upheld the criminal convictions of individuals were leaders of the communist party with hindsight the court recognized that that they had given into the temptation of allowing ideas that was seen as offensive or hurtful or or dangerous to be prohibited. And hindsight they realized that was a mistake, and how much would you say your that freedom of speech twentieth century US style has been contagious around the world. We have one hundred years of jurisprudence, a free speech. It took us fifty years to get it to where. Is today almost everybody in America thinks freedom of speech is part of the identity of being an American. We're proud of it. It's really the last fifty years in which that happened and in that fifty years it's been the supreme court and judicial decisions that have refined this doctrine enormously, and it's very distinctive in democracies around the world largely because of that jurisprudence. You can look every place around the world, and you will find echoes of the major decisions of the United States prim court, most notably New York Times Sullivan in nineteen sixty four. Now are in a time of contracting free speech with the rise of authoritarian governments around the world. We see what's happening in many countries Russia and China both distressing and how he thought they were liberalizing for a while. And now those governments are retrenching in digging in hard Saudi Arabia murdered Jamal kashogi by all accounts. Do you see a boomerang effect from any of those situations affecting the United States? I don't think so hope not certainly I think there are issues being raised now by our president, for example, condemning the media and questioning in some ways the device Haliti in the legitimacy of a free and open government calling on the need to as he said opened up the libel laws, for example. But I don't see much reaction to that in a positive direction from their standpoint. If anything there's a concern how I think that maybe there's too much free speech. Social media is complicating things because. Individuals now are increasingly inclined to get all of their information from particular sites, which have strong ideological bias. And that's in some sense part of free speech, but it also is inconsistent with the basic assumptions of how a democracy operates. So I think there are challenges that we face, but I think they're not so much because of the authoritarian machine elsewhere, although there is that seem in some of our president's statements. Do you think that Trump whether you love or hate what he stands for has affected or diminished, free speech in the US? I think he and his defenders would say he's just exercising. His rights of free speech by calling the press the enemy of the people, for example, that he doesn't give up that. Right. When he becomes president. It's not unconstitutional, necessarily, that's a complicated question. But to have the the leader of the country regularly tried undermined and through false statements. The role of the press in America is is very very dangerous. Let's take a phone call and Carrick in Brooklyn, you're on WNYC. Hello. For for. I just wanted to bring up the idea of phallic shown to for the Dono as band off the internet also media platforms for simply doing things like questioning government Arif's just wanted to see if you think that, you know, big tax in other government agencies have crossed the line in fringing on its first memorize or do you think that's acceptable? What has been done to him? And I'll take my answer off the air. Thank you. Thank you very much. Professor stone to extent that Alec shows has been banned. I don't know that's the case. But to the extent that he's been banned from using social media is soon by social media entities themselves, and in theory, they have the authority they have the right to decide who can and cannot have access to the platforms in the same way that the New York Times or WNYC can decide who they'll invite on. That's a little more complicated in the realm of social media because when when social media came into existence the government assumed. That anyone would have access and that these platforms would not be engaging in any kind of censorship or any kind of selective admission to the platforms, and that's changed in recent years, and it's complicated things. But there's no I amendment issue because nobody was excluding him is the government itself. We also Jeff, and I'm make the point in the book by the SAS, we've invited by our own comments that one of the greatest questions of the time is how are we going to treat for first amendment purposes? The major new communication technology of the internet and social media, but forms and over the past one hundred years, there has been a division the print media has been protected against any form of regulation, basically and radio and TV have had multiple types of regulation. The fairness doctrine equal time provisions. And the question now is will this new technology of communication the internet have one of those or something? Different, and that's a very complicated question. And where does it stand? Constitutionally. Well, I think we don't know the answer to that. That's part of the puzzle here. So you can say that the social media platforms have become so dominant, and in particular, Facebook and Twitter that it is appropriate under the broadcast. Regulation cases for the government to set up an agency that would participate in non censorship ways in the development of speech on those platforms, or you can say that has been a mistake in the past the red lion decision on broadcasting and the print media model should be the one that applies the social media. What was the red lion? Fish Redline decision was in the league nineteen sixties and upheld government regulation of radio and TV and that was before cable. So was it based on scarcity was based on in effect monopoly. The few big networks has it was based on scarcity, which is a complicated. This is this is a write down our first amendment doctrine alley and my own view is that there was a play with both kinds of systems protection against the government some form of government regulation, and whether the rationale stood up or not as a hope in question, in my mind, one of the ways that I think it's possible to imagine regulation of social media platforms like Facebook would be to implement. What was the fairness doctrine for radio and television onto Facebook by saying, for example, that Facebook sends you a two particular site, or if you go and look at a particular site that has a strong ideological component that it automatically has to send you the alternative side. The opposite side, you don't have to read it. They can't force you to do that. But they have to actually expose you to it. And the idea is to try to bring people into a better place in terms of understood. Banding that like world is complicated than only from one side. And Jim in the South Bronx WNYC. Hi, jim. Good morning, taking my call. My question for you give this could they address the rides of of tents through strict street speech from the last message extremely unprecedented in American history usually been the left it's been the targets of restrictions free speech. Now, you have groups in the name of anti hate speech who want to restrict free speech. I am I correct that unprecedented in American history. And what what can can you guess in lightness about that? And I'll take my comments off the air. Thank you. Thank you. Jim. I think you write that for the most part is directly. It is the the liberal side. It has been the advocate of free speech and the political conservative side. It's most of the time in the one. Who's defended restrictions on speech? This is true. For example in World War One. It's true McCarthy are through the Vietnam war era, and so on and we do see a reversal of that at the moment on college camp. As you say with respect to the left trying to restrict the freedom of speech. And I personally find that very troubling. I think shortsighted it doesn't understand why the kind of causes that the left has believed in and still believe in deeply were made possible only because of a commitment to freedom of speech, and that if individuals and government were entitled, or if universities were were empowered to restrict speech that others found to be offensive or inappropriate or immoral wrongheaded. Then in this country, we would never have had civil rights movement. We never had a women's rights movement. We've never gay rights movement. Those came about only because I d is that most people found offensive could be could be addressed and could be spouse and could be listened to. And I think that that it's important for people on the left to recognize that this excess that the left has had is largely the product of free speech, and and endanger themselves that they undermine. That though. Sometimes we have in recent years, I think examples of. Provocateurs on the left pushing their rights at public universities state, universities, which neither of your schools are your private universities under the banner of free speech to push racist, and sexist speech in particular, as they criticize what they see as political correctness and try to provoke a backlash to make the left look bad or even provoke violent backlash in some cases to make the left look bad. And now that's largely a political issue. But it would it be accurate to say presentable injure that at Columbia University. You would have the right as a private institution to set different standards for when somebody could do that or conservative club could invite someone to do that. Sometimes away comes about you have more right under the constitution in that respect to limit that than SUNY would. That's correct. So. The first amendment really only applies to what's called state action actions by the government, and with respect to public universities for first amendment purposes, they are state actors for purposes of of the first amendment private universities are not state actors therefore not governed by the first amendment. However, every major university and college in the country has voluntarily embraced kind of first amendment mentality. And certainly I have and we have Columbia Jeff has at the university of Chicago that said a couple of things that are important here. Number one as we wanted out, the free speech jurisprudence in the United States is the most extreme most protective in human history and the most elaborate, and and we think the most sound one element of that is how far should it. Go in protecting speech that is attacking other groups because abrasiveness ethnishity or gender that is a reasonable debate to have just. How far and there've been different views about this in the history of the first amendment. We've chosen to go very far in this country in protecting speech. Both Jeff night for somewhat different reasons have written in favor of that position. But it is a legitimate debate. The other thing to note is that there's an over lap between what the first amendment says and private worlds of of speech how we conduct ourselves. And that's important that we see those two spheres Vanessa in White Plains on WNYC Vanessa. Hi, thank you for taking my call. I'm interested to hear their comment on the antibeach DEA legislation and state action in that regard. I hard for me to understand the rationale saying that government contracts that was for government contracts can be conditioned on taking a particular political position opposition what I believe is. Awful conduct. He boycott divest. And sanctions, professor stone. Some states are actually doing this. I believe New York is one of them. My view would be that. It is not consistent with the first amendment for the government to basically refuse to contract with individuals who take a particular political position that the members of the state government disapprove, and that's actually not a complicated question, and that such laws aren't constitutional, and there's billet actually just past the US Senate endorsing the states that will deny contracts to companies that engage in boycotting Israel. Do you do is this headed for court is this going to supreme court? I would think there's a very good chance of it. I am personally against the Bedia movement for Roddy of reasons, but I think it is NFL to the first amendment to penalize for the government to penalize people who advocate that view. How about citizens United the supreme court for boy in forty years now has equated money with speech? How new notion is that in the history of the world will it is relatively new notion. The supreme court initially was ambivalent about the question, but insisted United the court defy for decision. Basically took a position that effectively invalidated many forms of regulation of campaign expenditures in our political process, and the interesting about it is in this case, it was the five more conservative justices who took the more aggressive free speech dance holding laws regulating campaign finance unconstitutional, and the former liberal justices who took a position. That would have allowed the government restrict speech in this context. And so we have there is a conflict between two different visions of the first amendment on the the side that basically held at those laws on constitutional their views that views the government cannot tell people that you've spoken enough. But basically, you have a right to give as many speeches you want to hand out as many leaflets that you want to give as much money as you want. And the government cannot say you're you've said enough sit down and shut up and the other side, the they the the centers of the case basically said that protecting the functioning democracy is central function of what the first amendment is about. And when speech is a point where basically undermines the working of democracy. It can't be limited not based on any particular point of view, but on the magnitude of expenditures themselves. So I mean, you wrote in the book that the underlying reason for freedom of speech is to protect and strengthen democracy. So now in this position. Where political influence of the wealthy few by spending all that money is widely seen as corrupting and diminishing democracy. Even while free speech is considered a foundation of it. We just have to be resigned to whoever happens to be on the supreme court at a given moment making these judgments as to which damages democracy more. Will it turns out that who's on the supreme court? The court rules is really important than you just have to keep working at this. That's the history of one hundred years Jeff pointed out, a profound question at the core of the first amendment is the first amendment about only stopping the government from censoring or being involved in limiting speech or is the first amendment also involved in allowing the government to help with the quality public debate. And that plays out not only in campaign, finance, but in new technologies like Facebook and Twitter and number of other areas as well profound question. That we have to resolve. How do you see by the way, professor stone? The current maybe we could call it. The Robert score such cavenaugh court in terms of any particular, free, speech dimensions. I think once striking thing about the current makeup of the court is that it is likely to divide five to four in the most important, and ideological type cases, whether it's speech religion or criminal procedure or whatever along partisan lines. And that's a precedent to have five justices appointed by Republican presidents retentive to one way in four justices appointed by democratic presidents to vote the other way really threatens the integrity of the court as a neutral detached body that is not acting partisan interests, but his acting out constitutional and legal interest. That's very troubling in terms of the court itself. I think that this will play out on a number of issues, but on the free speech. Area campaign finances. Obvious one regulation of speech about abortion is another one. We've already seen an example of that last term each about abortion remind me, yes. Oh, California had a law that required facilities that provide reproductive health care to individuals to to make valuable information about the fact that the state provides of worship counseling, and and free abortion services and other reproductive health services for those again afford it in a five four decision with the Republican point to judges on one side of the democratic point Justice on the other this report held on constitutional that state could not compel these facilities. Most of which were anti abortion facilities who basically were treating people women who wanted healthcare and moving them away from abortion as an option and not telling them that there were free abortion services and reproductive health care services Abella from available from this. Eight. They held violated the free speech rights of the providers not to be compelled to inform. Individuals of this factual information interesting, and yet there some state laws that compel doctors to provide women adverse information, if they're considering an abortion precisely and the principle that the court relied upon that the conservative justices relied upon in this case would seem very no matter. Principle to required invalidation of laws that require doctors to disclose all sorts of information, some of which not accurate to women considering abortions. We'll see what happens. I've always wondered why in the case of states that require the risks of abortions to be presented to a woman considering one that they can't also be compelled to provide the risks and benefits of pregnancy and childbirth and child rearing in there, whatever the particular circumstances are. Well, the issue abortion is obviously one that carries a particularly deep division in our society. And this is where there's a very strong effort to try to deter people from having abortions for those who believe that abortion is we're and the court now finds itself in a position where my own view is that that probably five justices on the supreme court who would vote to overrule Roe v. Wade, and although they may not get to that point very quickly that that viewpoint. I think will shape a lot of their decisions if they confront more first amendment questions along these lines since your book starts in the era of World War One and the free speech legal battles over that. I think memory, or at least family lore that were about to hear from David Glen cove might be very relevant. David WNYC. Hello. Oh, brian. Yeah. I just wanted to relate the story. And it's pretty factual that my grandmother was arrested while a student at Barnard. College. She was a an officer in the socialist club at Barnard college. And she inter fans say at a rally in Madison Square Garden, passing leaflets entitled will you be drafted and she was subsequently arrested. And and, you know, her prominent family got her off because they said that she didn't really understand the full impact of what she was doing because she was a woman, of course, women didn't really were under the control of men, supposedly. So what was the charge the well, the charge was I don't know if it was dishing, but it was whatever the law was against, you know, the conscription, you know, fighting the conscription or related to conscription law. That was just recently passed David. Thank you for that for that family story. And it goes back to talking about at the beginning of the second with respect to the socialist candidate for president of the United st-. Dates at that time Eugene Debs being found guilty guilty of what I forget for just advocating or supporting the right of people to not get drafted. So I think one of the things that we're trying to do with the book, but Jeff, and I've tried to do for many many years is to help people realize that what we take today as America's principle of freedom of speech. Impress relatively new in our history extraordinary in terms of its social accomplishments, and legal accomplishments and something counter intuitive and fragile that is there's no reason to think that the United States is now invulnerable to the rise of intolerance that we've seen in past periods as Jeff pointed out the world, and I started with the World War One period extrordinary in the repression that occurred. So is the McCarthy era. We have wondered in the book weather, the United States over the past fifty years have just not faced the level of insecurity and fear and panic that World War One in post World War Two eras abroad. And have wondered will we stand up now to the kind of intolerance that was very visible and painful in those periods. Are we strong enough is the jurisprudence strong enough to resist it? And there we leave it with the president of Columbia University Lee Bollinger and university of Chicago, professor Jeffrey stone, they are the co editors of a new book of essays by many first amendment scholars about free speech. It's ever Lucien and current challenges in the United States, but called the free speech century. Thank you both so much for joining. Thank you. Thank you. You can catch the Brian Lehrer show between ten AM and twelve pm eastern on WNYC or at WNYC dot org. The show is also available as a podcast and OTM listeners. Don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter at on the media dot org slash newsletter. It is the best newsletter. Ever. It's the on the media newsletter at on the media dot org slash newsletter. You won't be sorry.

government United States supreme court professor president Jeff night Eugene Debs university of Chicago McCarthy America Facebook Columbia University Brian Lehrer Oliver Wendell Holmes New York Times Ohio Jim
HABITUAL ACTIONS #1 WITH Dr. JASON GILES

Dancing with Bipolar

51:48 min | 1 year ago

HABITUAL ACTIONS #1 WITH Dr. JASON GILES

"Hi this is Cherie would dancing with bipolar. And I wanted to tell you why I chose anchor to make my podcast. First anchors the easiest way to make a podcast they give you everything you need for free in one place where you can record with either your phone or your computer anchor gives you creation tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds great so just in case your baby starts crying or your dog started working or your neighbors ringing your doorbell. You can edit that stuff out. Make your podcasts. On flawless. Anchor gives you distribution for free again for free can be heard on every podcast distribution including spotify apple podcast. Google podcast breaker stitcher etc. You can easily make money with your anchor account with no minimum listenership so download the anchor app go to anchor dot. Fm to get started again. Start Your own podcast with anchor by downloading the APP or going to anchor. Fm to get started. Let Me Tell You. This is a piece of cake. This is dawn serene from dancing with bipolar. Make your podcast do it Hi this is Sharon and this. Is My podcast bipolar. Today's guest is Dr Jason Giles. Jason is the host of habit Dr Podcast but also the author of deep under is yet to be released. Jason is also the creator of the HAB APP which is an APP. That will help you to break bad habits so without further ado. Let's bring in Dr Giles. Good Morning Hey. How're you doing awesome? How are you doing today? I'm doing great too so for the mix up. I didn't I didn't know especially over on this side. Good it's all good. It's not like we're going anywhere right up on lockdown. Yeah you're kind of on like serious lockdown. We're still pretty easy here in Arizona of but yeah I feel for you I really do. I don't well. We'll talk about that but I don't know what I would do if I was in your instance right now. I'm just go with the flow. I guess but get get arrested. I guess for violating curfew. Yeah I see well you know you have to go outside. It's a IT'S A. It's tough right because it because you don't know if you're the person who's got the problem and I think the best advice is to assume that you are infected right just even the you'd have no symptoms just assume that you're a carrier some. I think I read recently. That sometimes it's cases up to quarter people who have no symptoms at all have the virus. And that's how that's how it's spreading. It's not just sick. People coughing on sick people or coughing on well people it's You know you have it and so the safest thing is to assume that you do not that you need to go to the hospital because you have it because if you're not sick if you don't feel bad then does matter that you haven't but That you stay away from people. 'cause you don't WanNa don't WanNa give it to someone else and if you do if you do that. Few -SSUME that you're contagious. Even if you have no symptoms within naturally you're gonNA stay apart from people right you're not going to Definitely aren't GonNa WanNa gave within six or eight or ten feet of them. You'RE NOT GONNA go to big gatherings you're not gonNA go see your GRANDPA grandma. Yeah exactly and I think that's the safest thing from a in terms of personal also work right so you're not going to go work around your co workers. You're GonNa do something like this rear talking over the phone or on a zoo or whatnot. That's the smartest thing to do With that said it doesn't mean if just because you're a contagious in this imaginary universe where everyone's infected or acting like he is just because you are doesn't mean that you can't go outside right or can't Get some fresh air or can't go for a walk or can't walk your dog or any of the rest of that stuff because just because you're In this imaginary scenario carrying the virus you can't spread it to anyone if you don't come in contact with them so stay stay. Stay away from people. I just saw thing where I live in Los Angeles. The mayor wants people to wear masks at all times when they're outside which is absurd. Is that overkill a little bit? It's overkill yeah. It's transmitted like that. I mean it the contact cop Friday There's conflicting reports. I've seen stuff where it says. I can stay in the air for a long time. But but that's indoors so if you're if you're outdoors dissipate that's right and and there's a certain point. I mean it's cool. I'm talking to you about this as a certain point. Where you where it just gets to you. Where being cooped up or having you know not being able to interact with other people just read an article in the Wall Street Journal today about what happens when we're in isolation supreme court not long ago ruled that solitary confinement is cruel and unusual punishment. Because we're human beings need to interact with other human beings at an in some way at some level and we do it all the time. People live with people on the streets. People WE WORK WITH FOR SURE. Yeah just those. Little Micro Interactions Right. The raised eyebrow and this little smile and the is the flipping the bird. Or if you're driving crazy or or even the body language car right like you know you're not getting in my lane and And so there's that correspondence that there's another there's another person right. There's a human being there just like me. Okay we're not in this alone are can go on and other days you sent me simplistic way of looking at it but we we need to lead interact with other people. So article is pretty good. It's it's about how people are figuring that out and how some things is just not a substitute for just not not a substitute for direct Face to face even if that separated by a computer. Yes see that you can do some stuff with computer screens but you need. You need some kind of little bit of face to face interaction and And so my I get me. Spit balling on this. But my my my worry about The face masks is it. That makes that even harder right even harder at the grocery store yesterday. Getting a couple of things and Evrensel spaced out right. So we're sixty. Departs standing in line with our little cards only had a couple of things a little basket and I saw a woman very attractive wearing what looked like a something. You'd go out to dinner in even though this was about three o'clock in the afternoon at the supermarket like she this beautiful blue dress on and these way too big Gloves black like you know the gloves the cops would wear. They were investigating a scene or arresting here and there but there were three sizes too big for her. So they're floppy on her hands. She had a bottle of wine. She was looked like a dinner guest. She looked like she was heading into a long drive to go somewhere to dinner guests. That's that's what it looked like and earrings hair hair done up and a mask that wouldn't stay on and and so she was the poor lady she was. She looked ridiculous anyway and then trying to keep it all going but we had a little moment. She was in the in the The I'll the next aisle over and no conversation right because there's you know right but just the little face to face. Interaction like yeah. Can you believe we're going through what she seemed to be saying? Like you look ridiculous. And she said I know no words just face expressions back and forth and and so my worry with the masks as it were going to lose that touch humanity that little bit of you know well-wishing and and just tagging up as a person to another person but anyhow so you couldn't ask her what what what's all going on issues like in her own home movie or reality show. I think it was a it was actually better that the words were exchanged. It's better they didn't know because I could make up a better story. I like my career just a single bottle of wine at three o'clock in the afternoon I talked by. I told the story to my kids and my daughter She's sixteen. She said she's going home to drink that herself. I'd well maybe you know I read a maybe. This is the only opportunities she's GonNa ever have really beautiful dress and get herself off. Glamis. Yes he's doing it with style. Frei. Exactly it was so funny because I had today about this dress. I was going through my wardrobe. The growth you something. My mother who is long deceased had pulled the dress out that I want us to wear those kind of funny that that comes up today because it was like finding alternative. Beautiful Blue Drafts. Believe me. It wasn't me story yesterday in California's it's just interesting respondents. Yeah so we're I mean we're we're getting through we're managing we're suffering through and Which is which is all fine. I you know I. It's a serious right so it's serious it's a it's a serious problem and people are dying and it's it's a big deal at You know and even in the middle of all this countries aren't telling the truth you know China's lying about their about their numbers right in the middle of all this right when it would make a big difference. We're tracking stuff in what what's effective and people are trying and Russia's practice Russia's credit has dropped outta right that's right that's a country country club. We have no idea what's going on over there at all. They're just totally like blocked. Any news coming from the though I don't know but I mean I guess from like in New York City. They're all doing seven o'clock. Am like shout out on their balconies cooling these expressions of humanity yet. Russia has no cases. And the you'll be you'll be shot if you say otherwise I think is what's going on over there and they pick these other countries like Indonesia. There's nothing coming from their whatsoever and like weird little fastest that we have no clue what's going on but if they have an earthquake in Indonesia. I'm sure we'll be heard about that. And then all the people on the news for sure right. That'll be a strange very strange times. So let's move on to you your doctor which habit Dr and I looked it up to the raid definitely habit which is settled irregular tendency or practice especially one. That is hard to up. Yes so the habit Dr Podcast. What do you talk about on your podcast? Well it's a combination of those two things so there's a thank you by the way for your interest and curiosity. I think that's six. That's the key to happy. Life is being curious and yeah habits are All sorts of great definitions for them on my favorite is second nature right. So it's not it's not the stuff that's a Oliver Wendell home. So it's it's not the stuff that we're born with it's But they become as if there are nature are intrinsic nature the become automatic and So from a structural standpoint the brain is the most energetically demanding organ in the body. It per gram per gram or pound per pound. It uses more energy than any other tissue except the retina. The party Ri- forms. And that's really probably part of the brain. I think about Accurately so the brain uses all this energy for its weight. It's a hog right so nowadays even with the quarantine we go to the grocery store and pick up a box of Cap'n crunch or a you know some salmond or more quiche or whenever you're buying at the grocery store and food for the most part in the developed world is not a problem in America. It's it's a problem. The other way too many calories but not that long ago when we were having to hunt and gather individually or in small bands for our food before our culture. Which isn't that long ago right so I don't know twelve to fifty thousand years ago something like that. You're you're basically surviving or whatever you catch which means you've got a catch twenty five percent more just to keep your brain going so that's a big tax on survival For for a creature roaming the plains like us we have to catch and eat and digest us more food in order to survive. And so we do that with our bodies of course but the brain runs the enterprise and it needs a lot of energy and when you can make a repetitive action automated. It uses less energy in the brain. You don't have to you. Don't have to get your whole cerebral cortex right the frontal lobes thinking about what you're doing paying attention micro adjustments in your movements. Let's say throwing a rock at a rabbit right too so you can catch it and eat it if you make that routine automatic right how you're holding the rock where your eyes go leading the target a little bit all that stuff the more likely to get the rabbit and you don't have to use as much three power in order to get it in. That's true for all kinds of stuff talking walking right. You don't think about walking but when you're a baby learning to walk each step you have to concentrate on and so we're built. We're built to make habits and have it is just another way of saying that. This part of the brain does something Easier than it used to so easy sometimes the fact that it feels automatic almost like second nature. So that's how I look at habits and I think I think a lot of stuff is like that right a lot of stuff definitely go ahead. I'm thinking about the about face touching. It's like wow how often do yes yes I you know. I've been trying to count that daily like often. I do it and it's like oh my gosh. Why don't we bright so much break right exactly why you do the so much yes well? Nervousness routine automatic reassurance. Part of why we cover our mouth with our hands is a social right. We don't want to give away our expressions Part of what we do is It's it's a subconscious touch your head when you're thinking or you Yeah scratch scratch. My skin allow. Why Catholic every time like I'm playing a lot of words with friends lately like way too much and I noticed that I like the old man and it's like talking your beard cutting out my beard. Don't have one so yeah. So some of these are habits. Their people bite their nails is a question of habit. They They do all rea- William Air. Pull your hair pick at the scab right crack your knuckles A lot of things that are just we do him because we do own. It didn't start that way but they become and very easy to engage in. And you do that all the time. Right which navigate our houses by by routine. You know where the furniture is. You can see in low light most cases. Because you know we're the coffee table is in you know we're we're we're built to build habits and then to maximize the crap out of him right to really squeeze them for all. They're worth because they're very efficient right. They save us they in some ways so long as in this case of the rabbit hunting the rabbit turns that way which we think is going to turn based on how it's little out. You know the the rear leg move. We think it's going to go that direction and if and if we're good at that it's almost like we're predicting the future right. We can see okay based on this. I bet that rabbits GonNa go that way if I throw this rock here a bedroom and a hit and eat. Dinner gives us a tremendous sense of control having habits that make sense. Yes it does. And so. That's how the brain works for. It rains complicated right. There's no one says no we don't have it figured out yet But this this feature when I talk about like riding a bike as is this sort of old chestnut about habits. Everybody says Oh. Yeah I know what that means like. I didn't ride a bike for years but I climbed back on and I could ride It's because the skill set to acquire balancing atop an intrinsically unstable machine while you're pedaling it and steering it that's hard and once right. I looked I crashed one hundred times right. Skinned knees offense. Spry asked and wrecked bike and scrapes and black eyes and all that stuff but then but then I got it right and once I got it so far. I haven't ever forgotten how to ride a bike and so it's true with all kinds of stuff. It's also true with so predicting controlling future is enormously powerful if you can do that will. You're in much better shape. So we build things to predict the future right so computers and big mathematical counting. Engines the The mayans built the pyramids so they could see where the constellations were said. They knew when the planting season was GONNA come same in Egypt right or the when the Nile was GONNA flood. And so if you can predict future like if you could predict that there is going to be a global viral pandemic. You wouldn't have been in better shape than if you didn't write Ventilators we'd had master stuff ready to go. Yes so we don't want to be able to future everybody and having a habit unless you get the habit wrong right unless the rabbit turns the other way the habits very useful if the rabbit turns the other way. Your habit is now problem because you're used to doing a certain thing. And now the world has gone the other direction. So have it's our both our salvation. Because they are energy efficient in the brain but they're also our downfall when we rely on them too much in other words it feels so good to be able to predict the future that sometimes this gets word where drug addiction is. You feel so good to predict how I'm GonNa feel next Friday on payday when I go to the bar with my friends that even though I really should be studying for my you know entrance exam to the thing that I wanna go do. I'M GONNA go to the bar. And that's where the habit is in the way now that's where because because these automatic a now co firing neurons in the brain or habit loops as I call them because they're so Easily triggered because they are so eas you know they kind of have a life of their own. Second Nature Right We find ourselves doing things that we kind of know we shouldn't be doing but there it feels so good. They feel so familiar. They feel so right that they're hard to break. I think that's the second part of your definition right. They're they're hard hard to break. In fact in fact I don't think you're break. They're still there right like riding a bike. So if you're a person who drank alcohol like I did so. It became an automatic habit that system of drinking. That way. It's still there. I can reactivate it right. Like turning on an old car just needs a new battery and it'll run and so the only solution is to use that system. You can't have a different brain or have your brain works differently than it does. So you have to deal with what you've got. What you've got. Is this habit forming system? So what we do. You better make another habit. A habit becomes more automatic right. It's easier to activate at competitive habit that says I don't know to continue that civic story about the Bar You know I go to the library on Friday nights to study or or whatever whatever the other habit is it takes time to build those things just like. It took time to build the riding a bike capital. Drink drinking in the first place or anything that we get good at playing the piano or words with friends. I bet you got better at it. The more you played right better and a lot of levels. Yeah and now. It's funny because I've not played. Yep I'm thinking about it and I'm thinking out word and dictionary for that. I could get hurt his strategy. And how come you keep soon? Oh left side of the board for start right exactly exactly and it has. It's almost become an addiction in a way because when I'm not thinking about it I'm like I'm missing something. What am I supposed to be doing now instead? And it's like I mean we're doing. I'm really glad yes. I'm really glad that you mentioned that because I think so. Whatever we pay attention to is important now. A lot of people have that backwards. They think I pay attention to the things that are important and I would bet you that a month ago words with friends was not nearly as important as it is now. It wasn't even on my wasn't even on my radar. Things we focus on race start to fill up our minds right. This fill up our attention in that cool and so when you're focused on drinking more about drinking in the drinking becomes really important when you're focused on getting rid of beach volleyball or playing the cello or you know watching all the Francis Coppola movies you get better at it tiger king right. That's driving. I haven't seen it yet last night at dinner. What's Tiger King I have? I don't know what is your kids. I haven't seen it yet but Yeah it's apparently the new addiction for our societies shared experience. Right Right Right. Yeah so anyhow. That's the doctor. So I'm you know I'm medical doctor and And I I started in Surgery and then went to anesthesia. Got Very interested in what consciousness is. What does it mean to be awake so forth then having unexperienced with getting sober and I got very interested in that used to not care about that stuff but then once it affected me I got super interested and then the more like words with friends the more I studied and learned about it? The more interesting at got or new more wanted to know and I got super impressed with You know all that all that stuff and And then I got certified as an addiction doctor because death describe habits. It's sort of a facet of habits and the long spent looking at the bar. I came to the conclusion of this little bit controversial. That that's really what it is. It's a it's a habit so we in which we used to call it that right before the medicalisation of this problem we said I have a drinking habit or smoking habit right kick the habit it was. It was part of part of macular right. That's what's a disease and it's You know chemical imbalance and all the rest of this stuff which are You know it's I I don't know but I'm trying to add a fresh voice to it which is to say that part of why people drink and get themselves in trouble with repetitive. Drinking is it's a habit right. It's a it's a habit now what they do. I remember back in the day when I was alcoholic and I would wait for my my guy to get off worth it. We would have our own bar school. Do we would sit there all night. Maybe play a little pool in between it but I mean that's what we did in the days. We didn't do that. We'd sit at home and look at each other. Like what do we do? And we didn't we didn't have any other means of socialization besides that we didn't even know how to talk to each other unless we were at the bar which is terrible but You know I mean like when we were not in a in our in our cycle we didn't know what to do. I mean we we eat at the bar or friends quote friends at the bar our life without the bar basically other than his job. You know the giants appearance. You know I mean I I was here. Yeah exactly I mean. That's all there was to it. So yeah no that makes banks but Somebody with a dual diagnosis. Like I have like noses didn't pretty sober. Let's leave it at that. Don't drink anymore My doctors have a weed problem. Which problem you doing weed but You know if yeah but I'm so somebody was doing diagnosis in an addiction versus a mental. Hell they some kind of weird because within your own mental health diagnosis. You set up your own within your own right so like yes yes you're right. Yeah everyone snowflake I I agree you start migrating cut because you have your own experience right you have your own understanding your own vocabulary your own challenges you know Don Don. Sharon's case is not in any text right. Nor nor nor is Jason Giles. And right yeah. Yeah they're all they're all Specific to you. There's you can start to generalize about some things but come on if anyone tells you understand how the brain works. They're pulling your leg. Yeah they're lying. Nobody understands. Yeah so we live by mental health. Let's say these are. These are three of my habits that I came up with Yup okay. I'm not good yes I love that. Love that ATIS right. That's exactly right keep going up. Yep Okay it's always been collapsing. You tell you tell us time. Infinity is today never going to be different and always been like this. Yeah actually never going to be different. Oh Yeah always endeavor that you know you know you never supposed to supposed to use those words all the time right so and then I put the third one which Donald Looking at going. I'm trying to figure out what net by but it's like the pull of the addiction over habit. Yeah I don't understand that what I try to figure out what I wrote here. But it'll come to me but the first to insert this negative self talk and in this way habit. How how do you break the negative self-talk habit? So I have the negative self-talk habit also and I think it's a really kind of the bedrock of how I got into trouble. You know how wound up being A. Iv Narcotics Addict is the negative self-talk. Then it gets self talk with so bad that that shooting dope seemed like a reasonable option. Just to get away from it. So I I'm I'm resemble that remark and And So first of all at a all the way head to sort of the most important thing learned about that. Which is the the negative self talk just as you know a lot of time but the asteroids on its way right or this. This plague is killing us. All so the most important thing I learned is that the negative self talk is actually trying to help me. It's it's a voice of love. It's trying to protect me. It's not evil. It's not bad. I got the disease. It's not. It's not even negative it's it's like it's like calling. We have these missile defense systems in America and a couple of other countries happen to Right. So if any hostile countries decide that they're gonNA shoot missiles over here. We have these automatic detecting tracking and shooting systems. Whatever they're called you know anti missile defense. Yes and it's like saying that that things bad like having that's bad and it's not right in case somebody tries to Parma's these things flying action automatically and protect us. The problem is mischaracterizing was good and bad right. So it's it's a flock of candidates going over you don't really want to activate the Anti Missile System Ray and so a lot of a lot of of or the things I thought the worst about myself. were just Miss Measurements Right. Mischaracterized what was happening But the motivation for analyzing them and recognizing them as threats was was to protect me right. Protect me from embarrassment. Protect me from being outcast or protect me from You know stigma or being ostracized or from or from losing status or getting onto the bottom of the hierarchy. That sort of thing. So I'm not gonNa Tell Don Sri what I'm actually thinking. Because she'll she'll probably reject me probably humiliate me and laugh at me on this radio show and then so I'm just gonNA keep it to myself and then That's the best thing is just. Don't don't tell the truth right. Don't don't talk about being a drug addict or don't talk about having problems. Don't tell the truth right mental illness. Right don't hang onto that. Don't share that story because she might be cool with it but if she's not then I'm really screwed so I'll just right and so the negative. The negative talk tries to protect us. And if it's a you know if it's a nuclear missile coming from Russia or Soviet Union guest back in the day than yeah we want to activate the defense system because some things we shouldn't share publicly right and some things you have to be careful who you tell them to but that doesn't win. Never say anything about yourself ever or never open up and never ask for help so you'll be seen as weak. That's that's shooting the defense system at the geese so I think I think and then also that becomes a habit like okay. Well I got through that interview. I didn't have to be honest. And all right in the now. That's how you present yourself and that's how you think of yourself. I heard a guy the other day talking about this problem of not being candid right. Not being honest and he was telling story. It's it's famous guy and He was talking about getting hand on this about some would say for example. Would you have for lunch? And he would think what. What can I say here? That will give me an advantage in this social situation about what I had for lunch instead of saying chicken sandwich and some nice great instead of just saying the truth it was so in that I think is because of his comment is because it became a habit right. It's it's your if you start to think of yourself if you think yourself long enough as being under siege they got to defend yourself then. Yeah you're just. You're a person who's under siege means everything coming at. You must be an attack clothing that flock so so that negative voice the way we characterize it in how we listen to becomes a habit. Also that make sense. It does make perfect sense. It makes. Yeah it makes sense. 'cause there was a time when Like my the was out of control. I was hyper vigilant on every aspect of my life and I had had some bad experiences when I moved to Arizona. About being honest about my bipolar is which you know I was shocked by because when I lived in Connecticut. I never had a problem with the people. Were are going to really awful people zone. But they were more. They were well educated about mental health whereas out here it seems to be that of a generational gap between you know. Yeah it's I'm telling you. There was a culture shock when I moved from Connecticut era. And how long have you been in Arizona? It's Kinda like are you kidding me. It's like Shit I've been almost ten years now and it's still I mean I call it my right now like. I don't call Connecticut home anymore like I miss home. But I'm not something that never actually truly existed. And during the churning pandemic. I'm actually very grateful to be an era. Zona Connecticut. Part of fat cluster of. What's going on over there? But I learned early on Arizona's that talking about my mental health diagnosis wasn't GonNa get me anywhere except trouble and I. I hid it for years and like an I. I pay myself the belief that I had gone into remission of my mental health which I guess is kind of true but in all actuality it was kind of a FIB. I was doing okay with it. I was hiding it really well. I was maintaining really well. I was exercising and eating right and everything that I knew to do. Besides medication to keep myself. You know on an even flow and then all of a sudden one day. I woke up and I was in this depression. That you don't eat feel yourself unraveling. Oh Yeah No. It was like an overnight thing like I woke up and it was just like Bam like Oh crap I'm in the whole what do I do and I'm GonNa be honest about this. Go get help because I didn't want to die. Which you know was the other option of lake wine or how I know how my habit right I know how to get out of this really easy suicide great and it was like that's a habit but it was like. I knew that it was and I knew that it was effective for how I was feeling and I was like. Oh Man we don't WanNa go on this side of it and I got health and I had to be honest about what was going on with my mental health. And you know the podcast was born soon after that Yeah I mean this is last year Lester. I was hospitalized. Two Times Inpatient hospitalizations for my depression and When I came out the second time which actually this time last year I was still inpatient. Rate kind of weird. I came out like later because my year anniversary for the show on the seventeenth of this mug which is like I. I can't believe I made a year But yeah because I came out and I was like I have to do something to help people. So they don't have to go through what I just went through twice within a three month period of time of being impatient outward you know the whole nine yards corn on and off my medication with so this is kind of experiment. Catch Amash Nash. Saying this this is like a a way for you to speak up right. So it's not just to the people in Arizona. Obviously this kind of stuff reaches worldwide and it's a way to say. Hey you know here I am and this is a good day. I listen to some of your stuff and it's just very very straightforward. I mean very open. Totally honest and it's great and it's like here here here. I am and whether this is. This is the Magic. I think is really very interesting is whether or not anyone's listening right. It isn't that someone's listening. It's that your talking and of course. Of course someone's listening the the the holdup is not. They're interested people who have similar experience. Who Love you and care about that. That's easy to find but it doesn't feel that way. It feels like I can't talk about this. Nobody knows better keep to myself. It's going to be okay. Maybe I'll just kill myself and right because that seems like a. I don't WANNA bother people. Just kill myself and it's nuts and it becomes a habit also right it's becomes a habit also and then like words with friends we get obsessed with the idea and you start noodling on it and open you know. What would they do if they said this and now they probably wouldn't then you just haven't conversation with yourself? Okay have a conversation with yourself. That's fine but record it and then broadcast and then let other people say Hey don't you know and it's But at least you get to hear even if you don't hit us you know submit sand on the podcast or the or the article or the whatever if you don't show your journal to someone you're seeing it. You're getting out and so here you made my point. Which is I think that negative voice was really saying. Hey reach out and connect to other people. You're not the only person going through this. Your experience is kind of generic in some way. You know it's it's relatable and other people can connect to it certainly other people in the similar spot and maybe they don't have to be plagued with these thoughts on their own all the time they can reach out and connect and freight yeah. Yeah so yeah. You got the whole premise of the yolk. That's basically the premise of the show. I wasn't in so and so that way. So Voice Kill Yourself. It was saying look. You can't keep this inside. It just sounded different. At least. That's how that's what mine was saying. Right mind was mindset. Look you've got to talk about this. And that's how I wound up here. That's why I became habit doctor in the stuff I'm interested in is the stuff that I struggle with right stuff. That's hard for me. The holds my attention. I'm I'm a crappy scrabble player and But yeah but I I play my kids and kick my ass all the time. I can't even play my white. My wife is like the best gobbled player except for my grandma. She's the best guys. Come across and so it's hopeless to play her. It's just it's like by. How many hundreds of points lose not? Are you going to win like Oh hey within hundred points this time? That's that we have to consider a victory. I I feel good about two. There's players that I'm playing like level. Six and eight. I've not under a week. Chrome level. Nothing level eight. I'm pretty happy with that. But I race level. Twenty six words like three hundred points. I'm like what am I doing? You know like like WanNa continue this already beat but I do continue on with it because I'm like that tenacious that I'm like one of these days. I'm ready exactly. Try Yes so you know you'll be pretty but it's GonNa take a little while right stick with it got to stick with it. Yeah right there you go I want. I want Joe Rogan on my so. Actually I would try. Yeah and I've been hitting them up a lot and it's like well I. I'm interesting enough. I in that I could be on your show and it's like a cover if smokes weed right anyway. So seeking away. Let's talk about the V. Hab APP spoken I actually I signed up for your Beta because yeah I do I have enough a quote unquote we'd issue according to my doctors that If it's if it's what your category is for that which is okay so if you are at the APP I'd probably on that apple as well. Yep It's available. Yeah it's like one of these things where I waited till it was burnt. I'd never released it so you know I know it needs and I've got a whole team really smart people who are making it prettier smarter and more elegant veteran closer to what I have in mind and I'm learning from the people who are on also and so getting better But yeah had to say okay send because otherwise it would be one of these unfinished projects so thank you. Thank you very much. So yes it's it's the whole thing is kind of a guy casings. Who started a company called Net flicks and he said it was pretty big and he said. Uh Yeah you can look it up. And he said If if you're embarrassed by your first product out there and you waited too long to ship and so Which is you know what you did with podcast effort. Your first podcast is eight minutes well. Here's going on and the next one quilt. I didn't get an Easter basket. Obviously you're figuring it out. Yup You're figuring out as you go right and so I'm figuring out. Just go also the premises that most people can't afford to go to Rehab. It's too expensive. It's too expensive in terms of time. Can't be away from work. Well TURNS OUT. We can all be way from work for a month. I guess right now learning but but in general. It's not something that you would choose to do. Because who's going to watch the kids and how you can get your job back and so forth and And also it's embarrassing hell right. It's because it's known wants talk about being unable to control their own behavior. It's it's really It's really a you know in our society still it's very. It's a touchy subject. So yeah yeah right right yeah going to Rehab is like an award system. That's very very thoughtful. Who can afford to go many many times and or some ridiculously good insurance and no in someone else to take care of their lives. While they're gone. I mean how do you go to Rehab? Doesn't times without someone some support system. That's taken care of so it's a tiny minority of people that are like. Hey I went to that one to most people don't go. Ninety percent of people with federal criteria. Don't go which means is probably nineteen or or at twenty or thirty nine out of forty who don't go who are kind of you know. Maybe I have a weed problem where I might have the people who are sort of fun with problems that stage they they. Don't go at all 'cause there's nothing for them. You're not going to quit your job or right or get. Get on a list or spend seventeen thousand dollars. That's the average out of pocket cost to go away for a month especially when for most people. I'm not knocking Rehab. If you need to go go. I think that's for some people they get. They get great results but it's it's a small percentage less than one. Outta ten are sober. So it's a thing people mostly don't WanNa do and then it mostly doesn't work out and so we need something else and I'm to come up with something else here. Which is the essence right? So the essence is what we've been talking about. You have to tell the truth and you don't have to tell to somebody else yet. You just tell it to yourself but you've got to record it. Yeah and ultimately that's when things change right when you said. Hey I don't WanNa die. Maybe I'll make a podcast and and It's the Yes yup. Well it kept me kept me. Accountable just kept me totally accountable. Like even on those when I mean the habit of listening to my head when something bad is going on is ingrained issue when everything's going to lopsided like I can always die and it's like that's a terrible but it's like in my my psychiatrist and I have talked about that under lake. That's just because of how you have while there. We go back to this because this is how you grew up that this is like. What are your coping mechanisms? Now is that you know if things get tight you can guy but you're on the other side of it now when you're like I know there's another way Irwin's chicken see the other side. There's no way you can see the life after this you're in love the title of your show. Also that you're quite right because you're not getting rid of it. It's not like you could snap your fingers or take it madison or with Didgeridoo and have it disappear. It's like okay. I've got this thing like for me. I like to drink and but it's been twenty years since I had a drink but the want to is still there. It's still it's still inside and the and the chances that it would develop into a problem. I'm honest about it. It's you know that's still exists or at least there's a risk so I stay away from it but yeah how do you? How do you deal with it without you know giving up now? Don't you let me ask you a question because I I had an hour budgeted for this. But I'm enjoying the hell out of talking with you can we? Is it possible to pause for a minute and then pick it back up? Do you have time to do that? Okay all right. why don't you? Why don't you sit tight totally the end? Can I call you back? Give me like twenty minutes house at. I can call you back when you call me. Call me to live twenty. Sounds like a plan. Okay into mini. Okay okay so kind of a weird place for us to stop right there but we did So this is part one of the interview with Dr Jason Giles. I'm having to do the diction and whole lot of other stuff A little bit about Cova did and a little bit about just coping and Partout. We talk more about his veto system and more about addictions in substances. So this is dawn. Sharon and this is my podcast with bipolar. And Hey let's all stay alive okay later. Hi this is Cherie dancing with bipolar. As we all know cove nineteen better known as corona virus has spread throughout the world. There are a few ways to help lower the spread of this respiratory disease however. Wash your hands. Avoid touching your face including mouth nose and eyes cover your coughs and Sneezes Monitor your symptoms in consult with your doctor. Stay home and away from other sick people except for medical care. Clean and disinfect. High touch surfaces for more information please visit CDC DOT Gov Slash S- covert nineteen that's CDC dot Gov Slash Ceo V. I D. Nineteen thank you.

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Eugenics Is Still with Us

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Eugenics Is Still with Us

"I'm Shane Morris with the Colson center. Thanks for listening. I wanna remind you that you could help keep breakpoint on the air by going to breakpoint dot org and hitting the give button at the top of the page. Now, enjoy today's episode thought we buried this deadly ideology long ago that we've fought in the twentieth century think again. It's back in the very countries that opposed the Nazis for the call center, I'm John Stonestreet this break. Eugenics is a bad idea. Bad idea that, like all bad ideas have victims efforts to keep those deemed inferior from reproducing, or even existing were a central part of the Nazi experiment in Germany, which up ended the entire world and led to the extermination of millions of so-called lives on worthy of life. And yet you jenex is still with us. Not thank God the genetics of the Nazi variety. But the west is long been unable to shake the sort of eugenics. That's reminiscent of the kind practice before the Third Reich, this quieter type of you. Phoenix is sold with the claim to have the best interest of victims and society in mind proponents, where clean white lab coats or judges black robes, while still dehumanizing in advancing evil just a few days ago. In fact, a British judge ordered that a woman with mental disability that's inner twenties who's under second trimester of pregnancy before to have an abortion. Now, this order is contrary to communicated wishes of both the anonymous woman, and her mother, who's an immigrant from Nigeria and a former midwife judge Natalie Levin of the court of protection, which adjudicates cases, involving mentally disabled persons acknowledged that her order for a forced abortion was quote an immense intrusion into this young woman's life. But she insisted the state was acting in her best interest having this child, judge Levin argued would be more traumatic than killing it, because this disabled woman couldn't possibly understand what it means to be a mother and they shockingly patronizing. No, the judge went on. I think. she'd like to have a baby in the same way, she liked to have a nice doll. So presumably, the decision should be taken out of her hands. In the hands of her family who promised to care for the baby will thank God as the Catholic news service reported on Monday, the English court of appeals overturn this frightening ruling in halted the forced abortion, at least for now the three justices on the court promise to release the reasons for their decision at a later day, now it's anyone's guess what? They'll say what we must demand. However, is that the horrifying logic that judge Levin used in her rigid decision is confronted and confined to the dustbins of judicial history after all her words were far too. Reminiscent of the words Justice Oliver Wendell, Holmes used writing for the majority and buck versus bell back in nineteen twenty seven in that decision. The US supreme court ordered the forced sterilization of a woman with mental disability homes infamous justification for violating this woman's dignity, quote that three generations of imbeciles are enough. Those words. Later cited during post World War, Two Nuremberg trials by Nazi defendants as proof of their innocence, though. The forced sterilizations of those who are mentally disabled are hopefully, thing of the past forced abortion and selective abortion. They're every bit as much a form of eugenics and they're grounded in the same terrifying. Worldview in America. As in other developed countries, the vast majority of babies diagnosed in the womb with disabilities like down syndrome or aborted. Again, this is done in the name of compassion, complete with the platitudes of life with down syndrome is not a life worth living, how eerily similar to other phrases used by the Nazis to support the killing of those whom they deemed to be unfit. Now, you should know that prenatal tasks that lead to our contemporary eugenics practices will they're nowhere near as reliable as advertised, according to a two thousand fourteen study in the New England Journal of medicine over half of women who were told that their child likely had down syndrome either delivered or boarded babies which turned out. Out to be healthy and a whopping sixty percent of babies diagnosed in utero with Edwards syndrome. Another chromosomal disorder will they turn out to be healthy to even so let's just be clear? All life is worth living disability or not, and affirming. The profound inherent and equal value of people with disability is an ancient bedrock Christian practice the idea that there are certain people unworthy of life or of human rights. Well, that's a tree. That's born nothing, but poisonous fruit for over one hundred years now, despite the historical horrors of the twentieth century, it seems that too many are still willing to eat that fruit for breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

Natalie Levin John Stonestreet Edwards syndrome Colson center Shane Morris Phoenix Justice Oliver Wendell US New England Journal of medicin Germany Nigeria America Holmes one hundred years sixty percent