20 Burst results for "Oliver Stone"

"oliver stone" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

"Supposed <Speech_Male> to be so sacred, <Speech_Male> they had something <Speech_Male> to do with this <Speech_Male> very serious <Speech_Male> I, think that when Kennedy <Speech_Male> was killed that day I think <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> there was a signal <Speech_Male> from the intelligence agencies <Speech_Male> in our country. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The. <SpeakerChange> Who is <Silence> in control here? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> While <Speech_Male> while I'm looking forward to that. <Speech_Male> Tells you something <Speech_Male> that they still <Speech_Male> be companies <Speech_Male> they are supposed to <Speech_Male> be. So <Speech_Male> free speech <Speech_Male> are still <Speech_Male> worried about the Kennedy <Speech_Male> case, <SpeakerChange> it just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tells you a lot. <Speech_Male> Nervous <Silence> about what you're GONNA <Speech_Male> say. Ya. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Jeez <Speech_Male> well, yeah. But <Speech_Male> it got a copy <Speech_Male> excited I. WanNa <Speech_Male> see the spill <Speech_Male> so on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't have good advice <Speech_Male> to give you other than. <Speech_Male> Do you done <Speech_Male> in the past <Speech_Male> look to the <Silence> Europeans? <Speech_Male> and. The Australians <Speech_Male> in the Japanese. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Most <Speech_Male> of my films <Speech_Male> at least the <Speech_Male> majority of them <Speech_Male> have been funded not <Speech_Male> by Americans, <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> but by Brits <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Dutch in. <Silence> Canadians. <Speech_Male> And Australians <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> others. <Speech_Male> That's where I've been able to <Speech_Male> have my voice heard <Speech_Male> and they don't censor <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> So I. I <Speech_Male> have been <Speech_Male> able to say the things I wanted <Speech_Male> to say in my in my <Speech_Male> films without <Speech_Male> having to, <Speech_Male> you know to worry about that. I think <Speech_Male> only three of my <Speech_Male> films were <Speech_Male> from beginning to end <Speech_Male> where it <Speech_Male> was completely American <Speech_Male> money. So <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> found the best <Speech_Male> way to get <Speech_Male> my film. <Speech_Male> My films out Americans <Speech_Male> is not <Speech_Male> have, American, money in <Speech_Male> IT I. Think it. Michael. <Speech_Male> Bunch. <Speech_Male> Thank you. Oliver <Speech_Male> thank you for everything <Speech_Male> that you've done. <Speech_Male> Thank you for letting <Speech_Male> me Sit there on <Speech_Male> the set of the doors. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Something on their forget <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> you for these important <Speech_Male> important films <Speech_Male> that you've made <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> hope you know the world <Silence> of good that you've done. <Speech_Male> A <Speech_Male> sharing these <Speech_Male> stories poems <Speech_Male> with. <SpeakerChange> Much, <Speech_Male> appreciated. <Speech_Male> Good luck with the book. <Speech_Male> Chasing <SpeakerChange> the light <Speech_Male> everybody. Is <Speech_Male> Oliver Stone's <Speech_Male> a great memoir. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> eager to <Speech_Male> hear all the <Speech_Male> stories <Speech_Male> from a scarface <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> to platoon. It's <Speech_Male> it's an amazing <Speech_Male> midnight express too. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Male> that expresses in <Speech_Male> their. <Speech_Male> Hand <Speech_Male> what's the? <Speech_Male> What's the other one after <Speech_Male> scarface? Another <Speech_Male> big one that <Speech_Male> people probably aren't <Speech_Male> bragging. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Another <Speech_Music_Male> one you wrote. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Eight million ways <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to die now. <Silence> <Speech_Male> oconee. Yes. <Speech_Male> Varian. <Speech_Male> Of the Beret. <Speech_Male> Yes. If <Speech_Male> they get you to <Speech_Male> do a quiz. <Speech_Male> With people <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> Conan, the barbarian <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you'd have all. You'd have four <Speech_Male> names in <Speech_Male> years is one of the <Speech_Male> names nobody would pick <Speech_Male> your name for that. <Speech_Male> But. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Again another <Speech_Male> another <SpeakerChange> huge <Speech_Male> cult classic all <Speech_Male> these years later. <Silence> And? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So thank you for all <Speech_Male> of this. You <Speech_Male> may be <Speech_Music_Male> well <SpeakerChange> and thank <Speech_Male> you, everybody. <Speech_Male> For listening to this <Speech_Male> edition of <SpeakerChange> Rumble with Michael <Speech_Male> Moore. <Speech_Music_Male> And thank you to <Speech_Music_Male> our executive producer <Speech_Music_Male> Basil, Hamden <Speech_Male> our editor and <Speech_Music_Male> sound engineer, Nick <Speech_Male> Pause, <Speech_Male> and please <Speech_Male> feel free to write me up. <Speech_Music_Male> Mike at Michael. <Speech_Male> Moore DOT COM <Speech_Male> or leave a voicemail <Speech_Male> right here on the podcast <Speech_Male> speed and I'll have <Speech_Music_Male> some links and stuff to show <Speech_Music_Male> you here. <Speech_Music_Male> From. Oliver's <Speech_Music_Male> work infamous. <Speech_Male> Thank. <Speech_Music_Male> Everybody <SpeakerChange> will talk <Speech_Music_Male> to you soon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Only. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> We're.

Oliver Stone Kennedy Michael. oconee Michael Varian. Conan Mike executive producer engineer Nick editor
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

01:37 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Obviously it's understandable why it's an important film to stone the story Edward Snowden, as portrayed by Joseph. Gordon Levitt in the movie. But he's talked at length about why he hasn't made a film since this, which it seems as though it was one very hard to raise money for it because of the subject matter to very difficult to make. But it's not a movie that I WANNA marry fucker even kill I'd rather just not watch it again. It's it's an thanks for me. That's the twenty films. That's FM K for the Oliver Stone filmography we walked through every phase. Do you have any regrets anything? You'd like to take back I don't think so I probably could have thought a lot harder about the fuck category but that would also kind of contradicts the category so I just I with my instincts and that's the point. Right knows instincts took you straight to Wall Street, which is Beautiful Amanda thanks so much for for bearing your soul. Thank you to Oliver Stone for bearing his soul in his book chasing the light in his many films over the years I admire and appreciate, and I'm also a little bit concerned about everything that he's ever done. Any closing thoughts now you said it well. Okay this has been the big picture. Thank you to. Bobby. Wagner thanks for listening to this show please mask and we'll see you next week when we talk about something in the world of movies if we ever get more movies, CNN..

Oliver Stone Gordon Levitt Edward Snowden Joseph CNN Bobby Wagner Amanda
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"He was Oliver Stone was asked about the character needs just like you know it seemed like in the air there could be a female owner coming sometime soon. So it was almost like it was his version of feminism to be like now I will give the team, a female owner and I'm just like Sir I don't really know what you think's going on with women in. America in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine or now. But that's okay. I think it's definitely too long but also in terms of. The way that it's filmed in the way it recreates football I I guess that's how I a person who doesn't watch football think and understand it football now because I saw any given Sunday I'm like, oh, it's like super violent and you're in the mix and you can hear the the the crashing and it's really visceral and In that same oral history, a lot of people including Pacino. Talk about how. Watching any given Sunday changed the way that they watch football and I think for me it probably just informed how I watch football when I do watch it when my husband is being a nut. So I I enjoy this movie at the end of the day I just I find it re watchable. So I will marry it because I have to spend the rest of my life with at theoretically and also give it half my money so Wow that's a complicated way of thinking about your relationships any given Sunday I I'm with you. This was a very borderline situation for me if there weren't three movies that I loved more than it probably would have been a marriage for me for the same exact reason I love to watch it to think it's immensely depression. I. Think it's probably not. A very honest representation of the violence inflicted and football infect. Someone's is pulled from their skull in this film and I've never seen that on a football field per se but it's like all. It's like Oliver, some movies, it's the opera version of real life..

football Oliver Stone Pacino America
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Of the evolutionary spirit greed in all of its forms, we'd for life for money for love knowledge has marked upward surge of mankind and green. You. Mark. My words will not only save tell our paper but that other malfunctioning corporation called the US. Definitely one of the our role Oliver Stone movies. Ton Revisiting. Did Not like it and in fact, I wanted to kill it. I mean Wall Street, Yeah Yeah. Sane. Wow. You don't know what a good fuck is. Then because the I'm fucking Wall Street okay. So. Of course it's not that it's not not good and of course, it's just like it creates Gordon Gecko and then we all have to live in Oliver. Stone's Wall Street world like thinks that it's commentary and it's mythology is saying the you know the Wall Street big-spending greed is good character that it's trying to critique and part of that is because Michael Douglas gives an alternate performance and part of. That is because Oliver Stone is like working through his definition of what a great man is and what ambition is and what you should, what you should admire and what you should revile both in men and in capitalism and and also partly it's bad because you have the Charlie Sheen character in there who has to like go through his daddy issues like make good at the end, which is like. Clearly a stand in for someone who we've been talking about a lot on this podcast and Adding on a moral lesson that you don't really need. But Gordon Gecko of it all. Is All time in terms of creating a character and an image and at penetrating the culture I think you have to give him credit for that even if it gets away with him and a lot of ways that's the story got away from him. It's an interesting thing I I think you made my case very strongly when you said all the things before but which is that it created a culture on perhaps unknowingly perhaps not that I think was pretty toxic maybe it didn't create but it cemented cemented that Michael Milkin you know powerbroker. Pinstripe suit suspended superman figure that is obviously really gross. And Michael. Douglas's amazing. There's no doubt about it but this movie was really not that well received was not a hit and Douglas's the person who got an Oscar nomination and so even though it has this big reputation and it's considered a very big movie, it really wasn't I think many people considered a kind of a letdown in the aftermath of platoon even though it did have. There's an iconography to it. That is still memorable but God Charlie Sheen is not good. Not a good actor and there is literally a scene in which he's standing on the sky roof of skyscraper in screens into the night who am I like it could there be more dumb shit. Representation of a person going through problems than literally asking themselves who am I as they make decisions in life like there still seems to be like a little bit of a one thing in play and he hasn't totally tapped into his essential stone nece and I think I was just.

Oliver Stone Michael Douglas Charlie Sheen Gordon Gecko Michael Milkin US Mark Michael Oscar
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:32 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I just assumed that you could cancel all. Oliver. Stone's movies I think yes. That's a good point. That's seller stone in the time of canceled culture is fascinating. Fascinating So he's almost untouchable in a way because everything is contaminated. Yeah okay. So you're GONNA have to make another pick you're GONNA have to. Another film, which this is that a challenge for you. This was the last five. This was the one I couldn't. I told you very confidently yesterday that I had eight of nine slots figured out and the ninth one is. Yeah I don't totally know what to do, but I'll get there a figure it out. Okay. So we're flying. Fast and free. So I mentioned those the the first two films in the mid Nineteen seventy-four seizure nineteen, eighty, one, hand I think it's safe to say that neither one of us. Are GonNa, Fuck Mary, or kill either of these movies right Correct. definitely seems like Oliver Stone needed to get fucked after making these movies because they're just really kind of sad and weird and paranoid, and he's you shouldn't be making horror movies. You should be making the kinds of films that he would go on to make shortly thereafter. So the next films that we get. Are the one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, duo of Salvador and platoon. Do you have any laurels for either of those films? Is You not? I, I wish them well, and I have like a lot of respect. For platoon sort of. No do but. There to pass for me on both. Let's talk about platoon quickly because I'm GonNa Fuck Platoon, which is a complicated emotion to have about a movie searing platoon I understand platoon because of the way that it was it's it's myth was communicated to me, which is that this was the most real the movie that had ever been made. That was the way that it was silver in this movie comes after apocalypse. Now, it comes after full metal jacket it comes after a lot of these you know harrowing an serious, but also kind of Mythological approaches to to war films, and this was like I said much more of a boots on the ground approach Dale. Dye The the. Was the adviser on this film and he goes on to be an actor appears in many of stone's films, and he's the person who trained a lot of the actors to look like soldiers. And you know this book ends functionally with platoon winning best picture that is like the summation that is like ta of Oliver Stone and his story, and it's funny that he then goes on to literally. Thirty five more years of crazy.

Oliver Stone Salvador Dale Mary
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:25 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Knowing and intentional JFK than it is in perhaps the documentary that he says that he is releasing a follow up today. Again I refer you to the New York Times into New York Times magazine interview with David Marquez e where he is asked about this project and he explains all of the things that have since been revealed. That will be in his documentary and it's very hard not to take as an actual. Conspiracy theorist yeah. I I think the other significant complication around this is the documentary work. He's done spotlighting the leftist leaders of the world and he spent a significant amount of time. On camera off with. Vladimir Putin. Fidel. Castro. Yasser Arafat Hugo. Chavez he has put these people who. Many people believe are very evil and destructive figures in world history, and he's put them in a very positive light stone is very sympathetic to their causes. And he is has been accused of being a bit soft on people particularly Putin. Who you know many people obviously believe is a strong man and very dangerous figure and. I. Perhaps. This is my kind of like simple-minded wish wish casting but I would love to know what we would think of Oliver Stone, if you hadn't made any of these documentaries if he just had not done any of this work over the years because he they're inextricable now the fact that he made two documentaries about Fidel Castro the fact that he made a I thought a very, not good. Documentary about Hugo, Chavez and the revolution in Venezuela and how that affected south. America. Just like a very credulous portrayal of a person who is mentally complicated who is not challenged the movie I think that would be. It would be fascinating to look at these twenty feature films he made and just look at those films as like the text of Oliver Stone's life but I don't think I think there are inextricable now and that's it's it's it certainly complicates them. I do also think that the culture is just caught up to Oliver Stone and and it technologically and. Politically and psychologically where a lot more familiar with the type of sought that he is a presenting in those documentaries and it seems like. Y. You know what we see on Youtube is a lot of ways like an evolution of what started twenty years ago. Now can you hold him responsible for that I? Think no, we're GONNA talk a lot about like the reactions to his films and other people's interpretations of his art and I don't think that you can hold someone entirely responsible for that. But at the same time, Oliver Stone is very aware of his own narrative and he's very aware of the politics and it is very aware of. The media and schools of thought, and so I don't totally know how to untangle all of it because he is actively engaged in the work of his own influence and some of those daddy issues that we mentioned I think crop up..

Oliver Stone Fidel Castro Chavez Vladimir Putin Yasser Arafat Hugo New York Times David Marquez Youtube America Venezuela
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:20 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"So it's very hard for me to separate. You know what I saw on MTV versus what I saw in A. Oliver Stone Film I just kind of all blends together as as stuff I gotta catch up on. And and you know and how you receive it does affect how its effectiveness as well which I'm sure we'll talk about there's one in particular that I know we're going to talk about. So I think if you look at the subjects that he focuses on that approach that explosive impressionistic approach makes a lot of sense Vietnam and Kennedy and rock and roll and drugs and identity, and love. These are all things that are actually in some ways best understood not in linear fashion because too frequently if they're understand linear fashion than it's their, they're explained to simply and I, think he puts can. The the certitude of some of his ideas by throwing a lot of things that you all at once sometimes I worked sometimes it's it's what you're saying. It's sort of making things too obvious and that's part of what makes him. So interesting the glue of this this second stage approach is definitely Robert Richardson who was shot most of his masterpieces, most of his best liked or best love films, eleven of features. Were done with Richardson and then Richardson went on to become. One of the four or five more celebrated cinematographers of his era teamed up with Scorsese Tarantino Aero Morris all since working with stone notably has not really worked with Oliver Stone in about fifteen twenty five years and that can tell you a little bit about where stones career has gone too. I think that they miss each other and Hank Corwin is the editor who was a commercial editor who helped develop that editing style with Stone Richardson that I think you know when I think of Angkor when I think of. Natural born killers and he's he's been in the news in the last few years because of the big short and vice but he really built that style with stone twenty five years ago, and so those two guys along with you know Bruno Rodeo and a bunch of other people you know the casting directors who found a lot of stone players over the years they built that mythology that first ten years of significant work for him from eighty six to ninety six that I suspect we'll spend most of our time on. and. I guess the last thing just to talk about is what you opened with which is that. People think Oliver Stone is a conspiracy theorist. So. Do you think he actually is a conspiracy theorist or do you think he is trying to upgrade an unnerve conventional wisdom I? Think at some point he has turned into a bit of an actual conspiracy theorist at. The reason I answered the way that I did because because he was good at branding and this idea of Oliver, stone, and what to expect from his movies and from his interviews and handed the world of Oliver Stone extremely well communicated to me and it it's how I understand and I think as we've talked about when we talked. Previously about JFK and I'm sure we'll talk about it some more but. How we all learned to look at like actual film and things like this. You know there's a pruder and what we ask questions of and how we communicate Them and conspiracy like I. Guess our entire generation learned that from JFK. So I give him a lot of credit for that I think is possibly more..

Oliver Stone A. Oliver Stone Robert Richardson Stone Richardson JFK MTV Vietnam Hank Corwin editor Scorsese Bruno Rodeo Kennedy
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:36 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Like. Decades ago because it seems it happens a lot with actors, but that's just a little bit more because of. One projects release and you know happened in directors with Soderbergh I think in in in two thousand but it's the screenwriters were always just fighting to get anything made. So it's really hard to have to. Once exactly I mean that's that was exactly what I was thinking and it's clearly you know it's a manifestation of two projects that he'd been working on for a very long time finally getting the Green. Light in eighty or eighty, five, I suppose, and then making them in eighty six and they're they're kissing cousins, these movies you know they they set a template for the kinds of work that he's going to do, and we'll talk about them a little bit more we get into the game but like let's just put stone in context here as as a filmmaker before we get into the game. Okay. Okay. Twelve Academy award nominations in his career. He has four. Oscars. He also has two best director Oscars there's a very short list of people who have to best record Oscar. He got them both within the span of four years. That's just that's Pretty. Crazy and now I think is very overlooked when we talk about him because of some of that, you know the political energy that exists around him. Well, I think it's essential to understanding everything that comes after because he is. So quickly goes from all of the trials and tribulations and self perceived failures. He outlines in this part of the book to winning two Best Director Oscars in the span of four years, and he's entirely accepted by Hollywood and the establishment, and like once you are completely validated, then your mind starts going in other directions and that's how you get. JFK, and that's how you get the Oliver Stone of the ninety S. I think that's exactly right. There seems to be an act of defiance going on in the second third of his career where he's trying to take that.

Soderbergh Oliver Stone director Oscar Hollywood
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:14 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"He approaches with ward distance than then you are I do I think which in one sense makes lot of sense 'cause he's older than us. So he has quite literally more time and distance from it and I think also L. expectations of marriage and and things were different thirty or forty years ago. The child of divorce chapter for me is actually less about divorce and more about his particular relationship to both of his parents which are extremely important to him. As anyone who has seen any of his films would know because we're gonNA, talk about daddy issues but it yeah to me it was just a way of working through those relationships which carries definitely through the book I wanted to read a passage from the book about this specific phase of his life because. As, you said it's There is some critical distance, but he is also trying to tangle with his feelings and you know this is a guy who is born in nineteen, forty six his father was a gi. His mother was a woman living in Paris who his father met and brought her back to the states and. You know they have that very kind of traditional American Romance. You can imagine them being in that photo of the naval officer and the woman in the middle of the street on forty. Second Street during a parade kissing and then of course, like things come apart like so many things did in the nineteen fifties but he wrote something interesting here that I wanted to share Consciousness. Shared by most children of divorce that our lives are being itself is the creation of many lies. If my parents had known each other truly before they were married, they would have never united and I would have never existed children like near born out of that original lie and living a false front we suffer for it when we feel that nothing and nobody can ever be trusted again adults become dangerous reality becomes loneliness love either does not exist or cannot survive and my fifteen years on earth was a quote fake passed a delusion. So, in case you're wondering why Oliver Stone's films are paranoid and riddled with doubt. He it's all. It's all there in the opening stages of this book and a very, very free way and throughout the early stages of it, you also come to learn that Oliver Stone was. Outright in love with his mother and has strong physical urging for his mother, which is a lot to take in although radically honest and the way that he sometimes is but also maybe he is trying to kind of shock and provoke us and the way that it seems like stone likes to shock and provoke, and so it's this really complicated portrait of a young guy who has These wild mommy and daddy issues that may or may not be informing this life's work. Yeah..

Oliver Stone Paris officer
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:42 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"For the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way, and then after he does that he goes through the tremendously traumatic experience in the war. And then that becomes a centerpiece of the stories that he tells for the next twenty, five years and it it's fascinating to know kind of which came first was it the urge to tell dramatic stories or was it that he experienced life and he had be he came to understand life as a series of stories especially American stories about great men and then chose to pursue those stories as his life's work is if it's Kinda fascinating what if in terms of how he pursued all his work, I would add that there is also possibly a middle ground where he is trying to understand what happened to him and his own experience through the narrative structures that are familiar to him and. And can help further that experience and again that's that's a lot of artists I art, and you know marrying the two things which were quote not supposed to do but we're going to break all the rules in this podcast. So let's talk about what this podcast is going to be before we get into a conversation about the book where we talk about the artist Later in the show, we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA, play a new game. It's an old game for those of us who are alive in two thousand and six when I first heard about this game but it's new to this podcast. It's a it's fuck Mary kill. So Amanda I have chosen a handful of films a number of films that we would like to copulate with that Oliver Stone made that we would like to. Spend eternity with and that we would like to destroy immediately. So that is one way for us to travel through this twenty films demography all of these documentaries that he's made all of this work that he's put on the page and onscreen overtime. And I'm interested because I. Know that you are..

Oliver Stone Amanda I Mary
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

09:51 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

", stone, , Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, , which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. . There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, , which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, , directing surviving platoon midnight, , express scarface Salvador, , and the movie game. . It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. . We're we're both. . In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, , the massive scope, , the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. . When I say Oliver, , stone, , what do you think? ? Conspiracy Theorist <hes> just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. . And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. . He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. . Street to JFK. . To realize the way in which those movies shaped, , my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, , and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, , and maybe because of time in the way, the , world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, , which is just to say on the next generation. . I. . Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. . That's how the world should work. . Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? ? Mid already. So . many good points I. . Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, , and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. . He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. . Don't always stand up to deep examination, , and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. . But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, , and so I you know I find, , I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. . I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? ? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, , which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. . and. . Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to as much as we can released I wasn't college train a separate the artist in the art the art has to stand on its own can't complete the filmmaker and the and the work, , and you also need to understand that the work and the intention are possibly separate as well and Oliver Stone just makes massive all of that, , and he makes a mess of that in his actual art and he makes a mess of that in the life that he lives and in the interviews that he gives and the work that he pursues and. . To me that's exciting because it opens up conversation to talk about what can you take seriously and what is cynical and what is sincere and what is true and what is not true and how are we like an who is responsible, , which is at least a different way to talk about art. . So you know I give him that even though I don't agree with where I think Oliver Stone comes down on those the answers to those questions but even there, , I'm just guessing. . Well I, , think if you look at the book, , you certainly are looking at the man or at least the the self perception of the man, , and so we'll talk a lot about him and his story in his life and and his the way he is capturing his own life on the page which I I agree I mean he's just in case you didn't know this is an Oscar winning screenwriter. This . is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. . So he knows what he's doing on the page, , but he is also somebody who. . If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. . But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, , and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. . You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. . Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, , Oliver makes a mess of that he really. . is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. . He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. . But on the other hand, , he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. . But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, , and it's complicated right? ? Because he's A. . Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, . , and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. . So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism. . It's interesting that you said he's putting people in front of institutions and ideas and governments because I think that's true. . But it's usually one percent, , and if you look at his entire his filmography and and really I, , think even if you look at how he says. . A lot of political issues, , but it's it's not. . The, , greater good. . It's usually focused on one character who is often a man and quite often a white man it is and it is understanding history through a single person's experience. . So it's like it's almost I. . mean he certainly subscribes to a great man theory of history but at the same time as also reversing, , which is like the the the one person's experience of history, , which can be a really exhilarating in certain films that we'll talk about and really really misguided I find or not even misguided but just doesn't work and isn't illuminating and the way that he thinks it is. . IN IN CERTAIN Aspects, , and then also in certain cases, , it can just be about himself and it is I. . The thing that makes his. . His memoir. . So electric is that it really is self mythology and he is really trying to understand himself and trying to pin down that constantly moving wheel as you said simultaneously and and I really admire having access to that. I . obviously read a lot of celebrity junk and and memoirs and. . Interested in trying to have access to people's ideas and thoughts and understand their characters and most people won't give it up in that way and won't share and won't be as open and Massey at as as Oliver. . Stone is and that's true of the book and that's true of politics for sure and it's it's making. . The great man theory is is really relevant to this conversation not just because of the book not because of the film's but because it's a little bit unclear, , it's a sort of a chicken and the egg or the proposition with him. . Does he subscribe to those theories because we read about in this book, , He is interested in the dramatic pursuit. . He has a pretty clear understanding literally of how to tell a strong story and that story is usually through a homer like figure or a a habit like figure somebody who is you know on on an indomitable quest to achieve something that seems impossible he's he's really passionate about this and you know again, , there is something kind of haughty about this but also he just he seems to come to a very sincerely and so he uses Jim. . Garrison in. . J. F. K. or he uses Jim Morrison in the doors or he uses Ron. . Kovic. . In born on the fourth of July as these avatars as these great men who are seeking to achieve something that no one else could even perceive as possible and I think Oliver Stone sees himself in a very similar fashion. . He sees himself as this well, , to do white guy who volunteer volunteers for the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way, ,

Oliver Stone boomer JFK Sean Fantasy Amanda I scarface Salvador Vietnam America
Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

The Big Picture

09:51 min | 9 months ago

Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

"Stone, Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, directing surviving platoon midnight, express scarface Salvador, and the movie game. It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. We're we're both. In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, the massive scope, the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. When I say Oliver, stone, what do you think? Conspiracy Theorist just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. Street to JFK. To realize the way in which those movies shaped, my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, and maybe because of time in the way, the world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, which is just to say on the next generation. I. Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. That's how the world should work. Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? Mid already. So many good points I. Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. Don't always stand up to deep examination, and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, and so I you know I find, I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. and. Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to as much as we can released I wasn't college train a separate the artist in the art the art has to stand on its own can't complete the filmmaker and the and the work, and you also need to understand that the work and the intention are possibly separate as well and Oliver Stone just makes massive all of that, and he makes a mess of that in his actual art and he makes a mess of that in the life that he lives and in the interviews that he gives and the work that he pursues and. To me that's exciting because it opens up conversation to talk about what can you take seriously and what is cynical and what is sincere and what is true and what is not true and how are we like an who is responsible, which is at least a different way to talk about art. So you know I give him that even though I don't agree with where I think Oliver Stone comes down on those the answers to those questions but even there, I'm just guessing. Well I, think if you look at the book, you certainly are looking at the man or at least the the self perception of the man, and so we'll talk a lot about him and his story in his life and and his the way he is capturing his own life on the page which I I agree I mean he's just in case you didn't know this is an Oscar winning screenwriter. This is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. So he knows what he's doing on the page, but he is also somebody who. If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, Oliver makes a mess of that he really. is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. But on the other hand, he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, and it's complicated right? Because he's A. Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism. It's interesting that you said he's putting people in front of institutions and ideas and governments because I think that's true. But it's usually one percent, and if you look at his entire his filmography and and really I, think even if you look at how he says. A lot of political issues, but it's it's not. The, greater good. It's usually focused on one character who is often a man and quite often a white man it is and it is understanding history through a single person's experience. So it's like it's almost I. mean he certainly subscribes to a great man theory of history but at the same time as also reversing, which is like the the the one person's experience of history, which can be a really exhilarating in certain films that we'll talk about and really really misguided I find or not even misguided but just doesn't work and isn't illuminating and the way that he thinks it is. IN IN CERTAIN Aspects, and then also in certain cases, it can just be about himself and it is I. The thing that makes his. His memoir. So electric is that it really is self mythology and he is really trying to understand himself and trying to pin down that constantly moving wheel as you said simultaneously and and I really admire having access to that. I obviously read a lot of celebrity junk and and memoirs and. Interested in trying to have access to people's ideas and thoughts and understand their characters and most people won't give it up in that way and won't share and won't be as open and Massey at as as Oliver. Stone is and that's true of the book and that's true of politics for sure and it's it's making. The great man theory is is really relevant to this conversation not just because of the book not because of the film's but because it's a little bit unclear, it's a sort of a chicken and the egg or the proposition with him. Does he subscribe to those theories because we read about in this book, He is interested in the dramatic pursuit. He has a pretty clear understanding literally of how to tell a strong story and that story is usually through a homer like figure or a a habit like figure somebody who is you know on on an indomitable quest to achieve something that seems impossible he's he's really passionate about this and you know again, there is something kind of haughty about this but also he just he seems to come to a very sincerely and so he uses Jim. Garrison in. J. F. K. or he uses Jim Morrison in the doors or he uses Ron. Kovic. In born on the fourth of July as these avatars as these great men who are seeking to achieve something that no one else could even perceive as possible and I think Oliver Stone sees himself in a very similar fashion. He sees himself as this well, to do white guy who volunteer volunteers for the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way,

Oliver Stone Boomer Scarface Salvador JFK Amanda I Vietnam Oscar Jim Morrison Conan America RON J. F. K. Massey
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:51 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"This is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. So he knows what he's doing on the page, but he is also somebody who. If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, Oliver makes a mess of that he really. is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. But on the other hand, he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, and it's complicated right? Because he's A. Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism..

Oliver Stone Conan
"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:01 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I'm Sean Fantasy. Animated Ovens, and this is the big picture a conversation show. About Oliver, stone, Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, directing surviving platoon midnight, express scarface Salvador, and the movie game. It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. We're we're both. In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, the massive scope, the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. When I say Oliver, stone, what do you think? Conspiracy Theorist just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. Street to JFK. To realize the way in which those movies shaped, my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, and maybe because of time in the way, the world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, which is just to say on the next generation. I. Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. That's how the world should work. Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? Mid already. So many good points I. Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. Don't always stand up to deep examination, and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, and so I you know I find, I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. and. Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to.

Oliver Stone boomer JFK Sean Fantasy Amanda I scarface Salvador Vietnam America
"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

07:34 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Interesting because the way you described it at one point quote Wall Street is an extension of combat. Taking over a company is like a military action in these raids they stay up for weeks on end on an Adrenalin high and a lot of their terminology is war terminology close quote. So it's not just some random coincidence perhaps that that you made that movie with your background maybe it was subconscious even right that that would be something you're drawn to. Well in the Hollywood landscape. If you look at the time was very few business movies ever made my father used to say you know they don't make stories about business in a realistic sooner like what I've been saying about warfare platoon. I loved Walter Houston moving that Frank CAPRA did. At the edge of the depression they're also loved. Executive Suite by Robert Wise and but there's very few and I said, this is why because America the business of America is business is what is what Calvin Coolidge? Truth, to Wall Street little did I know was the center of it? I. Mean. My father had always talked about it but he talked about the good side and it was a different time. He represented modesty money was never boasted about if you're rich, you would never talk about it like Donald Trump talks about the vulgar. Going on. There was a new world and Bohol young people were starting to make big bucks. Never. Happened before you see young people work their way up. But. All of a sudden guys who are twenty nine years we're millions of dollars. It was like cocaine it was a Wacko. Things got off base and so I can contrast it by default world to this world. Yeah. But when the character of Charlie Sheen I guess. The character of HAL, Holbrook to some degree represents my dad. And I guess you know in the twenty three years between when that film came out and when did sequel A WHOLE GENERATION OF PEOPLE Who would have imagined? I guess that greed is good would've actually inspired all of these people to go to wall, street? Yeah. I would say how Holbrook and Martin Sheen I left him out chart. Wore the based on my father's honesty? But. What happened after that is completely. It's it's wrong. What happened? I mean? It was a morality tale was. There was Charlie realized a Gecko was no good and that it was a pilgrim's progress he he fallen. And he realized it and he was GONNA end. He was going to take responsibility for his mistake. And now is to Laurel for people at the time I remember I got critics were not great on and it was like that I was moralizing well, that was his story I want to tell. So right it was a bit like platoon come by but as a form of domestic warfare. Where he survives Charlie Sheen survives pretty becomes also murderer in a way he he sold father out. Was a good film enjoyed it very much wanted to make sweet smell of success and we modeled it on. A lot of quips. One liners in weird. Fun. Doing. Only Michael Douglas Performance really was the only thing the academy. Paying attention to but so then though two years later was born on the fourth of July when it came out I think still the best thing Tom Cruise has ever done. You win thus director against second time and what is that like four years? That's not many people can ever say that and I guess for you the most important thing even just watching your Oscar acceptance speech today just to go back and refresh on it seems like the first thing from during the making of it and right through Oscar, night was doing right by Ronkovics. There was a lot of that too for you though Ron had been the guy that you were able to talk to about the war for the first in a certain way for the first time, right? Ron Brought me into his circle in Los Angeles. Many vets and I saw the passionate Ron had against the war and I. I would say you know. T to had a case of friendly fire. He makes it very clear in the book friendly fire as I talked about in one chapter was a major. Player in Vietnam and we ignore it the Pentagon ignores it movies ignore it it plays a huge role in. Swan sad that. So many of the things that you see in the war, I put in the book. They don't pay attention to early they. They don't pay attention to those facts but. Twenty percent I think twenty percent of the casualties in any war on basically from friendly fire, you have to count that up. Yeah. You see how many problems that raises with the parents all that. Terrible, neglected, of course. This is. Going fast, but there is a film I did in between which I learned a great deal was talk radio. I think is one of my better fills you. got. A lot of technique to it, and I learned a lot working in studio slowly. Well, ninety one is another year like eighty six for your just insane to have both the doors come out in March and then JFK come out in December with the doors. It seems like the appeal to you. This was music that really struck you when you were in Vietnam as you write about in your book but also this was a guy who in some ways it seems like. His course was the opposite. He has father I. Think had been a military man and he ran the other direction whereas you had the inverse, right? Was it more fully realized person and I was at that point he was a poet he was far more. Emotionally intelligent than I was I was finding my way. The soul of a poet very sensitive man. You I can see destructiveness in them too and he wrote about it. I really admired him and I'm glad we. I'm glad I sh- brought some light onto him, and it really revitalized the doors career again and. They start the record sales everything. Picked up surged. Well with. JFK just to remind people this is your with Costner coming off dance with wolves. You've got this unbelievable supporting cast of Pesky Matthau asner lemon sutherland goes on and on and I. Think People you know the the focus was heavily on in terms of the media coverage was about the debate over the subject matter but I mean, it's a beautifully made movie. People go back and look at the Mr. Monologue, and then the montage around that, and just all of that was great but I guess I want to ask you. Has. It. Bothered you that in the year sense from the coverage, even before the movie was out, you know that you were there are some people that just can't hear the name Oliver Stone without thinking you know conspiracy nut or whatever those things are or can you just kind of brush that off not that easy to brush off it happens all the time. Politics. Overshadows the filmmaking. I realized that but what am I going to do it in my my opinions when asked or given? Yeah. Sometimes, I try to be political about it in diplomatic, but I'm not a liar. Yeah and I can't go along with what Melissa the vast majority believe on. So much of this..

Charlie Sheen Ron Vietnam Oscar America Walter Houston Donald Trump Calvin Coolidge Hollywood Robert Wise Frank CAPRA Martin Sheen Oliver Stone cocaine Tom Cruise Michael Douglas Executive Holbrook HAL
"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I imagine a because of my wife's connections to. Your. and. We would've gotten by but. I had disappointed myself because why had I gonna Vietnam in the first place? I'm taking a risk. Risk, WHO'S IMPORTANT You don't know what you're doing. You're young enough to take your risk you know. That was the idea and I you know I said this is not working and I gotta go out there on my own I gotTa beat back in Los. Angeles where Bolt was I have to find my way and who alleged. Getting it out of New York is not working for me so it was very painful but we had to. End Marriage. And I came out to La and Lo, and behold a week or two boom things start to go. Well, because I'd written a script of platoon which had been ignored because a Robert Bolt people got interested in it. Yeah. and. Marty Bregman of all people who I didn't know called me. And as as the book shows, Hey, this platoons a great script Lemme option it will make you would al, Pacino, and so forth and so on and Sidney Lumet. So that's. That's how the carousel starts. Yes, and we should we should say you know this is about nineteen, seventy, six, ten years before platoon ever actually makes it to the screen and there is a lot of heartbreak regarding both that project which was originally the platoon and it was sort of. Two polar opposite leaders of the platoon are actually people who had sort of inspired by different leaders that you dealt with in Vietnam people didn't understand that people tell I didn't know those two. So I thought those two sergeants were exaggerations and. You know yeah. They didn't one of them didn't kill the other but believe me they might have under different. In that platoon real people. That's why I was critic proof in that sense like you can say to me, you know Oliver Stone loves violence look at his shoes look at your the dry. You're the Dragon Midnight Express scarface. He loves mutilation above. All Blah. Blah Blah I saw this shit it's not like I am. That's the world I grew up in that viable and people critics never let me off the hook on that one you know. The only film that ever did that was a violation of that was was on purpose was this natural born killers was satire on purpose people didn't get that everything else. Pretty tries to be as realistic as possible. Unlike so many war films where you see too much. It's just to cinematic. It falls into an easy category. Actually wars are very odd ball eccentric and Kinda dull and very hard to film, and of course. This I mean you always need compromises with the screen because let's say you have an enemy at. Hundred yards away it's very dangerous but in movies I'll make him fifty yards forty yards away because that's you can see the fucking guy you can't. Yeah and it's interesting because here you are fresh from being in Vietnam. You you bring an authenticity to you're writing about it that somebody just sitting around in Hollywood might not would certainly not have any. The Vietnam movies that are getting made around that time coming home deer hunter. Those get made but your to I, the platoon and then born on the fourth of July which had been kind of presented to you as as a idea that follow these for years couldn't couldn't get done ten years with platoon eleven I believe ten for both ten. Yeah. Actually. Born in fourth comes out in eighty nine. It was re finished in seventy nine. Yeah and platoon seventy six gets made eighty six. It's a strange as I said, there's any strange dates January one succeed September fifteen. For me they registered but. They register ten years for both there I got sucked into the born on the fourth of July was. I learned a lot on that because that was Bregman Marty Brennaman called me back. He said I have another project. This is after platoon didn't work out and how the project for you with Sydney and how it's born on the fourth of July. Distorted is terrific story about this kid. Front Page Book Review Ronco Vicky was paralyzed in I'm so I. Hung Out with Rob. And I learned a lot I found out a lot about the vets I didn't know much about the vets I had lived in a city New York without many vets combat Ritz in La. There were held a lot more of them and because they were around the veteran's hospitals and I got to know that world. That opened my eyes to a lot of things too well, and it's incredible that you you write that on the same day you I met Ron. You also met the the guy who was the inspiration for Salvador that's correct. Richard Boyle. The Irish American journalists he was a character hanging around in written a book about a mutiny in Vietnam. Flower Dragon, which was I liked lot. It was about when the when the US army was starting to fall apart over there. There was a morale factor. The dipped very low. He caught the nature of that war. He knew he was always for the underdog. Richard. But isn't those that's a great day when you can meet two guys become the basis fields. So. The first real bang that came about out of the platoon screenplay was actually midnight express right? Because people were impressed by your writing abilities but they weren't GonNa let you make that and so along comes I. Guess It was Peter Guber initially with with Midnight Express, and you have great success with that ultimately at it. Goes on and wins the UN, the best adapted screenplay Oscar you're just thirty three been in La. Only two years. It's an amazing thing..

Vietnam La Richard Boyle Robert Bolt Bregman Marty Brennaman Marty Bregman Midnight Express Sidney Lumet Los Oliver Stone UN Peter Guber New York Pacino Lo US Hollywood Vicky
"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

08:03 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Thousand, nine, hundred, seven. Entitled Chasing the late. I'm talking, of course about the legendary Oliver Stone. Over the course of our conversation, the seventy three year old and I discussed why he volunteered for Vietnam how he was changed by his time there and how it inspired his work after coming home much of which has been about characters who do not realize what they're getting into until it is too late to get out. Why it took ten years for each of his to Vietnam, related scripts, platoon, and born on the fourth of July to get made into movies, and despite being one of Hollywood's hottest writers. In the intervening years, he was not content. Until he quote, got to make the movie I wanted to make close quote. Why since JFK he has often felt misunderstood and misrepresented in the media with. So many of his films in his view prejudged this political or controversial and never really given a fair hearing. Plus much more, and so without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Our, thank you so much for doing this. It's great to have you on the podcast and. Congratulations on this new book chasing the light, which is really beautifully written I. Never knew that I could care so much about your parents and your childhood and things outside of the movies but I really do and I guess, I just to begin with can you talk a little bit about what motivated you to write this and and what the process was like of doing it? Well, I have to say. That everywhere I went in the world selling the movies traveling people are always keep asking the same questions about how did you start? How did you get in this business? How many scripts did you write? What was? When did you sell your first script? How did you get to direct these basic questions that people are interested in who younger who are thinking about? China movie business, which is very exotic to many people because it's as it was to me, I didn't know how how how do you make movies? I had no idea. That's one reason but I have to say, honestly, the main reason is. To Know Myself Better What writing is about I've always been a writer was a writer as you can see in the book very young. My father encouraged me to write for money which was good. Good. To get comic books and wrote a novel when I was nineteen years old, which marked my life deeply actually because it was A. Very personal. My first expression of myself to myself where I in a sense a young man sometimes doesn't know he exists he's always being. Funneled from one school to the next one institution and you know it's difficult. AMERICA'S A. As far as privileges society is is for me it was. At the same time you don't get much of an identity from school I mean you tend to be shift you can be cataloged, and as you know, this was compounded by my parents divorced we were small family three people and we found each other separated from each one, another and. It was a very tough time for me at fifteen. It was sort of like being thrown out into the cold. David Copperfield Kinda thing all of a sudden my mother father who I thought loved each other in fact had a very contempt tempestuous relationship very much. I would call it. A magical childhood turned coal coal start freezing cold. And it's a strange thing to fall apart a family. The family to fall apart, it really means that you live separately. So when I wrote the book nineteen coming up back from Vietnam for my first time extended time abroad. Like that I've been a teacher for two terms in the school, and then I was in the merchant marine as a wiper. And I traveled a low around Asia and nineteen I learned about life and I wrote this book because as I said in a book it's It proved my existence to myself that I had feelings and I can put on paper write. The book was rejected and that setup part of this journey as a young man, the book was rejected by the publisher and I wanted to kill myself. But I couldn't do it. So I went to Vietnam instead right. which was a long. Yeah and that was that was a very easily achieved that aim I mean it was. An and you write very vividly about your time there. But I I guess let's just go back and talk about you were. There were some people who including the president of the United States who did everything they could to get out of Vietnam you did everything you could to get into it, which may surprise people because you had been accepted to Yale University after this period when you were kind of turmoil because of your parents divorced, you had very bright prospects there and yet you chose to after that initial trip to Vietnam where you're teaching, you chose to try to go back as an infantryman to volunteer for the draft. Can you just share for people who haven't yet read the book just give them a little flavor what was the reason to do that beyond frustration with your parents? Well I think I described in the book. That I was burned out that the boarding school. For years in a boarding school was very tough cold existence it was nothing I was used to and I had to adapt to become. To become like everybody else I had to compete against everybody else and. Join a way of life that is very east coast. Let's. Say you know very disciplined and I suppose I was bound for wall. Street. My father's world. I was not really adept at mathematics like he was nor was is intelligent as he was. I didn't it was I was dead inside. That's all I can say I was burned out and I think that's a common thing when you're actually that age if you read, which was one of the most popular books at that time was catcher in the Rye that sums up a mentality of somebody who With. Given all these chances you think wow, what an education but she unless you appreciate it, you can't. You can't. You can't get anything out of it. The it becomes cynical. You become stale. You become a lot of those things that you hate you you end up hating. Would I tied that to your statement about? These people who? Missed the draft. I mean, there's no I was in the class at Yale George W Bush when made a movie about two yes. Yes. He was his freshman year with me but those those type exists Everywhere, I went there were the. Column, the rich kids, the privileged kids they Bush, we know how to Air National Guard deferment which he? Violated basically, and then they go to war on these guys. These are the guys who ended up going Bill Clinton. Bombs all these places. He doesn't go to the draft neither does DONALD TRUMP DONALD TRUMP at least in. Well, he's. He's talking about nuclear weapons and throwing military might around and all that. Shit. And trump never went either. So this tells you a lot about my generation. Don't don't condemn all as a bunch of UH spoil kids and a lot of did care and fought for good things. Right I tried I mean from my bad experience Vietnam rough one I learned a lesson I tried to share it with the rest of the world to some degree. You know like avoid used war, avoid bad wars you know but. No one listened and we had several more. But listen as I said earlier, I wanted to end. It couldn't go on the way was I would never be an east coast product like my father went him. I would never be that I didn't know what I want to be..

Vietnam DONALD TRUMP George W Bush Oliver Stone Hollywood Asia Bill Clinton David Copperfield writer China AMERICA Yale University publisher Air National Guard United States president
"oliver stone" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:41 min | 9 months ago

"oliver stone" Discussed on Kickass News

"Go by talking about a man who. screenwriters have been working working on. They get their voice cut out. They get their voice box out. They no longer have confidence in what they're saying or doing and eventually become conformist. They do with the studio because they pay them. and. That's the death of you. That's conformity. There's a lot of that going on. knockabout they. It's important to have success and it's important. And now that I'm I've been to both I. Think you know I recognize both. And I use is both Do you think it's harder today to make a political film? That's critical of the government than it was back. Then Post Vietnam. Ever since the Patriots really. Impossible. The only fill the kind. There was a few, but it's been very difficult not that you'd set out to, but you know what you say did was tell the truth is i. do a Lotta Research, but you know it's very hard to to main JFK were. Did W, which is about Bush, and I showed. I I try to what in a funny way what kind of shallow a shallow presidency. We had a shallow policy foreign policy how we got into the Iraq war and I think. That movie was very effective for me in showing it, but there was at not at that time. It was a patriotic country and they're still. Worshiping the our military to the point of madness. It's. Yes super worship yeah. Yeah Yeah! I talked to Karl Rove around the time the movie came out and tell you the see was really pissed off. The Toby Jones is him. Feet Tall I'm like five foot, eight or something like that. Really it's. Pretty good there schmear. Bush saw the movie on. Clinton told told me that it was right on. I was already said. love it. Well this has been so much fun before we go real quickly. I have to ask about one story in the book. Is it true that Gore? Vidal wants tried to talk you and Mick Jagger into a threesome. You're going for instance is amounts or Gore, was a very funny man. Rate is and that's what we loved. Outspoken! Well again, the book is called chasing the light writing directing and surviving platoon midnight express scarface Salvador in the movie game Oliver Stone. Thanks so much. I appreciate it. Thank you. It was fun. Thanks again to Oliver Stone for coming on the show..

Patriots Oliver Stone Bush Karl Rove Gore Toby Jones Mick Jagger Iraq Salvador Clinton Vidal
Dell, Oliver Stone and Bolton discussed on Ethan Bearman

Ethan Bearman

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Dell, Oliver Stone and Bolton discussed on Ethan Bearman

"California transportation officials says motorists should expect delays on a newly reopened stretch of highway that connects northern California to Oregon one lane in each direction of interstate five reopened today for drivers traveling through the area. The highway opens six days after a wildfire roaring along the roadway forest. It's

Dell Oliver Stone Bolton California Technology Advisor President Trump Nikki Medoro Washington Pat Thurston United States Advisor Intel Oregon Thirty Percent Six Days
Del Toro, Oliver Stone and David discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Del Toro, Oliver Stone and David discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Guitarists playing the, same song, at the same time they all plugged into tiny battery powered apps after paying a, fee which went. To the us trillion children's music, foundation David certified he. Would easily break the Mark of three hundred sixty

Del Toro Oliver Stone David York India United States Five Years