20 Episode results for "Oland"

DYNASTIES 7 - The Olands

Commons

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

DYNASTIES 7 - The Olands

"This episode of Commons is brought to you in part by audible audible as the best audiobook performances the largest library and the most exclusive content curated by and for Canadians. Start a thirty day trial and your first audible book is free learn more at audible dot ca slash Canada that's audible dossier slash c a n a DA It's a July Day in twenty eleven and Dennis Oland walks into an interrogation room in Saint John New Brunswick police the station for like I said they can do is just kind of go through this events over the last Little a bit. Dennis is in his forties financial adviser and he looks the part wearing Khakis and a turquoise polo in for a man who had just learned and that his father had been found dead. Dennis Oland is surprisingly calm. Pretty clear my aunt that didn't have art attack ducks up he's happen to you And also the first anyone spearhead is he was this one of those crackhead type things or whatever or someone goes in you know. Does that kind of thing or looks being homeplace to the wrong time that that sort of thing. Dennis's father Richard was a science of New Brunswick's famous beer brewing dynasty. The Olin's best known for making Moosehead and he had a reputation for being difficult he and Dennis would sometimes have huge arguments on sailing trips or at family get togethers but I certainly remember Christmas dinner not last year in two years ago. Where Gaskin something simple you when you have a Christmas cake before rumour audience flame okay? Well it was my job to do that in a flame for like thirty thirty seconds. Flamed out so by the time I got it from the kitchen and dining room flamed out vital physical but I mean it was. It was ugly. I I might have left. I don't know okay. Everybody was very upset in the same John. Police are especially keen on talking to Dennis because it appears that he was the last person to see Richard Oland alive so after about an hour of asking about Richard and where Dennis had been the a day that his father died. They asked Dennis the obvious question. Did you have any involvement in your father's death. I ask you the last person there and something that I have to cover a no reason to want my father. Debt to kill. But as Dennis goes back and recounts his day over over and over for another hour the tone starts to shift the detective notes some inconsistencies in what Dennis is saying exactly. When did he leave his father's office? Why didn't he mention he driven the wrong way down? A one way street Dennis becomes agitated and so he I think he's realizing the On him in becomes nervous end. He saying he's getting a mental block but he can't remember where he parked how many times he visited at the office. And things like that. That's Greg Mark Key a professor at the University of New Brunswick who's published three books the murder of Richard Oland Difficulties okay launch. It's important I said thanking they just play it through and let me know what vice now. Now I'm getting a mental okay. You're trying to sorry I get focused tonight Trying to pay attention. I'm trying to focus on. I'm trying so hard at one point. Constable Davidson leaves the room and Dennis sits there. We're tracing a map with his finger and a nearby table and whispering to himself seemingly trying to figure out the route he took when he left his father's office It's About an hour and a half in. He's they give them a charter warning. Dennis allowed to call a lawyer and then after he makes the call hall. He sits back down in the Interrogation Room in constable Davidson tells. Dennis exactly what he thinks happened. That is given the conversation. There's no doubt my mind that you did what you had involvement in this in business. I WANNA know why okay. Dennis shuts down his lawyer told him not to talk. So the police swap out constable Davidson's good cop four the bad cop. He's senior dance partner. I've been watching this interview since it started involved in investigation. Rightfully Tako as very clear to me that you in this place at this point. Dennis is barely talking talking. He's sitting cross legged shifting away from the investigator refusing to look in the eye. The COP presses him so situation that you are Allen you were in selling doesn't change the way they feel quite certain my say. Ah We all wish that hadn't but it did As it's the way forward pack the path forward over order it is then is doing cold hearted murderous conniving person listen to Dennis find sick and tired of being browbeaten abused and watching his family. Be abused by this guy who sales all over the world racing expensive yachts doing whatever he wants taking people people here taking people. They're arguing with his mother over hundred dollars worth of groceries. That gets pretty old doesn't it. Dennis Dan Right This wasn't about financial gain for tennis. This isn't that right. This was about ending the tyranny. I've had enough of this. You're not treating me like this anymore. Or maybe there was no conscious thought maybe just like was just a moment of flash of flash whatever just no plan just but Dennis barely says another word after five full hours they finally come to an impasse. Pass as a look. You can give you this opportunity to do this right now now. I know you've had plenty of opportunity to sit here and think of this GonNa go. I hope you fully understand in your decisions. Air Can not changed and that this opportunity Growing waves and will never be presented again opportunity. We tell me what happened Dennis Oland walked out of that interrogation room. A free man but two years. Here's later he would be charged with the murder of his father. The trials that would follow would be the most sensational in modern New Brunswick history and the Outcome continues to divide the province to this day. The investigation into to Richard Olin's murder captivated an entire province for a decade now. The ORLANDS aren't Canada's most famous or powerful dynasty. They're not even the most well known one in New Brunswick but the story of the Oland capture something essential about dynasties dynasties rife with conflict sibling against sibling parent. Against Against Child. All for the sake of money control or even just affection. So is the case of Richard and Dennis Oland the worst example of a dynasty gone wrong long or is it something else entirely was the justice system so blinded by familiar story that almost sent an innocent man to prison the marshy man and from Canada land this is Commons this episode collinses brought to you in part by wealth bar in this new year. Why not be a little more generous to your future? Self Wealth Bar makes great investing ridiculously easy easy. You can open an R. S. P. OR TSA online than. Sit Back and watch your money grow and the really cool thing is that not only. Do you get access to ETF's but you can put your money into exclusive investments that were once available only to rich people well Farro Perry with the portfolio. That works best for you. So you know that your money is working as hard as it possibly can and it cuts out all of the work wealth bar managers and balances your portfolio for you. See your money stays on track effortlessly effortlessly. And this part's really important. With fees that are less than half the cost of traditional investments. Your money grows faster with wealth bar contribute to your wealth bars. RSP before the February twenty ninth deadline. And you'll also be gifting yourself a bigger tax return right now. Wealth bars a special offer to our listeners. Open an account count on line and you'll save up to a hundred dollars in fees start investing online in minutes at wealthed dot com slash candidate land. That's wealth wealth bar dot com slash candidate. Today show's brought to you. In part by audible audible is the best audiobook performances the largest library and the most exclusive content curated by four Canadians from beloved classics to the latest bestsellers audible offers emotionally rich intimate. Spoken word listening coming for anyone seeking be more productive better informed or just entertained. Here's what I want you to do. After you're done listening to this episode go sign up for audible double so that you can listen to too great books about the Richard Oland Case I. There's Greg Marquees Book Truth and honor and there's also another book by CBC Reporter Order. Bobby Jean Mckinnon called shadow of doubt. Both of these audiobooks are fantastic. And they'll take you even deeper into this case so go try it. Now Start Start a thirty day trial and your first audible book is free learn more audible dot ca slash Canada that's audible dot ca slash c a n an Ada Thursday so seven two thousand eleven at approximately eight fifty four am public safety. Communication Center received requests for service to attend fifty to Canterbury Saint John City Center. The officer. Sir Richard Oland. It was later determined at the scene. That Mr Rolling had expired. Preliminary results of the autopsy couple with the evidence at the scene clearly indicate Richard. Ola was a victim of foul play. Homicide there is no evidence at this time to suggest that this was a robbery or a random act. Richard Olin's body had been found by his Secretary Marine Anderson. Here's Greg Marquee again and if you hear them yelling in the background that's just Greg's Greg's cat and to warn you will be hearing from that Katy quite a bit in this episode is secretary. Maureen Adamson went into the office of soft few things in this that she went in through the the doors in when she got inside she noticed Things wrote a place and she looked over in the area where her boss had his desk. She saw body in the floor so she went down. She panicked won't blow out help to the business down below just a warning. The next little bit gets pretty graphic graphic. The scene of the crime was absolutely gruesome. Blood was everywhere. He was face down on the floor of his legs under his task and he had massive trauma to the back of his head. There was a pool of Rama's head in there was blood. SPLATTER in kind of a circle pattern emanating from crime-scene what was clear from the beginning. was that this wasn't some robbery. There were no signs of a break in meaning. Richard probably let his killer into the office office and almost nothing was taken. The Computers Richards Rolex. All of them were still in the room. The only thing missing was Richard's iphone. Richard Olin's murder was immediately a sensation. Greg Marquee remembers exactly where he was when he heard the news. I was in the Public Library that afternoon soon. And someone said that the library what happened in mentioned the name a certainly knew the name but I had never met Miss Rowland and it was a bit of a shock because again there had been a number of murders murders in in Saint John in the years prior to this and after this but this was not a typical case with a wealthy person being being murdered in his office. The Olin's are one of the most well known families in New Brunswick Irving's are huge in their influence the McCain's anes also are fairly an beyond New Brunswick as well for with McCain's and the irving's but the older ones are are are sort of a second tier dynasty. Something the songs and the they certainly have been around for a while. They're quieter sort of low profile. They valued their privacy and they were just not they just haven't been and his high profile as say the Irving's McCain's and it's kind of ironic given all the publicity that was visited upon the family after the murder of Richard and actually make making important distinction just at the top. There's actually two branches of the Oland family distantly related both of them in the maritimes and both of them involved in brewing. Doing there's the Nova Scotia Ohlund. Who owned the Oland brewery? In Halifax they sold their company to Inbev in the nineteen seventies and they brew beers like Alexander. Keiths Oland Poland and schooner. But that's not who we're talking about here. The New Brunswick Orlands are best known for Moosehead brewery which is the largest independent brewery and Candido. We're down so who exactly is this family. In the Olen Dynasty begins the same year that Canada was born. Eighteen sixty seven as the company is always telling us at six generations in the ruining business that year Susannah Oland opened a brewery in Nova Scotia. She ran the business and was the chief brewer but her husband's name was on the paperwork. Susannah Oland and her husband. Who came from England Jon in eighteen sixty seven to dartmouth and they started a brewery turtle cove and Dartmouth and eventually they moved across the Paul Fox Harbour to set up shop and Halifax the brewery was a success? After Susannah Oland died. She passed the business onto her son's a tradition that would continue for the next century in one thousand nine hundred seventeen the brewing business hit a bit of a speed bump Halifax explosion. God look at that. Not only was the brewery destroyed but one of the Oland sons was killed so the third generation of the family took over brewery in Saint John after the Halifax explosion. The interesting thing about one while they took over the brewery in he runs it for the first ten years and when they bought James Ready Beer in the west side prohibition was still underway. So you think about that. You're investing in a brewery during prohibition Bishen and so they made low alcohol beer soft drinks and things like that. When prohibition was lifted Moosehead was the only game in town if you're going to Salvia in New Brunswick it was advantageous of naked in New Brunswick and they had the only to lose moosehead continued to do well and by the nineteen eighties? It was the largest Canadian owned brewery in the country. Here's a commercial from that time. Did you know that ninety. Four percent of the beer brewed this country to breweries some choice. Mussa Lucite isn't booed by the big to its by the oldest independent brewery in Canada still owned and operated by the original family since eighteen. Sixty seven Richard. Toland had been a vice president at Moosehead in the nineteen eighties. His father was deciding who would run the company when he died. Richer had two other siblings his brother Derek and his sister Jane Derek had spent some time in charge of things in Nova Scotia and at one point moved back. The father had to decide which son is going to run and things will be the CEO so to speak according to many of the stories. Derek at one point had threatened to were planning to move to Australia. I believe in New Zealand and that seemed seemed forced the father's hand he made Derek. The eldest son had Guy Richard then sort of departed in Hof. Richard was forced out out of the business but he's never really gone. Because I think Phil helped set him up with a trucking company that became one of the bigger trucking companies in the region in in one of the main clients for that. Trucking company was Moosehead. Right plus he still has some shares Moose as well. So he's not involved running moosehead you said after the parting of the ways which was supposed to be acrimonious. But he's certainly benefiting from the Moosehead connection and the Family Richard Oland was well respected affected the Saint John Community. He was the chair of the one thousand nine hundred five candidates. Summer Games widely hailed as success he was involved with business development groups and the local Catholic Diocese. He was chair of the Board of the New Brunswick Museum. He was given an honorary doctorate by the University of New Brunswick was awarded an order of Canada. So when when Richard Oland was found dead July morning in twenty eleven it was a shock to the New Brunswick establishment his funeral was a meeting of the New Brunswick elite the premier was there were numerous cabinet ministers. Mla's lieutenant governor so were members of New Brunswick's other famous dynasties the Irving's McCain's canes but also present were the cops taking photos of everyone and tracking. Who was there just as they would for the funeral of a Mafia dawn at the funeral a journalist took a photo that would become infamous? It was Dennis Oland walking with his wife Lisa. Lisa's and tears but Dennis S.. Dennis is smiling Richard Dennis. Ns were very different people. Richard was a hard nosed businessman who people have described as cold and brash. The image of Richard being so controlling hot hot tempered unpredictable. That type of thing a bit of a bully the doing his own thing and not really caring what people fought a very active man Skiing emotion racing and he go on trips. He was a bit of a thrill seeker. Dennis meanwhile appears to have been more subdued a family man. He seemed to be the Dad You know who's divorced dad with three kids he he spent a Lotta time with. He had I think he had the kids in alternate weeks and he was living in Rossi and doing things at the club and going on family trips. He seemed to be close to his mother. The two did have one shared interest. One that's very on the nose. It was first episode of dynasties both Dennis and Richard loved genealogy in fact that's what Dennis says he was doing at his dad's office that day. Hey he had done some genealogical research about the Oland family that he thought his dad would find interesting. Here's Dennis again. During his interrogation Hugh for media. I guess the time that I've seen him. Is You know when we were doing this. Family history stop and why was over there yesterday. and which both have this idea from him. But I mean we both have this real enjoyment in doing genealogy stuff before meeting up with his father on the day that he was killed. Dennis appears with had a pretty normal day the day I was father's desperate spirit well the whole day in his office in Brunswick Tower which is just a blocker so away from his dad's office. Dennis told the police that he drove over to visit his father a little after five. PM Security footage shows him circling the block three times times before he parked but he didn't see his dad that time he claimed he parked in one spot. He went into the building he got to the top up of the stairs and then realize forgotten some documents back in his office. He walked back down got on his car and maybe set up to get them in any realize as well. I can't get into the building because my swipe card will not work on my own building after five o'clock or something like that go into my office by key it's too late to go back in so obviously because everything gets shut down at your office yet five yeah they leave at the time the elevator which you need one of those around around here the guard things yes so I went back and does it all. I have enough information on what he wanted. And when in Obviously you're getting ready to leave. Dana says he talked with his dad about genealogy for forty minutes and then left. Dennis says that after that he went to a wharf near home to see his children were there then. He went home after a pharmacy in a grocery store and finally called it a night on the way home I stop the the rent four warped see my kids with her Khazei do kayaking there and they swim after but they weren't there so I went home all these sick so we went to the drugstore. We went to cocker nurses a little grocery tormenting and Moses and bananas nephew other things at home and dinner. Security camera footage in eye-witnesses corroborated his his account for Dennis didn't tell the cops during the interrogation was that he'd gone back to his father's office for a third time before he went to the wharf ref he drove back briefly. Drove the wrong way down a one way street and parked and then he went back up to his father's office staying only for a few minutes he later claimed it was to pick up a book that he had left. According to the crown that was you know he he finally got up the courage to go back and his father one last time. So why did the cops think for Dennis Oland would want to kill his father. Well according to some Dick Oland Poland was a deck for one. He had been having a long standing affair with a local woman. Even though both of them were married going back over the last few a few years it was or anything in your mind that would stick out as being unusual or different than your father of bringing bringing up a while talking concern you. Maybe over he personally. No I mean there there is jury heard is already in the others. I mean there is this family concerned that he's he's at fair was having an affair. Or what have you I feel guilty right now. I'm not changing my mother but but I just didn't know who was true or not. The affair appeared to be a bit of an open secret secret and was causing tension in the family when asked who he thought had been involved in the killing Dennis points to his father's mistress. Only person that comes the line. Is this supposed girlfriend because she really seemed to be like the car. The Dragon Lady. She's she's this hostel Somebody who you think could be that fatal attraction type person yes But that's just I don't know so that's just me saying stuff that Here but then there's the question of money according to prosecutors. Dennis Oland had long been living beyond his means and his father had loaned him hundreds of thousands of dollars so that Dennis could keep his home after got divorced. The biggest thing my father did for me and it was a surprise a very pleasant surprise when I went through a divorce two three or four years ago now before years ago and it was a very bitter experience yes and inexperienced where I was very likely going to lose my home And this is the home. That is an old family home. grandparents in the family for for seventy years. Their employers is a farm behind it and he stepped up and said look that's not GonNa Happen And he basically bankrolled my whole divorce case which ended up being eighty five thousand dollars of the very lengthy divorce. Yes and then because I had to basically give half of my ass to my ex wife He angled that as well. Okay so that I can keep my house so basically I have a mortgage with Kim. Dennis was paying his father sixteen hundred dollars a month for the loan and it later emerged that he had bounced his last payment before his father's author's death so in other words if Richard Oland died Dennis wouldn't have to pay back the nearly half million dollars. He owed his father. The money was central to a police and prosecutors would present as the motive for the crime. The motive was a combination of his stress over his financial official situation. It wasn't as simple as havoc. He'll my father. I don't have to pay back the half a million dollars. He's advanced me. It was more like the stress. Dennis was living beyond beyond his means as as he freely admitted so he just had that cash flow problem so stress about financial situation combined with resentment over the mistress and against against the disrespect that meant towards his mother and the victim's wife and also made up. Maybe a lifelong you know set of antagonisms showed the father and son on dynamics when the cops began to turn the screws on Dennis during the interrogation. They focused on how severe Richard had been with his family. Did you just go earlier and could into an argument with him about money because in everything you told me. Dennis is about money and if I grew up in your circumstances with the money all around you at this stage of my life I would expect to be sharing in some of that. Not Battling with that son of a bitch every single day A. and having him control every aspect of my life because he wouldn't give up any of his goddamn money. You didn't plan this Dennis. He brought this Assan pushing Squeezed you rub your face in the fact that he controls it all disrespected. You disrespected your mother. Got this one this little sweetie taking away. I'm doing this I'm doing that. Where's my sixteen hundred bucks? Data's you only we sixteen hundred bucks. 'cause I bailed you out after. They told Dennis he was a suspect. The police got nothing more out of him but they kept trying to push his buttons. The the next little bit is both weird and kind of mean. So where do you go from here. Where do you go from here? Is there a plan for that. Besides wasn't Pro Thing Back Culture Bart Simpson was made in the camper. Thank thank let me show you this video here Mr Simpson. You call them the dirty pig. I think that was pretty accurate term. 'cause if everybody everybody else in your family and they did and sad thing is you guys thought you were hiding from your mom from former. She knew dairy family secret that everybody tried to keep no mce bucket. Full of Agar. You could everybody tried to keep it from everybody else. Even though the police were convinced Dennis Oland had killed his father. It would be a long long in time before they made an arrest her immediately after Richard. Olin's murder. It seemed like everyone in Saint. John had an opinion about what had happened was crazy. I think within the first week I mean there are all sorts of crazy rumors to the crazy ones I heard was was that it was a Russian or Ukrainian hitman and not only. Did they do it because there was some sort of business deal wants our or something involving the victim but you know we saw them on the jets at the Saint. John Airport the next day so this is coffee shop talk. The other really strange. When they heard is Dennis Oland was threatening to throw himself off the Saint John? I'm have a bridge a few days after the murder. None of that was true. But the rumors kept proliferating. Police searched. Dennis Olin's home a week after the murder which which only caused more speculation here. CBC Reporter. Bobby Jean Mckinnon at the scene I'm standing here on dollah point road and Rossi. Where Saint John Police Isar executing a search warrant? They've been here since the new our surgeon Glenn Hayward won't tell us who lives here but neighbors say the home of Dennis O.. Lend the son of prominent businessman. This men Richard Oland who was found dead in his saints on Office last Thursday. The police were tight lipped about what they knew but over the next many months. CBC News and Brunswick News Sue to get the warrant and information about the case slowly began to drip out tidbits. Coming out with the you know. The suspect suspect owes the way it was phrased. Suspect owed the victim have a million dollars. The victim had a mistress things like that and then I think at one point towards the very the end of the the suspect was the last person seen the victim alive and then finally the victim's son there's only one son by the time. Dennis was arrested. People knew that he was the prime suspect. Even though it was the biggest story in town some people weren't so keen to talk about it. People from the wealthy saint. John's suburb of Roth. Say where the OHLUND's Poland's lived seem to clam up I live Enquist Pam says was his just beside Rossi. People were not always forthcoming. They didn't want to talk about the case as for whatever reasons often they wouldn't give you the recent mainly just didn't WanNa draw attention to it or barest or they're afraid that say something or whatever it was but I found there was a little bit of almost like a cone of silence no in many areas of Rossa. I do think that candidate this nature living community Rossi does probably get a little bit of it. Covers a much of the right word but maybe production. I'm not sure in November of two thousand thirteen more than two years after Richard Oland had been killed his son. Dennis was arrested and charged with second degree murder. Because of all of the publicity the crown sent out five thousand summons to potential jurors the jury selection and had to take place in a Saint John Hockey arena. Dennis old higher top-flight lawyers and despite the fact that he was accused of killing his father. He's entire family only stuck behind him. They had the resources in education connections to do things like issue press releases and things like that I think is a bit of image management instrument here on I mean even during the trial. There seem to be press conferences almost every week right and which which you know would have any impact on the legal case race. So why are they doing right. It's because of public image and and things like that. The trial lasted sixty five days and was a public spectacle tickle most public would never have met Denis Owen for foreign very strong opinions many of them pro and con right in terms of his guilt felt in that type of thing so it kind of became larger social phenomena and depending on who you believe the evidence was either extremely compelling or exceedingly thin. I there's the jacket during his interrogation. Dennis Oland told the COPS that he had been wearing a blue blazer. The day his father author was killed. What were you wearing these pants shoes address? You're you're wearing those answer. Sugar Cashews address not call her dresser. Yeah and placer but surveillance footage clearly showed the Dennis this had been wearing a brown blazer that day and even though he was being tailed by police. That Blazer was somehow sent to the dry cleaners the day after after the interrogation when police finally sees the blazer during their search of Dennis's house they found something on it and they tested it in a couple of labs and they found. There were three or four. A small specks of biological material on Dennis's jacket the one. He had dry cleaned the day after his police interview which also suspicious to the police. That guy logic material belong to the victim. Then there's the missing phone remember. Richard Owens iphone was the only thing that had been taken from the crime scene that day. The phone had been backed up earlier in the day so it was likely in the office when Richard was killed but by six forty five that evening just minutes after Dennis had left his dad's Office for the last time there was no more activity on that phone but richards mistress have been trying to get in touch with him and according to the crowns sounds experts at around six forty five pm. The phone pinged the cell tower not in Saint John. But in Roth say close to where Dennis Oland had gone to right After so circumstantially suggested and that Dennis had the cell phone but the cell phone was never actually found and then there's the way in which Richard Oland was killed. He was bludgeoned. It was incredibly violent. And had the feel of something very personal there's overkill involved sometimes in terms of establishing or a bludgeoning death or something like that it's often connected to intimate partner violence or some sort of personal connection the defense however argue that the crown just didn't have a case first off despite numerous searches. The cops were never able to find the murder weapon. And and let's go back to that blazer with Richard Olin's blood on it. The defense presented evidence that Dick Oland had a condition that made his scalp bleed and that he was frankly. A A pretty touchy guy. More importantly why was there only a small amount of blood on it. Where's the blood right? Let's bad if you're hitting someone with a hatchet the hatch or ham or whatever it was the crown had its own blood expert. WHO said well? It doesn't always work that way but the defense expert said if you know when someone's hit the blood blood splatter back onto the attacker and there's no way you could escape being having significant amount of blood on your person. Acquire closing footwear and Dennis. Oland was seen on surveillance video only a few hours later walking into a pharmacy. Knee certainly certainly didn't appear to be covered in blood so according to the crown when he's appearing in the video the food store. That's only about an hour after he's murdered his father and the defense would show that videos. Say Does this look like a guy's wearing his golf shirt. He's in his with his wife. He's wearing his shorts. He's wearing during his doctors. You know. Does this look like a guy. He's just murdered. Someone asked for the phone again. It was never found and the crown didn't really have a theory as to why it had been taken again. The defense also presented numerous instances of what appear to be the Saint John. Police bungling the investigation officers not wearing gloves and the crime. Mm Seen Cox using the bathroom and owns office for two days before they tested it for evidence. And then there's the Brown Blazer that had little bits of Richard's blood blood on it the key piece of evidence in the crown's case when the jacket was seized Denis's home. It was touched by a cop with his bare hands. It was then left in a bag for four months before it was tested for evidence. And the woman who worked at the dry cleaners says she didn't notice any blood on the jacket prior to cleaning it in the end. The jury deliberated for thirty hours and on the day the verdict came down. Greg Marquees has he could feel the tension in the room before the judge came in and before the jury came in there was almost like a very serious is gloomy atmosphere in in the room. The jury found Dennis Oland guilty of second degree murder. Here's A. C.. TV report on the verdict. The jury foreman was asked by the court clerk had reached a verdict he replied yes and he replied in a strong voice guilty at that point. Dennis Oland collapsed into his chair sobbing uncontrollably. He put his face into his hands sobbing saying my children my children and and my God my God and at the same time. His family was sobbing in the front row of the courtroom. They were trying to comfort each other. Dennis Oland was sentenced to life in prison. But that wasn't the end of the story for Dennis us. His family still had immense resources to fight the case they appealed the decision and they won the New Brunswick Court of Appeal ruled that the trial judge had given the jury. sorry `incorrect instructions when it came to that Brown Blazer. A new trial date was set. A new jury pool was convened and thousands of potential jurors once again gathered in the Saint John Hockey arena but not too long after a jury was put together. The justice declared a mistrial because of quote improprieties riotings. Instead the justice. decided he'd hear the case alone. So there's another lengthy trial another set of arguments the New Brunswick public is is once again captivated by the story an earlier this year. Eight years after the killing of Richard. Oland there's another verdict and this time time the outcome is different this time the justice fines. Dennis Oland not guilty. The Dennis Oland was greeted with applause when he left the courtroom a free man. He declined to speak but his lawyer had plenty to say. I hope that everybody in Saint John on now understand and appreciate that. Dennis Oland did not kill his father and understands the misery that he and his family and and his friends and supporters have gone through through the last eight years. Even though the justice found Dennis Oland not guilty. Realty doesn't let him off in his judgment if you read the judge's decision in the second case. He has some critical things to say about Denisovans testimony. He doesn't believe him as a witness. He says there are things that indicate the Dennis Oland is involved his case etc on the other hand is not quite enough there right. The murder of Richard Oland and the trials of his son that followed captivated new brunswickers partially because of the Star class. Divide in the province. It's the poorest province in Canada. But it's home to so many dynasties and if you've listened to our episode on the Irving's you already know that the new Brunswick elite intensely private and immensely powerful. It was a rare look into the personal life and even the personal finances of the accused in terms of a the member of one of New Brunswick Families for Greg Marquee. The most important thing to understand about the case is how close Dennis Oland was to going to prison for life. Despite what a judge eventually deemed to be Pretty Flimsy Evidence Nebraska Court of Appeal not found at that point on the trial judges instructions to the jury in the first trial. Dentist would still be in federal penitentiary now and according to the second trial he's not legally your mind turns. How often does this happen with other offenders? Who Don't have that illegal affects is not always the case that having lots with lawyers and deep pockets are going to jail because we didn't have all sorts of examples where people are convicted despite having you know the top lawyers and the pockets but certainly we can make a difference? It's too early to tell whether the old family will be able to move past this trial or if will forever tar the reputation Russian. But what's almost certain is that will never know for sure what happened to Richard Oland that July Day in twenty eleven. That's your episode of Commons for the week. This episode relied on reporting done by Greg. Marquee Bobby Jean Mckinnon and the team New Brunswick Nicholas Colour and Tamsin Amanda Mcclain's and see TV news. If you found this episode interesting I urge you to check out the two excellent books written about Dick and Dennis Oland. There's truth honor by Greg. Marquee shadow of doubt by Bobby. Jean Mckinnon both are excellent. If you WANNA get in touch with us you can tweet at us at Commons as part you can also email me or she kennedy show Dot Com. This episode was produced by myself Jordan. Cornish are managing editors Kevin Sexton and our music is by Nathan Berlin. If you like what we do please help us make this show. You can support US and get ad free podcast. Just by going to patriarch dot com slash candidate.

Richard Dennis Dennis Oland Richard Richard Oland Richard Olin murder COPS Saint John New Brunswick Canada Dennis Dan Bobby Jean Mckinnon John Dennis Olin Constable Davidson University of New Brunswick Sir Richard Oland Brown Blazer Dennis S Rossi
November 20: Trial, and error

As It Happens from CBC Radio

47:47 min | 2 years ago

November 20: Trial, and error

"This is a CBC podcast. Amazon echo dot is the perfect gift for everyone on your list. No matter who they are like that person who won't be home for the holidays. LXI? Call home calling home or who actually likes fruitcake Araxa reorder fruitcake order placed or who still believes in Santa Alexa, where Santa Santa's currently over Calgary or doesn't. Alexa, turn on the fireplace. Okay. Amazon echo Dodd perfect for everyone on your list. Hello. I'm Carol off. Good evening. I'm Jeff Douglas. And this is as it happens. The podcast addition. Tonight trial and error. Dennis Oland was being tried again for the murder of his wealthy father, Richard Oland. But now the judge has declared a mistrial citing a major mistake by Saint John police officer frost and translation Montreal calmness. Patrick legacy, usually writes in French. But today he switched to English to China's anglophone colleagues for their indifference to what he says are the Antero premiers attack on francophones rights trauma center. Doctor Tamara O'Neill had dedicated her life to treating injured people. She died yesterday on your ex-fiancee shot her outside the Chicago hospital where she worked what struck him was that nothing. Struck them a doctor who has examined Canadian diplomats suffering from Havana syndrome says they have post concussion symptoms without any blow to the head bubbly personality and Arizona woman is trying to find a home for the friendly pitch. Jin who showed up in a fancy rhinestone vest and to figure out how it got so stoned and wool endowed Iceland's list of most eligible Ramsey ram registry. Is hot off the presses. And we'll speak with one sheep farmer who got four hunky specimens in there as it happens Tuesday edition aradio, whose guests are on the rampage several rampages, actually. The second attempt to try Dennis Oland for the murder of his father has hit a major snag today. A judge in New Brunswick declared a mistrial after ruling that a police officer conducted improper searches on potential jurors in the case in twenty eleven the prominent businessman, Richard Oland was found dead in a pool of blood in his Saint John office. A jury originally found his son Dennis Oland guilty of the murder that conviction was later overturned. Mr. Ohlund has always maintained his innocence. Now, the trial will proceed with no jury and be decided by judge alone. Alan gold is Dennis Owens defense. Lawyer we reached him in Saint John mister gold ear client Dennis Oland. And his mother were all smiles as they left the court today. How did you client take the news of in this trial took it very well because it leads to? Judge alone trial, which which we had wanted and apply for and benign successful because the law didn't allow the crown's consent. So yes, we're happy. Because of what happened that's can tell us it may be in layman's terms, what this police officer did that led to this mistrial, certainly the the supreme court of Canada has has emphasized in two thousand twelve and a series of cases the importance of juror privacy. So when people come forward to know willing to serve on a jury they have a right to privacy. And we're not allow to investigate them the way it's done some American courts. And so these very strict limits on one information, the police atten- look at in connection with perspective. Jurors they can look to see if they have a criminal record. Or if there's some other qualification that excludes from jury duty, but you're not allowed to research each and every contact they may have had with police officers. And is that with the policeman did and not apparently is what the policeman did in this case. He didn't tell anybody to ask words, he then told the crown, of course, had to tell us and that led to the successful motion for mistrial. Why would it matter? The how how could you just I know you're limited in what you can say. But what was that? What would knowing how much contact any previous contact or or feelings about the place? What impact it might it might give an impression that the perspective juror might favor, the police or my disfavor? The police example suppose, they had just pathetic and unpleasant experience with the police. Well, that's not something that we're entitled to know. Though in this case, you have of said that the police mishandled the case from the start. So maybe just give us a sense again as to what you think they did wrong investigating this murder. Well, the the the first trial simply reveals considerable number of missteps they're supposed to secure the crime scene. So that people don't wander in contaminated the evidence destroy will veal as it did at the last trial. For example, there was an exit door that was the more likely place for the actual killer do vaccinate they didn't even photograph that door. It was like they didn't even notice it. The they took over a hundred photographs of everything else in the location except this exit or they never checked that door for fingerprints. The crime scene was visited by people that had no business being there a crime scene. Like, this is very challenging for police force to make sure that the evidence. That every bit of evidence is found that might help solve it. And I think the challenge was just too great for this particular police force, then Dan is Ellen was found guilty by a jury already and that verdict was later overturned as as you well know, but so what why do you think that you can convince a judge this time that Dennis Oland had nothing to do with his father's. Well, again, we don't have to do the convincing. The crown, but the case is a circumstantial evidence case of involving some really quite extraordinary puzzles. There's a lot of smoke and the question is whether there's fire, and they judicial mind illegally trained mind who understands how faint how appearances can be deceptive who understand that you have to be careful not to jump to conclusions. That's the kind of mind can accurately and reliably look at this case, one of the key pieces of evidence is you know, is the during the first trial was the jacket a Brown jacket belong to Dennis Oland that had small bloodstains in DNA that that that seemed to match his father is that again going to be a key piece of evidence for the crown. I think I think in many ways, it's the key piece of evidence. And this is the kind of evidence that I'm talking about. Because at first. Bless you think. Oh my gosh. How could that happen? But the trial itself is going to bring forth evidence that, you know, these kinds of stains the transfer of stains as is not uncommon and the trial will also put forth all of the other evidence in which there were no bloodstains all of the other quoting shoes at cetera, which were carefully examined. So this is this is the point that a judge can look carefully at all of the evidence in and not just Bafokeng on one or two pieces of evidence that seemed to suggest guilt does your client Dennis Oland have any series as to how his father was killed. We we have we have no idea, and it'd be virtually impossible for us to have an idea because dick he he had certain aspects of his life that were kept secret from his family. We don't have a police force. We're not they're investigating the crime. Seen within minutes of the body being discovered. So no in in the real world. I think it's almost impossible for outsiders to to figure out who did it, that's the polices job. And we say they didn't do properly in this case this morning. Dennis Ellen's mother has stood by him during all of this. Have you ever seen her her loyalty, her belief that her son did not kill his father waiver? Never never never. She some absolutely wonderful woman. She liked the rest of the family does not deserve this tragedy visited on them. It's been over a decade now half a decade. They've been living with this. And she doesn't deserve it and her faith in her son has never wavered for an instant curiosity. There were there of other cases, where this police officer had done the same kind of search to before the jury selection. Is it possible that there are other decisions other cases that will be reopened certainly if I was a warrior who had a retrial this jurisdiction. I at least demand disclosure to find out if the police had done improper jury vetting during the selection process. Thank you. Very welcome. Alan gold is the defense lawyer for Dennis Oland. We reached mister gold in Saint John New Brunswick. Usually Patrick Lega say does not writing English. She is a columnist with the press and the Quebec based news outlet is published entirely in French except today. Today. The headline on Mr. Lagasse as column reads guys remember past the gate, and what follows is an appeal in English to his colleagues in Toronto to pay a little more attention to the quote, one two punch that Mr. laga say accuses on -tario government of delivering to its Franco on Tehran citizens. We reach Patrick legacy in Montreal Patrick. Why did you write your column today in English because I wanted the come and terra in Toronto in Detroit oppressed to understand what's going on under their very nose, which is francophones writes in on -tario are being trampled. And these people into come and Terry up, they're not paying attention, and they're not showing any kind of outrage say for Shelley by and Toronto Star. And why do you think that's hypocrisy because when you do have linguistics spats? In Quebec the same very newspapers. And I you know, I pointed out the Toronto Star pointed out, the global mail in national post are very keen on commenting on what's going on, you know, especially when the government is perceived as the villain in the story. They will publish very passionate than pugnacious opinion pieces use it past a gate controversy from a couple years back as an example. I mean, you found numerous pieces attacking Quebec in Quebec government for its treatment of the anglophone minority here in these very newspapers. But these newspapers concerning the what's going on with the French university and concerning the Commissioner for French services and on -tario day are missing in action. Okay. And that's what premier Ford in on -tario. He's cut. But he says he's hasn't reduced any services that these are just the services that used to be part of the French-Language commissions office would now be done. Elsewhere. So that he says, basically, nothing's changed. What he said. Yeah. Well, I'm saying what the francophone community in on -tario is saying is that these do look like ideological cuts because when you look at the Commissioner's office all of its employees are going to be merged into diem Butman office. So I one fails to see what financial gain is going to happen. And you also if French-Language university that's scrapped as well by family afford. That's an old dream of the Franco and -tarian community Emma graduate of university of Ottawa and even at the time and dreams about a fully Franco in -tarian university. We're going on at the time. And now, it seemed on the verge of becoming a reality, and it's being cut. And again, I come back to the treatment of the Toronto commentary as I call it regarding the treatment in Quebec of the anglophone minority which is not perfect. But which as institutions that are. Publicly funded by the Quebec government. So so I'm I'm wondering where is the world class francophone Ospital in on -tario like you have a world class Ospital in Montreal that operates an English where is the French university as I said, you have tree publicly funded universities in Quebec that are operating in English. But it was covered. Right. I mean, the globe star the post the CVC I'll covered affords decision to scrap the French-Language commissioned and the university. So you're saying that it's the commentariat. It's the columnists Natatorium lists who failed and that's why I used examples in my columns about past Icke, this linguistic controversy from twenty thirteen in Quebec and going back to this opinion piece in the globe and mail at the time. It started with a quote from Frederick Douglass, the well-known anti-slavery activists from the United States. And then the first paragraph of the. Piece said, you know, you read this, and you could almost apply that to what's going on in Quebec today. And I think that's in the Smit arch. Exaggerated. But it it just goes to show that you know, when it concerns the rights of the anglophone minority in Quebec this very same. Toronto press is very keen on publishing, but there's an injustice going on under their nose and they're nowhere to be found. Okay. That does a bit extreme to compare it to slavery. But the same time, I mean, you wrote with outrage about past a gate you described it as as over zealous. And this is the part of the office of the of the French language going after a restaurant for Italian restaurant for putting Italian words in its menu. I mean, come on that it was more than just in candidate around the world. People said this is weird. Look, I I was by coincidence. I was interviewed that that same time by the late to any burden when he came to Montreal to do a show and most of our conversation pertain to pass the gate. I'm not saying that's the gate was not a well-deserved black guy for for Quebec and the fiscal weather that. For us is what some people call the language police in Quebec, I'm just saying these newspapers in Toronto would dictate you know, a big part of the agenda. They were very keen on publishing these species, and rightfully so. But I'm saying right now, there is an injustice going on regarding a linguistic minority and on -tario, and they are nowhere to be found Allender though what that's based on. I mean, Doug Ford's cuts perhaps reflect that voters don't care he's proceeded voters care, and maybe the columnists that reflects that they believe that the readers don't care. Maybe it's apathy, and and not hypocrisy behind all this part of my intellectual and realistic training what done in English, and I remember very good axiom of the Anglo Saxon journalism. It's comfort the afflicted and flick, the comfortable and in this case the afflicted are different. Tyrians and there's an injustice going under their very nose and they are nowhere to be found. I found that appalling that maybe it's because they are reflecting the fact that the public doesn't care, you know, in Quebec, you'll find a majority of people who are against reasonable accommodation who will find that. You know, if you work in the public sector, you should not wear this is logic veil. The hit job, for instance, a majority of Quebeckers will find that. Well, there's some of us in the press go against this public sentiment. I don't think the journalism should be reflecting the will of the powerful. I don't think that journalism should be about just. Reflecting what the general public thinks you have to go with what's right, and sometimes an injustice is an injustice, and there's one in on -tario right now it's been going on for years, by the way, it's been going on for years. I think that the suppression of francophones rights in Ontario in this country is a great untold story. Patrick. I appreciate speaking in hearing about it. Thank you, always a pleasure thicker by Patrick legacy is a columnist with La Presse. We reached him in Montreal. The catalog of Iceland's most eligible bachelors hot off the presses. And it doesn't hold back on page. Thirty two wreck see is quote, generous broad well-stocked, end domino unquote, a few pages later. You've got good ni. He strikes eight broad figure and rock some luscious locks. This is the ram registry in Iceland, at least, among sheep farmers. It is a hotly anticipated catalog, and it is extremely competitive out of thousands of handsome Rams, only forty four made the cut this year. Snidey thought holes daughter hit the jackpot. She is sheep farmer who has four Rams featured in this year's ram register we reached her in borger, Fyodor Iceland. Snide is how exciting is this year's crop of Icelandic Rams? Tmz it's pretty exciting tickets that the publishing this Cadillac. It's always exciting for farmers. We like what we see. I understand you have some very eligible Rams just can you? Tell us about some of your prizes. We have four lamps this year in the Cadillac are in their first year. So they were two thousand seventeen so that are very young. And then we have one Brown morning. Very nice like human love proud of him to be there. So do you think you'll get these your Rams, we'll get some action? It's it's really more like a firm Bank. So they don't really guess any. They don't really get to meet any use maintenace produce. Donation and that makes sense to the farm the descriptions of the Rams in the catalog. They kind of read like dating profiles your ram field Drafi this what's how is he described in the catalogue? So they they usually starts with the description just stuff that they're like, they're look. So they describe him personally that he gets horn for good that they are not like growing in worth what is safe, and they described that he is not around his shoulders. And. Yeah muscles on his back and and at good five myself, and then they will. And then they described his temperament that they say that he's used to full and nicely Belsen calm. And then there's like they do like an average calculation for his offspring. I wonder why it matters that they're good looking. I mean, if they're not gonna meet any us. What does it matter that they got nice Faye? Cases or their horns are in the right place. Well, it's maybe not that they're nice lifting so much, but like with the horn farmers don't wanna bleed maybe horns that are growing to one phase and are gonna end up injuring Braam van picture is it's pretty important to have a good picture them in their pictures a lot. It's nice if they are sending tall and not looking in the info at is put in there. Well, I'm looking at if you picked his they are really, quite handsome, fellows, aren't they? Yeah. They are. There's one named Lobi described as an experienced ram who is great and horn Lewis as a short head a Deford ram with a calm manner is that fairly appealing for lobby. He is actually in there are who ramp. So he is not in there for his needs like muscle or meet like the carcass quality ready. He is in there for farmers. That are freaking for the wool is another fella stripper. Who is nearly quite dashing and has the color of Arctic, FOX. And this is I I like this is a wear of his environment. And knows exactly what's expected of him. Yeah. For which means Smurfs actually, he is lethal, but to special breeds with envious, Mandic, sheep breeds. They are when Beverly calm useless for meat production. Because they are always very skinny that. They never gained any muscle. How much heat them, but then much taller than the other sheep? And they're very smart. And they have this quality of knowing like when the weather's changed or there's major coming or something like that. So when they say that he knows what's expected of myths. Probably meant says like when they're hurting the sheep. He knows like, okay. We're being heard at home. I'll go in in front and elite. The other home is also beautiful black and white ram in here by the name of nNcholas. Yep. Nick from the north of Iceland, and he is described as call and respectful and carries his head height has a like an open I'ts everything that goes on round him. And he is well behaved in calm. But. He's suspicious or can fall and doesn't like cuddles from Saint Gers. He likes to know who it if it is trying to cut him is that in your in the catalog that he he doesn't like. Yeah. That's that's direct translation from the Cadillac, and he sounds respectful to I I like this in Aram. Yeah. Very beautiful. Now, what kind of reaction do you get to this annual publication of the the the ram catalog? I mean, do people think it's kind of funny that our farmers. We don't think it's funny because think it's completely normal those descriptions, we don't see anything funny about it. It's just what we expect from the Catholic every year. Like if there is a round that they put in there, and they don't mention anything about his temperament. We're like, oh why why been put it in there? Like, we want to know everything about them. I guess I mean, we look to this catalogue explains. Why is land is famous world famous for your sheep? Yeah. I guess. Oh, we're pretty happy with them. At least three never been. It's never been mixed with any other breeze. We've had a lot of advances in our breeding for the pets twenty five years. It is competitive, right? I mean, not everybody gets their ram in the catalog. You've got four great Rams made the cut. So how how Chester you about that? Yeah. We're very happy with that. We've been running this far for three and a half year. It's an old breeding farm, but yeah, we're very happy. We got to in their last year and four now so very happy with that. I think they are all very eligible ramps with lots of sex appeal. Perfect surveilled definite me, especially this time of year. They can smell the use going to become very agitated this time of okay? Let's get back to work. Thanks making. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye snidey Anna Thor holes daughter is sheep farmer in Iceland. We reached her in borger Fyodor. To check out some of Iceland's most eligible bachelor Rams, go to our website, CBC dot CA slash AI, h. Glen Campbell with of course, rhinestone cowboy a song about a struggling artist to yearns to be a star in shimmering outfit. And in a way that song is about the mysterious stranger who showed up last week. Jodi Kirin's house in Arizona, wearing a gorgeous jeweled vest, his past is a mystery. But clearly he is a star. And he's already getting letters from people. He don't know and offers coming over the phone. Jody Karen runs a bird rescue center called fallen feathers Peoria, Arizona. She's used to calls from strangers about birds. She's not used to calls about pigeons wearing rhinestone encrusted vests, but she did get one. And when the caller brought the pigeon over to MS Karen's place. Sure enough it was wearing a flight suit, which is a fancy name for a diaper. You put on domesticated birds when you let them fly free, usually. However, they are not covered with jewels. Now since pigeons are quite bad at using glue guns, MS Karen surmised at the pigeon. Belonged perhaps to a human or as she told the website Gizmodo, quote normally wild birds arriving with clothing is enough proof to me that this bird was owned and loved unquote, and that checks out. Now, we don't yet know who owns them. But everyone loves him. Lots of people have offered to take the rhinestone bird boy if someone comes forward to claim which is very generous. But do be warned the bird himself is free, but you will need to invest invests. Dr tomorrow O'neil went to work to help people in distress some in life threatening situations. Instead, the ER physician ended up in the care for colleagues. They don't say her doctor O'Neill was shot dead yesterday in the parking lot of Chicago's mercy hospital. The attacker on Lopez also shot and killed a police officer and affirm ac- resident and died during the rampage, according to reports until a few weeks ago, he was Dr O'Neill's fiancee today, Dr O'Neill's, friends, coworkers and family are in mourning. Among them is Dr snare top G. We reached Dr top topsy in Brooklyn deputy chief vote, I'm sorry for your loss. Thank you. You work in an emergency room. I'm sure you've treated gunshot victims yourself, did you ever imagine? When have you own friends that become a victim? Now. I never imagined. Yes. We do treat gunshot victims all the time. And I've seen a lot of a lot of dead bodies and bleeding hearts, but it's a little different when it's someone you're close to someone you can relate to I saw myself in her and even friends for a couple years, though, still different still hurts it always hurts. Someone dies in your arms, but I can't believe happened to her. And she herself Dr Neil tomorrow Neil would have probably have treated gunshot victims as well. Yes. That's true. It's very common in our field to treat ten traffic them. She works that in Chicago where it started prevalent as well. I trained in Saint Louis, and I'm here Brooklyn. And we see it a lot. I'm so sorry to hear that. Okay. How did you come to know, Dr O'neil? So we met at a retreat during residency a couple years ago, we hit it off as friends immediately live, very similar life. When is trying to get our career going well, women of color, also, and the emergency are y'all that doesn't same thing. Is you that is saving lives? Literally. We're on the frontline you really relate to them and get along. And she just had this amazing humor always smiling. And that was so attractive she was professionally really important to you. But she was also your friend wasn't he? Yes, she had a great sense of humor. She was so caring. She's always my laying. And that's what I noticed when I first met her a couple of years ago. That's all I remember her. What do you think motivated her to be emergency room? Doctor. I think it's somewhere to a lot of what motivates a lot of ER doctors, you feel like you're actually making a difference. Very fast paced. You have to think on your feet. It's not boring. It's very rigorous. And at the challenge every day the challenge, you never know what's gonna walk through the door. You know, what you're going to deal with and the funny thing about all this as we know this, and then something like this happened or friend that just it's just really getting to me. It's like, I know things like this happen all the time. But when I hit close to home, it's just a little different. And she was shot and killed by a man, she had been engaged to why mope has killed her and two other people, and you had been invited to a wedding at one point. It was going to be between Mr. Lopez, and Dr Neal is that right? That's correct. She started talking to a couple of years ago when I first met her on that you had a bridal shower in August and the wedding listen up Tober. I don't know this the civic details got cancelled, but she notified me to cancel the plans. And at the wedding was called off. I try to acquire either for her to find out. You know, does she need anything what's going on? But I didn't wanna push your cause me talk to me. Let her know that I'd be there. She never gave you an indication that she might fear for her life. She never did all only heard during the year as how much she man. And how much us excited to finally someone to get married and have kids so excited about her future? And then it was suddenly cancelled. Yeah. Now, it sees it exist. Yeah. Did you ever meet one Lopez? Did you meet this man, she was engaged to? I actually never did. I was going to meet them at the wedding. I'm in New York, and she Chicago, but I never got to meet her yon say sensitivity. It's interesting that this comes at a time when doctors are trying to tell the world that gun violence is something that they are dealing with all the time, as you know, there was the the National Rifle Association was saying stay in your lane to doctors who were talking about the gun violence, and what it was doing. Right. What do you say to the today after what happened to your friend? I say I challenge you to step in my shoes, my bloody shoes, and Stu how you feel when you have these gun victims in your has. And I treated so many young adults. And so many innocent people where I'm holding their hearts holding debt heads in my hands, and it makes me still angry because this kind of all been prevented. And I just challenged him to step in my shoes and see how UC L 'cause I see this all the time, and it hurts 'cause I'm the first person that's easy on the milli- brings them end. Or when of their friends drop off their gunshot victim front into our ER run. What difference? Do you hope speaking out about your speaking? With us today might do. I just want everyone to know how wonderful doctor Mera you'll allies. She was a great front, and that we lost someone so amazing because of gun violence, and that I hope every questions everyone where is safe what a safe now happened at a hospital like what should we do? Now. One of the change going to happen. That's topsy. I really appreciate that you tack to about your friend. And she sounds like an amazing person and a huge loss. Thank you. All right Bye-bye. Snapchat. Top G was a friend of Dr tomorrow O'Neill was shot and killed yesterday at a workplace Chicago's mercy hospital along with two other people we reach Dr J in Brooklyn a few hours after that shooting in Chicago. There was another in Baltimore a five year old girl named Amy Hayes was caught in the crossfire and seriously wounded she is expected to survive, but that girls half sister Taylor. Hayes was shot and killed while sitting in a car this summer Taylor. Hayes was seven years old today. Baltimore's in from police Commissioner, Gary tuggle address the shootings. It just goes to show you that some individuals don't care who gets hurt. And it's it's it's gotta stop at the end of the day when when people pull guns with reckless abandon to harm, the people Natal care who gets hurt that's an issue. That's that's an issue because it's just first of all senseless. But then Secondly, it really shows that there's some individuals that that just don't care don't care who they heard in. They have to be removed from the street that was Baltimore. Interim police Commissioner Gary tuggle speaking to reporters this afternoon. Last night was the twenty fifth anniversary of Canada's richest literary award the Scotiabank Giller prize and for the second time in a quarter century. The winner was Victoria based SE Dugan who took home the prize with a hundred thousand dollars for her novel, Washington black MS Dujin, I won the Giller in twenty eleven for half blood blues. Her new novel follows an eleven year old boy by the name of Washington whose relationship with his master's brother takes him from Barbados plantation on a surprising journey around the world. Recently, SE Dugan spoke with Michael and write about our latest book on CBC radios, the Sunday edition, it seemed that the book eventually was about this attempt to break free from the psychological tethers of slavery. I think people who've been through events still I mean, you're still grappling with that. As you continue on into your future life, and that wasn't maybe something I had read a lot about fiction. I mean, he's somebody who is essentially destined for extinction. I mean, you're born you toil you die and probably in a very unnatural and painful way, let me stand you there. Because when you're researching the whole idea, slavery, and you include in the novel, some of the worst torture. These people pouring Honey of let the seat. How do you go through that kind of research without your skin crawling? I mean, you don't get through it. More than your skin crawling. Every single Teleki depicted in the novel is from the historical record. I didn't. It's rained anything. It's a real. So that description of somebody being covered in Honey and being staked to an end hill in the end sting him to death that that was somebody's actual death. I mean, not research this very difficult to do. But some you know, I felt I had to pick that espeically I could because people did live through that. And it's important to show that and for the reader to understand that these were real lives that were lost. And this was real pain that was caused that was author SE ado, Jen, speaking to Michael right on CBS's the Sunday edition last night is a Dudin won the twenty fifth Giller prize for her novel, Washington black, which is also a finalist for the twenty eighteen man Booker, prize and view would like to hear more of Michael's conversation with MS Dudin tune into the Sunday edition the Sunday. Sean marshalls patients served their country. And now they appear to be paying the price. But the are not soldiers, Dr marshalls patients are Canadian diplomats and the families of diplomats who were stationed in Cuba. And then they came down with what is being called Havana syndrome that is the term being used for the unexplained nose bleeds, nausea, headaches and mental impairment, which also struck US foreign service workers in Vana beginning in the spring of twenty seventeen Sean Marshall is the medical director of the brain injury program at the Ottawa hospital. We reached him in Ottawa Dr Marshall, you are a brain injury specialist and you're looking at the brains of people who didn't suffer a brain injury. So what do you make of that? I think is very interesting the patience that I've seen appear to have had a brain injury. Look like they've had a brain. But you're right. We can't identify. This fully what the causes of rangy was there's no obvious signs of trauma. Nothing that would indicate that Dade somehow collectively got concussion. No, definitely no, no obvious sign of concussion. Normally, you know, when someone has a brain injury, it's pretty apparent someone's had trauma, and it's pretty evident. And what is evident tells what what their brains look like, well, there's a range. So for instance, in in this population that we're talking about today, they look more like a post concussion patients, and I can cut in is someone has an ultra action in their in their functioning and abilities after having a direct traumas that brings a for instance, a fall or straight ahead or contact in in sporting event. We also have Martin severe brain injuries when they have those people in car accidents or more serious trauma. They might have bleeding or hemorrhage into the brain what kind of symptoms are they showing telling you about they're experiencing symptoms, very reminiscent of patients concussion and symptoms linger and. These so physical symptoms can include things such as headache problems of light, sensitivity, noise, sensitivity and balance problems. They also have difficulties with thinking abilities. So they note that there slower in their thinking they have difficulties with concentration, and they have difficulties with dividing their attention. So for instance, they're easily distracted by you know, say multiple conversations going on at once. Similarly, they can have further problems with fatigue. It's a very striking symptom year to -bility kind of emotional control their their mood is up and down. You know, it's very typical for them. One thing they have in common is besides all these symptoms is that they were all associated with the Canadian embassy in Havana, Cuba, and they all began to have these symptoms at about the same time. Is that right? Well that you'd have to talk directly to the patients vote. So I've seen them after the fact that there is a common link in that all informed me that they are from have had time in Havana around the same time. So again around that time as whether the time of onset of sentence. I. I can't confirm that I do know it's around the same time. But also, this is something any Volve they didn't necessarily have specific trauma. So they're kind of their symptoms as he's gotten revolving, and they weren't necessarily sure why they were evolving an excellent feature by Doug Sanders. The global mail heat interviewed several of these diplomats. They're all deeply alarmed by all having these symptoms and not having any knowledge or in I guess formal investigation as to how they all could event it up having the symptoms while working in the embassy. What do you make of them? I think that as a as a patient with these symptoms even patients who have had a concussion and have these lingering symptoms is hard to fathom how you'd have these symptoms, and what I make of it is it must be very stressful. The Canadian government is not saying about this being rather hush-hush. We do know though, that the that US diplomats and their families who are in Havana at the US embassy they began having these similar. Symptoms all appearing to be related to appear to be brain injuries. And but the United States has been far more open about it than they're they're getting keirin and investigation. What have you have you been able to learn anything from the doctors who are looking at the US diplomats who are suffering the same symptoms? I have been able to I've been lucky enough facilitated, you know, fic- ain't government to be able to the as with physicians in the United States treating patients with similar profile. Again. I don't know details of their patients due to confidentiality started thing. But it certainly seems to be a similar pattern of what the the American experience has been to the Canadian experience from what the information I've learned from those physicians who have had contact. So in in Washington, though, there's they're speculating that the brain injuries were caused by mysterious energy weapon attacked by some foreign power. Does that seem plausible? That's probably the on. What I can see you know for for conjecture on needy. All it does seem possible in that we know that trauma to the brain can be an injury to the brain can be caused by for instance, radiation. Bring we know that can be caused by blast waves from from bonds like there's different ways to brain can have trauma or injury. So that would not necessarily be an unreasonable hypothesis, but I can't come in for then don't have any specific knowledge about that. But these people, you know, that you can't say that these are people who might make things up or be a bit hysterical. But anything these are not buttercup czar. They these are people who have been through some of these people have been through all kinds of things as diplomats and military coups states of emergencies hurricanes cyclones. They they they know how to cope in in difficult times. So it's unusual for them to oh, find themselves in situation and being so worried about what's happening to them. Based on the information. I get from taking their histories and the ability to see them and complete physical exam nations. It appears to me that there is some pathology here that there are there are problems and clearly that will be caused them distress. And and because of not knowing what to do I've certainly seen that with the intervention of doing that there've been some level of improvement yet. There are some still persisting Simpson's, which what we see with concussion patients. But you're right. I think that was something seems amiss here that this is something that would be something's occurred in my opinion, having seen these patients in their presentations, very curious stop Marshall. Thank you for talking to us. You're welcome have good day. Dr Sean Marshall is the medical director of the brain injury program at the Ottawa hospital. We reached me known awhile. I was right. I knew it. I didn't want to be right. I wanted to be wrong. But I was right. I knew I should not have scarf that giant glob of leftover was hobby from Carol's lines. But you know, waste not want. Not. And at the time. I said to myself, Jeff, this is gonna hurt and. Wow. Wow. Was I right. That was a pain that I have not known before. But you know, it turns out that just believing. It was going to hurt may. In fact, have increased my blinding white blaze of knows fire and that is confirmed by new study out of the university of Colorado at boulder researchers. There recently conducted an experimental people's expectations of pain and to what degree your expectations influence the degree of pain. You feel now it turns out as tore waiter senior author of the study put it, quote, the more pain, you expect the stronger your brain response to the pain. The stronger your brain response to the pain. The more you expect the team plays subjects in an MRI, then measured the blood flow to their brain. While showing them symbols representing degrees of pain from low to high, for instance, the words low or high, and then each subject was asked how much pain he or she and -ticipant it then they exposed the subjects to varying degrees of heat the worst being about as intensive holding a hot Cup of coffee what the participants did not know is that the amount of heat administered did not correlate with the q given just before regardless. The subjects report more pain when a higher pain Q was shown and their brain scans. Likewise, showed more activity in regions associated with threatened fear. No. Of course, I could have spared them all that grief. I just have a nose for science. You've been listening to the as it happens podcast. Our show can be heard Monday to Friday on CBC radio one and Sirius XM you can listen to the whole show on the web. This Goto CBC dot CA slash AH and follow the links to our online archive. Thanks for listening. I'm Carol off. And I'm Jeff Douglas. For more CBC podcasts. Goto CBC dot CA slash podcasts.

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Turkey's Constitutional Court Overturns Wikipedia Ban - DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

Turkey's Constitutional Court Overturns Wikipedia Ban - DTH

"In these the daily Tech Headlines for Thursday December twenty six thousand nine hundred. I'm rich drop Elena. In ten six ruling Turkey's constitutional court ruled that a ban on wikipedia in the country violated freedom of expression. The country initially blocked wikipedia in April twenty seventeen nineteen after the site refused to remove content that allegedly portrayed the country as supporting terrorist groups. Turkish law provides blocking websites deemed to pose a national security risk. It is not clear what access to the site will be restored Bloomberg reports that earlier this year prior to a settlement with the US FTC. On violations of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act Youtube considering using professional moderators to screen every video aimed at children under eight that appeared in the YouTube kids APP according to sources the accompany drafted a press release and was prepared to announce the change but reportedly ditch the plan at the last minute because handpicking acceptable videos made YouTube. Look more like a media company and less like a neutral platform apple announced the arena. Three and Renault three pro smartphones. Three pro offers a QUALCOMM snapdragon. Seven sixty five five G. system on a chip with a six point five inch Oland display featuring a ninety hertz refresh rate hd are ten plus support and one hundred percent coverage of the D. C.. I p. three color space ace it features a quad camera ran the back with a forty eight megapixel main sensor eight megapixel ultra wide lens thirteen Megapixel telephoto with two X. Optical Zoom as well as a two megapixel Pixel monochrome sensor the Reno three offers a smaller six point four inch of full hd Ola display with a media tech immensity thousand L. S. O.. C. Inside it awesome includes four cameras in the back but operates sixty four megapixel primary sensor eight megapixel Ultra Wide Lens a monochrome sensor and a time of flight depth sensing camera both phones featuring thirty two megapixel Hole Punch Selfie camera four thousand twenty five million power battery with thirty Watt. VOC four point -O fast charging an in display fingerprint sensor Sir all running Andrey ten based colorist seven the Reno three will be available December thirty first in China starting at three thousand three hundred ninety nine yuan while the Renault pro three three comes on January tenth starting at three thousand nine hundred ninety nine Yuan Russia's Ministry of communication announce it successfully completed test of its countrywide lied sovereign Internet. The test focused on determining vulnerabilities to IOT devices and the networks resilience to negative influences with deputy head of the Ministry Alexi Sokolov saying both the authorities and telecom operators are ready to effectively respond to emerging risks and threats to ensure the stable functioning of both the Internet and unified telecommunications communications network in the Russian Federation and finally Bloomberg reports that Samsung plans to invest one hundred. Sixteen billion dollars over the next decade in its semiconductor conduct business focusing on further process miniaturization using extreme ultraviolet lithography. This will see Samsung invest about ten billion dollars a year equipment research and and development as well as collaborating with clients to design and manufacture custom chips. Samsung also hopes to differentiate itself by packing chips with its memory and logic chips into a single package. Samsung currently holds about eighteen percent of the chip foundry market with industry giant. TSMC holding over fifty percent more discussions of the Tech News of the day. Subscribe to daily Tech New show. We took new show DOT COM and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines. Wherever you get your podcast thanks for listening? We'll talk to you next. It's time for all of us here at headline remember have a super sparkly day.

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The Future of Higher Education Post-COVID with Lee Edwards

Venture Stories

48:56 min | 6 months ago

The Future of Higher Education Post-COVID with Lee Edwards

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is Metro Stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody we're now accepting applications for network catalyst accelerator program founders in. Our Program have gone on to raise money from LUX sparked a sixteen Z. Slow First Round Susa homebrew Maveron obvious and affects signifier and many more learn more at apply at village global dot V. C. Slash network catalyst. Everybody welcome to another episode adventure stories by global here today joined by a very special guest returning guest longtime friend. Lee Edwards of root of leap. Welcome back to the PODCAST. Thanks so much pleasure. So the first time we talked we talked with Nicole Quin last time. We talked a hard tech with a TRAE SALLOW. And today we are here to talk about higher education So before we get into what's happening In higher education the AGE OF COVA. Did I. I WANNA ask of. What got you so excited about this topic when you trace your intellectual journey a little bit. Yeah I mean honestly when I was in Highschool Olin College was In its first year they were just starting to college and the whole value. Prop like the the thing that sent out to. All the students for marketing material was like help us build this college. We're trying to do things differently and let that message really resonated with me. I think it's like a kid with. I like a kind of a mixed mixed background in high school. I tended to like not really like the kind of lecture format of things in the memorization and tests and stuff like that and kind of did a lot better in classes where I was getting my hands dirty and kind of like actually being a little more self guided so that's I ended up not getting in the first year and then getting into Olen when I replied and it's a college that is constantly kind of like investigate or kind of like Crossing itself in trying to figure out how did things differently. How to improve things and actually like co developing courses Especially in his early years. Stay you can't help but go to Olen and then come out. Having spent a lot of time thinking about education. What's what works. And what doesn't earliest your opinions of those things. So it's just kind of been like a an interest of mine since then and before you went down this rabbit hole. Sir Post covert. What's happening pre Kobe? What were your opinions of of what needs to change or what was messed up. What was yeah so like every sentence I say in this we should. We should like pretend. There's a caveat that says like this is not the opinion of Olin College of Engineering and I don't even know they'll be upset. I'm doing this without talking to them. Mostly but I do think particularly with engineering and this is kind of even more true. Like ten fifteen twenty years ago just a lot of focus on math and science fundamentals which are really useful for a certain kinds of applications of engineering. I mean I think if you're going into like aerospace there's just a ton of math and physics in your typically GonNa end up with before you start building engine turbans for airplanes but for lot of other folks like people that are writing software even just like people building consumer hardware stuff or electronics. Like honestly a lot of people are self taught. I know some and we all know very impressive. Software engineer is that you know went to school for Music or philosophy Or didn't go to college and actually have even met people like intellectual jeering. That never studied that stuff formerly who are really amazing and so their tails like. There's a disconnect there right like is college really serving people by delaying long until they get their hands on things like so many mechanical engineering undergrad degrees. You don't get to go into the shop like until near the end sometimes because of size sometimes of level of risk tolerance and mostly I think just because the curriculum doesn't mandate take a bunch of thermo take statics dynamics and then learn how to cut some at all like sure. That's an elective really. Are you going to be a mechanical engineer? Without knowing how to actually fabricate that's one and then I guess there's a whole other set of hot takes that are sort of more political around like while on one side of the spectrum. I I I definitely believe in kind of the access and equity in education like we're seeing Lots and lots of loans and scholarships need based scholarships out there that are available but still. Don't think it's enough. It's still clear that we have a stratified class structure in this country and part of that is about opportunity access to education really at all levels and then I think the other side of the spectrum. I can buy their argument around. Group think of higher education often the sort of like every tower walled garden of it and some of the criticisms about tenure which Owen doesn't have tenure and that was kind of one of the original precepts. So that's what the trade offs of of not having tenure tyler. Cowen has long said that they should. We should get rid of Sanyo. Lazy or not innovating or you. Yeah it's interesting. I mean I think the original impetus behind tenure is a good one which is sort of you think about the original higher education institutions. They were supposed to be the sort of like ivory tower in good way kind of like bastions of knowledge and trying to make them resistant to the swings in politics. I think ironically the idea of professors not being able to be cancelled in kind of the twenty twenty definition of the word cancelled. Now we're seeing that kind of reverse but originally the idea being like. Yeah so you want to study the nineteen fifties in America and you want to study and teach Socialist Economic. Theory your tenure. You can't really get fired. You get yelled at constantly but you can't get fired and I think that's a good thing but on the other hand like the idea behind. Olen is it's a very teaching centric college and I do think that if you stop carrying about teaching if it's just sort of reviewed and sort of you know if there's sort of this objective conclusion that you're not performing as an instructor as a teacher. There should be ways to sort of do performance reviews and bringing someone else who is sort of better more passionate more effective in that environment. So I think you know it depends on depends on the institution. I guess in kind of what their goals are th. There's didn't to what's happening now. It's guessing because you're on the board of Sushi here more but increments less than I am. What when I say Bergdahl I think. Sort of covert is the perfect opportunity for that because people are because people can't be physically on campus. They're paying a lot of money for an online education that they can elsewhere. Get for free a much cheaper and so they're realizing it really is about the credential or about the network which they can also get in other ways because they're not on campus and This is hitting Colleges budgets left and right and so what does that mean. Leave this for much more nuanced perspective with what's happening. Yeah so I mean I think in the very immediate term clearly what's happening it's campuses being shut down Folks that I've been talking to at Olin and elsewhere are sort of expecting or at least preparing for a semester or two Being shut down it seems like a lot of folks are preparing for that. I think part of that is just colleges. They're sort of by their nature a little more conservative and risk averse. They kind of have to be right there. Taking like you're taking your eighteen year old kids and being responsible for their lives and You know it would be a huge problem like just in terms of like human life and also financial liability and brand hit if they're an outbreak at a college so I expect them to be a little more conservative than most places. So yeah WH- evidently what they're doing is going online and what's kind of interesting is there are a lot of schools that have been doing online education for a long time and sometimes their online education is a lot of them. I think is actually quite good. I've taken some Stanford online courses that were actually really awesome and clearly very custom built for the curriculum. They were teaching others are sort of being forced online and having to figure it out and then other is sort of their online education is kind of a money maker and a second class to sink within school so. I think that a lot of colleges are also aware of the fact that not everyone is sort of Down for paying higher education level prices for a Webinar. And what's really interesting is. Would that release of online content and actually y combinator has been doing the same thing where they basically say our experiences so valuable the network that you build in person and just the experience of being immersed being around other people is so valuable that will give the content away for free. 'cause it's not about coach and now now they're saying actually you should pay. Us THIRTY GRAND A YEAR FOR THE CONTENT. And so it's kind of an interesting congruency in my mind and Owen is an interesting place where we've sort of always said that the content is novel and the courses were teaching are not taught anywhere else and most of them are hard to do online. And there's certain things that you know you can't you? Can you can teach calculus online over a Webinar. You can probably exit that class and know how to do Calculus. It may be less fun for you but then there are certain things that you can't do online like machine shop or maybe you could send people drill press and and hope they don't get hurt at home but So I think that everyone that I've talked to in higher education again at Owen. Elsewhere is definitely aware of that risk and they also worry about deferments As a result. If you're graduating high school right now are you thinking about you. Know I defer year take a gap year And then come back when classes are on campus again. I think you know I don't know what the sort of prevailing outcome is there for me personally. That would have been an attractive option to me. But you're going to see some amount of this of acceptance deferrals and so it's going to be kind of weird about that. I talked about twitter. Earlier is like when you're trying to fill a class and colleges accepting a certain number of students they want. They want a freshman class with. Call it a thousand students because know their number of faculty staff the size of the dorms Like all the facilities dining hall like they have kind of carrying capacity and so they basically know their acceptance rate and they sort of multiply that number of offers we give out time acceptance rate maybe minus some buffer so they can use the wait list. That number is going to be out of whack this year. Nobody knows what it's going to be and then you're GONNA end up with a ton of people on a weightless probably in the next year. What is that number end up being? So there's a lot of like little. I'm only catching a glimpse of right. But I think there's a ton of Minutia of college administration that is just being turned on. Its head right now for something so many of these schools just kind of operate the same way. There's a lot of just like well established. Well understood you can get a degree in college administration kind of processes that are now kind of having to be rethought. What's going to happen on? Is it just going to be a pause and come back usual or locking to go out of business? And what happens with the dominance year? Walk us through how that works. Yeah so one thing that's interesting about endowments like there's been a lot of discussion about this recently obviously with the The P P P in Harvard. Getting a nine million dollar loan from the government and folks pointing out that their endowment is somewhere around fifty billion fifty nine billion. Maybe so there's a lot of ways to think about this. I think that a school like Harvard. They've and certainly say Yale. A lot of the huge schools have many billions of dollars in endowment. And there's a lot of me wants to bat so one is That's not the money they have to spend the purpose of an endowment is this college should last forever so there it's invested. There's good investment managers. The person who manages the endowment is one of the best endowment managers of any kind nonprofit college anywhere. His returns are through the roof and They draw far far less than that. So the College of that size might draw one. Two to three percent at the most endowment and maybe seventy five percent of the budget is covered by that a much smaller. School may flip that around and maybe only twenty. Five percent of the budget is is covered by the endowment. But then there's another interesting nuance which is the dominant actually multiple endowments and if you graduate from college. Gift money to your school. A Lotta Times folks will put a note on it. That's like this is for the library. This is for the museum or a large might come in and say I'm dropping ten million dollars. It's to build a new dorm with my name on it and Those indictments art your mart and have to stay that way. So there's going to be a weird thing happen anywhere when you see that. Harvard is freezing. Pay Or pay increases rather for their staff. A lot of folks are GonNa look at that and go like well. The Chapel still open up you know on. The sports team is still operating. Or you know why the schools were offering I'm especially worried about some of the schools surviving and shirt. Maybe the people who didn't want those things to exist are gonNA get. I think there's huge turmoil in everyone's kind of bracing for that impact right now to talk more about how you see your not just post co bid. You know a year from now but five years now The college landscape really Shaping really evolving. And if you you mentioned you you don't or can't invest in right now but let's say you were doing. He's dedicated fund so lead to focus on the future higher education. What would be your requests for start ups or or with interesting. Where would you be looking? Yeah totally yeah and again. I should reiterate the hot take the reader at the the the disclaimer. That this is my hot take and not representative all and so. I think that Oland has done a really good job of. How do you make an engineering education? Much more real world and Outgoing president of Olin. Rick Miller just kind of planted a bug in my ear that I can't stop which is sort of. What is that on the liberal arts side and first of all? Yeah okay. That's not that interesting. But then as he started to describe it. There's so many folks that are really interested in like policy and politics philosophy. And what can we learn from literature and what we learn about human nature through theater and like all these things and there isn't a ton of like let's apply that directly to the real world and maybe that's okay. I mean I do think that higher education for a long time has been. Let's learn for the joy of learning. Let's learn to enrich ourselves and I do believe in that but I also believe in. Hey we've got you know. The people would s degrees trying to solve problems in the world and again my hot takes lots of people be mad at me for this people would be the degree degrees telling us. We're doing it wrong. And so I love to see kind of in the vein of Mark and recent essay. And maybe I want to approach it with a little less snark in. I guess judgment is one of these folks in a room right. So can we solve different problems? Like let's say with Kobe right in front of us right. How do we figure out how when we get out of social when we get out of lockdown into back into the world and businesses are slowly rolling open folks that have jobs like ours are going to get to work from home and as long as we want and we might stay safe for a very long time and then there's all these other folks that are GonNa go out in the city and work with their hands drive cars and drive trains like do this critical work nurses doctors and firefighters police officers and they're putting themselves in harm's way? Are WE GONNA end up in a situation. Where the second wave of Of Corona virus is going to have this massive economic disparity and social class disparity. It seems pretty obvious that it will so can folks like that getting room and kind of think about problems in the and I'm not saying that they don't and certainly this exists in lots of places but I think it would be fair to say that most colleges are not oriented around doing that with undergraduate students in these disciplines and certainly not tying them together with engineers and on the other side certainly engineers can benefit spending a lot more time with folks like that and again the traditional education model is departments and be as be as being different from bezos and graduate programs being different from undergraduate. So there's this intentional silo so I mean think that. That's a huge opportunity. That can have a ton of value for the world. And certainly aligning what? I think that there's so many different. There's so many problems with the way liberal like the folks who are the most in debt from college and not able to reach earning potential on the stem side often. It's much easier to find a high paying job on liberal arts style degrees. That can be a lot harder. And it's only getting worse and worse it's getting more expensive and the ability to find employment. It's harder so we could benefit a lot more alignment between. What does the world need? What is industry need? What does the economy need? And what are we teaching? And how do people get Jobs THAT WAY. And so certainly on the stem side Online education bootcamp stuff like that has has done a lot to move more people into stem and I think one of the cool things about the bootcamp model is it really is aligning. The demand industry would the supply of people. That will do it. There is not as much activity on sort of. What's the boot camp for an economics major? What's a boot camp for a philosophy major It's different from like. Let's just watch webinars online totally. Who who's Lincoln the interesting there today? You Think Lamm does fundamentally disruptive or or or who who else can today. Landis is very yeah very very cool model. I'm also really interested in Minerva schools which is a little bit closer to a traditional model. Then Lambda School is. I'm all your listeners. Know about lambda schools. I almost kind of glossed over it but lamm does they would not describe themselves bootcamp camp. I imagine because it is a little more mercer longer term program but they're very very focused on student outcomes and they're very very focused on social mobility than the big thing that everyone talks about with them is the income sharing model which basically makes it. So you don't have to have money up front to join the program you will graduate and then pay back and lots of press about that. That in my opinion has been very unfair About you know ways that That could land you in trouble. If you're pledging your future come to your college but I don't know in my mind is a asset allocators myself. This is a little bit of an argument about the kind of asset a debt versus say. The students themselves are very happy with the outcomes. Minerva schools actually. This is another one where they're going to be disrupted because a big part of Minerva is. They're taking students smaller classes and They put them in cohorts and they often will go around the world to different locations and they studied together and build community and they're working on all kinds of different things and it really does span everything from machine learning to linguistics Or you know pure math or philosophy so I think that there. I think that they actually have a very interesting approach. They're very new Not One hundred percent. Sure how long how old I WANNA say less than ten years. So that's an funny thing about this right. We talked about the long feedback cycles in venture capital talk about a feedback cycle when you take an eighteen year old Through a four year program. They're twenty two and then you want to track. Their lifelong outcome might have to wait about eighty years before he sorta or. Maybe let's say forty fifty years till they retire. So yeah it's always I think that's one. Let's say designer engineering challenge of trying to build a new educational institutions like. What's your feedback cycle in terms of being tied outcomes totally and I'm curious to get your perspective on what we're doing at. Ondeck it so on deck sort of you for the audience is a sort of Stanford Mba for founders or trying to be like that you know this year we're GonNa have thousands of people who've paid us you around US dollars So we'll be for a million dollars a year and People are having a great experience. So far it's mostly people who either have about their company or just starting to leave their company and overtime. We'll move sort of an essay model and I wonder how far we can take this idea. Stanford Mba for founders. Maybe maybe also for under undergraduates who say hey. I don't WanNa go to duke or whatever you know. Pay QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS TO BE Eventually I'd rather pay a hundred connects less that and use the rest of the money to invest in a business in my business. Like what would you be doing? If if you're on Dak or what questions would you? Would you be yeah well? I think it's I think I I didn't even mention that in the previous answer but I think disrupting the NBA. There's like some clear opportunity. There almost even just redefining the NBA as what it originally was and has gotten away from would be interesting which originally the NBA was explicitly. Let's turn engineers into people that can run businesses? It has gotten away from that and there. There are a lot of programs that you know that that is still there Their goal but a lot of MBA programs are fantastic at turning people into executives. Right like you look at a professional. Ceo that comes in and runs a multibillion dollar brand company or something they always have an mba or almost always But you look at founders an MBA programs have not done a great job of even say startup founders and certainly startup founders. That eventually do grow and being become the founding. Ceo POST IPO OF THESE BILLION DOLLAR COMPANIES? So yeah I mean clearly. There is an opportunity for teaching people how to start a business. that's not tens of thousands of dollars and almost explicitly about building network and signaling It's more tactical and more. Let's say I mean it can. It could still be about building relationships but a little more relevant to to what you're doing. I suppose I think one thing that you guys are certainly providing that is super valuable for anyone trying to get into startups in any capacity as a founder employer. Whatever is just sort of getting that network right. I think that folks have known you for a little while Eric. I of that. Like part of part of what you're trying to do with your life in general is to sort of lower those barriers and try to make people more accessible to each other. I think it's like one of the more rewarding things about venture capital is that you're kind of incentivized and you're given the space and time and ability to just sort of connect people go. You're you're working on this You're you're working on this. You guys should talk. Are you sorry to pull you to talk We get made fun of for that sometimes. Like oh you're silly connector but there is value in trying to reduce the exclusive exclusivity of networks and trying to democratize them So you know I think to the extent that you can build this community online in this way and how that's going to get easier and easier. I think both in terms of US getting used to having online communities and in terms of tools for building. Online communities improving. There's just so much more like in my mind. Social good to providing access to starting companies to people all over the country all over the world. decentralizing silicon valley since week. It's not a place. It's the mindset if colleges a bundle some combination of education network and credentials Online education has a somewhat on bundled the education part of it combined with sort of accountability network You think like why he hopefully object are starting to to get that although you know Stanford or Harvard is still great places to go over there and I think the last remaining part is the that we haven't really got started on as much as the credential and I think that Har- or to get at how do you think about the future of credential. Of course there's sort of you know. Vertical face you know Empl BOOT bootcamp style do camps you know growth camps etcetera specific skill based credentialing But there there isn't sort of like as broad and also legible credentialing paid. This is a really impressive. Well rounded person who went through a bunch of hoops and sixty eight. And you know Bain and McKinsey can trust that or whoever google at scale Maybe maybe it's a false premise. That we don't need to recreate that broad. Credential is just all sorts of micro vertical credentials. How do you think about the future? Yeah I mean. I think they're to talk. I guess all around the issue from different sides like I do think there is some utility credentialing in some sense right Just kind of the idea of like okay. You took these classes. You probably know these things. Let's interview further and find out more There's certain areas where like I suppose. A hospital wouldn't really be super interested in interviewing someone for a medical doctor role if they haven't gotten a degree Regardless of how regulations around licenses and stuff worked I think that would still be the case on the other hand like I think we've started to become exposed a little bit higher education credentials or sometimes just signifier of sort of where you come from not necessarily what you've sort of been through what you've learned And certainly I think that's one reason it's kind of amazing to see how big that story got around the fraud around. Sat scores just like one of the biggest stories of the last few years. And really that's all it was about was sort of cheating on credentials but it did. I think really kind of pulled a veil back and start making people think from an employer perspective side like I think certainly having been like CTO startups in hiring managers at startups and even like smaller public companies It's it's always the lazy way out to try to look at credential and I think when you kind of do on conscious bias training as part of hiring process one element you often talk about. Is like being aware of how you might bias yourself when you see that. Harvard logo on the resume. You might find yourself giving them the benefit of the doubt in a way that you wouldn't otherwise But honestly it's kind of just a lazy way to hire people like some of the best people I've hired Didn't go score. Went to a school that I hadn't heard of Or maybe didn't have a great reputation and forcing people to look a little more closely at the individual and to have just a good hiring process have good interview questions that actually serves you finding the people that are good fit for your company it may have less to do with. How quickly can you implement merge sort and sequels plus and more about? Are you going to be someone who's going to be successful at this company long term? Those two things might have minimal. Overlap so yeah I I do expect to some extent. There's going to be a lot more skepticism of traditional provincialism from higher education. And it's probably a good thing long as it doesn't go too far to the point that we're having people build airplanes that you learned everything they know about aerospace from playing curveball. Space Program But don't expect that will happen and Let's talk more about the endowment for a second. What hop what does it mean for LP capital because only? God what does it mean there? Yeah yeah in terms of investing in venture so Yeah a few things so I think. College endowments are usually invested pretty conservatively. Because it is going to be much more about wealth preservation then growth like you. You can plan if you take a look at your endowment if you could just shoes for it to stay static and say just grow just track the market. That's the investment strategy. Many many schools probably most are doing So it's a good thing because a lot of schools there been hedged really well and have lost you know less value than the S&P five hundred. Certainly they've lost some value sending you see a few effects warn is you'll see a lot of stuff now about how. Hey during a downturn is a great time to invest in venture capital and so. I think you'll see a lot of more sophisticated. Lp's choosing not as an investment strategy. But I don't think colleges are going to sort of say now's the time to add more risk in fact what might happen is if you imagine. The portfolio itself has lost ten percent of its value. And that's you know things marked Like things that are held in the public markets if you think about how much. What percentage of the endowment their venture capital Portfolio Represents? If it had moved from three percent it was at three percent. And it's designed to be three percent. Maybe it's moved to four or five percent just because Venture capital portfolio marks are slower to change. And so what you might see. A lot of dominance saying like. Wow we're over indexed on venture now so we don't necessarily want to get into a new fund or maybe in the worst case they're going to say. Hey we actually aren't going to be in on five of this fund that we've been for four funds but I think what you won't see is college endowments refusing the capital call. So I'm concerned about that. For CERTAIN VENTURE FUNDS LIKE smaller seed. Stage funds may be our first time funds that are driven by. You know you see you. See the rise of microphones. Lately a lot of the last couple years. I guess I would predict a little bit of a downturn in those. It seems that if you've raised the microphone and most of European say like your friends in fifty grand at a time or something they might say. Hey Times are tough My partner lost their job I might want out of the fund. you're not going to see any colleges doing that because their long term and you know every college wants to live forever so they don't want to damage the reputation in venture So I don't think you'll see it go that far. You know a lot of complaints about the higher education system it's been around That and the inability to pay that off. But it's been hard to compete because it's Or or Italy. You can't even forgive those those loans but it'd been to compete because you can't compete with The government in some sense And that's why some Sa- I think also I talk a little bit about financing how that works for for student loan as most work and whether we should be excited about is as there are other alternatives. Yeah Well I think clearly the like you can look at all these graphs. They all say the same thing that the cost of college is going up and it used to be the case that getting a job. Getting a great job was much easier by having a college degree to some extent. Didn't matter what it was in just sort of having that stamp of approval Weirdly I think we have it is. It's definitely been trend. Over hundreds of years of higher education that higher education is getting more and more accessible and again it is not perfect or anywhere near perfect but it's a world of difference away from say when Harvard was founded. It was a place for the elite of the elite To study you know religious Related Education and what you've seen as as like more people being in. It has simply made the supply of people with bachelor's degrees go up and up. It's no longer a guarantee for a job. I mean that's kind of like no secret so then it becomes difficult to pay off the loans that you've made and it's the one lone UK eclair bankruptcy and get out of so student. Debt is is pretty insane. Although I think was looking this up recently I think about a million. Americans have defaulted on their student debt. That's obviously especially tough now. So yeah I don't know I mean. I do think that there is going to be a little bit more skepticism around like should I take out a big loan and go get a degree in something. That isn't GonNa pay me money like certainly if you're wealthy that's like the idea of going to college to learn and have a great experience and meet people maybe meet. Your Life. Lifelong friends in partners. Like that's great. You need to be in the financial position to do that. Because you're not gonna be able to just sort of repay it in a way that you may be could've fifty years ago So yeah I don't know to some extent that's a bubble. I'm also really partial to this argument about the car. The cost disease Which again I guess is not universally accepted and I'm also not any PhD's who cares what my opinion is but the argument essentially is that there's no solution to this problem because the cost is disease argument essentially says there are lots and lots of things in our world that technology scale have made cheaper on sort of a per unit basis There's a lot of negative things. People say about global agriculture industrialized farming One thing that it's good at is lowering prices because of the massive scale and the technology that's gone in and maybe at some cost to state local farming or food quality. Some people might argue but in any case As lots and lots of things get cheaper and cheaper for people globalization making Making hardware cheaper. Right you're flat screen. Television cost you one hundred bucks. The Wallet share that services that cannot scale goes up so getting massage getting a manicure Going to college seeing a doctor anything that scales linear early. When people is essentially increasing in value increasing in cost As a percentage of your wallet share so yes so I don't know I'm pretty doom and gloom about the state of the state of this Something's gotta change and I think like so many things with Cova. It may not be that code is the reason. End that this changes but it may just sort of accelerated. I think if someone is paying thirty thousand dollars to get a bunch of webinars about and a reading list Shakespeare. They're going to wonder like connived. Gone to the library and reading group with my friends. I I don't know I mean certainly there you know. My grandmother was a shakespeare scholar so I shouldn't Stewart. There's a lot of value especially in something like that to talking to people that are real experts but Is it worth thirty thousand dollars? I don't know maybe if you're rich already speaking you you had a line in your Tweet storm about The non technical disciplines world needs ethics history policy liberal arts but the way they're taught in Roman sizes are out of occupied nature. Demand Zero colleges are integrating those startups. What can be done here. Yeah he's trying to lead to that earlier. I mean I think that well. Here's here's a specific. I'm like completely stealing this from a single conversation. I had a so so I have to credit them. So Rick Miller. Who's the outgoing president of Olin College was? I don't know how many other people he's talked to about this but is been kind of thinking about what's he doing that he's retiring as president and one thing he's been thinking about is what if you let's take ethics. What if you studied ethics and you do all the typical ethics curricula right? You're learning all the different schools about the thought. Throughout the many centuries that it's been studied but you're also building a portfolio approach in a sense. Where maybe you find a real problem that you WanNa try to apply ethical thing to and you're probably going to have to work with people from other disciplines to actually make impact. I'm so at say like an access to water in sub Saharan Africa steam after work with civil engineers and all kinds of stuff. So you build this portfolio project application of what you're doing and do this like twelve times In the same way that someone who's like studying computer science may end up graduating with a bunch of projects. They can show her. Someone studying graphic design. I'm congratulate with a design portfolio. Isn't that going to be more attractive to the market? Would civil engineering firm be more likely to try to hire you because they can look and go? Oh Wow? We made a ton of impact in these different areas so it is kind of like applying an line set to liberal arts education and so a lot of people will just. I think the allergic to that idea but I'm also just really partial to the idea that there's so many different ways to learn and letting people choose what they want to learn. Some people can learn the classic thing. Right is auditory visual manual bevere. My mom is actually a special education teacher. That teaches Read on particularly older ones who've been illiterate for a long time and there's a very specific technique that works really well. It doesn't work for anyone else like it would be a waste of your time but different problems. Having different styles that are good at solving them and different people being attracted different styles of education. I think that this random idea that I've literally thought about three days. It'd be super interesting to see someone. Actually try that and see if that actually works better for certain kinds of people certain kinds of learners and this the market were more appreciative of it. Why did get expensive in you? Were talking specifically why. Why did they spend so much money on the celebrities and stuff like that Like all these that billy now. Kobe even before Kovic silly like that. Really Students Juanita with the customer there. Why is this well? I think that some of the other than certainly this is not the thing that explains the whole trend but sometimes when you see a ridiculous building on a campus. It's the thing I mentioned earlier where some allom is like. I really want my name to be on that college campus for the rest of time so I'm going to build a door and like this is a classic thing when you talk to college administrators. They're like Oh my God. This person wants to donate so much money. We can't say no but it is the most useless thing and we could not convince them to put the money into the general pool for unrestricted funds because of their essentially ego. That's not that's not going to be the number one cause but it certainly doesn't help things. Yeah I think that I think the cost is used definitely a huge part of it. I think just the willingness to pay the idea that if you're of a certain social class you kind of need to go to a certain kind of school will to meet other people that are also of your social class. That is not something that was invented recently in. You know that's too to a large extent. What certain colleges have always existed to do so? Yeah I mean those folks are GonNa Price Insensitive and I think it's I guess. I just keep coming back to various forms of the cause disease if there are more they're also just more and more people wanting to go to school as traditionally at had been something that opened a lot of doors for you and and it still does open auditory. But then it's just harder and harder to scale college Especially if you want if they wanNA keep what they perceive as their quality bar. The cynical take that I've heard is that colleges are really a tax shelter hedge fund and that schools health is really a you know sort of subsidy or demane business which is the the Dow business And Harvard when he was like Harvard actually better off. You know going to four hundred students that have a like triggering it way more giving you all the way up and just you know tripling down on the on the Dow Dowman. How do you respond to that Critique broadly stirred government should they have sheltering should government be Sort of financially supporting these students. Yeah I actually. I had to tweet a while back where I was like. I was like higher. Education is basically a it's an endowment. Actually named the school. I was like this particular. School is essentially an endowment. That happens to use its management or DC is a hedge fund happens to use its management to train its future. Lp's so I had a good friend. He was in academia reply. Like no stop. It's kind of unfair because again it's not like people are. It's the tend before profit although on the other hand you know certainly top paid college administrators and certainly the dumb advantages. Make millions of dollars But the endowment manager of again the best performing undocumented yell could make way more money on Wall Street especially given his track record But still they make millions of dollars So I I think maybe there's some truth to that snark should Government pay more for college like absolutely I mean I think we're so underinvested in education at all levels All over our society. It's shameful one of my good friends. Laurie VOSS WHO's the Who was the founder? Cto N. P. He's from Trinidad and he's sent. He tweeted a video the other day the President of Trinidad and Tobago or prime minister. Maybe the Talked about an through a little bit of shade at Donald. Trump talked about how the islands were ready And he has been listening exclusively to doctors and scientists And he said this is the culmination of US investing in people investing in our education. We have experts here. and Gave me chills even just repeating it. It's like why are we not doing this? I mean obviously. We do. Invest some in in education All over but I I would say not nearly enough certainly the point that I would think even more so with K. Through twelve wire teachers paid so little like especially now everyone who has kids. I'm not someone with kids but everyone who has kids that I know is like Oh my God. This is terrible extending. I love my kids but I can't spend as much time with them. I'm like yeah go. Thank your third grade teacher when you wouldn't school opens up. This is what my mom does for a living. God she makes you know Not as much as a software engineer which is kind of ridiculous so Yeah certainly I think it's I guess. I would go so far as to say disgrace. How little we prioritize education relative to how important it is and I. I think there's the the the more nuanced got to the question of how much should government be supporting incumbent earth encouraging upstarts And I believe in the case of education They were saying that they should Brian Cavell was saying that you get out the business of sort of Of of the sort of interest free loans or just the way that they do the loans. I wasn't sure exactly the argument. You're aware of it out there or more. Broadly like favoring incumbents I very upstart yeah. Yeah there's I mean there's certainly an interesting economic Arkin obviously about like you're providing interest free loans like. What are you sort of doing to the economy at large And sort of having the government underwrite these things. That's I guess I would say. I'm not quite a deep thinker on that issue Yes in terms of favoring upstarts large institutions. Yeah it's interesting. I guess in like a perfect world with a lot of capital blindness problem. You might want to do both. I think like one thing again there so few sort of startups in education. So I have to kind of keep coming back to old but one thing all in talks about a lot is Kind of a difference between college and the mission so in one hand we were always wanting to innovate and we're always trying new things. On the other hand kids are going to get an education so if you kind of like figure out this interesting way to teach thermodynamics and then you go cool. We've taught this light. We figure out this really cool thing in other professor that came up with that is onto their next experiment. Eric Wait. We built that dynamics class. For what reason like shouldn't we all be taking it now So you do need an investment in both so I think there is you know like the some of the public universities that I really respect. I'm from Florida. University of Florida has done a fantastic job with research with educating tens of thousands of people with all kinds of backgrounds again not quite good enough But getting there City College of New York where actually winds incoming president is coming from? Like one thing. That's really impressed. Me About the union. Suny systems is decreasing example. When you're talking earlier about acceptance rates in sizes of school like those those schools have very high acceptance rates and they think that's a good thing and I think it's a big thing. They're trying to provide opportunity to people. It's a very community focused politics. It's all about folks that live in Manhattan Brooklyn Queens And what are the other ones? Staten Island in the Bronx That they want to provide access to the community. So yeah I mean. I do think that there is A good case for both you know. I think some people might argue that the government's not super great at startup style ideas you know kind of disruptive innovation early certainly. They haven't been recently so at the moment. I mean I guess I would say that a lot of the innovation I think I think probably most people would agree a lot of the innovation at. You're seeing that's really deeply first principles. Thinking innovation in education is happening sector. That's you know certainly If you look at the people that started an online learning really early and have done a great job lots of private schools if you look at Lambda School in what you're doing it on deck And you know certainly Oland Minerva Think about like Clermont colleges have done a really great job of building. Kind of a consortium model you know new in the sense of college meaning less than a hundred years old Cooper Union All private about that The Yesterday has been the Edwards of route The upper people who WANNA learn more. Where might you point them? Value on on twitter and Anything you WANNA plug. Oh yes so I should say that. Yes a routing. Tears is stitched firm. We're focused on what we call a heart attack so there's four of us were all engineers and we're all still very much practicing at least as hobbyists So I focus in what I call hard software so I'm looking at am L. developer tools. Anything that's difficult to build in software crecy used to run our She ran big parts of hardware at square and adopted on the Apple. Watch and Ipod touch Nanos so she does. A lot of electrical engineering consumer products supply chain. Cain does a lot of industrial automation. old industry. He sort of walking. How STUFF WORKS DOT COM? So we're interested in all kinds of that stuff and never too early. We talked to folks like before they've quit their previous jobs and they're thinking about startups. I'm so Leeann. Dc and So yeah we're doing Precede PROCEED. Say like million dollar checks on average but certainly higher lower As we're trying to figure out this crazy new environment And last part there said. Oh Yes yes yes. So at at Terrance T. E. R. O. N. T. and my blog is lead on AF. Lee Thank you so much for granted. You're an early stage entrepreneur. We'd love to hear from you. Check US out at village. Global Dot V. C.

Harvard president founder US Olin College Owen Lambda School Lee Edwards twitter COVA Minerva schools Software engineer Lamm Eric Wait Oland Minerva Olen NBA Rick Miller Highschool Olin College
He bought the law

Future Perfect

33:32 min | 1 year ago

He bought the law

"They just look at the picture in here got I had the picture them to hold on Jean mayor is the chief Washington correspondent for the New Yorker. And she's flipping through her book for an old photograph. Here he is John M Olin. Kinda central casting plutocrats. We're looking at a guy who's wearing a blazer and a pocket square gets to go out on a hunt with his dogs his dogs were beautiful. I have to say he really did have gorgeous looking labradors. We can't fault him for that. No. John Olin was more than a stuffy guy with some good dogs. He was also one of the most influential conservative philanthropists of the twentieth century in, Jamie. Here's book, dark money, she does a deep dig into that influence. He is the founder of the Ol- impounded nation. And he is the inheritor of the Olen company, which is father started, though, Olin company made all kinds of things from mining explosives, to munitions to chemicals John Molin inherited the company from his dad, and he was a stickler for hard work, according to one biographer, he didn't really believe in days off, and that hard work mindset, translated into some pretty conservative values, China Molin was Perry anti-government, but the truth about the Oland business was that it exploded, thanks to the government, I and World War, One in the defense industry, and then even more so in World War, Two the income come. Became one of the biggest private companies in America during that period interests like Andrew Carnegie in our last episode John Oland port, the money, his family made with government help into some very questionable philanthropy. From the bucks, media podcast network. This is future perfect a show about trying to do. Good. I'm Dylan Matthews this season. We're looking at big philanthropists, and how their money shapes the world around them without anyone else having vote Olin foundation has profoundly changed American society. We'll tell you how it is changed our courts how it's changed our universities. And how it's changed the conversations we have about conservative ideas, but to understand why all in I decided to get political with his philanthropy. We need to go back to the nineteen seventies as our good friends in Jefferson airplane. Explain this was not a great time for stodgy capitalists, and hunting, suits. Olin was upset about this cultural shift and he was angry about mounting regulation of capitalists, like himself, I worked hard to try to understand his mindset and a lot of it has to be speculative. But what I noticed was that the direction of his philanthropy changed as his own company became a target of the new, more militant environmental movement. There was a lot to target, for example, in a tiny Appalachian town called salt. Fill the Olin company had a chemical making plant that was pouring, like hundred pounds of mercury a day into the drinking water right into the streams suddenly people begin to realize that mercury was causing her Indus birth defects, and there were these pictures in the New York Times of particular mercury speech. Well, in Japan that showed these babies just horribly deformed, people insult fill started asking questions, what is the mercury doing to us, and the environmental movement, was just beginning to take off and take note of this sort of thing, and it cracked down on the Olin foundation there, the renew regulations and before long the company was being targeted with hundreds of millions of dollars of cleanup costs. Oland was seen these regulations and expenses piling up on the one side. And then on the other side, Houston, a rise of political correctness. Houston student protests that is all my monitor Cornell and radical cultural changes on and off campus. And he finally said enough is enough, and it's at that point that you see the John M Olin foundation changed from kind of traditional giving it things like hospitals. The conscious things that wealthy. Families in America had long given to that. We're not particularly political to something, very political if the country was leaning left Olen wanted to tilt it right again. He wants to build a counter intelligence. Yeah. In American academe Lia and take back the colleges from the leftists and hopefully train up a new generation of conservative students. Luckily, I was able to interview people who were involved in this process. There is a very thoughtful man named James Pearson who I talked to who also worked for the Olin foundation. All right, fire away. See if I can help you. We also talked to James Pearson. He told us the back in nineteen eighty one he was working as an assistant professor at the university of Pennsylvania. He was seeing the same leftward shift in academia and his friend, William Kristol now a really famous conservative activist told him you should check out this place called the Olin foundation. One thing led to another. I went up and talked to them. And they hired me at the old fundation in nineteen eighty one nine hundred eighty one was also the year that Ronald Reagan took office. So it was a great time to be a conservative in politics and the intellectual world's not so much. You know, at the time we came into this, there wasn't much going on at all the conservative world was tiny, but the foundation staff had tens of millions of dollars to make that world grow, you know, we didn't know where we're going it was very experimental. Will we saw good program? We put some money behind it. There's no overall plan really though and foundation, basically planted a bunch. Of tiny political seats, watered them periodically and watch to see if any of them would sprout. We'll keep back in hindsight. It's pretty clear that some of those seeds not only sprouted the grew into really powerful trees. We're going to look at five of those seeds turn trees today. The first conservative media. In the seventies, there were some conservative magazines but they weren't widely read. And we were just talking to the choir. So the all in foundation said, we need to fund grants grants grants for books books books. One of those was Charles Murray's book about welfare. They it you know what they fronted a new criterion. The American spectator is another magazine they funded firing line funding for this firing line. Debate is made possible by a major grant from the John M Olin foundation, which was kind of a debate program, our topic tonight is resolved, the ACLU is full of bologna, where you had William F, Buckley who was spectacularly articulate. The reason why it has got the reputation of unfocused bunch of is, is that it has earned that reputation and he would come out there and just? Go to war with any liberal on television. You principal threat to feed him in America is crime and as C L U comes up the attempted ban on capital punishment. The overweening social problem in America is the loss of mall coordinates and the view. Oh you tries to clamp down on religion. Forever chose its public face the need for civilized with strangers. And so it brought these conservative arguments to the entire country through their television sets firing line was on PBS for nearly thirty years. And for a lot of that time it was paid for by the all in foundation. And the other grants grants grants for books books books paid off to at the American spectators peak. It was selling hundreds of thousands of copies initial in Charles Murray's book about welfare in the nineties, it helped inspire one of the biggest welfare reform laws in decades conservative media was no longer dead. And while the Olin foundation, wasn't the only force behind. It's wild growth. They definitely helped cultivate it which brings us to the second seed that the Olin foundation tended to conservatives among campus. When the other things they began to do was pour money into college publications that were conservative. The major one was the Dartmouth review. It was edited and run by a number of people who later became very important voices of the conservative movement. Massive demographic changes have been foisted, upon the American people. You've got Laura Ingram writing in it. Who is now a FOX host. You have to Sousa filmmaker local commentator, author diminished, a Souza's at our desks, discussing his book, the big, lie, exposing the Nazi of roots of the American left and want to get to the book in just a minute. But I would like to hear more about the time you call this is a dick that is my various Fistican colleague as recline talking to few years ago to Tim Geithner, who is the Treasury Secretary for much of Obama's presidency, and Ezra's asking about one of the Dartmouth reviews, worst moments. It was a time when there's an early stage of the conservative movement among college campuses and Dharma's was one of the epicenters of that movement and conservative students at that point start a newspaper called the Dartmouth review and they published a confidential list of members of the lesbian gay soon lions, and including on a bunch of people who hadn't come out to their friends or their parents, and it was devastating to them. I grew up in Hanover, New Hampshire where Dartmouth is the reviews activities are legendary there. Well. Over the Dartmouth review, does, who's also published an interview with a Ku Klux Klan leader. Xtra edited photo of a black student getting lynched on campus. Serandon anti-affirmative action article written entirely in Abban IX. I'm not even comfortable reading the headline. What it just looked like was, how students are becoming conservative. They're writing these treatises and running these publications and you would not have known unless you looked really carefully that there was a stream of funding coming from a handful of very conservative, corporate donors who were deliberately trying to change the politics and public opinion in America. This was one of the Oland foundations more moderate, successes undergrad still lean liberal overall. But the third seed all in water, too deep root on law school campuses and grew into an established branch of the law. It started as part of a broader Olin push to make law schools. More conservative, what they realized was they could easily build up their own academic institutions on the ride, but those wouldn't have any power standing because they'd be seen as fringe. And if they wanted to really have influence, they had to take over the prestigious institutions, which is harder than it sounds, you can't just do it frontally, because the academics will resent it and resist it. So they have to be a little more snaky than that. The all in foundation would find faculty members who were conservative, and then they build up a center for them at their school. They were very careful though, in how they described these programs. They realized that if we said, this is the center to prove that marks. Awesome is a lie that a university wasn't going to take their money. So instead, they came up with the serve anodyne cryptic titles for their programs things like the Madison center for freedom, the super successful, third seat that Olen watered was one of these powerful programs with a cryptic title lawn economics. I mean listen to the title of that law and economics doesn't that sound bland? Basically, the idea was that lawyers and judges should be considering economics and making their decisions. And like, how could you be against either law or economics or any combination of them? It just sounds good. But let's say your company's polluting a lot. And let's say the people who were affected by your pollution, take you to court before law and economics. The idea was if you injured somebody with your pollution, you absolutely had to pay for it after lawn economics. That wasn't. So obvious. Yes, you had to say, what are the economic impacts of punishing company for polluting? You know, how much is it gonna cost the company, maybe you shouldn't punish a company for filling towns river with mercury because they closed the plant and people in the town would lose jobs? And maybe you had to be more careful before you said something was a monopoly in an antitrust case, because then the companies involved, couldn't grow, and employ people and make money. And maybe if you give hersher prison sentences in criminal cases it create more of a disincentive for crime. So it had a conservatizing influence, and that's basically what it was about. But it sounded very bland. And so if, if it has this concert has an influence. How do you get places like Harvard and Yale and Chicago on board with this, what, what makes this attractive to these big institutions? Well what happened particularly the way it worked its way into Harvard was kind of an interesting story to me. So at some point in the early ninety. Eighteen eighties. Let's say nine hundred and eighty five it was, in fact, nine hundred five there was a conflict at Harvard University law school, Harvard was hotbed of leftist new thinking about the law. There was a group of what they call critical legal theorists, radical lefty, professors there at the law school, who began to teach the kids that they should turn against corporate law. They're encouraging the lawyers. There are training to go down to the high level law firms and sabotage the law firms in order to undermine the free market or capitalist system. So that was written up in the New Yorker magazine at some point in the middle nineteen eighties and some of the old funders graduates of Harvard Law School were incensed, of course, a school like Harvard law. They wanna place to top graduates in the big law firms. That's what they exist for the dean was concerned about the reputation that Harvard Law School was begin. Inning to get as a result of this. And at that point, the Olin foundation struck and the dean of the Harvard Law School got in contact with one of our trustees and asked if we could would support a program, which took a different point of view toward this. They saw it was their moment to say, hey, we've got plenty of money, and we can give you a program that will give another point of view, it won't be. These lefty professors. We've got some ideas about how you can teach law and economics. This should be a law and economics program at Harvard. That's how they got through that door. And we did fund that quite generously in as goes, Harvard law. So goes everywhere else, the rest of the campuses, said, well, harvards doing at we should do it to pretty soon. We heard from some people at Yale Law School, which we fund in very soon we heard from Stanford law school, which we funded very soon. From Columbia, which we. Within a few years. The Olin foundation was funding lawn economics programs at most of the top law schools in the country. I think we did have an idea at the time that whatever the top schools did the lower level schools would have me late pay would have a domino effect. And that's how it all began. Earlier. Jane Mayer use the word sneaky, which sounds not great as the were saying that the Owen foundation tricked law schools into adopting. All this didn't trick anyone but they definitely had their own agenda. There's another great book about the Olin foundation by political, scientists named Steve, tell us tell us ask James Pearson about all of this impairs and give him an amazing quote that I read back to him in our interview. Give me a second to read it. If you said to dean, that you wanted to fund conservative constitutional law, he would reject the idea out of hand. But if you said you wanted to support law and economics, he would be much more open to the idea. Lon economics as neutral, but it has a philosophical thrust in the direction of free markets and limited government. It seems neutral, but it in fact, isn't yeah. I probably shouldn't have said that. I think that I think here would be the point. We never tried to manipulate the universities and tell them they had to do something that we want them to do. They always came to us, we understood, and I understood because I'd been in academic that you can't tell universities and professors what to do. That's impossible. Olin foundation money. However, definitely changed the schools. Nowadays. Lon economics is a common field of law. All the major law schools, have a couple of people doing it and they have journals in it, and they do research at all. These students going to line economics classes, they become lawyers and judges and law professors, and they take with them this basic idea that you really need to crunch the numbers when you're making decisions you have to make sure that you're not costing company too much causing too much job loss when you're enforcing a regulation, and then the other idea, they had that was brilliant was. Why just expose students to this ideology? Why not expose judges two judges for already on the courts. We're going to take a quick break. But then the last two seeds planted by the foundation seats that have reshaped how judges judge and who gets to be a judge at all. The on saying Arianna 'Grande and Drake are talked about ad nauseam celebrities. But there's one thing that's rarely discussed their music on switched on hop. We go deep into the sounds of pop music, explain what it means. How it's made. And why it's so effective. We talked with some of today's greatest artists producers journalists code, the musical logic behind our modern soundtrack and understand its role in our culture switched on pop. Won't reveal for you. How a secretive Swedish producer behind many of the top ten hits of the past twenty years. We'll uncover the ways that songwriters embed their political activism into today's most popular tracks. We'll show you this apprising musical civil areas between Cardi B and Tim and will even dive into the classical pass to hear how the Jonas brothers MIR Mozart's youthful party days. I'm songwriter, Charlie Harding. And I'm used collagen Nate Sloan join us on a journey through the world popular music by subscribing to switched on pop on apple podcasts, Spotify or. Are your favorite podcast app to get new episodes every Tuesday? I'm Todd Vander the host of primetime. A new show from box com this season we're tackling the American presidency on TV stories that capture the way television effects, and reflects politics and culture. We'll take a look at fictional presidents, who changed the way we think about the real Oval Office, that isn't gentlemen. The president of the United States. Warning, PLEASE take your seats and how real presidents US TV to further their own goals. What did you come here to plug? Have you heard of the formal correct from the first TV president people have gotta know whether or not their president's crook? Well, I'm not a crook to arguably the last, we have fighting the fake news. It's fake phony fake primetime. From the vox media podcast network, N, vox dot com. Listen and subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back to future perfect before the break, the Olin foundation, took a seed of illegal discipline lawn economics and helped it spread through reputable law schools across the country. But the also watered, a different law, economic seed, a series of programs for judges kind of like little summer school. And it was really it was really fun these summer school like programs were called. Manny seminars named after this guy, Henry Manny who organized them, and they're holding these snazzy. Tropical resorts, you'd go to classes in the morning where you'd be exposed to law economics and kind of basic conservative and libertarian theories of the law, but then in the afternoon in the afternoon, everybody would swim and golf, and they bought an play tennis, and then they'd have sort of these lovely dinners together, and it was all free for the judges. There was a seminar, all about the economics of wine with wine tasting and there's an incredible photo of Milton Friedman, the super libertarian economist, giving his own lecture, he's an Hawaiian shirt in front of a blackboard with a smile on his face and sunglasses on it looks like. A blast and I think the camaraderie was probably wonderful for the judges and, and, you know, just that alone was big draw. There's a judge in my family. So I know a little bit about it, and he described. It's lonely business you're by yourself having to make really difficult decisions. So these judges are at these resorts palling around drinking wine in learning some pretty wild things again, this was law economics. So there were being asked to think hard about economics and how it might apply to the law. Take our pollution example again, line economic suggest that you should consider the cost for the company, if you make them clean up their act. But one communist in these summers took things further. Yes, judges to think about all the air pollution in Los Angeles. A serious problem back in the day. The downtown Los Angeles skyline was routed in smog again today. Commuters driving into the city saw it slowly emerge from a dense grey, haze, millions of people or coughing and weasing their way through the worst Tober smog attack in almost a decade, not crate. But the economists said and this is red from quote, if you give me a capsule that will clean all the air in Los Angeles, beg me to crush it. I will not cross the capsule because if I do poor blacks will have to pay twenty dollars more for land rental and the black and watts already used to living with bad air, loses his discount for doing that. He's basically arguing that because black people have adapted to the crappier of Los Angeles. It's more important to keep the air bad. So that rent stay low than to give them clean air and the judges weren't just learning about pollution. I remember Henry man, he would give his lecture on the idea that there is no such thing as insider. Trading and I should eliminate all the laws on insider trading by the year, two thousand something like sixty percent of the federal judges had attended the seminars which is astounding that includes judges who later ended up on the supreme court Ruth Bader, Ginsburg attended and apparently enjoyed herself a lot. She said quote, the instruction was far more intense than the Florida sun. And we have good reason to think that this training matter. A recent paper by communists Elliott ash. Daniel Chen, and Sarah Naidoo found the judges who went to Manny seminars were likelier to rule against the PA against labor unions and four businesses. The seminars taught that long sentences can deter crime so jets who took the seminars imposed longer sentences. My favorite finding is the judges who took classes with Milton Friedman gave lower sentences for drug crimes because Friedman wanted to legalize drugs. The paper is called ideas have consequences in the Oland foundations history is proof. They really do. Olen was hugely important in law and economics. It's amazing. How successful they were. I think they got one of the biggest payoffs for any kind of investment in conservative philanthropy, anywhere. But there was one more seat that you'll invention Asian watered one that arguably hadn't even bigger impact on the courts than the Manny seminars. The federalist society the federalist society. They came to us very early in nineteen eighty two. They're a bunch of students law students, and they'd had a conference at Yale and they wanted to continue it. These conservative students wanted to set up a national office, treat, a large organization, I remember being skeptical of that. Why do you wanna create a national office? You're a student group in some law schools, but he figured why not give them some money and well, we know what's happened, the federalist society over the last thirty five years, just in case you don't it's since become one of the most influential legal networks in the country with two hundred law school chapters, and tens of thousands of members before long, it had krone into kind of. A credentialing process where if you were a member of the federalist society, you had a good chance of getting a clerkship with the conservative judge because it kind of did noted that you were part of this Qadri, and so other conservatives flock to it on campus. And it really helped people get ahead. The federalist society invites promising young law students to informal events like barbecues where they can network. Justice Clarence Thomas, attended at least one of these networking barbecues, for example, wearing a Hawaiian shirt and chatting people up federalist society, which the New Yorker magazine called the conservative pipeline to the supreme court. It's the Lincoln for conservative lawyers. I mean, I think at this point the federalist society which began with funding by the oil and foundation has succeeded way beyond the wildest dreams of John M Olin. He could never have imagined. How important it's become the. Society provided a shortlist of potential supreme court justices to President Trump. President Trump basically delegated the role of picking supreme court justices to the head of the federalist society Leonard Leo feigned by many conservatives. As President Trump supreme court whisper and Trump also the federal society, drew up lists of judges in the lower courts, and so they've really become kind of the unofficial pickers of America's justices in the Trump era right now on the supreme court. There are five justices with deep connections to the federalist society. John Roberts Samuel Alito, Clarence, Thomas Neal, Gorsuch, Brett Cavanaugh. And there are many more federalist society judges in lower courts across the country. I've come to think that it's a perversion of philanthropy to turn it into an extension of politics. I mean, face it, what you've got here are handful of the richest people in the world who are exerting outsized pressure on American politics, simply because they have the extra money to do it Vic big tax deductions to build up foundations they control and there's no transparency. There's no accountability. And it's just on the face of it, an antidemocratic force. I was particularly surprised to hear this from J mayor. But it was really curious which is Pearson would say, if I asked him is there something at least challenging to our norms of democracy about having billionaires with particular preferences, having this kind of influence over the ideas, the governess, basically, has most of your career been spent doing undemocratic thing. James was a really good sport about it, though. Yeah. That's a good question. Are these legitimate instruments for influencing thought in a democratic society that these vast pockets of wealth, on accountable, anybody again, exercise, great influence in our society? And that's not right. James also argues that there was money coming from the left as well as the right. And so the rate had to fight back, somehow, there's one that debate to be had about whether the left or right. Gets more money overall, there's a recent book that tried to add it all up and found the billionaire. Overall or kind of conservative, and they donate their money accordingly. But the fundamental question is should anyone left or right? Have this kind of power, just because they're rich, that's a, a modern development in American politics. If you ask me as a healthy development, I'd probably say no, the whole thing. If I could just redesign it from scratch, I probably would not include it, but I don't have those powers. America's posed to be all about people freely arguing for their vision of the world big rockets robust debate, but the rules of the debate aren't fair, not everyone gets to enter you have to be really rich to play at a high level. So it falls to rich liberals, like Tom Steyer. Enrich conservatives like John Olen to wage that fight. Sometimes they're fighting to protect their money, stop people from regulating the places that came from just up courts from ruling against their businesses. But their motives, don't need to be narrowly self-serving to be troubling. John Lynch foundation wasn't geared toward making the old Inc. Money, but it was geared toward spreading Johnson's vision, even though most Americans probably don't share that vision. This isn't just a problem with explicitly political foundations like Owen next time on future perfect. We'll talk about how supposedly humanitarian work in poor. Countries can raise similar issues, and there are few better, illustrations than the experience with the Ford Foundation in India, I would say that the time of station is something that is remembered as a sad and scary time. That's next time on feature perfect. Perfect is produced and co reported by birth Pinkerton or editor is imagers. Dasa our senior producer is Jillian Weinberger, and were mixed by Jared fact, checking by Laura Bullard, our music is by APM, Noam, Hassenfeld, and pob intesne bear. Syringe naidoo. Amanda, Hollis Bruschi, and also Connor were super generous with their time this episode. Thank you to them, and we're going to have QNA's with Sereshk Amand on the site. Things also Steve tell us, he's book on all. This is great and bends sauce, Casse, who also took the time to talk us through ideas future perfect is made possible through a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. Treat more of our reporting on -ffective altruism, took out FOX dot com slash future. Dash perfect.

Olin foundation America James Pearson John Olen John M Olin foundation federalist society John Olin John M Olin Oland Olin company Harvard Law School president Harvard Milton Friedman FOX John Oland the Dartmouth review Yale Henry Manny
90: A New Girl, Stop Apologizing Chapter: Leadership!

RISE Podcast

15:51 min | 1 year ago

90: A New Girl, Stop Apologizing Chapter: Leadership!

"Girl. Stop apologizing is out in the world, you guys, I know I can't believe at any more than you can. But it's true. This book baby of mine is finally here. So if you have a desire in your heart, but you're worried about what other people will think of you for trying to chase after it. This is the book for you. It is the most tangible, and I hope motivational advice I've ever written down, and it's available today anywhere books are sold. And if you like it when I talked to you just like this, then you're gonna love the audio version girl stop apologizing. Go grab it right now. Today on the rise podcast. It's my pleasure to bring you another chapter from the audio book of girl stop apologizing in this chapter. I wanted to talk about leadership because here's the thing. Whether you are CEO or stay at home, mom, you are leading in your own way, and it is imperative that you step into that calling on your life and show up for it. Well, so I wanted to have a conversation about how I've grown as a leader. And how you can show up in your community as a strong, bold courageous woman who is ready to shine the light. So that others can walk down the path behind her. Welcome to the rise podcast. I'm Rachel Hollis. And I built a multi-million dollar media company with a high school diploma and a Google search bar each week. We'll be airing tangible direct advice or inspiring interviews with the same intention. These are the tools change your life. Skill six lead her ship in sixth grade. I took a picture inside a t p it was girl scout camp circa nineteen ninety five. And I still have the photo in an album covered with peace sign stickers and multiple artistic renderings of the stew c s in the photo. I'm dressed as a young native American Girl as imagined by a young and ignorant, white girl Brown tie-dye, and knock off timberlands aren't part of any tribal dress that I'm familiar with. But my twelve year old self beyond cool to sit beneath that mock teepee for a solo picture donated by the local Oland mills cultural, appropriation aside that particular girl scout experience sticks out in my mind for two reasons one because we made scrambled eggs by boiling them inside ziplock bags since I have never. Ever been a camper, these sorts of wilderness, skills, still seem highly impressive in to my best friend, Amanda, and I made up an entire dance routine to attempt GRA song and taught it to the whole squad. The song was in the outlaw. I mean, obviously and it involved choreographed steps and moving into more than one formation. The dance was originally something we did during a break as a way to fight boredom. But it was I'm hypothesizing here. So adorable to the assembled group of troop leaders who were likely all a little bit in love with Tim and that creepy pencil handlebar moustache, she was rocking back then that we were asked to perform it at campfire campfire. You guys campfire is the girl scout equivalent of the big show. It's where everything goes down. It's where patches are given out and troops are recognized is where we join hands in one. Big circle and seeing make new friends, but keep the old anyone. Anyway, it's a big thing deal and troop seven Twenty-three was about to make our campfire debut. When the big moment came we all danced our hearts out and during the grand finale when the song cuts to the unexpected inclusion of Indian reservation by Paul revere and the raiders well sisters, it was as if the spirit of Juliette, Gordon low herself was inside each of us. I was a leader even then and likely so were most of you as little girls many of us for the ones who organized exactly how the Barbie accessories would be distributed fairly. We were the ones who instigated play dates or ran for drama club president it wasn't a conscious thought, but the ability together groups, and unite them around a theme or. Audio was just part of us, if you're lucky your parents, encouraged you in these natural leadership skills, if you're not as lucky they may have unintentionally tried to snuff it out. Don't be bossy. They'd say, you're not in charge of everyone. They'd remind you never mind that when one of the boys displayed these same exact characteristics. It was seen as admirable look at that natural born leader, they'd come it with fully leadership isn't a trait that was encouraged girls when I was growing up, and maybe that's why so many of us struggle with the mantle. Now, we don't tend to think of ourselves as leaders because that's most often reserved for business settings. I'm here to tell you. I don't care who you are. And what you do during the day working or mommy ING or school, or whatever it's all the same to me in this area. I need you to embrace the idea that you. You are a leader. In fact, we all need you to do that. I've spent the last half decade of my life, building up a community of women both online, and in person who believe in a similar philosophy as I do we welcome and support one another regardless of what we have in common, and despite our differences, we give one another space to belong and the encouragement to pursue our dreams. And I'm so blessed that so many of you share my vision, I'm double Dover by how many women follow me online or come to my conference or by my books, but here is the truth from the very bottom of my heart. I'm not looking for one more fan. I don't need one more woman to like my Instagram feed or think my shoes, they're cute. I'm not trying to develop a community of fans I'm trying to develop a community of leaders. Are you an influence her? Are you in media? Do you run a conference a business a podcast? Are you a mom in the PTA? Are you a teller at the local Bank? Are you a volunteer for Sunday school at church? Are you a high school student? Are you a grandma of seven great? I need you. We need you. We need you to live into your purpose. We need you to create an inspire and build and dream. We need you to blaze a trail and then turn around and light the way with your magic. So other women can follow behind you. We need you to believe in the idea that every kind of woman deserves a chance to be who she was meant to be. And she may never realize it if you yes, you don't speak that truth into her life. You'll be able to do that. If you I practice the idea of being made for more in your own life after all if you don't see it. How do you know, you can be it? If women in your. Community or your network marketing group or your zoom, but class don't ever see an example of a confident woman. How will they find the courage to be confident if our daughters don't see a daily practice of us feeling not only comfortable, but truly fulfilled by the choice to be utterly ourselves. How will they learn that behavior pursuing your goals for yourself is so important, and I'd argue that it's an essential factor in living a happy and fulfilled existence. But it's not enough simply to give you permission to make your dream manifest. I want to challenge you to love the pursuit and to openly. Celebrate who you become along the journey when your light shines brighter. Others won't be harmed by the glare. They'll be encouraged to become a more luminescent version of themselves. That's what leadership looks like leaders are encouraging. Leader share information leaders hold up a light to show, you the way meters hold your hand. When it gets hard true leaders are just as excited for your success as they are for their own because they know that when one of us does well all of us come up when one of us succeeds all of us succeed, you'll be able to lead other women to that place. If you truly believe that every woman is worthy and called to something sacred that requires opening your eyes and your heart to certain women. You may not have noticed before. And though it may seem slightly off topic for a book on personal growth. I want to ask you to consider who your including in your sphere of leadership. I want to challenge you to do something look around you look at your Instagram feed. Look at the speaker lineup for your conference. Look at your. Staff look at your friends. Do they all look the same? And just so we're clear, I don't mean do they have different hair colors or personal styles? I mean, will frankly, I mean are they all the exact same color are they all the exact same type? Do they all go to the same church? Do they all live in the same area? I see this everywhere in female focus media right now. I see it manifest on stages. I see show up in the company staff photo. I see it with the speaker lineup. I see it in advertising an every single time. I see it. I wonder why isn't this homogeneous of setting to this group? Why doesn't this disparity bother them? How can they pull together sixteen speakers only one of which is female or at a women's conference? How can you choose ten female speakers to represent all women and nine of? Of them are white. I don't think it's a conscious choice for most companies or conferences or friend circles to shun diversity. I just think that we tend to choose what we know. And what we know best are people who look and act and think like us, but friends this is not what the world looks like this is not what business or the market looks like this is not what our community looks like representation matters. It matters that you sit in an audience and see yourself on stage. It matters that a company who sells to a multiethnic multicultural world works to bring every voice in. So that they consider as many perspectives as possible. Black white Latino Asian old young gay straight Christian Jewish Muslim differently abled plus size petite. Everybody should be at your table. Everybody should be on your stage. Everybody should be on your staff. Everybody should be invited to your kid's birthday party. Everybody should be welcome in your church. Everybody should be invited over for dinner every single woman, you know, and every single one you don't could benefit from the truth that she is capable of something great how she ever going to believe that if nobody sets an example, how has she ever going to believe that if nobody cares enough to see it in her and speaks the truth allowed? The thing is I believe there is magic in each. And every one of you listening to this. I. I know this with every fiber of my being that if you all begin to live more fully into that call on your heart in spite of how scary and uncomfortable. It feels at times, I know we could change the world. The incredible thing is by embracing. You're calling and refusing to hide your glow, you wouldn't just make your world brighter. You light the way for the women who would come along behind you. We should hang out on more than just this podcast, which means that the next time you're on Instagram or Facebook or you to be sure and type Rachel Hollis into the search park and check out all the fun things. We have going on on your favorite platform. The very first day of rise is own your past the second day is on your future. But I realized I was leaving something yearly import out. So for the first time ever, we added on an additional day to arise women's conference own your present this day is devoted to health and wellness and not a diet or an exercise plan. But how do we view our body? How do we take care of ourselves? How do we change our perception about who we are? And what we're capable of. We're going to dig into an entire day to talk about it. The speaker lineup is incredible. It will be the most motivation day of all three. And even though the conferences sold out. You can still get tickets to this day, then he apples or Dallas just head over to the Hollis co dot com and click on our event staff to find out one permission. If you need to change and this year, I think you do start with this.

Rachel Hollis Instagram CEO Paul revere Google Oland mills Amanda Tim president raiders PTA Dover Dallas Facebook Juliette Gordon million dollar
Hour 3: 9/5/19

The Paul Finebaum Show

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Hour 3: 9/5/19

"Plants capture c._o. Two what if we could help industrial plants capture it to thank you we can help lower emissions more and more for scientists than carbon capture is key to reducing c._o. Two emissions globally. It's one way exxon mobil helping industrial plants be more like plants that the unexpected energy of exxon mobil cried passion and patron tree of college football football leaves the paul finebaum show our three podcast. No it is not jerry springer. It is tony barnhart sitting in for paul finebaum here on the paul finebaum show paul zone assignment and we are here till seven o'clock to take your calls at eight five five two four to seven the two eight five. We are halfway through the show my goodness zipping by what why don't we take some calls. Let's go to mike in washington. Mike mike how are you. I'm sorry my i andrew in washington mistake. Andrew are you there. I'm here <music>. You're tony no worries. No worries up here man. I gotta tell ya i keep seeing on t._v. That night glass. I sweet inequity and it made me a little jealous. They don't have that up here well. They take very good care of us here at the s._e._c. Network and you can thank you. Thank you can thank man mark kubiak for putting that together. That's awesome. Hey wanted to you you know tennessee fan through and through <hes>. It's it's come on tough times. I've listened to the show all week and hurt a couple. All different opinions and i've heard years. I've heard paul but i gotta tell you. You've been covering college football for how many years <hes> it is a long long time this. This is my forty th actually this is my forty four th year believe it or not. I started when i was six yeah. That's awesome congratulations. I you know how many times the tennessee fan base turned on that football program. I've certainly seen it happened in the past i it is few and far between and and if they are turned on its head coach rarely on the players right and they'll give you that absolutely this group is gonna. It's gonna fight hi there good players on the football team tony. I know you know that there are good highly touted recruits. There's good players that have showed it in college and this group who's gonna keep fighting in guys like doin'. Jenny's in that locker room are not going to let this group. Go down <hes> because of disappointing week one now granted it was that's that's as low lowest got. I was in the stadium in that same seat. I sat in on saturday when we lost a home to wyoming you two thousand eight and it just it. I didn't think it could get get any lower and saturday. I think it was a little bit worse. Here's my question for you this group if they come out and beat b._y._u. Which i do think they're going to do. They're not osteopathic played on saturday b._y._u. and they can they can get a little confidence under him. I still think this is a very capable team of beating some people keeping it close with teams and by the end of the year this offense of lies going to look a lot different much-improved. Do you think this tennessee team can make a bowl game they they can okay. Let's tennessee going abo- before the season started. They can absolutely do it but what what has gotta happen is. They have got to make up their minds. You're listening to the coaches are doing everything they can do. The players have got to say we cannot quit. We have got to keep playing and the first rule as as a coach once told me if you're you're in a hole the first thing to get you gotta quit digging. Okay you gotta quit making mistakes and you gotta get except the thing of what was so bizarre about watching that georgia state state tennessee game. It was almost like the tennessee players will waiting on georgia state to do something dumb to give them a chance to win the game. It was like hey don't they know we're tennessee and their georgia state and they're supposed to quit exactly and they and they didn't quit they kept fighting and fighting and fighting and they say and their coaches knew do they could probably win the line of scrimmage so to me. That's right now. It is physical particularly on the on the line of scrimmage but it's part of this thing is mental. Can you get yourself up to play b._y._u. When the whole world's telling you you should absolutely win the game. Yeah i agree. I mean i i looked at the guy was sitting next to we. Were talking doc in your throughout the game we were saying you know we're probably gonna win this game but this is gonna be ugly and then all of a sudden. It just got out of hand. We couldn't handle it in our players couldn't handle also a quick note for saturday tennessee b._y._u. Have you heard what's going to be going on in knoxville. I have not telling me it is the the first game that beer will be sold in neyland stadium. They're not gonna be a night game. It's gonna be a little extra rockets in there for those b._y._u. Fans that have made the trip to knoxville well this whole thing about beer being sold in the same. It's going to be interesting. I it to me ultimately. I don't think it's that big a deal. I i really don't but we'll see how we just. I just don't think it's that big a deal but we'll see how it turns out. It'll be interesting. Thanks for calling. I do appreciate it. Let's go sued t._d. In georgia what's up t._d. Hey mr monitoring how you doing. I'm well. Thanks call you mr because i've i've never talked to you before this first time caller longtime fan appreciate that okay question for you. You're not a fan of the door dual threat. It quarterback system are you if i had the choice. I'm running it. I'm going to have a little bit of the art because you haven't got to have a little of the r._p._o. Oh honestly it's really difficult to have your quarterback hit that much during the course of the year so to me if i've to me if i've got the talent i probably don't do all the r._p._o. Stuff but the guy who know how to do it well so you you you like running the ball thirty five time the game right well i like. I like to run it more than i do. Throw it yes i am. I am old school in that regard because i grew up watching vince dooley football and i know now there's only you can only take that so far when they start putting eight guys in the box and you've got to do something to adjust but i just believe it's very very hard to get your quarterback hit. There's only so much tread on the tires and i just don't believe you can get your quarterback hit that much okay. Do you think a a team in the national championship what i do at three a quarterback without a dual threat quarterback yeah because i've seen it done. I've seen it in alabama georgia. Did it forty years ago alabama. Did it not not that long ago at all. Okay there. We go okay one more question. <hes> everybody you know by from look gain manager and all air. I'm gonna tell you what i think. It can't be over the line of scrimmage. That's why gets detainees plays well. I'll tell you what he's talking about that well. I think i think jake a really good quarterback and i think the game manager manager well. I think he's more than a gay man at you. Sit there and watch them. Throw the ball now. He's he is a guy who throws it to the right. Guy didn't make very many mistakes. I think only had for interceptors last year but you know what the great thing about all of this is. We're going to find out okay. We're gonna find out. Via is banged up. They're going to continue to get into but <hes> oh whoa whoa creighton for. Let you go. Did you read jephson tales article. I have not i know jeff recruiting very carefully. What what did he write today erode about the three years of coagulant by kirby very good article <hes>. I don't want to go into detail. I don't wanna take up too much time but <hes> to get a chance. Read it great article all right. I'll go to the <hes> <hes> do success. He's had in drafting five stores. Okay very good. Thanks for calling. I appreciate it. Let's go to you got a little bit of time. Let's go to coy in florida koi man you georgia people need to calm dow l. k. reel it in its if getting out of hand because what has georgia done other than win the recruiting war every year here and <hes> become the buffalo bills of college football. I mean you're coach. I don't really think he's or georgia's coach. I do not believe he is an xs and os coach. I think he's a little mustang with above of more talent and for the most part everybody's just saying that georgia's gonna show up in jackson beat florida but i mean it's still flora <hes> and we have so many people on the field at one time and play and i know depth matters but i think florida's scary kind of good to be honest with. You and i hope we start. We keep playing just getting by every week because georgia hasn't done anything okay. Well i am i am. I'm anxious. I'm anxious to see what the gators are going to do. I think the gators have a real shot to beat auburn. I really do and so that to me. That's good. That's a facet auburn auburn. The tony works we're talking to when it gets to the real game that matters georgia and florida game this year florida is going to go into that. They're going to be told all week long. They can't win and you know what happens when that when people do that because kids sit there and you know what george always keeps already. He's walking around their fans even act like they become some glorious. Iconic dynasty will football team when they haven't really done anything but when s._e._c. you see championship maybe two or three they haven't done so until it gets stolen. You know the old show them to be the man you gotta beat the man they haven't hasn't done that. They haven't even come close really well. We can't close it is going to be a fun season. Watch urged. Who would you flat. Georgia and florida fans go back and forth. It's going to be fun. Hey co ed gotta run. I gotta take a break here. When we come back. We're going to have oland buchanan from tech sags dot com to bring us up to date on the aggies. This is tony bart sitting in for paul finebaum. You're listening to paul. Finebaum show podcast and we're back this is tony bar sitting in for paul finebaum and we're here to take your calls until seven o'clock at eight five five two four to seven to eight five now saturday texas they any of them goes on the road to play clemson the defending national champions at death valley texas a._m. As a double digit underdog but we've talked a lot of people who think they akis aggies can go down there and get it done. One of the people who who believes that is my good friend. Oland buchanan of tex eggs dot com if you're interested in texas a._m. Athletics that's that's where you need to go olen. How are you my friend. I'm doing great tony really looking forward to this weekend and heading out the death valley and you know seeing a good game well. Here's the thing you give us a list of texas dot com. You give us a list of reasons why texas a._&_m. Can go into death valley and win this game. We we don't have time to go through the whole list but let me ask you about a couple love him. One is at the very top of your list is confidence. Why does texas am have confidence going into this game. Last year they were able to <hes> there were double digit underdog to <hes> at cal field and went out and quite frankly had a chance to to win that game and my you could make an argument that they should've would've won it. There was a very controversial call. <hes> that went against some at the one yard line and there was a <hes> you know nisa twenty. I think it's a twenty six yard field. Go <hes> that a a turnover at the at the clemson <hes> twenty one <hes> onto one play that came out because the cramp so <hes> you know they came close closer to like or at least they feel like that <hes> haven't had that experience <hes> you know i. I don't know that they're gonna beat <hes> clinton clinton. I understand why clemson is a a favourite and should be but i think one of the big factors in when you play a team like clinton is you don't want to take a team. That's gonna come in scared and a team of contaminated. I don't think can help intimidate number two. You've got the gym. This is interesting. The jimbo jimbo fisher effect. What is the jimbo fisher fat well in the history of <hes>. I guess nine game history between he and <hes> davos ladies any of the games have all been <hes> you know for the most part very close going into the fourth quarter <hes> yeah la- last year twenty eight twenty six game is an example. I think <hes> if you look at it even jimbo fisher's last four to state team which was as you know a lot of injuries and had a true freshman quarterback that game and with six and a half minutes ago was seventeen fourteen and and <hes> florida state had the ball at the <hes> clemson forty now they have some turnovers and it got out of hand late but the point is that i think jimbo schemes well <hes> against clemson. I think it's a good matchup and again his history shows that <hes> you know one way or another. He keeps the the games always closed between him and dabble. I think if you can get the ball the ball game into the fourth quarter and you have a chance to win the anything can happen. I think it would take that you'd be one of your lists is karen mon and you mentioned the fact that he played well last year i if you're going to go on the road food and win a game against a quality opponent in this case the defending national champions you gotta have a quarterback with confidence that he can get the job. I've done you're saying kellyn mind is because of what he's done is a reason why texas a._&_m. Can win this game. Well not just because of what he's done in the past but he looks like a quarterback that is improving jimbo fisher is told us he's improving and we saw flashes of that against texas state now. Look we understand the between texas state and and clemson is the difference between east and west so we get that but <hes> kelton appears to have a better grasp of the jimbo fisher's offense what he is expected to do <hes> identifying the the the <hes> receivers and making this decision just a shade quicker now. He's got to show that he can do that. <hes> in a big time game on the roll well like you said but the indicators are that <hes> you know he's <hes> they did. He has made an improvement and so if i get a better than i had against against clemson last year i got a pretty good chance owen buchanan texas tech texas eggs dot com own. I think the key people have asked me. I think the key to the game. I know about trevor lawrence. He's a great quarterback and all that but to me. The key to this football game is texas ability to keep travis from going off for one hundred and fifty hundred and sixty yards you you believe the texas a._&_m. Run defense has improved to where they've got a shot in this category well i think so they were able to keep him somewhat contained last season and that's a a big reason like you mentioned that that was in the game eh chance to win <hes> <hes> but yeah you know and then was what third in the country last year <hes> in run defense and there are some big questions how good they could be with all all the guys <hes> that they lost off that you know front six or seven <hes> but you know the the feeling around here is believe it or not <hes> that even know three starters arteries gone from that defensive line that offensive like it is potentially even better with just a matter p._k. Back and bobby brown looks like a defensive tackle. It's like that guy who's <hes> gonna have a breakout year and michael clemens who was heard all of last year he would have started right instead of kings the keke and he's you know back unhealthy <hes> and their linebackers though <hes> inexperience for the most part anthony hines and but he johnson <hes> you know they look good so <hes> <hes> i. I don't know that they're going to be as good against one as they were last year but i think there are <hes> i think potentially delay and they're they're. They're going to be pretty solid and i guarantee. You're going to clemson travis f._d._a. Data that'll be a huge testified that where they are and finally if they're able to slow down the rhone p._t._a. From from getting big numbers and you turn the game over two trevor lawrence and those savers vers justin ross and you've gotta make trevor lawrence had a couple of interceptions against georgia tech so the question is is is the texas m. pass defense this can they get enough pressure to make trevor lawrence uncomfortable right and <hes> you know i think the defensive line is <hes> even even with considering lamont. I think the defensive line is the strength of this texas a and pain <hes> i think they can get a good inside pass rush again with matt abi keagan saying brown and <hes> <hes> they've got some guys like i mentioned clement <hes> some guys on the outside that can <hes> get some pressure. I think <hes> i think thank mike elko. The defensive coordinator will come up with some <hes> interesting blitz packages and things like that and they realize they know that they have to get pressure on. Uh on trevor ours because hey we all saw what happened in the in the national championship game and sure don't wanna be victimized by that all right olympic texas ags dot com tech's dot com. It's always great to catch up with you. Have a have a good trip down to death valley. Hey thank you so much telling me all right. We gotta take a break now. When we come back. We're here to take your calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. This is tony barnhart sitting in for paul finebaum. This is the paul finebaum show. You're listening to the paul. Finebaum show podcast all right welcome back. It's good to be with you tony bar sitting for paul finebaum and we're here to take your calls until seven o'clock eight five five two four to seven to eight five. We have got a fool pool bank of calls. We are slammed. Let's go to foy in four where you north dakota kota sir bless your. I've never been a what's what's the temperature out there right now about sixty eight degrees and is that high for this time. I'm a year just about right. That's about average now. Give us a couple bites and get your forty below. Bless your heart so what you get. What are you what you got got on your mind. Okay you know i've been i watch if i bombshell. I'm a very loyal gator. Fan grew up in florida <hes> love my gators and i've been hearing the last twelve days. They didn't play up to par they. They didn't do what they should have done against miami <hes> p._m. Philippi franks took a step back. The offensive line look ready <hes>. They didn't tackle well. I've heard all the the negativity that one could hear yup and a lot of it came from gator fans it did but now the other day i was listening to another network that <hes> is kind of up. The coast i from the s._e._c. and mark rick was saying he thinks at that same miami team at florida. Beat is probably gonna end up winning the coastal division division. I'm not saying he's right or he's wrong. He might be considered a bit of a homer since he went to miami and he coached there but i'm wondering two things if miami is being a better team than they appear than some people are giving them the opportunity to be. Maybe the florida wind doesn't look so bad after all yeah and i think you need to keep things in perspective and see how the season plays out before everybody gets on the ship and says it some i wrote after the game. You must first of all the the gators won. Okay they won. The game and miami is eighteen. That is absolutely capable when you look at the rest the team that everybody's picked in the coastal is virginia well that that's going to be an interesting match up but you're absolutely right is that you don't know about that win over over miami until you play some more games and see what miami does okay and like to ask you the question. If i might sure <hes> <hes> have any of your listeners and i had the honour to watch it the other night watch the show saturday in the south the drama that's being done about s._e._c. Football yes i did. I did watch until he was great stuff. Yeah great stuff and i'm hoping that others are the network <hes> realize that it was really exciting to learn about the history of that goes back to the founding of the conference out. They started <hes>. I'll tell you what i don. I hope the rest of the shows are as good as that that was it was excellent and i want to compliment the people that put together. It was really wonderful. Well thank you for taking my call absolutely appreciate it for you that that's a a piece of this. That's done by i mitchell. We had a chance to preview part of it. When we were at the s._e._c. media days and yeah. I watched every minute of it the other night <hes> every tuesday night for the next eight part series ninety minutes each last tuesday was the first seven more series on tuesday nights at nine o'clock and it is it is must that's put out a d._v._r. Alert so if you don't have your d._v._r. Set then you have to do it. Let's let's go to allan in alabama alan. What's up. Hello yes sir here. Go right ahead yes. I i have a question <hes> make a statement first and then give you to answer my question <hes> last week <hes> i'll watch watch finebaum show and very first time caller but <hes> i am talking about how good argon was defensive blind offensive offensive line. They had a quota fourth year quarterback who would probably be fine for the heisman trophy and yet auburn went to a neutral true site with a freshman quarterback who i think grew up in that game he did start off bad but who wouldn't be an eighteen years old insurance months outta high school <hes> and i wish that you and paul and some of the commentators at i listened to would give almond a little love and respect <hes>. How do you feel really about the performance. I know but we were playing top eleven team. The rest of the s._e._c. who i love and pull for every week played a bunch of cupcakes which <hes> and we have a week when this coming week and maybe bow will be able to show a lot more of improvement what flipkart you say about that well. I thought it was. I thought the win for auburn which huge again you put your plan a top ten eleven twelve team a team that is picked by a bunch of people to win the pac twelve so i thought it was a huge win for auburn now. Now the other questions looks like bo knicks can handle the pressure <hes> he he. He handled it very well in the fourth quarter when he's bringing auburn back. Now we gotta get some other. Questions answered about auburn. We know about the defense. They're they're their superb. Okay now. You gotta prove that the offensive line is going to allow auburn to run the ball when they want to run it to me. That's the next big a big thing but the thing about that auburn schedule and you know this is that it's going to all be revealed that they're going to get a chance to prove everything everything that you say about auburn. Auburn is going to get a chance to prove it so i thought it was a great win for auburn well. I appreciate that and <hes> i do know that that they have one of the toughest schedule and the country and like i say i love the s._e._c. up pool for auburn i and s._e. Second and against anybody we play away and <hes> appreciate you taking my call and i certainly appreciate you when you're substituting for paul finebaum. Well thank you album is very very kind to me what we'll talk to you next time. Let's go to darrell darrell eight long. Look how about all the game. You know. They will do fortunate on that no call late. He don't at quarterback. I don't know how that looks like. They're looking at that all the way this team yards. That was a big no call supportive football game out there and you spur. What i'll talk to you about was georgia. I'm looking at some slack on those who stole enough points but if you look back on tame yard touchdown call back on the whole we had a do hope all this off the phone their fourteen forthright there <hes> we have other turn back and saw the thirty. That's all guys on the block to the bag again. These often look that bad. It's just it's just a stupid. Mouth equals the really good overall. What's your yeah. I mean i looked and i thought i thought thirty six was not reflective. How georgia pretty much dominated the game they listen. They could run when they want. There was really no sense in taking a whole lot of chances in that game <hes> <hes> because they could run the ball when they wanted to and yeah. I just don't think you can read that much. Think georgia should have scored fifty or something like that. You pointed it out the place where they had the ball scoring position and just dropped it or things like that so. I just don't think you can make that many assumptions about georgia because the school was thirty. Hey on the road in the s._e._c. Take it get on the bus go home. Absolutely the first game of the season is absolutely right. I got two weeks to policy. Not we're going right back on the phone at least get ready for another game. I think we should be able to handle bid to steal and then you know. Just you're still there but <hes> i also okapi sponsored. He's catches some people animation. I love it man. I mean he's told the players stove and i just i just love watching him. You know he's into the game. That's what's gotta ought to be successful dolls. The atmosphere and a couple of weeks at notre dame is gonna be off the charts and it will be something special. Hey we got. We gotta take a break when we come back. We're here to take your calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. This is tony barnhart sitting in for paul finebaum because this is the paul finebaum nine months. You're listening to the paul. Finebaum show podcast r._i._a. And welcome back. We're take your calls at eight two two eight five five up to four to seven to eight five a reminder that at the top of the hour at six o'clock hour we will have vince dooley hall of fame football coach for whom this field the old sanford stadium will be named on saturday and nobody's looking forward to that. Let's take a couple of quick calls before the break hossen. You've been holding on for a very long time. I appreciate it. What can i do for you. Halston are you there. He is not there there. No that's too bad. He held for a long long time. Let's go to jimmy in chicago. Jimmy county the <hes> you know reviewing that <hes> that over a working day one thing that really stunned me and it happened right before the very first play from skirmish in the game they pulled up a graphic and oregon had the first possession and herbstreet said this situation is going to make it a really tough blog forecast and they could the caption and those photos and turns it turns out that oregon is missing are up awful receivers and they're tied for the games and i went. Where did this come from and it turned out. I guess the two of them were game meantime decisions. They were hoping they might be able to go if they were moving. Okay during pregame warmups and then the other guys were gonna be out at least a month and i went holy cow well and then it turned out oregon. I thought considering considering that with very impressive just shows they had really good steph and if they get those guys back and their full speed man. They're going to be pretty good well. I think i think with their offensive line and obviously they've got the proven quarterback who have gone certainly at near the top of the draft had come out last year i i think they're gonna play utah for the pac twelve championship i really do so. I think they're good football team. No i absolutely agree to me. It's a three man race. It's <hes> oregon in <hes> washington and utah and it will be really interesting and but when that wide receiver dropped that touchdown pass in the back of the end zone and then then the freshman kicker misses the thirty or field goal. I'm going that is going to come back to haunt him and sure enough. Auburn drove down for a field goal ten points swing and then <hes> they have the ball to all three and and herbert botches the hand off and auburn picks it up runs nine yards yards with the formal oregon did a great job keeping them out of the end zone but man. I'm telling you they just <hes> they've made enough mistakes to lose two or three games and then all after auburn got the brain dead <hes> celebration penalty after that touchdown near the end they get penalized fifteen for some reason they squib kick in oregon resurgent like thirty five yards down of oregon over thirty five. They have a chance to win the hell. Mary on the last play and herbert throws host the ball <hes> tenth four year starter and picked to be one of the second or third quarterback picked in the draft. I couldn't believe it but <hes> but but i wasn't oppressive organ and you know often open hung in there you know they're gonna play for sixty minutes but i man i. I just don't know about that offensive line. I mean <hes> against playing at baton baton rouge at college station. I think they got a shot at gainesville just because i don't know about frank's but <hes> <hes> the young quarterback backwards i mean nick's he was running for his life most of the night and of that line. Let's go out to get a lot better jimmy. That's been that's been the key for auburn. Burn in the entire off season last year. Auburn auburn did not have a thousand yards. They had gone nine straight years with a thousand yard rusher. Before last. I asked you a booby. Whitlow should be thousand yard rusher. They didn't make it last year and and that ultimately is what cost auburn in the long run and if they they don't get better on the in this conference when you play the better defenses if you can't run the if you can't run the ball they they're gonna. They're gonna put eight in the box and make you throw it and once they make make it and you can't run it then then you're in trouble. No doubt man is it. A game of inches knicks made that first down on that bottle but what two inches absolutely but he had but again i give him credit as a young quarterback. He had the president of my presence of mind that when he got to that corner warner he said you know what i gotta. Get this i can't i can't be throwing the ball up and and he got it and games like that. Turn on inches they turn on plays made and not made so yeah. He's going to be a great player form. It's just gonna take a while. He's gonna <hes> he's going to get an introduction into this. They see for sure her and <hes> but that's gonna be a great head start for him. Though because <hes> you know it gets a good year of experience behind him. He they'll have the top notch quarterback and dan <hes> <hes> they're always going to have good player so <hes> yeah they're in good shape in that position <hes> in as long as they can avoid injury and <hes> it'll be be really interesting year. You know there's just so many teams have so many good players in this league and if you have an injury or two that can change everything everything you're exactly right. Hey jimmy. I gotta run. We're getting close to a break here but thanks for calling call me next time. Okay all right. Let's go to cathy in alabama alabama. How can i say i tony hey look. I think it is awesome that we've got bonex. I am an auburn fan tried untrue orange and blue <hes>. I'm looking forward to the two lane game. What do you think about the experience that bo has has got already and what he is going to have after he he's tulane because i feel like the green wave is nothing to play with. <hes> some believe that their quarterback is the same <hes> system kind of thinking that bo has <hes> i believe he is going to be ah eventually both going to be really good in the arcade and he reads it very well <hes> for being a freshman quarterback which we haven't started added one since nineteen forty six until he met oregon so what do you think about the tulane game coming up well about alburns chances. Ah i one of the things you gotta do in a game like this. Kathy's you gotta look around. You said okay. What do we need to work on to get better. Obviously auburn needs to run the ball better and they need work on that. What can we do to help our freshman quarterback. Grow up and then you work on those things okay. This is about you. Don't you don't mess around around in a game like this. You try to take control early so that you have the ability to pull player put players in players out and to work on the things but you can't can't take a asked tennessee and georgia state okay you can't taken opponent for granted and then all of a sudden they get a little confidence and the game gets gets into the in the second half and then you've got a real problem so the bottom line auburn needs to take control of the game early then they have the luxury of working on on the things they want to work. That makes sense to you. Yes there. What do you think about the young about young line though we've got like oh and pop oh and and <hes> big cat bryant a._j. Brit i mean you know there. There's guys on the field and everything and i feel like over the season. I mean game by game. They're gonna snap thin. They're going to start clicking. They trick or catholics. Stop all right kathy. Thank you so much appreciate that. I've gotta run. We're going to take a break. We come back. We're here to take your calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. This is tony barnhart sitting in for paul finebaum. This is the paul finebaum show.

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The Developer Tribe - Steve Lilley - Episode 004

The Developer Tribe

28:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Developer Tribe - Steve Lilley - Episode 004

"Welcome against the developer tribe. Thank you for taking the time to listen to. Everyone is reached out. So far this podcast thousands into the processes and practices coaches educations beyond offering the insight and giving us closer reflect. Thank you for being here. However you got here without trumpet my guest today. Steve's elite director e cans pass and support club encourage development program. Steve began is career in car seats coaching later. Moving into professional academy and become a qualified teacher before combining two as a coach educates if english. Fa where he was a coach developer. For five years. I met steve. When i took my youth modules and like so many others gained more than i could have wished for not least to be talking to each other on the podcast steve. Thanks so much for being here today. Thanks yeah of course by the time this goes out if the listeners onto already the faa has taken a bit of a restructure like so many during this pandemic. You've responded to this positivity setting up your own coach development company. Tell us more by econom- what you're setting out to achieve gone a slightly different way. They've gone a little bit more digital which broke it up. Fine the eld now. I'm not only gross. Lost five years Supporting accusing clubs. Just still an h. Demaim fra and During the to osias me logged friends through through digitization and also been garages game and great a little bit of a demand and so it kind of is noble from a small idea and very quickly So we'll review counties and and the fact that they the the some of the qualifications. I had to live up on a line. And he's a very very good people in terms of affiliate affiliates judas with time allotted delivered so Got them imboden and hopefully as we continue support in the coaches within the grassroots guy dealing with a potential gutless so much in youth football coach development and having had a look at the website. Looks like you have a team around you as well so tell us about your journey to become a coach developer and those skills that you've needed to be successful in that role is in the star is from college. I know i know owns. Do you invest. they are not enough. Studying and i actually adzic tweets the best six weeks my life coaching fun weeks and long time ago. It's about from weeks very new oxford six weeks long. The only coach Do believe head. Coach was along There's not much roper. Rigid laces find down time and he was a headcount. Oland out the seventeen year old lap. Thinking this is relevant so that women's schools and then i kinda place it between ought to adamy very young coach fabulous academy at the time. I agree one which had no right to be really use in amongst the symbols and the monday nights I'm kind of a i kind of. I didn't fly out of without him. But i needed to go from wife my fan i went to So the qualifications and the experience of teaching married up is experiencing mccutchen cod fall into coach and married up while economic. Quincy you will not fly it. And he's still have been involved with the Aide bayliss hoppy college and got another inspirational kind of all going to do what you do. In price of asian pestered jamie out and he just. I think probably me a license just to get rid of it kind of went from that. You a persistent sorry. I suppose i really wanted to get into today with you. Is that drool role. You're undertaking with the one that saw you support those coach educators around you at the gloucestershire fa whilst also being coach educating yourself. How did you navigate that. Yeah good question. Yeah it's it's an. It was a restraint as in the end. Nothing was managing ten or eleven cheeses farm qualified and experienced. Ever make so it would challenge for me and and it was also had livestock. Eight appointments they into of ones. Mexico level to land is acceptable and daubs nine to five and it snows. I answered remember that that was my full time. Role is very much that pox on rome but then fabulous. Everyone involved with populous. I'm which is what some gains to get involved. I think not to waste not just in gloucestershire across the country really for all these different cheeses and mendoza mustn't forget in the mentoring program. The not to be out there. With a large workforce of quality people are certainly seen a lot of movement on twitter and lincoln of those people looking forward thankfully security new roles at least from what i've seen my experience at the gloucestershire. If i was sitting there postive one due to the quality of the staff. That i suppose what i'm getting at is the there appeared to be a need for the coach. Developers put on different hats at times within the role. You mentioned mentoring does assessing well. That goes along side or as part of being a coach educator. How'd you go about supporting the affiliate shooters around you. In terms of navigating those different roles that responding to the needs of the candidates. Yes a good question. I mean it's assessment was a pretty big talking point throughout the five years old today because it's asthma giant as well as the came into the role from a and made stink rights area to johnson tastes which was a challenge in itself. Intend to stop. It is in stuff not just across the county but across the country for the f. i Who again with covid leaning on other other people skills that we have off is an education as jettison. Founding liberal to the policy was was fantastic. Really think i think it's different to welcome at playas so you don't go for much of agents imam o'dowd who have been broken into Taken under the team because if does it are no. He doesn't know team and they probably just want to level one a few days and they may not have any ambitions to move on and then coaching grab than doing good for the kids and then go on the same colts the potentially who one of my career in coaching So in that respect differentiation for us is same juices I getting through the qualification. Want do be volley added stuff. Drama actor bomb them and support signposts instead to wherever they wanted to go ready. Yeah that's an interesting answer. You mentioned before about pilots of coach education going online some of the challenges and not other any others including that one. Actually the you see as being the biggest challenge in coach education in the coming years odd. Looks like yeah you know. I don't know what it looks like. I understand the. I'm not young man anymore in young people and molten lennon's. I'm done. That's the way the well i guess the respect is the you know the mums and maybe obvious extra. I still fail of is a is a massive of gain on the grass and learn from your mistakes and ben fate back from able then. I haven't stopped up in black coffee this morning with a good friend of mine who has an si and cheese cheese in the middle of our and what is being in a coffee shop with with connor out. Saudi other yet lose that. You know you need interaction with button. If level one for example benefit role people together across route and an look and they would been something more than. You might have a problem with what's happened with our control was say about might look a little bit and challenge. Yeah i hear that some of that interaction perhaps going to get lost in the online experience. I'm at the university of stirling now and speaking with the bear. cba students. They're coming to terms with the mostly online experience. And they bring up that issue of is difficult to re child while others on the course and have interactive learning in social space. Hopefully you'll network will go some way to play some of those gaps. That have been left behind. Do you have any major concerns about well. Football coaching in general in england is up concern outta concerned. And i just think we're on a good roll. I think we're on a good roll with things. And until i say what. It looks like a story which made the comment on the big advocate england. Dan i Very speakers dutch with with a big influence on my youth career actually and his career as a coach so very awesome stick up downing will ever circumstance fully england. Dan some hang hats on how i felt the we. Would you know. we'll go discussion durable rollins. I'm and and some other book is something happened didn't it. A bit of togetherness is a coaching community I like it looks like yet Hopefully we can carry on. Doing things will continue to improve. Yeah tell us more about the england. Dna what does that look. Like as a framework. I was was rolled out to give us an identity so i think initially from the national team and the national team. The site Dementia was the only thing that you joined us. This is the chair while i want And something drip drip fed into grassroots and to coach in the mentoring program for own fantastic. Not it will go to clubs. She's being denied she's doing stuff. Went outside unique. What is your club. If the only thing that's giant has been child stops at under seven actually kill let should be simla same similar experiences through the age groups. So things shouldn't change every and sam's of the philosophy on johnson. How the coach how they bligh accept the fact that the men's room i went into clubs and club direction. Which is the why. This is the way we do stuff mastic in that. Respect minimum to bit of Coaches it just gave us a bit of structure structure. We wanted rolling one and we want the ball rolling. Well probably because outages in the party calling toll too much and doing too much else maybe. Maybe it's totally different now. That around as much a wife who football practice. They spent a time when computers. So i shouldn't even running around on our sessions. I felt it was fantastic. Goal for everybody to kind of from not stick to under the send. But i'd lots fabulous of polls out with everything horses for courses and it when it wouldn't have been accepted by all affect generally. It was well received asuncion colson anyway. Used it myself in. My role is headed. Coaching for an organization founded a useful tool to meet. The coaches weather are an apply of frame to that progression. That wasn't too prescriptive with a mind when a new coach comes to for support. How is it that you identify where they are and what their needs might be it from them. The ones that have been out bed And i think stop the playa and we wanted to look the team. Mitch that players while supplies that because every environment is slightly district so you know why wander group of any moment now depend on their age the motivation or ability while the stuff they do. I'll differ every time i think our country and the way we coach we'd sets up after meeting. The plies needs dun-rite this. He comes on saturday. Grassroots hopeless that in a group you might have different motivations. You might have allowed or latu absolutely sob on being a professional and you might have signed group. Somebody who is. She doesn't think about football. Told one session to the next is into stalls but quite enjoys coming with a friend. Basset challenged with the point. Been thought things come from the playas because while we coach the bias nothing is need and then i think i'll have to be on themselves. What the challenges found. And then you'd like to think that the we coach developers that we can identify some things as well else's a three point model. Yeah that's interesting Prevalent in the academic literature sunny with my master's research conscious confined it quite difficult to talk about the practice accurately. The might have a really coherent ideas to that philosophy and practices but so often we find that their spouse practice what they actually do two quite different things. How does coach development helped with shortening that gap the gap between. Sorry tim that got between just between what we say we do. Which is and then what we actually end up doing. Shopping out subsidize dies. Well someday when indigenous tastic be sometimes slow often ostad inspector here like. Does this happen all the time i listen. It's it's like. I think i've always under review modem is simple model ali inundate off. Always thoughts coaches the we. We love the plan and we love to be lazy. It's coaches in the in the review. It's almost like i'm going out on it. I'm going to do and then if it didn't quite work on a in and we didn't complete the process and the f. b. fantastic in in in in encouraging reflection Whether that's just a self reflection on the way home because he's a volunteer grassroots coaches but i think reflected how how detailed you wanna be with is up a self. Reflection is the basis of the next is salako So i think been a real we. Actually it's something that said learn about myself. I didn't are sound. These guys to reflects nods reflect myself So we as a team we have to really improve those skills and how we go across the. I'm not the answers the question but no no. Absolutely a dozen reflective practice is something i saw with the modules showed us a couple of souls to use. Could you take us through your process of learning about reflection. Because i think i pasini village reflected. I've never done it coach from very young age and the time you spent any carthy on the way home from practice initial reflection. I don't think i have adopted it. That was a bit from luisa back Such as she down a pipe challenge for me. I could really relate to learn it on causes. You know they come to level one and he would. I not walked expect from a level one. Ross reflects in the practice. It was a great journey for me personally. Always on time danny is that china is hard. It's really hard But i like payments strap. This isn't it the more you do it. The more you joke down he find what's right But yes tough me knows. And i wasn grain of a wind simon expert now saying compared to some of the stuff and some of the mcdonagh's bergara fantastic reflect mrs you side yet off jimi jimi. It can become quite quickly with reflective practice sense of being surveilled. You know when you're on the coach education costs in the atoll. g needs to reflect on your practice. It can be a natural tendency to just write what you think. The person is going to be reading wants to read. And how do you help candidates during the standards that process you. You're not so interested in what is giving you want to see. Yeah yeah that's a great. Or i think we leaned loan on. Am reflection is almost taken out of the equation. Because you lie as much as you. You know as much as we nab abbott old an in situ visit an attachment. They always did well. That has always did. We comes to assessment this in the months. It's take yourself coach develop arabic quesions study the first time all the second time. I think it's good. So the property. Trust that area in the same boat raw than somebody. Who's maybe been in coaching for years. And the once build the confidence up reflecting then depending on another one. We have three options. Starting eleven up trail to reflect. I think by the end of the last couple of days we will leave him alone on the fest one or two and an zony when they built a conference up but we felt that we can go in challenge the reflection. It sounds like there's a skillful use of distance between the toss. You sat in not being on top of it. I think his army natural for people coming in especially pops those on level ones that haven't experienced it before to look to office coach educators. And think right. You're the expert you told me what stew and all go out and do it so it must be caught. A shock sometimes two candidates to come in to find that. Actually they're gonna after long pocket a lot themselves chamula but we think of any actually alannah and don't forget some of these people come coaches that bi-polar into school or many years ago and was like that you know we from abroad and john keep up so they come into classrooms for the first time and i actually did sites at mattel and another teacher not long ago on arm heads-up from the i am here to learn from unique game both group discussion on ten undercut the boat. I'm leonard as a real talent dirty waltz challenge because it's different web landed so so in the current climate. The problems the were facing the moment that that could be a barrier to engaging with mentoring support in a way that the company like yourselves do. What's your advice. The coaches during this time to really push that partisan that knowledge foods ovid. Yeah is that what you referred me. It's just nice to say that people are out gross again isn't it. I mean i. We've missed it. August it Massively dot to go to work with blinds going from toxic For me it's just easy one which is practiced his go and again. I cannot light to go in the garage with with coaching. Help one of the things that used to cy. Lately not feel awesome match was not gonna catch people out ale. We kinda got to mainly trying to help them and i think that now initially i was asked to go a few weeks ago to a local club just At hall under up to the at dots. If i on a team and can say i've gone up. They were brilliant absolutely brilliant. I'm gonna told him that much surprise. Were i'm here right. They let the kids play. Oh in their own. A spokesman nicely to from a star would not kohl's tastic the final. I can go along the becky. Austin say berlin i keep going and then come and see a few weeks move weekend outside. I'll probably answer that question on that list again. I love that phrase of not trying to catch them out but trying to catch them in nikki not during your time as a football coach developer. Is there anything that has come up with that. You've seen regularly the that needs addressing blimey question and i have gone so A bona every night on out. So it's it's something all the birds in the last few weeks and across the board. And i guess anyone will judge. I'm not preaching another thing. I've ever preached on bill. I'm just challenging people's thinking practices. I'd say and before a size understand that there are restrictions in terms of spices numbers. Trying in nego corwin pitch saying practices where physical returns minimal So we haven't sephora kona multo which i think is fantastic tool they can choose a be taken physical who know saying it and then i'll watch matches because his silent full-blown cb now and this is very much an ebb and flow about football. There is if you watch other livable. For best example of the other night up attack with thais is an invasion gainful. You'll never not be an invasion. And i understand there elements of control session but sadly with foundation victory but ultra the garage gang to be an avid flow about china's sessions for me and i'm old physical return than thing is locked down because of low said children now and that the lifestyles dino they don't go out to plice socially as much be organized just a really believe that or challenge coaches to at the end of sessions. Just reflect on the plans that a good physical workout run up and down enough says it. Probably a challenge coaches. Yeah woke us. Stop look like coal kind of things. Are you seeing in practice. That concerns you about. The physical return side is placed. It's still too much a little bit a little. I was nazi. Mooning right down on the taman a friend of mine. Let's just take a step back. I look a whole lot strode. And you haven't had seen his fantastic to say somebody kids. I'm focusing on animals. But then i'm not gonna i. She took sticks back in hollister said moving. There's no buzz is nec- buzz familiar really especially with the cold months coming up as well but even saw it still needs to be. You're to watch games on the weekend with these children. Vote anger mr steele right on seventy. He's games up. I'm rondi by the way. That's how and under i nine look in my opinion so if that plan that of the weekend to run up and run back julie. We need to make I guess that's where i'm coming from is thought about parks is designed then and usa constraints to replicate the intensity think practiced is on. Definitely i think fox. I want you. We'd can't if we don't become obsessed with playing out and through an except where they are in the game and his aren. Wholesome like i said it before. It's an invasion game and the bowl sometimes has to go that way early. Yeah astonished good to build up. Just think it's practice design practices on. I unlike tight fiscal. Rutan's you prepare implies for them much on a weekend. If on a wednesday night running around 'cause you bet your fame around a wife me football practice as much as they did Yeah it might be just made by sabet off. Just get people's minds. I'll keep it on challenging self. I'm show through your wack and three company team that you have around you you'll be able to achieve that steve. Thank you so much fear time today also for myself in the countries that were fortunate enough to have you support the moisture at the fa really wish you the best of luck with the new venture. Where is it. The people can find you to reach out website which is www dot com. He often see. I n e company nine came about in. Look down Say i n is coaches. Coaching advisory network but the number of are grams at first program is possible Which is going. It's just going off filling. The void sent you being lost with what happened with the qualification. So and we've got off to that. I i believe we can support the garage. I'm a senate was initially gloucestershire somerset It's very quickly spread it. Because i believe there's a demand fantastic plow then you know forma. Affiliate teaches a mental brian. Thanks steve. it's been great to have your insights here. Welcome to the tribe and and ruby embarked on. Yeah of course anytime awfully have you later down the line you can let us know how it's all going in some of the successes that you've had gripe again that's it for full. Thank you for listening to my guests. The forgiving tonto links to find out more by coaching network and for ways to get in touch with him. It's great to have you here. And my thanks again to willow supposed to me in the platform so far get in touch for social media or by email the developer charging. They'll come you're listening to is by bb phoenix. This finds you well ford to next time.

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COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 32: The Fierce Urgency of Now - Pursuing a Safe and Efficacious Vaccine

Mayo Clinic Talks

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 32: The Fierce Urgency of Now - Pursuing a Safe and Efficacious Vaccine

"This is the Mayo Clinic. Talks curated weekly podcast for physicians and healthcare providers. I'm at golden into medicine physician at Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. Today we're going to talk about vaccine development and clinical trials regarding vaccine's specially in the covid nineteen crisis. We know what's going on in the water. I just checked today at five point two million cases of COVID retold three hundred thirty thousand deaths in US alone. We have one point six million cases at ninety six thousand deaths. How are we dealing with it? You're dealing all over with all kinds of techniques. You're all aware of the social distancing but with the twenty percent of patients who are not fortunate enough to be isn't matic admitted in the hospital and five percent. Icu How they're being treated and widely therapy with reminisce aware and triple therapies and many other therapies that you heard off the bridge therapy with convalescent. Plasma has come and be able to identify new symptoms so overall everybody's agreeing that Cohen is is creating chaos. Today we are joined for this forecast by Dr Gregory Oland. Greg is the director of the male rexine research. Group is the Editor in Chief of the Journal vaccine and he's also the Mary Lowell. Leary emeritus professor of medicine. As far as I know there was nobody. I know in Mayo Clinic. Who understands vaccine development as fond about developing? Vaccines has been in this field longer than Greg. Thank you for joining us. Great of course. Been good to work with you. You've been a long standing and valued colleague Greg. I feel very fortunate today that I had you act to speak to our audience are what's going on. I mean you have been in the trenches developing vaccines all your life. You beat that allow and your lab has been joining vaccines and immersion vaccines before I get into the Nitty Gritty of does Psalms Kobe to sub-units. And what's going on all the different vaccines that have made it to the market? What kind of general principles are involved in the in the development of these vaccines? What are the characteristics addition? Have that's a great question because it bears so strongly on what's happening now in how people think about it and an easy way to remember it is really a three thinks to that are crucial one. Is that the vaccine has to be efficacious. And that can vary based on for example. The malaria back in might be thirty percent efficacious and yet offers value. The second is safety. Remember that we're giving these vaccines to help generally healthy people to prevent the possibility of future infections. So necessarily the safety bar should be set very high and then the third and distant factor is sort of feasability factors. Can we manufacture it? Does it need a cold chain is at one or two doses etc so ideal rexine would be maybe one does might produce enough. Antibodies have side effects as we have seen some of the rack scenes. And as you said doesn't need a cord. Shane and could be valid in tropics. And of course one thing that you're talking about is and what six billion ablation in the world and if if you have to create a wreck scene for six billion people that's an enormous responsibility. Non said it. Well what clearly? In the in the Saas Colby to wireless. What are the proteins which are imitable for Vaccine Development on? What would I as a researcher what you're looking at? Yeah so. There are four structural proteins and then a variety of so called non structural proteins. In the. When everybody's heard about is this sort of spike projection off. The virus called spike protein or protein. That's really that really seems to be the target of the majority of neutralizing antibodies but there are also a nuclear protein matrix envelope proteins that we happen to think are also very important for a holistic development of immunity against viruses. Like this. Remember. An important factor here is this is an rn a virus an rn. A viruses are marked by the capacity for mutations in recombination events and one concern about so-called s only or spike only vaccines. I just published editorial last week about. This is the idea that there could be the enough mutational pressure that you have escape. Mutants that then become dominant or less than the value of a vaccine that was produced. Say this year against the virus as it presents this coming fall or winter. I've heard a lot about the neutralizing antibody which mentioning about what is a neutralizing body. So the idea behind a neutralizing antibody is that this. This binds to an important part of the virus and it binds with high affinity and avidity and neutralizes the virus the problem any vast really very insightful in critical question on it is that when you develop sub neutralizing or just binding antibodies. That don't neutralize the virus. You actually run the risk of vaccine associated or body enhanced disease in the people who get the vaccine we saw that with inactivated are be inactivated measles and just a year and a half two years ago with the new denny back seat so this is a really important critical aspect of vaccine safety which I suspect. We'll talk more about in a bit and so just because you touched on it. Can you elaborate? I've read about some complications being. Is it going to the same disease? If violence is not neutralize completely or is it new heart lung complications. In some of these vaccines. You're you're exactly right You know with the SARS covy one back in two thousand three two thousand four. None of those vaccines progressed past phase. One the primary reason being that the virus disappeared and the second one. Is that in a number of those candidate. Vaccines there was the development. Just as you're suggesting of pulmonary pathologic in those animals and it was to animal models mice and ferrets that got the vaccine then had a viral challenge and developed a immunopathology in in the lungs and hepatitis. Like picture so it really is important that we get this right and one of the cautions that I have is. There is immense public and political pressure for a vaccine which as EVAC SINOLOGIST. I get that but at the same time if there is a side effect discovered because we have rushed the vaccine. Have we really done the public favor? And you and I took an oath I burst do no harm and so my interest is not only in developing vaccines but ensuring. They're is safe as possible. That's right right now. We have only know about this fight. Point two million cases and the numbers up these are the only the cases we jarve coming up a lot of them. Eighty percent if symptomatic hourly twenty percent does symptomatic of people. Not even getting distant. Now you dig the hole six billion population and give them vaccines. And if you don't do it right. The mant of vaccine related problems will go to millions by the number of cases. We have right now. Now I mean we. We already live in a culture where there is maxine hesitancy and a lot of skepticism about vaccines. If we don't do this right will set back public acceptance of vaccines by decades. Getting it right when you mentioned one is the neutralizing antibody that you mentioned. But when I hear experts like you and other stopping you also talk about this diesel aspiration in vaccine development. Why is that important? It's important for a couple of reasons. One is that you need a certain amount of t helper cell activation. That's part of the development of adaptive and cellular immunity so want to develop long-lived cellular immunity so if I get the vaccine tomorrow and two years from now I'm exposed to this virus. I want to have trained my immune system so to speak to recognize and then start producing antibody against this virus or part of the virus that it seemed before the the other aspect of it. And you touched on it. When you mentioned the pulmonary pathology is that you want to have a what's called a t h one what I've talked about before before was t h to you want to have a t h. One Bias toward the immune response if you will. Because that's those are the cells responsible for viral clearance of infected cells? And that's really an important feature these infections. So if you don't pay attention to it we only worry about the neutralizing antibody and the B. Cells as I'm understanding from you. The prediction might be just a year are shot are too if you do for a diesel. It could go on for five or six years or hopefully longer so. That's one part is durability and the other part is when we're when we're t h to bias when we're biased toward antibody only that's when you start running the risk of vaccine associated enhanced disease so we really do want to get that right out come back to that again as to why some vaccines can be given once in Your Life. Bang like there's also lacks which we know of and others like flu shots. He ever get every year and Ramdas Flowers Koby to fit in. But I come to that but coming to the board as you just mentioned there was lot of rush from people body aches. I can understand businesses closed. Everybody wants to get on with their lives. I don't want to be taking medicines. I want to be digging blast my life. I can award these. These are being given right now. Because you're not having a vaccine but from start to finish. Can you explain? Why does it take so long to make a vaccine and your experience? How long does it take do develop of acts you you've been involved in so many of now Another great question Typically in the. Us We have a regulatory pathway. That I'll describe in a moment moment but it is designed to be reflective evidence based pure reviewed. So that no corners are cut. It is it is a deliberately long process in order to ensure safety and good efficacy that time interval in the US is generally seven to twenty years so for example. The chicken pox vaccine that our kids that took almost twenty years to develop costs about one billion dollars. Us To licensor a vaccine in do all the studies. The reason for that is this. We Start for example in my lab working on a covid nineteen vaccine. We start with the preclinical work. So what is the platform? We're going to use. What antigens should we include them? We're going to study it in small animal models at that point we present our data to the FDA and they allow a phase one clinical trial phase. One is I in man. Trials usually involves ten to sixty people were around there tens not hundreds or thousands and the idea. There is really searching for the right dose the right method of administration in safety if those go well. Then you're allowed to go to face to face to has hundreds of subjects and again you're evaluating dose. You're valuating safety. If that goes well you enter into the so called. Valley of death is called that because only about six percent or so. A vaccine candidates are actually going to make it through phase. Three clinical trials. These now involve tens of thousands of people. Because you're really wanting to know about efficacy. And you're wanting to know about safety at that point and I've served on this. Fda committee all this data comes to an expert committee. It's reviewed an a vote taken on whether it should be a licensed in the US nowadays even if that Vote is positive. The FDA FDA insists on face for studies where hundreds of thousands to millions of people have now gotten the back seen through routine clinical use but we nonetheless passively gathered data looking for any other safety signals. And the and the reason we do that and calculated out the numbers. Here let me just read some of them. If you want to know about a significant side effect occurs one in five thousand times you have to study. Nineteen thousand two hundred people okay. So far. None of the vaccine trials that we're hearing about at involved that number of people you WanNa know about a significant side effect. That occurs one in ten thousand. You're you're talking about studying just under forty thousand people and one in one hundred thousand which will essentially only know about in face or studies. You're studying three hundred and eighty five thousand people so it gives you a sense of. Why does it take so long? Why does it cost so much in? It really revolves around safety given the time and given what have known is the FDA the vaccine development going to speed up the process of stage one phase one and phase. Do I understand several of these studies already in face two which is very surprising given the Took in the past young Well you're right and in my opinion We Are. We are rushing. One understands that that's been called the fierce urgency of now. And and we all get that as as clinicians and and as the scientists but at the same time I think the appropriate pathway is preclinical small animals and then non human primates studies then phase. One face to face three trials. Now now you can adapt those trials and there are ways in which you can safely speed those up but never in my mind. Never at the cost of safety we must ensure that other physician scientists in the public trust the process in that trust is born of knowing that we're putting safety of everything else and that's where my concern revolves is that we're doing simultaneous phase one two or simultaneous space to three studies involving ten thousand. Not Twenty thousand or fifty thousand and and I have some concerns about that one of the ways in which One could shorten or at least decide whether a vaccine candidate should go forward. It's being talked about is human a challenge studies the idea behind here and we do it with some Other pathogens is we would give somebody an experimental vaccine remove them to a facility and then deliberately infect them with the virus at at this point. I personally don't think that's ethical. I think a lot has to be worked out about that primarily because we don't have a proved rescue therapy if one of those volunteers were to get in trouble so for me as as a physician as a scientist as a Mayo Clinic clinician. The safety of our patients must always come first. Just listening to you. A number of adverse effect in one hundred thousand and you need three hundred eighty five thousand Beijing are people do study it and if that's positive the billions of people we have it it would mount very soon to be of adverse effects that could be world. That's now yeah now the one in one hundred thousand. We never really discover those until face or studies. And that's understandable from a logistic feasability issue. But it's the one in ten thousand and under that I'm concerned we. We don't see when we do shortcut. Trials with small numbers of subjects behaved. This magical thing. They come up with a vaccine knowing the characteristics knowing the mutation which is going to happen at a spike in level and others is. It doesn't look like it's going to be one and done that one vaccine and it'll take care of lifelong immunity always going to be something which we have to take the flu. Shot combined with the flu shot doing the fall season and get once a year for the rest of our lives yum and the short easy answer is nobody knows yet. Net remains to be discovered but to your first question. I don't think it's going to be one and done. I think we're going to need different types of back and for this reason Right now the world's manufacturing capacity if we switched everything to just produce this vaccine if we needed to doses we. We can't do it so we're going to need different types of vaccines. We're going to need different types of vaccines because we're immunizing different. If you will categories people immuno immature children Immuno SENESCENCE ADULTS. Immuno-compromised people pregnant women That is rarely amenable to a single vaccine platform a I would put forward as an example Influenza where we have some seven different types of influenza vaccine I like that pushes companies to develop back scenes like that because I think we wanna be as a personalized in our prescription of a vaccine as we are with drugs. Choose the right vaccine for the right person at the right time. And so I think Almost assuredly we're going to need to have several different. Kobe vaccines how did the SALT? Dev LUMP The lady she'll vaccine before that Jenner read the cowpox therein so many people around and do the vaccine going in a short time with this lot of adverse effect that they did notice trial and error and they've actually become a model because vaccines that their loved the whites. You know it is interesting to look back at the Jenner and even before Jenner Jenner's noted because he was the first to publish which is a lesson for all of us academics. He wasn't the first to use it. It had been used actually probably centuries before in China India Etc but he published and your point is a good one even the advanced Second or third generation Smallpox vaccines that. We have now still suffer from the same side. Effects of being alive attenuated Vaccine Jonathan Edwards in the early colonial time of this country when he was president of Yale got smallpox vaccine in a month later died from complications of it so You know the that of course was done back in the days before they really understood the science. Now you take something like polio. Vaccine that you mentioned with salt in. It's it's very interesting. So sulk Developed an inactivated viral vaccine and. Sabin an oral vaccine and in the testing of the salk vaccine. There's the so called cutter incident. That was the name of the company making it and something went wrong in the process. This is in the nineteen fifties and the virus was not inactivated and yet was administered as an inactivated vaccine and children developed polio. As a result of that I don't think that would happen today obviously because we do lot release testing Cetera but it points to the fact that in the field of back Sinology. I've been in this field over thirty five years. I can tell you that there are always surprises. We've had influenza vaccines since the nineteen forties. We're still doing testing on next generation. Vaccines to improve them so so we will never be done. We can never really make them good enough. We have to keep improving them like all of medicine but always be for us has to be an exceptionally high bar for safety. Now you might. You might vary that bar based on Conditions for example. Let's say that SARS Kobe to was killing thirty percent like Ebola thirty percent of the people at infected. You might accept a vaccine had more side effects that were not lethal or inducing. Any permanent damage. you might. You might accept a vaccine that had lower efficacy and higher reacted in this city because the risk benefit would still be favorable. That's not the case in the current environment with this. It needs to be very very safe. I need to go back and ask you one additional point which I hear vaccine and exports talk about his mucosal immunity vaccines and what does Nichols Limited. Why's it important and you see that play a role in the of the current vaccine that dot young. That's one of those unknowns. I was referring to where I'm sure we will pay more attention to that in a second generation. Co. Bid Nineteen backseat. There were some early studies looking at entrance. Nasal Administration the vaccine. You could demonstrate the development of new Kozel immunity but insufficient sterilizing immunity to protect against disease. So you coastal immunity is important for respiratory pathogens because they are being introduced in entered through the nose and mouth but it is not more important than more systemic or immunity so so both have to be considered so a common way of remembering some of these vaccines live versus at United. Is You know if somebody's competent. Competence competent rather good sense. They can tolerate a live vaccine really good. And if you're GONNA compromise like transplant or the huguenots And the younger children you know. Give them kill rack. See that save for what you think. Are we going to approach these tire? System in The Kobe to case a amish. You're nearly there is EVAC sinologist. I'm GonNa get you into vaccines yet. You've you've articulated it very well. We basically started have four categories. You can think of of of vaccines actually either. If you think of something like tennis which is tax soy but let me leave that one offer now in terms of respiratory viruses. We have whole virus. Vaccines that you mentioned. Those can be attenuated. But live or inactivated. We have recombinant protein. Vaccines have vaccines that are delivered with replicating or non replicating viral. Vectors Nets That's actually one of the lead vaccine's right now and then we have Nucleic acid based vaccines whether M. R. A. Or DNA vaccine and then finally our our own approach at at Mayo. Which is a peptide vaccine so that you can make them cheaply store them indefinitely no cold chain and no contraindications allergic reactions so that we of course think that our platform is going to turn out to be a winner. But we'll see this really lives to Segue of the kind of side Scooby Doo vaccines which I've been studied and we have this. Recent press came out about the modern not emanate. Would you mentioned and you tell us limping about what does wreck. Scene is about so the dirt vaccine is an MRE vaccine in a lipid nanoparticle. So the idea is that you inject this. And then the M. R. A. With this Lipid Particle was taken up into cells and then the MRI which is a genetic code for the S. Protein STARTS REPRODUCING WITHIN THE CELL. So the idea is to force our own human cells to make s protein so that we developed immunity against the virus. And you're right. That is now in phase. Two clinical trials. They did a press release days ago. I think it was oddly enough and and I don't particularly like the idea of presenting science through press releases I like. Publications are peer reviewed but oddly enough Though they had studied more patients they only presented results on a fraction of the patients but in that fraction they all developed a nice high levels of and in a monkey study that was done preceding. It demonstrated that after one dose. They could protect those monkeys against severe disease. So I I would call it a promising candidate we have never licensed an MRI based vaccine before and a lot of safety work. I think to be done yet. What about Oxford University vaccine that they've been working on and it's impressed too young? That's a that's another one of these viral vectored vaccine in this case. It's a chimpanzee Adna. No virus that has been modified so that it does not go through many cycles of replication. Which of course would be a problem. But within the the virus they've inserted the genetic code for the s protein full length of the s protein. So again that virus. If you will quote unquote infects us when it's administered and then the genetic code for the s protein of SARS. Kobe to virus starts replicating making s protein. We make antibodies against that and then immunity if our bodies should see the actual live virus and and also heard about the INOVA Pharma but that is a very unique different way of inserting the vaccine which is not typical and could be problematic when you're using it for mass production and mass administration you're nailed again This is a DNA based vaccine again. That has never been licensed before. Dna vaccines contain at least the theoretical of that DNA integrating into the host genome into our own DNA. And that's that's of major concern if anything like that were to be seen. It hasn't been but were it to be saying that that would be a concern. The other issue with that on it is that you're not only having to inject the vaccine but then you're having to do something like electric peration so that the DNA can actually get into the cell. So it makes it inexpensive bulky platform that I think would be hard to use in a mass vaccination setting and likely pretty expensive and then the Mayo Peptide based vaccine which you are involved in and you did mention some of the characteristics of riot peptide vaccine could be beneficial to the steps on. What do you do? What kind of a considering for the school Redo Young? Yeah thank you for that for the question. So what we've done is we've spent about fifteen years developing the science behind this. So we use very elegant. Very sensitive mass spectrometry. We take human cells. Grow them in a Petri dish. And then in fact though cells with the virus then what we do is using mass spectrometry. Were literally pulling off the sell. All the protein pieces so it's called processing all the pieces of the virus that the body processes are breaks that virus down into and then we pick off those individual little peptide. So we're actually seeing what our immune cell see. They don't see the virus they see pieces of proteins of the virus. And we're actually isolating those pieces so it's a it's a very natural process and then what we do is we do. Further in vitro studies where we take humans who have been previously infected with the virus. Expose their white blood cells to these peptides. In order to determine which ones do they react to in other words they biologically in immunologically relevant peptides? Then we take those package them with the Lipid nanoparticle or with an edge event and then Inject them into animals. So we've done that with measles we've done that with influenza most recently Rick Kennedy. My lab has done it with smallpox virus actually Vaccinia virus end demonstrated that we completely protected these small animals against viral challenge. So the advantage of it is. You can make peptides extremely cheaply. You don't have to have a cold storage for them. You can store them indefinitely in. We're hoping we can include a peptides from a variety of the structural proteins. We talked about earlier so that the body is trained to think it seemed the whole virus and would react appropriately if somebody ever were infected at you're describing the You created the based vaccine for other wider says it comes to mind on these selections of the different whether the MRI where the DNA whether it's peptide based on the regional dis of these labs were working on the White House's Were working on the same writers and developing mining vaccine or is the race towards nobody can scale to six billion maxine difference proved to be effective and has all the characteristics at local pockets developed their accent which is equally effective and then we probably have a head to head trial on vigil. Vaccine produces more antibody. Looks like so many unexplained questions at the present moment an answer still will require but right now the world of the politician and everybody's screaming at you saying we don't care what you're doing tired. Mrnd DNA just give it a name of vaccine and US and said you are cautioning. Us THAT RACE CAN BE. Are that that can be very risky. Proposition can delay maxine Dome Movement for years. So I like the I like the caution like to have your view about the whole concept about the race towards this. It's an IT. I think you'll you'll appreciate the name of the editorial I published in back seen last week. It was called the tortoise and the Hare a cautionary note on SARS Kobe to vaccine development and from that old Greek fable saying that the race is not always to the swift. It's to it's to the wise and the whole point was to point out that we can. We can move vaccine development forward and we can be wise at the same time. I think we have all seen doing. Science by public. Media is a very poor way to do it doing science by you know economics or politics or pull up a public pressure. It's all understandable but as professionals our job and as physicians in clinicians is to evaluate those and figure out what is what offers the best efficacy and the highest standard of safety as we mentioned and we talked about I think several vaccines are likely to fulfil that criteria you asked about will why why these different platforms. It does have to do with the expertise in the interest of the individual group or or a pharmaceutical manufacturers expertise with a with a certain Technique for example but it also recognizes. I think that we're going to need more than one type of Maxine and so I applaud that there are a lot of vaccines in development. Some of them are most of them are never going to amount to anything. Over a hundred and ten vaccine development efforts have been announced most of those the vast majority of press releases. They won't go anywhere there me to kind of ideas. I think the the NIH Here in the. Us has done us. A great service by putting together a sort of partnership if you will call active and the idea there and I really wanted endorsed. This is to say rather than all these competing interests. Let's put together master protocols so everything is studied the same way. Have the same data monitoring and Safety Safety Board overlook all of this use a standardized lab an independent board of Stance Titians? So that we really do get the best science in the best quality of these clinical studies in order to make wise decisions. Now I I like of caution because just like you. I am a general practitioner and so I have to spend so much time just explaining the routine vaccines which work out. Somehow this vaccine development for size Gobi to has been hyped up so much that I'm already getting patients asking me about. When will the vaccine be ready? Don't want to be a situation where I am. Dealing with the adverse effect and explaining to the patients how rush hour judgements and our our scientific community knocked. Apply all the rigorous principles. Did you teach in the graduate school at be? Learned from so many experts. What to do? Because you're right. We shouldn't do any harm. So I completely agree with you. That you distill beneficial to have all those guidelines social distancing handwashing putting the mask. Eighty percent are insect dramatic a twenty percent improving on what to do and then the community is trying to find out ways of reopening the businesses by caution but rushing ranked seen thinking. Well that's the way to do. Things are not doing it. Right is going to be a whole huge crisis. As you just pointed out will in fact let me give you an example that reinforces what you were talking about in the two thousand nine influenza pandemic now we've been making influenza vaccine since the nineteen forties. Every year we take out the old strain in the vaccine put in the new. This was no different in two thousand nine. The new pandemic strain was put into the vaccine inactivated of course sub-unit and yet physicians nurses wouldn't and the public wouldn't take the vaccine because over that six month time period. They said it was rushed. And we didn't know about safety so we live in a vaccine skeptical society and with a safe maxine like influenza. We had maybe only a fifty percent uptake so we. We really do need to get this. Right as you're as you're pointing out and be able to legitimately say here's the safety profile of this vaccine and I'm not gonNA. I'M NOT GONNA recommend it to patients until I take it I well. I'm so glad that very thoughtful and physicians like you sites decision. Scientists will spent that entire career life than thirty five years of off the most glorious service that I know of that you have your served all of us at Mayo Clinic and the and the technology so as long as your name is there as long as there are individuals who you trust a doing this vaccine. As long as you're writing editorials in your vaccine group telling us what to do I think all of us in the general practice the government and the people are going to be satisfied with that then to continue doing what we're doing in fact. The the story goes that the the guide released a genie from the bottle and the genie was leaving the bottle at disappearing. The guys. Hey I'm going to grant me a favor man. I release you from the bottle. I'm told you in Rambis some famous. The genie said are you crazy? In fact with grand your favorite the bottle myself what I am saying is doing it right and doing well. So many great minds working on it And thank you very much greg for taking the time to talk with us. I'm sure there's evolving feel and if I were to interview in six months from now it'd be a lot more that we have learned from you learned and you're you'll be able to. I think we'll probably repeat this this Recording this fall when we know a lot more. That's right thank you great. So be just heard. Dr Gregory Poland Director of Maxine Research Group Editor in chief at off vaccine and professor at the Mayo Clinic. Rochester talk about the vaccine development in Kobe. Nineteen crisis and also talk of some of the clinical trials. We continue to bring you updates on the situation as rent's unformed if you have enjoyed the Mayo Clinic podcast. These subscribe stay healthy. And I'll see you back next week.

Influenza Kobe Mayo Clinic US FDA Greg Mayo Clinic Rochester scientist Maxine malaria Jenner Jenner Editor in Chief polio SALT Dr Gregory Oland Minnesota
"Photography and Copyright - An Interview with Maggie Hallahan" - Podcast 674

The Digital Story

31:14 min | 1 year ago

"Photography and Copyright - An Interview with Maggie Hallahan" - Podcast 674

"This is digital story by cast number six seven four February twelve two thousand nineteen. Today's theme is the tiger fee and copyright and interview with Maggie how a ahead. I'm Derek story. The online world has changed the business landscape for artists who care about protecting their intellectual property, but there are reasonable affordable steps that you can take to protect your images from being used by others without your permission in on this week show. I talked with professional photographer Maggie Jala Han about those very steps. I hope you enjoy this interview. So even though maggie's client list, probably includes companies that we don't have on our such as Microsoft by working with these large entities. She's had to learn about, copyright intellectual property, and all that kind of stuff, and because she's had to learn so much on such a grand scale that really helps understand the big issue and understanding that they issues exactly what I wanted to talk about. Because it's like a lot of things for instance, if I'm going to write an article about X, I really need to research to x or three x so that I present X properly, and that was way too. I'll. Probably for this show. But but you get my point. And that's the sense. I had when I sat down with Maggie, even though we're going to be talking about copyright for you. And for me, and of course for her. And even though she's worrying about things that you, and I don't need to think about what she has learned applies to us and the steps that she has are steps that we should be taking for our own work. So I'm going to get over to the interview table right now. And we'll see what Maggie has to say. I think you will enjoy this. And I definitely know that you're gonna learn a couple of things. All right. So here we go. Here's maggie. I'm sitting here in the studio at Nike Jala, Han, professional photographer. So in that, I have known since Iceland. Right. Isn't that where we fifteen years ago? How my gosh when light room I came out, right? We. One data. We were trying to help the user interface group of pro photographers went over there with Mickle Oland, and we use that Eappen. We were. But we're talking about something a little bit more serious today. Are we? Yeah. I wanted to come up and and speak with you about them portent of carrying on this incredible tradition of copywriting, your photography work. I think is important to and that's why when you contacted me about this. I said we've got to do the show. Right, right. Yeah. It's ever going people when we were younger Tatas how to do this. And we did it and we had good benefits outcomes. So why don't we get into it? And I can tell you my procedure does do that. Let's start with a little bit about the kind of work that you do because you are shooting for some some pretty large businesses these days and have been for the last ten years or so. Yeah. So I had been in editor photographer for about twenty years, and I worked worldwide and at about the time that digital started overtaking the market is was when I transferred into doing photo brand stories. So work for big corporations like Microsoft and Electronic Arts, and I developed libraries of images so that the people that work there in marketing can pull them down in use them, so copyrights, really important meta data, and that the images aren't used out of the want of that brand. In through this work, you really up your copyright game. Right. I mean because it was actually important that you can protect your clients. Right. Or you are the guardian of those images as you've told me before. So you learned a lot about copyright through this type of work. Yeah. I mean back in the day when we were found you had to do copy slides, and then send the copy slides into the copy office, and it was a long process, and it was hard to do. Now. It's digital. So about the time we did light room. I figured out that you could take the entire shoot. So say photograph for two weeks and Africa and you come back. You can not have to edit anything, and you can export all those images is small J pags and then submit them to the copyright office. And at the tiny, submit them. That's it. They are in your name, and you are the copyright owner of your own images. One of the things that really jumped out at me when we start. Talking about this as there's really not a big reason to avoid doing this. I mean, if it were something that was very complicated. Took a whole lot of time that would be one thing. But actually now these days it's relatively simple process. Right. It's simple and the benefit is just amazing say if you have created something, and it's your art. And then someday you'll see that art being used or even someone has stolen your art. And they're reselling it to someone else for big marketing campaign. You don't have the legal standing right of already owning the copyright the likelihood that you'll ever get them to stop using. It is pretty small you've tackling one of the things I was going to ask you, which is I think it's an urban myth, really. But that if you can prove ownership of the picture in other words that say that you can go to corden have a raw file that then you would have a case. But actually if you haven't copyrighted the age. You're not even gonna find a lawyer that will help you right now. Now. In fact, I have case it's we sent. And when I talked to lawyer that vises me a lot on copyright since it was copy written right after it was photographed, and it was so clearly misused she's taking the job on at this point in what you know for her percentage. So I not even having to put money out for a lawyer to to get this person to stop us by the same token, if you hadn't done this. You're not gonna find anyone to help, you know, she wouldn't have taken it on. She checked my copyright like I had to produce it case together before she accepted. There's two overwriting reasons why I think that this is a good idea in nothing about copywriting one. Is you have some recourse, right? You have a chance right against people who are misusing your work. Usually, the one thing that you could probably count on is that you could get them to stop this using it. Yeah. Because in the letter to them. Cease and desist letter. You could just say, this is a copyright image to me, you are not authorized stop using it at once brute. Right. So having a copyright gives you the leverage to get them to stop using it goes right up that chain of command their legal office, and they say pull it off now. Right. Exactly. And so really what you're the thing that you're creating for this effort is peace of mind, right? Then you have some records. You know that thing is when you're out creating especially your personal copy at my personal work as well. You've created that work. It's part of who you are. It's it's hard to imagine. What that feels like if someone has taken that without your permission, and then amplified it and are making money on it. It's it's pretty horrible experience until you actually experience it, you don't really know how terrible it is. For me. I have all my Garin shared with my business insurance. And it's my asset. It's the things that I have created is top most value to me. So I have now my film is digitized and gone back and copy written all of the film work. I did as well. All right. So you thoroughly convince me about the need to copyright how hard is it to do this. But that's the thing. Easy to talk about the. Okay. So you remember in light room where you could just take all photos and do next port. So when you export these the technical law that I've been advised by lawyers is win you export them. The sizing need to be as big enough that the image is recognizable. So that size is only about twelve k so you can export anything around three fifty by two fifty or something in that range. And then when you do task bunch, you do a test ten say, you have ten thousand images in that light room library just do about ten of them. And take a look and say, oh, hey, I totally recognize that this is that guy, and that's that car, and this is this girl, and you know, like if it's recognizable then that's good enough. And so then you take folder put it on your desktop or external drive. And then you take everything out alight room. And you say export all you don't need to go through and only export certain edits. And it doesn't matter. If later you change the naming convention, you just take the whole body of work and you export it. And if you say have ten thousand images, and you export them all at about twelve. K you're definitely under DVD size of. I mean, you could be gone for weeks. And you're still under a DVD that twelve k. A lot to get back into gigs. Exactly. Or a so then so you have this this folder of these these images that aren't very big. But has everything everything from the shoot? Okay. What happens next? Well, I just want to add a little note. And that is if you have a client or someone, and you've put any of that on social media while you were out and about before you've copy written it, then you can't include that particular photo in the big exports. I just want to note that if it's been published or pushed and someone you sent it to someone and they published it, then it takes the whole entire group of images, and it changes them untie unpublished work to publish work, and it's much more complicated problem and much more expensive. So for the fifty five dollar all, you know, ten thousand images best to use all unpublished work in that grouping. That's a that makes me think about just workflow on something like this. So if I were going to do something I was going to go up and social. I would just take that shot with the iphone right with my smartphone. Put it up, you know, have fun with that. But all the work that goes on my card right with with what I call a real camera. All that work. Does not go on social does not get published and till the copyright is let's say we're talking to someone who really is doing their art with her iphone, and they like to publish every day. Well, the have the budget. They can do a little copyright send off of their phone and upload everything they shot that day, and it's just fifty five dollars a day. So they could do that. And then still do social every day, and that would be copy written before it hit the social. So it is technically possible. It's just my style of work right now is that I do be groupings of of a project, you know, more repa- ties of the and then I can do it. But let's say I was really like shooting for corporation, and I was doing it all with super-quick technology, and it was getting published. I would pay the fifty five dollars a day in every day copyright a letter. Good. All right. So that's good to know. So you can do online. Or you can download us short-form. We're talking about dealing with the US copyright office here, right? We're not talking about some third party agency or something like that. And by the way, pretty sure it is still the only copyright office in the world. So they get tons of people from Europe and Paris and Hamburg, sending to the US copyright office. So we have international people using that website all the time. Oh, good. Great. Now, you the kind of the Mayland way, right? There are two ways. Okay. There's the online upload. And then there's go and export the PDF onto your computer. That's the short copyright form short-form, and it's just one page, and then you can just fill it out with your hand. Like, you could handwrite it. And then you can hand write your fifty five dollar check. And then you can take that ten thousand images put it on a DVD. And then take the whole thing and send it by UPS. And the moment you have sent it. You have a, you know, the proof of sending it on the UPS at that moment that it's been sent is legally copier, and even before it actually gets to the office that that moment that it's in the shipping its copywriting. And by the way, this is for video music, like all art is the same form. And so when you send it out, then you peace of mind, no one can ever steal it and you've done unpublished works. So now, you can just use a work anywhere you want and you're covered. I like that. Because I make a duplicate of of the check and the page that I've written it out, which by the way, when I write the formal or do it online. I put the most limited amount of work. So if I go to tens and AM for two weeks, I just say tens Aena two thousand six. Like, I wouldn't put details because you don't need to can just be very open like multiple countries. Just somewhat identifying the thing that's identifying the actual image not naming convention. It's the pixels of the image thing that copywriting. So when I do that, I'm a duplicate DVD. So in my file, I have my original handwritten one I might DVD, and I have a copy of my check soon as the check has cancelled and it's up on my account online export the back of the check and the front of the check in like a little PDF export and print it out. And then I put it with my other form that I had filled out. And then I actually have a copy of the DVD. I've case going on right now where I did it like that. And I don't have to go back to the copyright office and say, hey, double triple prove that was in there. I have it on DVD. And I took that to my lawyer. And I said, look here's the copy that I actually sent in look it's right here. This is identifiable. And that is what? The lawyer goes that's all I need. And the boy is beautiful because that's really nice not having. I mean, you could if you really needed to. But it's nice not having to go back to the copyright office. They get some sort of something that proves that. He did it. You've got it. All right there. I have never even talked to anyone who's done that like you'd have to talk to someone else. I've heard there's a fee and I hear that. There's time you have to wait. I'm sure it's horrible. Sure have no idea. I just know there's more forms to fill out. And then there's money, but I've never heard of anyone is done at this more manual snail mail way. I've never heard of any lock ace that then goes back and ask the copyright office to prove that it was in that if you have your copy DVD, and you have a copy of what you wrote and the correlate to the project, and then you after you send this in about a month or two later, the actual US copyright for your whole fifty dollars of unpublished for the unpublished work. They send you a copyright form with like an embossed stamps saying this is copy written really, and it has the name from the collection of Tanzania in two thousand six or whatever. What are your mind when someone does find image of yours, and they want to use it what sort of things that you think about when you think about whether or not to let them use it? You know, what cases do cases deal? I guess the real dividing line is if someone's going to be making money off of the photo accompany that using consumer photos for consumer use and they're going to use it worldwide right now someone came to me, and they were like Exxon and they needed a photo that I was doing in Africa. I would charge them about twenty five hundred year for you. So that image, and it would be a limited time that they could utilize it, and they would have to come back if they wanted to use it longer. That's because they're going to be using that in time magazine talking about their great efforts in Africa to help some something with education or something that in that case, they're using it for brand for raising their brand value. And so they owe me. Money for that. Now, someone is working like they're raising money for malaria prevention bednets, and it's an NGO. And you know, of course, say I'm going to let them use the Mench. They give me copyright credit. And hopefully, they're going to be you know, able to maximize how much money they're raising. Exactly. And your name is associated with something that you feel good about absolately. Let me tell you Exxon generally won't put my name on that photo. When it runs, you know, so they're not gonna give me brand recognition in general. I can go she ate that. And it is something that you can put on the table, but in general like, Microsoft, EA, most my big corporate clients would never use my name on anything. They're paying you. So. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's advertising. Right, right. I wanted to just share about the contracts with my corporate work that one of the things that I'm doing is. I'm copywriting everything. That's obviously unpublished as soon as I can. So that it can start giving it to my client quickly. So they can utilize it win. They are utilizing it. I've already set up an agreement before I start my shoot. And and we sign deep paperwork around leasing and copywriting in. So I cop. He right the images with the copyright office. And then I offer them unlimited time lease of the images. So if there was something I did in my production that turned out someone was in the photo in the far back, and then they wanna sue Microsoft, or they wanna see electron arts, Microsoft or electronic guards or some big company could just say that person who's trying to them because they're pitcher was used in advertising or pitcher of them. Their artwork or their house or something if they're trying to see Microsoft, Microsoft would refer them to me into my company, and I then deal with directly. Also, if someone is used the image, and they didn't have permission and say, I photographed it for Microsoft. I am responsible Microsoft's. That's oh my gosh. Someone using that photo, and it came from Bubba. It's my job to write a cease and desist letter and stop them from using it. And so Microsoft doesn't want to be the deep pockets at all though, it's a lease in part of my business agreement with them is that I take care of it. I am the one standing and in charge of you know, what the result will be. So speaking of your photos, so work could people go to find out more about you, see the work that you're doing great. So my website is m h p v dot net and that to Maggie Jala Han, photography video and actually have video clips on. All right. All right. Good. Do you take all sorts of jobs or? Everything. Like, I love everything. I mean, obviously, I don't to food for McDonald's civic. I love people I do portrait. I photographed a lot of famous people. I have done film feature films. And currently I like doing larger projects that bring awareness to currently. I'm doing water protection and water prevention, and I have done a lot of work with malaria prevention aids family planning, so I'm like doing large bodies of work that is consistent league. Great for people to use hurt it. Right. You know, if you know who to go to write for this Maggie. Thank you so much coming up to the studio today. It's great to see again. Thank you. I love that. You are doing this. Derek? It's such a great service for everyone. And I hope that people continue to pass on this. Evergreen information around copyright. All right. Take care Anki talk. You later. Those terrific. Thank you so much Maggie for sitting down and joining me and talking about this very important subject, by the way, as Maggie mentioned, you can learn more about her by visiting her site m h p v dot net, and I have a link in the show notes over and look at everything that she's up to look at her client list, look at her work. And you know, think about if you've got a big project coming up where you really need a professional. Maggie would definitely be good joint. Portfolio box tip of the week. So I have a good one for you this week. And it's showing you step by step how the create a professional looking contact page for your professional bauxite. And I think that's super important because you know, we put our great images up there. Maybe put a little bit about ourselves. Well, the next step is the thing that we hope is that someone sees that and goes, wow, I would like to work with that person that artists looks like he or she really knows what they're doing in. So you wanna make that easy and you wanna make that professional looking. So the Lincoln the show notes to video of produced by portfolio box that just shows you Bom Bom Bom. Here's how to do it only takes a few minutes. They had some great templates. You picked the right template. You customize it, you publish it. And suddenly people have great in easy. Way to get in contact with you, and you know, they're going. Wow. This is a good looking contact page. That only does this person know how to take great pictures. They have their act together on the business side of things as well. All righty. So that's our tip of the week for folio box. Also want to mention that our contest up close is winding down here for those of you that listen to podcasts on the day that publishes today is probably the twelfth right? You have to the end of the day. Just send your close up image to the nimble photographer at g mail dot com. Remember the person that is on it? With the best up close image gets a free one year subscription to portfolio box pro in that is a nice treat. I'm telling you. I am so excited about this being able to give this away to our listeners. So if you haven't sent your shot in yet, there's still time attach it to Email send it to nimble tiger gmaiLcom throw. Oh, you're lens cap in the ring and see if you can get this one year subscription. It's a very very nice thing. If you wanna see my performed bauxite, all you have to do is go to the digital story and click the about link up in the top Naveh bar or just go to Derrick story, photography dot com. And you can see what I've done in terms of my work history and a couple galleries and so forth, and you can get a feel for full Ishaq site. It's really quite nice now if you wanna create your own you can do that for free. Just click on the tile that's on every page of the digital story or use the link in the show notes. And then that'll take you over there to our landing page. We have our own landing page on portfolio box. Get started there, you know, build your free site get to know, the tools get a feel for it. And then if you decide upgrade to the pro site, which is only eighty three dollars a year, including your custom domain name. You'll get twenty percent off. If you started on our landing page. That's right. You'll get twenty percent off the eighty three dollar annual prices that my friends is a good deal. Big thanks to portfolio box for sponsoring this week show. Get that up close shot in someone is going to win a free year. Progration has some software digital recovery. Pro that can save your lost raw photos. So you might remember about pro grade I interviewed their head guy back a while ago. Terrific memory cards, terrific memory card reader will now they're also in the photo recovery game. Here is a report from penta pixel. Let me just read it to you and tell you what they're up to recovery. Pro goes beyond Jay peg files and recognizes other types of photo files as well, including most types of files from cameras by companies like canon, Nikon, Sony, Fuji Panasonic DJ. I go pro and more than they list. A whole bunch of alphabet soup of raw file extensions in total. The software is currently capable of recovering over ninety different types of photo. Video and audio files. From SD exc-, micro S, D H C, compact flash and CF fast cards. So their thing is that, you know, some recovery software allows you to get certain files other recovery software laws you get other files their recovery software allows you to get more files Morphos and go way be on Jay pegs into all these different types of raw files that aren't always easy to recover. Now. If you're interested in this the program, digital recovery pro is compatible with both windows ten and MAC OS ten and it's available for fifty dollars for a twelve month subscription if you like to give it a try. There's also a try before you buy evaluation copy, and you just have to go over to the program digital site. You never know when you have something big wrong in the last thing you wanna do lose those important shots. Hopefully this. Software will help you. Quick update on this Costa workshop, so the reserve list has sold out. So right now that link won't work over on the sign up page on the nimble, photographer dot com. And what will happen is we'll go through the registration process here. Probably within the next week. Those of you that are on the reserve list for sonoma's coast. You should be seen a note from me real soon that walks you through the registration process after that. If there are any openings in the workshop, still go to the waiting list, if you wanna be part of the waiting list just drop me a line via the contact form on the nimble, photographer dot com, and just let me know that you wanna be on the waiting list, and I'll, you know, hang onto those in the order that they're received. So right now, we don't have anyone on the waiting list. So if you were to get on the waiting this UV first and second third and so on down the line. And this workshop is shaping up a really really nicely have excellent headquarters. Just like I do at Joshua tree. So we got a place to stay. We got a place to hang out in work. And do our lab got a place to enjoy food. And we've got a place to shoot. Because both of these locations both the Joshua tree. And at a data bay. You just have to walk outside our headquarters, and there's great photography there. And I just love that. Anyway, if you wanna learn more about it you can click on the workshops page. There's a link in the Naff bar on the digital story dot com and learn all about it. And those of you that are on the reserve list, you'll be hearing from me, really. Thanks to our inner circle members. And we have our current for the challenge just about wrapping up the still time to get an image in which is raw capture. Send me your best rock capture without any editing in light room or photos or capture one pro just the raw file just the raw file. I mean, converted to j peg I please. And then sent it to me. You'd be amazed at how cool the shots are that. We're getting right out of the camera. And you know, this is something that just makes me smile makes very happy. Big thanks to our inner circle members for supporting this podcast for for participating this fun site that we have going on over patron. We have our own inner circle site where you know, we have these photo challenges, we share content, and we comment on each other's work. And it's a lot of fun. If you want to become a part of that click on the patriot tile that's on every page of the digital story, and you can go to site and take a look at it. And if you want to support this podcast, which I highly recommend you can take care of that right there as well. And finally, a big thanks to our friends at Red River paper, I think the coolest printing paper company in the business, and I say that because I had been working with these folks for years. And they are fantastic. They are so enthusiastic about inkjet printing. It's almost scary. I have to tell you. They have a wonderful Facebook page at Facebook dot com slash Red River paper we have a landing page on their site. You can just click on the tile on every page of the digital story that takes to our landing page in from there. You can learn about the special offer, you can learn about reviews Tourelles, you can get supplies. And of course, you can buy printing paper as well. Give them a look start making some art that you can hand to other people. And so they can hold it in their hands and go my word. You are good photographer. Red River paving, the longest running sponsor the digital story. So great to have. All right. That's gonna do it for me this week. I hope you enjoyed the chat with Maggie hope. You'll learn two things. I know I learned a few things working out some good stories for next week. Make sure you come back in joining intil. Then have a great week by now.

Maggie Jala Han Microsoft US Africa Nike Jala Iceland Exxon time magazine malaria Mickle Oland editor Aena Tanzania corden Europe Facebook Red River
Former Prisoner Pays Forward the Gift of Being Heard

Stanford Social Innovation Review

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Former Prisoner Pays Forward the Gift of Being Heard

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm might Voss publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. Levels essay and Oland Artie visa victory. LS? revels thirty eight from Oakland, California. He's been out of prison since may twenty seventeen he spent almost all of the previous fifteen years, incarcerated and California. Arizona and Mississippi he did not commit crimes in all three states. Never know what the administration's thinking at the time, but I will say they don't want you to become too comfortable in one spot. And so a gospel twenty years at one prison, we're going to allow you to speak five six years here. Time to move on Shannon, characterizes his younger self as an angry man, some of the anger perhaps resulted from his apprehension and conviction. The first time for causing quote, great bodily injury the second for second degree robbery though. He was moved from prison to prison state to state, Shannon, manage to remake himself he earned three assoc-. Hits degrees and learned enough about computers to graduate from student status and become a teaching assistant while still incarcerated in that role. He began learning about how important it was for a teacher to consult with his or her students regarding the best ways to learn. My teacher always always asked us for what we could do to make this program better took suggestions. And we'll make a whole new program in a prison that might sound like a subversive idea ask the inmates. You're trying to help for suggestions about how to help them more effectively. Shannon was fortunate to have an instructor who saw the benefits of including his students in the process of designing and reforming the curriculum. Shannon himself was encouraged to identify the most challenging parts of the computer courses and design ways to help the inmates less students having trouble a lot of other mates that I was dealing with wherever senior population. And so they kind of didn't really know. Stable was going on. And so I was able to say, hey, let's break it down into much simpler time, and so they were really appreciate that Shannon, became increasingly convinced that feedback from the folks he was helping had multiple benefits and having learned how well cooperative partnership can work in. The course he was helping to teach while he was incarcerated Shannon brought that approach home. I was released made two thousand seventeen where their particular obstacles that you faced when you return to Oakland. I started doing my job research. I started doing all myself. I had a couple of us. But every time I got into an interview we got to a certain question, and there was always a temperature trying and I assume that question is to you have a criminal record. Correct. Shannon sought help at the center for employment opportunity. He told the counselors there. He'd take anything they had he just wanted to be able to support himself and as he put it. Not be a hindrance on others. So the CEO the center for point opportunities found me a job in San Francisco. I community housing partnership, which is a nonprofit organization in which I still work to this day. So I started off as genuine too much to the job. I received a text from CEO, and they asked me a couple of general questions Channa knew from experience that inmates often came out of prison with expired driver's licenses. You wanna help them he thought show them how to get a new license? So they can drive to the job. You're going to help them find at the time. Shannon. Didn't immediately realize how powerful that particular bit of feedback would be I didn't know that. It was a big deal there. I did find that out to one of the workers by the name of Nate called me one day and wanted to speak with regards to the feedback. He explained to me how quick six words turn into this big thing he said that he couldn't keep them on the shelf. It was like every time a new class came in all the handbooks and practice tests relieving, maybe somebody at the center should have thought of providing help to clients who'd require a licensed. But the fact that the suggestion came from somebody who knew firsthand what the centers clients needed emphasizes that power of feedback. The lesson wasn't lost on Shannon rebels. It allowed me to be I witness at the actual power of it for my little suggested to where it's at now. Shannon has advanced from janitor resident service counselor for community housing partnership building and San Francisco with fifty residents who are transitioning from homelessness to independence. He says he's leveled up and he carries with him the lessons about feedback that he began learning as a teachers assistant when he was still incarcerated and so often quoted reading listening and ex my residents that I worked for to provide me feed that what do you guys like to do or what can I do improve the program for you? And I came up with the flyer that I gave. And just told them. Hey, take two to three minutes. Jot down a few suggestions, and I'm going to incorporate your suggestions to better overall program for you guys one of the benefits of that process was ice cream Sundays on Sundays. Another one was better grooming at the suggestion of one of the residents, Shannon found barber who'd come by their place set a generator and provide outdoor haircuts. I was staying for the fact that they finally had someone listening to their ideas and equipment money what they want Shannon has built the process of seeking feedback and implementing the resident suggestions into the routine of his job, he hosts regular meetings dedicated to collecting those suggestions, and then he brings them up stairs. And I'm able to open up with my supervisor and manager. Like, hey, this is what I did. This is what my residents are asking for this is what I can do right now according to policies, but I would like to be able to do more. So kind of wakes up to upper management. It's a good thing. That's happening to my position. It's a good thing. That's happening to the positions of everybody involved and part of the explanation for this. Good thing is that Shannon RAV for victory. E LS has continued to seek feedback from the people he's helping and to provide it to the people supervising him. The theory is simple. Don't assume, you know, what's best for people. Even if you've been in the position, they're in give them the opportunity to let you know how to help them and trust their suggestions. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Shannon RAV William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Oakland California Stanford San Francisco Oland Artie Stanford University Managing editor publisher robbery teaching assistant Arizona CEO E LS Twitter Stable Mississippi Nate
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Medical vs. Public Masking

Mayo Clinic Talks

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Medical vs. Public Masking

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Qna I'm Dr Halina Gazelle. We're recording this podcast on Monday April six beginning week of the cove. Nineteen pandemic back with us today. We are privileged to have mayoclinic infectious disease and vaccine expert. Dr Greg Poland Dr Pullin. Thanks for joining us again. Of course it's wonderful to have you here since we last spoke the big news comes from the CDC with the recommendations for masking. And I'm wondering if you could bring us up to speed. This is a really important strategy to be talking about you know in the US. As of today we're talking about roughly a third of a million cases in the US and getting close to ten thousand deaths so the idea here is how do you layer strategies in a sense more and more strategies to decrease the risk of transmission from person to person. So that's one point. The second point is we should really distinguish between medical masking. That's a whole different category and public masking if you will with cloth mass we don't WanNa be taking surgical and ninety five mass away from healthcare workers that are on the front literally versus making our own cloth buying clot mass for use in the public. The third point is the reason to do this. Even though they're not quite the same efficacy as medical mass is that they do have efficacy and they are not only a way of decreasing breathing in the virus primarily through large respiratory droplets but also a behavioral reminder that there's a pandemic and life is not the same right now and a reminder not to put our hands in our eyes nose or mouth into. We've washed our hands with also some dangers that we should talk about in terms of using and now I tell us about those again so some of those dangers would be once. A mask gets wet. Maybe from our exultation. It really begins to de-criminalize ineffectiveness in filtering any sort of respiratory particulate matter. So that's one thing it would need to be changed the second thing. Is You do yourself no Favor if you wear a mask and then touched the mess either to adjust it or take it off in the wrong way so has medical professionals were taught how to put a mask on how to take a mask off that this would be unfamiliar to the public and I think the key thing is that you want a mass. That's you know comfortable but still tight fitting over the nose and mouth. Sometimes you see people wearing a mask. This goes above their upper lips. The most important thing is once that's wet once you going to take it off you take it off through however you're holding it onto your head you do not touch the front of the mass and then that mask needs to be washed before it would be used again just washing with soap and water in your laundry machine. Whatever it is is is quite satisfactory. You don't need to go to any extreme lakes Greg. Could we just go back to the beginning? A little bit. You talked about medical mass versus mass at the public. Might wear such as cloth mass. What does it mean for something to be an n? Ninety five mask so the idea behind an N. Ninety five mask is it has a filtering ability down to an actually below the size of the Corona Virus Corona viruses about point one two microns in diameter and ninety five protects. Down two point one with ninety five percents efficiency which which is where it gets its name. That's not the same as a cloth. Medical massacre the cone mass that you see nor is it the same as a as a Komai cloth mass the purpose of face coverings. I feel like sometimes. They've talked about protecting patient. Sometimes protecting the public from me. What is it? Is there a difference among the mass. About what purpose they serve. Probably the the most important function of the mask when you're talking about outside the medical setting among the public is if If I had coverted nineteen and I might not even know it by the way so. It's not like I'm sneezing and coughing and have a fever. But it's apparent that you could transmit the virus when you are a symptomatic or pre-symptomatic so in that case were preventing me exhaling the virus or respiratory particulate matter out onto the public and into the air where others might get infected the massar pretty effective in that the other side of the coin if you will is protecting those who are not infected from becoming infected by breathing in contaminants air contaminated with virus respiratory particulate matter. So why did the recommendations keep changing just last week? We weren't advice to wear masks and now we are. I think for a couple of reasons You know in fairness what the government and medical institutions are wrestling with is. They're trying to thread the needle in the best way possible because it does get a little confusing. We don't want the public to think that the recommendation is for medical masking that would be detrimental to us as a society healthcare providers and patients who are sick with the disease need those mass. Okay so we're talking again about a cloth masking that we would do in public. The second point about that is concern among many that. The data is at least controversial and in some ways as to how much benefited offers and people are concerned that if we go to a cloth masking recommendation that people will drop their level of preparedness by social distancing by hand washing it cetera. And we don't want that to happen so And then thirdly the the the issue of how Dos your desk how you take your mask off safely. Clean it so for all those reasons. There was controversy and discussion back and forth over a couple of weeks at the national level as to whether to make a public recommendation. And I think they've done the right thing. I've looked on the Internet trying to purchase a mask and I have found that you can't order one right now if individuals are going to use a type of fabric. Is there any type of fabric? That's better than another or that. They should choose for their to make to make their makeshift mask. Yeah we can. We can make a couple of general observations. None of us are fabrics scientists but we can make some general recommendations. One is the tighter the weeds the better. The second is the more the layers the better. Of course you bump up against the ability to breathe comfortably if you have too. Many layers The other thing is that people can go to the CDC website where they do have some discussion about this and more importantly they actually talk about an illustrate. How did make your own mask? Which I is important. People understand and again. Don't make something. That's not protective. And that would give them false reassurance. You know I've noted that in other countries wearing masks seems to be more common when we've had some of these viruses in the past. Do you think Americans are really going to get on board with this as a great question? We have sort of seen that. Asian countries tend to more readily wear these. I've observed for decades when I travel particularly over into China and and and to the Pacific Rim countries. I think that more than likely when when all of this is cleared up and we look back. I think we're going to more readily mask in the wintertime. When we have a lot of wrestling Tori viruses circulating and I know I know people are very concerned about Kobe. Nineteen and rightly so but every year we face epidemics bigger than this. I mean just this year in the US just the US. We're talking about thirty million people who were infected with influenza. Five hundred thousand of them. Were so sick. They were hospitalized and thirty thousand ten thousand like Kobe. Thirty thousand have already died of influenza including over one hundred fifty children. So I think we're going to probably pay more attention to vaccines compliance and I hope as public Sort of a cultural milieu. Where you don't go to school or work when you're sick and you mask during that time of of heavy transmission. Yeah that going not going to work. When you're sick is a tough one it is. Do you have anything else? You'd like to share before we closed after Poland The only other comment. I meant to make some general comments about masking so the the tighter the weeds the more the layers and there has been some studies looking at hypes of of fabric for example high-quality woven. T shirts tend to be better than for example scarves con towels that are liquor with tight. Weaves tend to be better so there there are some materials that appear to be better than others in the few studies that have been done and again you can find that on the CDC website. This is great information you shared with us today. And I appreciate Dr Greg. Poland being present with us on Mayoclinic question and answer and Dr Pull. Oland is an infectious disease expert and a vaccine experts and he has been visiting with US regularly. Stay well until the next time we meet again Greg. They do you to Mayo Clinic. Acuna is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org. Then Click on podcasts. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu.

US CDC Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic News Network Dr Greg Dr Greg Poland Dr Halina Gazelle N. Ninety influenza Poland Dr Pullin Dr Pull Acuna US China fever Oland
Rosalie Ham and Ellie Marney

Published...Or Not

26:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Rosalie Ham and Ellie Marney

"This is a three cr podcast and this is published or not i. I talked with rowsley hand back in two thousand. That's twenty years ago. And since then she's many more books and we've chatted about those two but i think this is the book everyone was waiting for. Welcome back rowsley. Janet's you debut novel. Dressmaker introduced the character. Tilly don age from deng guitar. Not only was it a bestseller. It was made into a movie. Now leslie teach you stink. The eccentric nature of your characters were correctly. Cast in the movie. Adid because it's a different museum. That's a completely visual thing. As opposed to reading words off a page you kind of have to let gar and you have to trust. I will do the right thing. Why the story in the essence of the story. I had it could produce a good screen rice and they did that so i thought that the characters or the actors took ties rolls around and made them days and would goods. That were funny. A my were hops. Hilton's you know they. They just entered into the spirit of the whole story although excellently not to complain about we'll have the last twenty years. I've read many other books but there are some characters. Actions are remember stronger than others. I still can't look at ceylon route and not think of teddy mix. We's and the revenge tilly took on the township dunga. Did you feel it was a story untold. All was a christian from your is for more. It was because right the just makers pot of course rising costs and so the the may not i aim was to get dry. Just get to the end achieve that. I wanted to go back and make tillie a little more rounded initiative fleischer out in her emotional psychological development and pointed you wanted the characters to comeback interact with her finish is get like settled the dust because when she fled dunk. Tashi fled another past. So the dressmaker is sacred addresses. All of that kind of drills on the same things but more so so the hall. Id between the purpose of costume clips of qatar. What actually fashion and what that does to pay. Or whether it's a lie with tells the truth those things were all talks about in the dress. Mike is sacred and few you feel quite satisfied about that now about my themes being explored a bit more in. The interest make is sacred. It's two years later and a handsome stranger arrives. At duncan see. See what's dunga talaq now. Well it's it's still in the basically the signs the chili lifting when she fled ablaze behind her people are rebuilding re town exactly the same way it was the rebuilding of the town of symbolic and the ending of the book speaks volumes about those people and their accomplishments if any will then we have This handsome stranger. So he's a lawyer allen econo- what's he done guitar looking for. He's looking damage as it takes everyone while to figure out exactly what his intentions and that you have to decide for yourself whether they sinister or not he inadvertently brings to the surface. What she did to the people of this tamatave tilles not their wares tilling goodness. She's just hiding in plain sight. She's in common street working as alarm. And it's not in fifty three minutes carnation year. These great excitement about the crowning of prince systems. But then there's a great deal of excitement on the collins strays he'll about coming over -tunities fashion and so that is where refined way and sergeant farrukh rediscover. He damage in the and they're the dress. Mike is sacred kind of evolves from that reach. You realize new sort of melbourne does have a lot of big occasion will is lord miss all but this miss member and this mistrial. The the gallon of the year but she was really enjoying it. She wasn't being used as as a design note will she had to follow the orders of madame flock and valda feature two bills gender money. She was bereft so she had to stop us from scratch and so starting from scratch that means getting a job where she could do watch indeed. That's the only thing she she can do. She can't do anything else. Economically in design at Her serta purpose wishy lived what she did with her life and where she worked kick things very naked. She didn't have to travel dumont. Sure expose itself a great deal with. It was quite a suitable place for her to be for the time being an further to that she knew it was only a matter of time. Because you'll past is prologue it will catch up with you into this to a business comes to customer who requests again from tilly with the most usual body shape and tilly recognizes that immeidiately. Who is that's sergeant ferret again. Katchouro take central stage and the purpose of frocks and how traces gowns all connected. Everybody in cape everybody there. It's a thing that everybody wants in to white. Find tilly so of course. That's the way you do it. You wouldn't want to ball up to her on the street. She would flee again. He uses the excuse of new frock to phantom which is quite a dangerous thing to during the ninety fifty. Six years will homosexuality then Voyeurs did it. Stop being a hanging offense gary. Tom and there's a lot of things to be scared. Because it's such an farren connects to lead back to the mid sweney family. They've come from guitar and it's a large family and teddy was the eldest and much love san he died. There was a lot of blame. It on tilly for that. How would you describe the mcsweeney family. While they're working class there also a united group and they they represent truth and goodness i always have they detained data and they still do and they also represent those those people that don't conform or can't conform to what's expected in the nineteen fifties and watch the social classes hypocrites all expect able to to be but there are big loving morally upright sincere group of people who very very happy and they they do with things that will jumps area school with the recycling dunga. Todd dying a good bill cosby because sacred and make everybody else. Bad who understand they banter therefore you must blame them and accused of doing things. They haven't really done to deflect attention away from your own shine. Got a lot of kids that got hit. My sip szucs got to host in also got vani lovely bombing bombing mexa a comeback. This money gets a job in the end. Only win that this the welfare officer coming talk ominousness. Maybe we could get rowsley hand to read from page one hundred two from the dressmaker secrets. This is the entrance of the welfare officer and it begins on monday justice. Everyone was about to stop peeling spuds and running the bath for the youngsters. The children up and down the collingwood straight flayed gates question shop and from does slamming. A doc Appeared of profit at the end of the block growing large as he progressed. Kicked decide abandoned hopscotch towards cricket bats. Footballs is pigs. Release coach and from behind foliage. Where was the child wilford department officer heating whose house what reports in filed during that reef case lashing these speak hand. Someone shouted watch out but it was too late. The welfare officer was already at the vikings block on the corner. He studied the large pilot. Old half draft was dicing under fruit tree. Golob perched between his is standing on its back raging up into the train stuffing i progress into the pockets socks shirts hats and skirts civil children mcsweeney spokes stein fleet positive for behind hit the ground and the horse will admit is gently turned in the direction of the officer. Welfare officer took her file from his case. George victoria charles henry in charlotte. He looked up. That would be the imbecile child bombing standing beside the horse holding the hand of the youngster. Rix your stealing e. coils and the horse is not safe. He was a plague on their lives. You navigate him a name. I think religiously ham you enjoyed writing this dark presence across. It's such a huge amount of revisiting. The people of deng but the tickets to make the lockable. I think the welfare officer was particularly likable at all. But in terms of being a villain in a story. I think he does crash on good job. He does justice. Sergeant was always a nice guy. He introduces tilly to his crowd at the he club. Now this was the most unusual club. The first thing we're told was how to escape darn cloak your coat. Keep it close to you. Why these highly legal as of people. That aren't fishing through now in society. People that dress in order that they feel more themselves. Where costume on the streets that the peaks them as being no who members of upright nineteen fifty bio gathering social venue to enjoy jealous company bay themselves and of course they on the threat of being a great from the police force etc. Answer they have a very secure thing you this is also a time. The divorce wasn't seeing to being the The thing and were introduced to the actress nater oland and she said to tilly. I have had noticed fortune. I have triumphed over prejudice and oppression. How did the divorced nita. And until you become friends ostrich kakira recording. It all came from the hippocampus club because nasal orleans being an actress and difference. And you're not nauseated. Ordinary person that would feed heavily into a lot of fifty society. Used to hang out at the hippocampus clump. Great the'sour everything would appeal to her enormously about that place. She would've make sergeant fair they. We need to talk about the fox. This much found is description of materials styles parades and even a dips of flinders lane. When i'm not going to say which characters because there was a lot of interesting characters nissen quote from the book. They retreated to bed with a stack of fashion magazines. And when they tired of looking at shoes brooks they let last take. It's pinta course. Looking at shoes and fox. I i must get a description of a frock from you and this is from page two hundred and fifty two and this is a scene frock. That was designed by tilly. And the where just loved it and described it as these esmerelda walked towards herself. The him kicking out the discreet plate that fell from the naval boostup. And it'll surprises of some spray plates. The color of sky. I like small whitecaps on busy lead. Hawaii's she was a truck show of as you a satin and scattered all over her. In colored gown seahorses hated in rainbow colors in tiny explosions of swimming say creatures. It's not stockton sold. The fish bonus was insufficiently interrupted by the increasing plate which peaked the is curiosity. Enjoyed down the sea bids where we'd swipe around the him. She told the plate danced out. Like turbulence say delightful playful but respectful shaking grit sublimely. So we'll have to done age from deng guitar in her debut novel and has flooded with another story of fun and fox in the dressmaker sacred. Thank you very much. Rose lay thank. You thank you. And now it's davidson non michelle sleep. The title of my book today becomes nissim dollah if said in italian so what has opera to do with a psychological thriller about a serial killer. Well the author elie money is about to tell us a eliot. Welcome to three. See i i david. It's lovely to be here nissim. Doormat none shall sleep turandot. It's an intriguing connection yeah. I borrowed a few classical references for book. But you've also referenced rumpelstiltskin and believe it or not to dot and rumpelstiltskin have something in calling. Yes it's the focus on names not knowing people's names or having secret names revealed during the course of a mystery so that was something that i wanted to play around with a little bit in this manuscript so turned on his actually said no one. She'll sleep until she can find the name of a would be lover and rumpelstiltskin has issued the decree the find out his name then they have released but then that ties in with this novel. Because we're looking with a name of a serial killer yes. The whole story is a puzzle. So the raiders Chasing after the answers in the same way as the protagonist. So i've got my two key. Protagonists emma lewis and travis bell two teenagers who've been recruited by the fbi to interview incarcerated juvenile offenders and They get caught up in an active homicide case at the f. B. is pursuing when one of the juvenile offenders. It they interviews steps giving them insights and information into this case just before we get into the story proba you actually mike another reference and raise the specter of the romantic era poet byron. There is a pleasure in the past lewis woods. There is a rapture on the lonely shore. There is society when none intrudes by the deep sea and music in its raw. I love not man. The less but nature. More from these out interviews. In which i steal from all i may be or have been before to mingle with the universe and feel what i can express yet candidate conceal. That was on a lovely recitation. Thank you. I've never actually connected. Romanticism with serial killers. But it mike sense it's only does i mean look. I don't know how many people are aware of the fact that when harris was constructing the character of hannibal lector. He was borrowing a lot from imagery mythology about vampires. A so. When i came to write none shall sleep And i was constructing the character of my juvenile sociopath simon goodson. I didn't want to use the vampire imagery. Because i thought i well. That's been done before. But i loved the idea of this cold in human figure so i i borrowed quite a lot from the imagery of the ferry prince. So someone who's a little bit the'real unearthly their attractiveness the intelligence and Focus on wheat. And also someone who's very cold and has a very calculated way of interacting with payroll romanticism. Deals with this sense of an overwhelming emotion. Which is often being put to a more productive and but then yes you turn it on. Its head and that overwhelming emotion. You can't express so you take to killing people as emotional release a type of catharsis estimates. You've mentioned emma. Lewis whose recruited adolescent partner. Here is travis bill. They have experienced with serial killers. Yeah all of my books are so i write exclusively for young adults and i also exclusively right crime. So one of the key issues with making a teenage protagonist plausible in that kind of scenario with when they're dealing with adult law enforcement. Is you have to give them some kind of connection to either the crime or the perpetrator or the victim of a crime. So emma lewis is eighteen years old and she's a current college in the us because that's where the book is based but two and a half years ago. She was kidnapped by a serial offender And was the only girl to survive So she's a serial killer survivor and insight into the psychopathology of serial killers. And how they think and how they behave is what what gives her the authority to act in that adult environment way yes. She's being relied on information on a little concerned national. As to how true to life this might be in terms of how many adolescent serial killers. They're out and where did you get your information or is this just a product of your imagination That's really interesting question. I actually did quite a lot of research on juvenile serial killers and also how young serial offenders start and that was really quite high opening. Which is that. You know a lot of serial murderers actually do start very young and certainly a lot of the formative childhood experiences helped create the conditions where they start offending or they they it helps them to develop that psychopathology. That encourages them to offend another concern. I have is edmund. Cooper who's the fbi i. Agent routes ama- and travis. One hit would have to question the psycho pathology of someone like cooper for placing adolescence in jeopardy and thinking it was acceptable. Let us the fbi for you know. This book is set in nineteen eighty two. So i don't care how much people know about the behavioral science unit of the fbi but that unit really kicked off in about nineteen. Seventy two some of your listeners might have watched the show mind hunter which was a dramatization of the book. Mind hunter by john douglas. Which kind of goes into the detail of how the behavioral science unit developed and how they developed this brand new idea of criminal profiling and that was when they first got the idea to start going into jails and interviewing serial killers to find out processes in their thought patent to try and figure out their psychology. I guess so. I figured between ninety seventy two and ninety two in that first decade when behavioral science was still in its infancy that they would still be doing some sort of wacky risk taking innovative things during adolescence to interview other adolescents. To overcome that barrier between an adult. Yeah that's right. And i figured the cia was experimenting with esp and lsd. And all that sort of stuff in the seventies and. I figured the fbi was still doing innovative things. So the idea of recruiting a couple of teenagers to get through to juvenile serial killers wouldn't be out of the range of possibility one person that you've already mentioned that i m has to interview. Is simon goodman soon. And he's sort of held in a silence of the lambs. Taught incarceration but those interviews between emma and simon can be quite unmoving. Yes now. I'm in was a lot of fun to ride. As a character he's incarcerated at saint elizabeth's institution for the criminally insane which is real hospital by the way in washington. Dc and he is incredibly bright. So he's in the ninety th percentile for his iq range and you know he's got all of those elements of charm and charisma that you kind of associate with this pop culture idea of the serial killer so it's actually quite challenging to write someone who's incredibly bright and he's he's always ten steps ahead of everybody else in the room so that's always a challenge and and also you have to ride. He made an age appropriate way. He can also get under ms skin though. Yeah he's very insightful. He's very perceptive. His personal inclination is to needle people to unsettle them in order for him to find place where he can take advantage another psychological liar. Then is salmon's to insist a kirsten which rises other interesting psycho. Pathologies of connection and control and justification. Yeah i loved writing. Christians comes across this kind of floaty frothy kind of off with the fairies type character but she's also one of these people who are like completely emotionally open like she. She's a very vulnerable damaged character because she's grown up in the shadow of all the things that her notorious twin brother has done and she's kind of living in her own asylum. But yes she and simon have this strange kind of codependent relationship and they never really apart. And so she becomes a way for emma and travis to dig a little deeper into the things that might give them an advantage when dealing with simon this latest of course back to turandot and rumpelstiltskin none shall sleep because simon knows the name of the serial killer. That cooper is looking for but of course the reader and listener again to have to read it for themselves to in the person is benign of the serial killer. Saad ultimately emma and travis can do what adults can't do. They can form a connection with another adolescent to capture a serial killa so ellie the book is none shall sleep or nestled. Dorma the author elie money and it is an allen and unwin release so thank you very much for talking with me today. Thank you so much for having me and letting me ramble a little bit about serial killers well genetic taxes out for another week on look more books to read the next week more oldest to chat with vials of khurana virus in such like we will do best to keep bringing you more office next week. See well it's listening next week for now you've just been listening to published own not on three c.

tilly Tilly don allen econo fifty three minutes prince systems farrukh rediscover madame flock valda twenty years mcsweeney Katchouro sweney rowsley emma lewis wilford department Golob George victoria charles henry deng nater oland tillie
The Authority: The City of Magpies

Slate's Culture Gabfest

43:53 min | Last week

The Authority: The City of Magpies

"The world's changing they've all sense. The prophecy is clear onto used to protect the go. Boy wherever they are something happened as well people going to be literally fast looking for a girl. Lyra welcome to the authority slates his dark materials. Podcast it's season two episode one. The season premiere the city of magpies. Were slates resident scholars of experimental biology. I'm dan quayle. I'm a writer at slate and my demon as a prairie full name. Gilda i'm laura miller and i'm a columnist at slate and my demon is a theater named second walking back laura. Welcome back to you to dan. Thanks so this season two premiers a chance for the show to catch our attention again after a year away. That honestly feels like it was more like a hundred years. Feels like we're living seven worlds away from the world of season one here on our allies. I'm pretty early on in this episode. We get a moment that is really crucial for fans of the books. It's the meeting of lyra and will are two main characters for this series. Let's listen to what sounded like ourselves. Is this your house no on. We'll probably finally someone else to talk to. So this season premiere covers much of the first three chapters of the subtle knife. Which is the second book. And philip pullman says dark materials trilogy my favorite of the mall. We see our will learning more about sheets. Gaza the city of children and other world that they both come to and we get to see a council of witches and watch one which is scottish wreak havoc on miss coulter and the magic cerium. So today we're gonna take a closer look at witches who they are and the his dark materials universe how they're portrayed in the series why they all have such exciting names on the authority. Were going to do our best to talk about. The worlds of philip pullman books without spoiling the story of the books. So we'll fill in the blanks for those of you who haven't read the book a while or who haven't read them all and we'll discuss things like demons and witches dust and panzer bjorn in great detail. But we won't give away anything in the plot that's in store for library or azriel anyone else. Nevertheless some stuff we talk about might be considered spoiler adjacent by people with a serious to knowing anything ahead of time so proceed with caution listener. Beware and here to answer your questions if you've got a burning question about his dark materials you're having trouble figuring out how to work your leafy ometer email us. Ask the authority at slate dot com. We'll address it on a future show. So let's talk about this episode. One it it begins with you know some side stories about which is and what nabet really began for me with. Lyra encountering will in sheet to gaza city in this new world that she's come to after the events of last season's finale when she walked through the portal lord azriel opened up The gaza looks like it's been recently abandoned for reasons that we don't know at first and laura. The design of the city is super striking. What does the city remind you of a mediterranean style hill town but it's built on this little peninsula out in in the sea so it's both like a port town and a hill town and it's very much the kind of place that you would visit on a trip to italy. I really love the production design on this beginning with the weird stairway that cuts back and forth going up from the docks into the actual streets of city which is an echo of some stairs some sort of mc for stairs that we see in the credit sequence and it just suggests kind of mind bending quality she says is is a is a strange place in in these narratives. Because it's like a meeting place where not too much of the actual big action of the story happens but still. It's very crucial because things that happened in the past in she has a are driving. Everything that's happening in the story. Now the name means city of the magpies in italian and we will later learn. How fitting that that name is but the main thing to know about it now is that. It's been a city of merchants scholars. It's sort of like in the embodiment of a renaissance today and we see recurring decorative motif on the buildings which are angels. And they're especially prominent on the tower at the center of the city which is called the tory day ungodly which is italian for the tower of the angels. She is weirdly deserted except for these gangs of feral kids. And one of the kids explains to lyra and will that. The city has suffered from a plague of spector's which are these invisible entities or at least they're invisible to children that only attack adults and just sort of suck their soul out of them basically and leave them like zombies. The one other thing. I'd add about the city is that it's it is like a renaissance city in that it's a center of of merchants and commerce and innovation it seems like innovation. You know of the kind of unique ways innovation presents itself in the different worlds of these books. But it's also it resembles closely a city of the present in our own world. And there are you know. They're bottled sodas their ovens that work and cafes and produce me it seems like a town in italy like right around the time of. Call me by your name. Maybe like megan nineteen eighties. Italian town And they're obvious sort of differences between our world and this one the close seemed a little bit more old-timey the stoves might be fired but they're still electricity but its shares in its design a lot of qualities of the renaissance while still having some aspects of the modern day and it's also infested as we told by this gang of children that laird well meet by the spectres and we actually get a glimpse of one adult and the city in the course of this episode of adult who clearly has been attacked by these spectres and has had the life sucked out of him. And it's very striking image. He's a pale and sort of dust covered in and he's got this vacant stare and he truly looks as though everything that that is human about him has been sucked away and he's now just the sort of shuffling shell moving through the city almost kind of ghost when lyra meets will early in this episode. She distrusts him early on but pan is the one who reaches out to will and encourages lyra to make a connection with him. He mealy sparks to well. He talks to him a thing that you know we. We know from last season demons. Don't always do to other people and it helps lyra understand. That will someone who she should team up with. It also serves as a helpful reminder to us of of the ways that demons influenced their humans in fact this whole episode is filled with a ton of demon stuff down. Thank i didn't notice. Oh hey gilda nice of you to pipe up. I write all the attention on demons. In this episode. We see the witches demons talking to each other and lee scores be and hester. It's still creepy to see people without demons and there are a bunch in this episode including the kids from chita gaza. I see what you mean sake. By now. however lyra encountered a few people who either don't have demons are able to separate from the at some distance like the witches so she doesn't react with the same instinctive revulsion that she might have earlier and that we learn more from the books than from the series because a series just really as a burden to explain something. That's very natural in so natural in libraries world that nobody ever really talks about it but is completely different from our own. So we know that people that demons are are repellent and like like a mutilated person to people in lara's world but she has a little bit more experience of this. Although when we first met her she lived in a world where people always take the demand for granted with this first encounter with will. The serious has handiwork way of rebooting the concept for audiences who are coming back after this seemingly really long break even though it's only been ear and reminding us of some of the basics like people aren't supposed to touch each other's demons and lyra can actually articulate for will what a demon is. which is. It's a part of a person's self. It's not a pet definitely not a pet. we complained about the shows. Under-use of demons all throughout season one. I mean maybe complained about it ad nauseam but this is a really nice shift. I thought in this episode. It's almost like jack. Thorne was listening. Dan get over yourself. Ok okay okay. Hey everyone i'm marie race and i'm the host of this is uncomfortable a podcast for marketplace about life and how money messes with it because money. It can make us feel support. I feel embarrassed ashamed. Charter my finances. Absolutely makes me nauseous and it can even lead us to hide things from the people we love. I was the one with the debt. And i was the one with the secret on. This is uncomfortable. We share personal stories of how money impacts everything from our relationships to our identity and it can get uncomfortable. Be sure to check us out wherever you get your podcasts dakota ring slates podcast about cracking cultural mysteries. We explore topics. You've probably thought about a non quite like this. Like how did a certain kind of racist white woman come to be known as the karen. I do not want to be in a category with psycho like that. And what if. I told you that the award mullet didn't exist in the nineteen eighties urges save. We didn't have a word for it. It just as existing out here with no label. How did a theory. About sherlock holmes the sexuality throw a fandom and tv show in the chaos someone threatened to report me to make university and tell them that was a pedophile. And how did an unexpected interview with jane fonda lead us to investigate who really created the jane fonda workout. I have become famous for the workout but the person that created the workout was not me. I'm willing paskhin undercoating. We talked to experts and enthusiasts. Guess the bottom of these mysteries to figure out what they mean. And why they matter. Subscribe to dakota rang. Wherever you get your podcasts. We also talked about how the humans in their demons were not touching as much as they do in the book. That sense of like physical connection was not as present in the series as it is in the books and it seemed to me like there was a little bit more actual physical contact between lyra and pan which probably made easier by the fact that there's now only one demon instead of a demon for every single character. But that also i i noticed and appreciated all right so it's crucial that they get the lyra will friendship right. I think for for many people including me. That's the heart of these stories like the cosmology is great the great epic narrative the resonances with milton and blake. But what. I'm in this for his for the friendship. The growing relationship between lyon will. That's what is that's what. I connect you emotionally. That's why i remember the most from the books. so they got a nail at laura. How do you think they did. I think i did pretty well. Lyra is very lyra. She tests will according to her sort of urgent code of you know like can i push him around eversource full. You know you know what what good is he. Basically and with will we see that he is almost like kind of a proto adult. He's more competent than she is in many ways. Because he's been carrying for his mother so he can cook and he is a little bit less capricious or he's a lot less capricious. He's more responsible but he's also had fewer because had to be so cautious in covering up his mother's mental illness so we see that the two of them are complementary in a way and they actually do figure that out pretty quickly. I mean but the important thing about this phase of the story though is that there are no adults now. Previously lyra and roger had their own little adventures and scrapes around the edges of the adult world which was sort of driving all the action and then when lyra off on her o- off exploring she had fodder corum and john fun and lee scores being the witches and even york as sort of grownup figures. Who were helping her and protecting her and guiding her or she was you know being moved around like come on ity or whatever by azriel mrs culture but now at the beginning of this what we know is that she is really disillusioned with. I think all adults as a result of lord azriel killing roger and she's passed the sort of hero worship phase and the full adolescent disillusionment phase. And she's prepared to strike out on her own but in this case the minute. She's getting ready to do that. The sort of story provides her with a another child as her her ally. What a smart. Move on the part of philip oland at the exact were. She has become disillusioned with adults to give her a world in which which there's an force lack of adults in which if adult shows up immediately be consumed by a spectre lyra gets some real works in this episode a lot related to that sort of urchin code that she you mentioned. I really liked that a lot. You know. I felt in season one that times. Lyra felt a little bit blank. She was always real super watchful and serious. But i i didn't always get the sense of the big personality that i always think of lyra. Having the big personality that led me to name a kid after her for contract. But you know in this episode. We have like her inability to make an omelet willingness to try her total lack of interest in shower and howard basic spelling nece the way she takes over the house as soon as will offer her place and just claims her own room I love those moments in their fun in ways. That larry hasn't always had a chance to be fun And bat. I thought was a real nice addition. Yeah we'll by contrast is if anything just has an overdeveloped conscience you know. Unlike lyra lies steals does all kinds of things without much of a of a qualm. There the scene where he wants to leave money. And i think that's always wondered what is the currency that he wants to leave and would it be used in gaza but But you know when he wants to leave money for the food that they take that to me was very charmingly reminiscent of a phillip pullman. Hated to hear this but some of the scenes in the chronicles of narnia where the child characters debate the morality of what they're doing especially in the lion the witch and the wardrobe where they take the fur coats from the wardrobe when they're going out in the snow and they have this whole debate about it and they finally decided it's okay because they're not actually taking them out of wardrobe so they're not stealing them their their remaining inside the wardrobe so to me. He's more of a traditional child. Hero of a british literature. You know he his list feral child but he has. He carries a lot more real world weight than those child characters of the past. When more than lyra really to write for lyra the adventures there have been so other worldly and even losses have been so other worldly as his at least to a reader of your like us coming at it from our world. He seems those are wadey real world problems that give a kid a kind of gravity in a story like this as opposed to the you know the epic adventures than lateras had speaking of his. You know the the the real the earthy nature of his of his character we get this funny reminder as they approached the tower of angels that one thing will has that the book will of the book does not have is that he has an iphone. He takes it out and takes a picture of the tower of the angels. I like i one cares what role this will play in the story because in a way it's sort of it's almost his elite. It's it's a truth telling device if you use it right and if he can ever get service and i'm curious whether they'll find a way to use that because that's a that's a fun parallel to play with so let's do a deep dive on her subjects day which is which is which is which is So the the other story going on in this episode while will and lyra getting acquainted inch guy is is mostly happening aboard. A magisterial summary. The car nolde. Magistrate games cardinal and franck fail are there and they've taken a witch prisoner who she was captured during the hostilities followed lord. Israel's opening of the window. Mrs coulter convinces them to let her interrogate the witch and tortures her. It is quite unique. Fashion by tweeting out. Twigs of cloud pine from under her skin Which is always seemed a little bit other-worldly but it seems worth asking and explaining to our listeners. like what are which is a are they human. Are they something more what we know about them well. The witches in historic materials are more than human they have these magical powers and most of them of this powers come from a kind of connection to the natural world which is really embodied in the clown pint twigs. They can fly. They can control the weather to a certain degree. They are healers and they had this interesting power of going unnoticed when they don't want to be noticed they don't feel cold or heat as intensely as humans do and they seem to be able to travel between worlds adrift without suffering serious consequences. Another interesting thing about the which is is that they have no possessions so while we never learn all that much about where they live they have houses or farms or of hunter gatherers. Who knows it is very exciting to actually see the meeting hall. Depicted meaning hall is where the different clans of the witches which seemed to be located in specific or tied to specific like lakes or mountains. The assemble to meet now so so the the different clans don't always agree and sometimes they go to war with each other I'm personally would be very interested to know what sorts of disputes historically have led to the which is going to war against each other since owning stuff including land is is just such a major Cause of human conflict. But we still just don't know that much about them. You describe it as a meeting hall. It's interesting to look at it. And i get the sense of it. I mean they're so tied to the national world that seems like sort of a natural like a a sort of mountain top outcropping on which they're surrounded by they're sort of in a gulch inside a natural amphitheater so sort of a mix of a meeting hall and sort of big open air theatre like trader or something which makes sense everywhere by flying. So they're not gonna wanna stay in places that have roofs. Yeah we don't know. did they. Just find this place. Is it like some kind of cold air or something or did they make it like. We don't know what you know they do. You know if they build anything at all At that meeting scores be as present. He's invited to join this meeting of all the different clans and at the meeting. Ruta scotty One of the which cleans makes this case for the which is joining the fight against the magisterial and this meeting is pretty important because the books make it clear in the series implies as well the human. Don't get invited to these. Which councils this is not a common thing and it's a big deal for lead to be there. Let's listen to Has to say about why the which she believes. Witches should join the fight clean. Scotty queen seraphina piccola. That man does not belong. His hair at my reckoning. As are you routing. Scotty is angry. Everyone should be angry. Sisters catch circa has been taken prisoner by the stereo. I have word. They are rounding up. Anyone who questions. There will thirty the way. Those animals in the majesty area have crack down on the world since the opening towns tightly controlled by armies where out of our depth here so the time has come to act to show them much stadium that their actions have consequences. And i am here to beg you sarafina. Petula and older sisters. Join me in rescuing catcher. I believe we have no choice. So enlighten world own of the witches are female they have children with human men and if those children are female they become which is an if they are male they may rejoin human society. They may do some work for the witches like martin lawrence. Elliot's does in charleston yes throws and according to pullman lor. There are other worlds where there are male witches. But not in this one now. The richest will also live more than humans which makes their relationships with men inherently painful and is the sort of tragedy behind fodder koram's relationship with surfing apocalypse. She's still looks the way she did when they were together. And he's an old man so they fly with cloud pine and i was. I'm totally fascinated by the series treatment of cloud pine. I'd always assumed that it was a kind of it was like phillip pullman way of getting around the idea that which is needed. Fly around on broomsticks. So it's kind of a stick. It's like it's like a spray of cloud minus how he always describes it in the book and there's a scene in In the golden compass where lyra goes out to martin saleh's yard and picks out a particular spray of cloud pine that seraphina piccola has left behind and suggests that suggests that was like a little cloud pine parking lot. Lots of which has left. they're they're they're not broomsticks definitely not broomsticks but here in the tv series. They made a kind of interesting choice. Which is that cloud. Pine springs are tiny. They're very small in that scene of my lense. Elliot's back in season one. What we saw was choosing between cloud in different little jars instead of going out to the yard out to the parking lot and we see in this episode it's actually implanted in the which is skin at like lives inside them in some way and and aids them presumably in their power of flight. And so when. Mrs coulter's torturing this which that the magistrate has captured she does it by put like agonizingly holing this out of her and i found that just like a super fascinating idea. The idea that you requires not just holding onto this magical device but becoming one with it so that it affects your system like norplant but for magic. Yeah i gathered that each which has her own particular tree and so we also see seraphina. Give -ly a sprig of cloud pine to call her with and that is presumably. Why lend celje has all of those springs so that he can call devour rich. Oh that makes sense cis so that because he's the console he just needs to be able to get a witch on the phone. Whenever i you know you can't communicate through it but you can definitely like you know. Say i need to talk to you by by using these things. A super-rich will What is the deal with their names. They all seem like finish our latvian yet. They are actually at Derived from the finish and there is the story going around. Which i i can't say how truthful it is. It might be a joke that that philip pullman made that he got some of these names from just looking at a finnish They're great name. Seraphina pekka is just amazing And it was ruta scotty. But there's a kind of an interesting undercurrent to this because a fascination with finish nece and the kind of way that it seems like the most sort of remote unna adulterated version of nordic nece is something that you see a lot in english fantasy fiction. Tolkien was obsessed with the finnish language. He loved it and thought it was beautiful and he based his invented elven languages impart on finish associated in the minds of sort of english people who feel like they have this. You know there's sort of this weird mixture of different kinds of Races with wildness and cold the cold arctic paganism and this kind of noble. Savagery remote. And it's and it's wild really see it in the elves tolkien like. They're not only. Are they all tall and beautiful. They're all sort of like other worldly way the witches yeah so like some of the other cultural characterizations in historic materials. This sort of thing can feel a little dated and reductive. You know like fins are all like. This is like a stereotype of the finnish. Although it doesn't. I think the biggest stereotype of the finish is that they are all alcoholics. And the witches. Don't seem to be a big drinkers but But at any rate please don't know they're there. They would never do that. What i liked that the series has done is it's cast People of color and other non nordic types as the witches. So you get a little less of this sort of racial centralism which is sort of implied by all the the finnish names like. I'm sure they're not want to believe that. Only finnish or nordic types could be witches in his imagined worlds. But i think that he. He saw a great romance in the in the far north and and that's reflected in the the finnish names us. Mrs coulter is trying to find out more about this prophecy that the witches have about lyra the prophecy that we heard recited a little bit of in the very beginning of the very first episode of season. One of this series. She tortures the switch enough to hear that. The that in the prophecy. They're the which have another name for lyra before she can hear more before she can hear what that name is. Though the imprisoned which calls a yamba Her god of death rudy scotty lows right into the saban stabs her and slow motion. I've i think i talked last season. About how much. I enjoyed the way. The which is fight in this series. One thing i really do mrs something you mentioned already this. The books version of how which is can make themselves go. Unnoticed crucial moments. You know it's like it's great that they can fight like superheroes early harry potter wizard's or whatever but they also have this kind of magical modesty that allows them to go unnoticed when they want to Mirrors for me wills way of avoiding the attention of teachers are social workers when he's in his world. it's this sort of rigorous enforced not invisibility but unnoticed ability. I'm going to read a little section from the subtle knife From page thirty three. Where where seraphina piccola does this in the book and serafina peck allow Into the place where the switches being held and kills her before she can give away too much information. But here's what the book says. There is one thing serafini could do. She was reluctant because it was desperately risky and it will leave her exhausted but it seemed there was no choice. It was a kind of magic. She could work to make herself unseen. True invisibility was possible. Of course this was mental. Magic kind of fiercely held modesty that could make the spillway not invisible that simply unnoticed holding it with the right degree of intensity she could pass the crowded room walk beside a solitary traveller without being seen so now she composed her mind brought all her concentration to bear on the matter of autry the way she held herself so as to deflect attention completely took some minutes before she was confident. She tested by stepping out of her hiding place. And into the path of a sailor coming along the deck with a bag of tools. He stepped aside to avoid her without looking at her once. I love that. I love that lives. Just love that. One of my favorite examples of the sort of sideways creativity phillip pullman to think of this way that which is become visible as opposed to just like they snap their fingers and poof. They're gone or like a fucking cloak. Yeah it's a it's a. It's a kind of magic worked on the minds of people who perceive them and later i believe that will a which i can't remember which one discuss his ability. You know his of invisibility skills and agree. The which agrees that. It's it's sort of a related thing which makes me think that might be something that felt pullman observed in children as a teacher. You know that there were certain. Children had an expertise that going unnoticed by adult as never having been one of those kids always desperate to be noticed. I'm a real lyra I'm not familiar with that one One other thing about which is that's really important now is that they're demons which are always birds can travel far from them and this is really unusual and lara's world and in a recently published story said in lara's world called serpentine pullman. Gets into a little bit more detail about how they acquire this and it involves a particular ritual that requires them to go to a desolated area. I believe somewhere in central asia and perform this ritual. and it's it's very it's very traumatic. I mean lyra finds out about it. And she learns that it's unexperienced that completely transforms the person who has it. I know which is a supposed to be good. But they're deemed flying so far from them gives me the creeps even know that they're supposed to be good exactly. They're sort of beyond good and evil. They make their choices. Based on factors humans demons can barely understand that makes which is sort of tough sells as major characters tv series. And so you know a lotta times. A series leaves us with a lot of sort of majestic pronouncements from the witches and from their demons. Here's some that we get from routine seraphina 's demons as are humans are speaking to each other during the big council of witches. The prophecy was clear. We must find that child. The prophecy is not all days. You risk too much much. Cerium has thrived of your indifference. We've just got who show them. We are in different. No more with or without can't help. The show really leans into those kinds of nommik pronouncements when it's not leaning into just how totally hot all the witches are with their diaphanous robes and their tattoos their sexy cloud pine tattoos I hope that as time goes on a little bit more of the spooky -ness of which is as you say the politics of which is what it is that these different clans really are concerned with comes through in this series as well. Because i find that really fascinating about them all right. Let's talk our way through the rest of this episode near the end we have two parallel stories in one mrs coulter who had just finished telling the cardinal everyone on the submarine that she has done failing thank you very much absolutely completely fails to get useful information out of the which Early in that attacker to scotty not only on kills the which had been captured but also stabs the cardinal and then mrs coulter makes a deal with fraud fail to shall we say dispose of the cardinal so that the imaginarium take full advantage of these new worlds which have now opened up presumably led by from fail. Yeah and it's worth pointing out here. That one of the reasons why. Mrs coulter wants to interrogate. The witch herself is that she wants to learn what it is. The witches know or believe about lyra but she does not want the magisterial to know that she wants to protect lyra at the same time that she's trying to figure out how larry fits into the power struggle that are going on in her world so it's not just that she wants to show what a boss she is by Succeeding at something. That everyone else feels that she also wants to make sure that she can selectively pass on the information she gets from the witch so this we seem sculptor In you know yet another smashing outfit as the machiavellian master of this story she she recognizes even before the cardinal get stabbed. That mcphail is ambitious. He's a potential threat to her. And also that the cardinal is a weak leader. He is denying the reality that they're all forced to confront as real blows open a hole between the world's and he just he can't deal with the reality and he just he the framework of heresy and doctrine that the cardinal lives by just cannot encompass. What's actually going on. So this really makes him problematic as a leader so as soon as she finds out that the cardinal is stabbed. We have to remember. This is big surprise to hurt anyone else else. She just pivots. And she positions herself as fail ally. She flatters him she knows that he's motivated by ambition and that he's less susceptible to her beauty than the cardinal was strongly suggested the cardinals sort of hypnotized by her sort of seductive manner and she instantly becomes the sort of counselor whispering in his ear and just telling him how great he is and how much she's going to help him. It shows how experts she is at working within this patriarchal It's toossion the other thing is that's important in. this story. Is the idea that she's going to allow the cardinal to die but she is going to take on the skin for him and the idea of sin as something that functions almost like a commodity is a really interesting one. That comes up much much later on in the story. And so it's worth noticing there that they they make a kind of trade when her being responsible for the cardinals. Death is a trade that she's making with macphail which indicates that even though these people are all big power mongers. They still actually believe that. Sin real thing definitely following fail does and he's willing to sort of hand over that poker chip that poker chip of sin and she's willing to make that exchange In order to get the thing that he wants that makes him able. It seems to accept the power. Move that it's necessary for him to make. I do agree with you that she looks fantastic. I would like to shout out. Her torture boo get. She does fantastic torture. Boots in this episode. Really good petar tron. They seem comfortable and their knee. Highs you can be up to your ankles and blood in your sulfide. There reminiscent of rene russo. In the thomas the remake of the thomas crown fair where he just one thing after another eight gouache great except evil or is she all right so atkins sheet to gaza. The theater tells lyra that will is a murderer. And that's one of my favorite moments on the book. I just read it. Because i love it. So much It's on page twenty eight subtle knife. She asked what is he a friend or an enemy and the elite theater answered. He's a murderer. When she saw the answer she relaxed at once. You can find food and show her how to reach oxford. And those were powers that were useful but he might still have been untrustworthy or cowardly. A murderer was a worthy companion. She felt safe with him as she felt with. Your bearnes. send the armored bear. God i yeah. So much they fudge it a little bit in the series. Let's listen to how they treat it here. Good she's like there's something else about into he's connected to this place to do. I still love this determination from liar that you know what once she knows. He's a murderer. Everything is cool. That is the kind of guy who she is willing to be associated. She knows she's very terry. And it's going to be useful to have someone. That particular skill is no armored bear. But at least you got something either. Our last shot in this episode as well looking up at the tower and she to gaza with a spectre rooting around behind him. This sort of big black smoke creature or would you think of the design of the spectres. Well i was very curious to see how it with these creatures d rendered and i did like it. It does something to the ghosts in gear detoro crimson peak which is a movie that i love and it also has a kind of a baroque quality to it's a lot of swirling wisps of a shadow. I my my verdict is a thumbs up on the spectres. I give it a thumbs down not into I just because let me read how they're described in the book which is quite vivid. This is a again from the subtle knife. This is Ruta scotty actually seeing some specter's In the country where the gaza's it might have been a good land to live in but for the spectral forms that drifted like missed over the grasslands and congregated near streams and low lying water in some lights they were hardly there at all just visible is drifting quality in the light a rhythmic evanescence like veils of transparency turning before a mirror. Now i'll grant you that that seems basically impossible to animate. Seems like the memo. You write sheriff extra men when you want them to come back and say yes i will do that for you for seventy five million dollars and so i understand that like it's easier to do this like sort of smokey thing that yes kyodo doctoral using crimson peak reminded me a lot of the way that so many monsters now have end up looking like the mentors in the harry potter series. Which which in. Its time when you know when alphonso koran designed them for the third harry potter movie they that was a really unique design. The sense of these creatures who were underwater yet in real life with a sort of smokey trailing quality to them and the fluidity with which they moved through the air. This series sometimes seems overly dependent on these kind of harry potter works of designed the way the witches move. Just like the just like fucking l'estrange it is in In all the harry potter movies and that drives me a little crazy. And i i recognize that that it's a lot more menacing this way but i what i liked about. The description of the spectres is how nearly invisible they were and how seemingly in substantial they were. They were literally insubstantial but yet they had this kind of dramatic hollowing out effect on their victims. And when you see this thing. I'll remind will you're never you're never like what could that possibly do. It looks like it's gonna fuck and eat him like right now by sort of like the. I like the gulf between the way they looked and the the horrific effects that they had. But let's see when when we finally get to see a spectre an action which presumably will happen at some point. Let's see treat that because they silkeborg awesome well and would just counter that with the fact that i do not see how against the setting of cheetah gaza. It would be at all effective. Have them just be a kind of a ripple or a film. I think maybe in a less colorful less object filled setting. Maybe some place darker spooky. You could maybe do that. But i think that they'd get lost. Visually in in in cheeto gaza carry water for the production. Zion team i see again. Laura miller no problem i get it Well whatever they look like whether however you feel about it they're scary. Shit there's one right behind wilt so good cliffhanger We'll find out what happens next week when we come back to discuss episode to the k. So please join us then. In the meantime set us allied on twitter. I'm dan close or is that look and you can email us a question or comment at asked the authority a one word at slate dot com. Thanks for listening our producer phil surkis sleep. Editorial director for audio is gabriel. Roth i'm band. Plus i'm gilda i'm laura miller and i'm suck and remember without stories. We wouldn't be human beings at blue.

phillip pullman lyra Mrs coulter Lyra laura council of witches and watch miss coulter panzer bjorn azriel jane fonda seraphina piccola chita gaza gaza john fun azriel mrs lord azriel philip oland laura miller lyra lies italy
Hello From the Other Side? And Bitcoin Puts in Another Big Week

CNBC's Fast Money

24:29 min | 4 d ago

Hello From the Other Side? And Bitcoin Puts in Another Big Week

"Today every answer matters more than ever before because whether it's about health deliveries or finance some things just can't wait. That's why ibm is helping. Businesses manage millions of calls texts and chats with watson. assistant it's conversational. I designed to help your customers find the answers. They need faster no matter the industry. Let's put smart to work visit. Ibm dot com slash watson assistant to learn more in this back twenty nine grader lineup. Brosseau brian kelly jeff and bono and ice tonight on fast the ultimate thanksgiving trade. Get ready to stop the bird. Pass the gravy in un mute yourself why investors are feasting on this day at home stock ahead of her day plus bitcoin going bonkers this week. The crypto cracking above eighteen thousand for the first time in nearly three years are on bitcoin. Baller pk breaks down where it's headed next and later to the moon we'll tell you what lit up the solar trade today but we start off with palo from the other side. Despite the spike in cova cases around the country companies are looking out to the other side of the pandemic as we make progress on vaccine pfizer. Just out today with big news that apply for fda emergency use of its vaccine in corporate america. Sending signals of an all-clear nike merck. Tj calls kosto all either increased or reinstated dividends this week until we start to wind down earning season more and more companies are getting comfortable. Forecasting the future. The number of businesses issuing forward guidance is a thirty percent from last quarter so corporate. America's looking to the other side is the time for investors to do the same brian kelly. What do you say well. I think it's great first of all that corporate investors corporate Corporations have a little bit more clarity. But that's what this whole reopening trade was about from the bottoms. That was the whole thing that you're not gonna have any clarity but when you do boy then it's going to be really good so let's look what we have this week. We had a good news on the vaccine. We had multiple companies up their dividend. We also had multiple companies. Come out and feel much more comfortable with giving guidance however the market was basically flat to down this week so to me. This information is probably already priced in and of a home game and saying is now the time to get in. It's probably not at least not on this news now. We still have this. Tug of war is the vaccine going to be ready enough or we're going to have another walk down and we're going to have a q one. Gp parent that's negative. That's the tug of war that's going on in the market and the news we got this week didn't resolve that unfortunately and that's exactly what j. p. morgan is forecast contraction in q one but seek. Rosso aren't aren't we sort of just throwing out next year. In a way when it comes to multiples. I mean in a way are investors looking through and just saying you know what. It's a passer almost. I don't know if they're going to say it's a passer. I think the bar has gotten higher. So i agree. With the fact that companies now over said have a little bit of visibility because think back to march. There was nothing we were flying blind. We were flying blind on the show. We're fly corporate. America was flying blind. Everyone the world was flying. Why now you have a flashlight. You don't have a spotlight. You have a flashlight. So i think people are starting to get more comfortable with the market more comfortable with earnings. But let's remember nike. This will make it the nineteenth consecutive year that they raise their dividends. So i'm not sure if there's not a little bit of dressing up the window if you will. I don't think that it's a contrived issue that they're doing but just think about it. I think b k. makes a great point. Is this the top. is this a cell. The news event. We've seen vaccine a lot more beneficial news. We've gotten clarity on the election. So and we've seen that balance of power with the republicans in the senate we've gotten basically a goldilocks environment for what has been a terrible plague. That hit this country and the world. So if you're saying are we through it. I don't think we're through what i think. The market is pretty good at navigating. And saying hey you don't want i think the worst is over and we have asked that question. Are these events the cell the news events whether be getting that vaccine news having clarity as to win the first distribution could be made and getting through the the bulk of the volatility of the election. Not say that. There won't be still some volatility but i think the biggest unknowns are now known at least in terms of having a winner bottom so do would you agree that this could be sell the news that would go starkly in the face of what has been a seasonal trade going to urine. Were to go higher. I think given all the fiscal stimulation the support that we've had with all the news today. Notwithstanding right you you do. Have to use steve's term a goldilocks situation where it is prime for risk assets in terms of looking to the other side. I think yes that has been priced in. There has been a look through to the other side. And that really explains rotation out of some of the stay at home names from the technology names into some of the value plays but when i'm looking at these these dividend increases and and and tying all that together right all of those companies with the exception of mark retail companies and. We know that those companies have been able to to be more efficient operating by slashing capacity by slashing workforce and bringing that so that's going to lead to inventory management. We've already seen a rotation out of seasonal hiring so yes there's going to be more cash at hand but what to me it is is that is a signal that we are seeing operational efficiencies leading to digitalization of companies. That is here to stay at. I don't really think that necessarily bode well for employment so again. Two sided coin here. Yeah jeff let your take. I think what we've been seeing has been going on for a little while now. And i know there's been this rotation going on and we've seen that cool off a little bit but let's not forget you know you have value industrials materials banks where you want to go there up some fifteen sixteen seventeen percent on the month. So the fact that they're cooling off a little bit isn't a huge shock to me The dividend story has been playing out for a little while. Now this is the second straight month where we haven't seen any cuts or suspension. So i think that's a good thing. Companies now have two trillion dollars of cash on their balance sheets just as a perspective. The previous peak was about one point six trillion and. I think it's really interesting if you look at small caps you know. Perhaps the most economically cyclical index. You can find and you have seventy percent of all earnings revisions actually being to the upside there. So that's the highest. We've seen in twenty years. So i do think the market is doing a good job of looking to the other side of all of this and i think even if we see a slowdown in q four or q one which is probably likely i think. The market's perception of this slowdown versus what we saw say in february or march is going to be very very different and i think that's what the market's been telling us for some time now as small has beaten large and value is beaten growth interest rates have held in there but i do think stimulus has to be part of the equation here because this case shaped recovery is very real. Ten million people are still unemployed retail sales for example or slowing down. But as i said on the show last week. I think the vaccine news actually make stimulus and twenty twenty one more. Likely because policymakers know they're building a bridge from today to a point in the future where activity can return to normal. So i think you take that in combination. I still wanna play this rotation trade. Even if it ends up being choppy over the next couple of months yeah The general had mentioned small caps. The russell is up two point. Four percent This week brian kelly. Where would you position yourself. And and do you think that's an interesting notion and jeff when you first said that you thought that the vaccine news will make it more likely for stimulus. I sort of was like. I don't know i'm i. It's growing on me. I like it better and better the more i hear it. I'll tell you a brian. Kelly what do you think of that that at least if you know it's targeted you know that there's a about time you might be able to get some republican by into you know. Let's spend this money on on a package. Yeah i think that's right. If you think about you know why didn't we get any stimulus leading into the election. Is that there really. Wasn't any political incentive to do that so now if you have a vaccine you say hey listen. This is kind of a six month problem in a sense. Let's just get through. Let's build that bridge. I think you might be able to get a little bit more political buying. It's not likely to happen until we have the new administration. So i do think the market is incorrect is correct in that sense but again for me. There's just so much uncertainty here in the us. I'd rather look over to. Asia rattled look to japan. I'd rather look to china. And if i look at what's going on with nike bring it back to what we talked to. At the top of the show nineties growth is coming from asia. they're raising dividends and they feel comfortable. I think that's another leg to that kind of asia's going to take the growth baton from here. Yeah and of course. Nike said back in september that it expects the second half of the fiscal year two to be up significantly when it comes to sales biden. Would you agree. Would you say you know. Us may not be the best place to be right now. I mean it's a global pandemic. yes i think. Emerging markets look attractive. I wouldn't say anywhere outside of the us. I think europe so has their challenges. Japan has has a long story pass. And we're seeing a rotation out of that. Buffett is allocates resources there generally speaking. I do like em correlates well. Some of the natural resource plays as we do look forward to getting back to a normal situation and economic environment. Yeah grassley you've been on the natural resource trained to yeah. I mean if you look at the value that fits all into the value. Play outperforming growth play. I've been in the diversified chemical space. So you look at a name trend ceo. It's very levered to europe. So i agree. I think that you can see a lot of these names and ceo oland w. r. k. Really outperform going forward. I'm still in that. Value bucket. expect them to outperform grossly over the next six months. Sorry let's talk a little a zoom today topping. The tape is a stay at home. Trade played out in a big way in today's session. The soft could even higher as year of four. A zoom thanksgiving. That's right families gathered around computers instead of dining room tables this year to keep socially distant zoom knows. It's coming the company's lifting forty minute time limit for free meetings on thanksgiving day. So are you feasting on the stay at home stock ahead of the holidays. I mean theoretically this could be some of the first time people start using zoom a win and they might think this ain't so bad i think zoom is pretty well known at this point and i really don't think this event coming up in the holiday season is really going to be a revenue driver in the sense of looking at this being a long-term or trending new actualization of revenue stream. So no. i'm not buying it on the news. You look forward to the to the sorry. You look forward to the pe ratio twenty twenty one and it's up close at two hundred. It's one of those runs. I don't think now. I don't think this is the catalyst for investing. If you're not and now. I don't think this is a reason to get involved. I mean some context. Obviously just last week. A lot of the at home trade's got slaughtered on the vaccine news and zoom had one of its biggest weekly drops that it had ever seen. Jeff mills zoom here in some of the other. I mean we're talking. Ea for instance peleton. Those are all up. Today they are. You know i'm with a win on this one. I think it's really interesting. You know usually when you see those stay at home names up on the day you also see up on the day you see tech do well. It's kind of an overall virus. Stay at home trade. You did not see that today actually outperformed growth by thirty or forty basis points. Small outperform large by somewhere around seventy five basis points. So i thought that was notable in the sense that that value cyclical trade although down outperform even when the stay at home names were up and i just think you get to a point where the growth and user adoption or whatever. You wanna call it. That's assumed by the valuations just aren't likely to materialize in the future. And that's where. I think we are right now. So it's not necessarily the stocks can't go up from here i think they can. But when you're thinking about relative outperformance and where you wanna be. I wanna be in small caps emerging from two and a half year bear market. I want to be in japan breaking out. After a thirty year bear market. These are areas that i think in outperform over the next twelve months versus some of these other areas that i have just done so well and the valuations are so extended. You probably need to take a breath here. How at a name like palatine. Brian kelly and i. Asking you because are biker You so you have some experience with this area. But it's also theoretically entering a seasonally strong period. I mean going to you're going to january. People typically make all sorts of resolutions about getting in shape and losing weight and here we are peleton right and peleton. I mean peleton's bent on an absolute tear. I do think that's kind of a permanent shift here because those are relatively expensive bikes. Once you buy that. You're likely to kind of stick with that type of thing. But this entire trade. This zoom trade ahead of thanksgiving reminds me of a simpson's episode. I'm a huge fan of the simpsons. You may be to melissa. I'm not sure but homer simpson makes a fortune in pumpkin. Futures makes a fortune but critically homer forgets to sell before halloween. And that's the key. You gotta sell your pumpkin futures before halloween. You gotta sell zoom. You gotta sell those things before thanksgiving because the trades over can connect that to popular culture. Be good for you breaking news here on the vaccine front. Gotta get with all the details. I'm melissa well. After the news that visor and beyond had submitted their application to the fda for emergency use authorization of covid nineteen vaccine. The fda has now set the date for the outside meeting their advisors to discuss the application december tenth. Now that is along the lines of what we had heard they had asked the committee members to set aside december eighth ninth and tenth So it is december tenth to discuss this requests for -mergency use authorization. That is a key step before the fda would potentially green light this vaccine for market and so we are looking at just a number of weeks before this could start to get distributed now. A lot of people wonder why so long while we talked with dr months of away from operation warp speed. This morning noted the fda now that it has the application needs to look through thousands of pages of data and graphs on everything from the efficacy to the safety to the manufacturing standards of this vaccine and analyze all of that and put it together for the committee members then to look through and to discuss and they will release all of that information and briefing documents two days ahead of that meeting on december eighth while at least two days they might release it sooner than that but now we have a timeline from the fda confirmed december tenth for that outside meaning of advisers after that they could green light. This for market definitely. Good news but meg. I'm curious. The fda has digest all those pages of data. Could we see three weeks. After december tenth for moderna e way on review if it takes that much time to get through all that stuff. That's a really good question i mean. Do they have a second set of folks there to be able to look through maderna's application because we are expecting that moderna will file within a few weeks from monday when they had their data So you know within a couple of weeks slough said end of november early december. But he expected that we could be seeing. You know a few days. Apart for these advisory committee meetings for pfizer and madonna and then presumably a few days apart for the fda decision. But you're right. These reviewers are going to have a lot of work to do over the coming weeks. Yeah lots of overtime for that matter. Thank you meg seagrass of your favorite healthcare pick. I think you have to buy a basket of these. And i think you have to buy an index. Because it's what i've been saying for a while. Now if you look at these vaccine plays. They topped out in july. Then we have this secondary headline phase going into the real vaccines and it looks like they tapped topped out again. Pfizer is well off. Its high for just a couple of days ago so when i say well off of it six percent off in the same week so when you start to look at these names melissa. You can't be buying these names. If i asked you what pfizer was up to date. People would get this wrong without looking. It's only a down one percent year to date now. Madonna is up four hundred percent. Because it's been on the scene a lot shorter time. You can't buy the vaccine news. More than one or two pops. I would say sell these names and by the economy versus these names. Yeah we had a jeopardy's analyst who covers all of these names on yesterday who's saying that. He expects pricing to come down dramatically from when the vaccine will first hit the market. And he wouldn't wanna be long. These names as andrew that manufacturing base which could prove difficult bottom. And where do you stand on some of these. I think he makes it a lot. I think he makes a good point. I said for a long time. Listen stephen said i've said guys has said it. Trying to winning horse out of this race is literally impossible. Pfizer was up dramatically and is traded off. You've seen similar price action with modern out. I think you do express this view in some of the tertiary or secondary names because just in the short term. You have price pressure on this vaccine and this is a headline risk. You have to still have a legitimate company of supply of drugs manufacturing efficacy and all of the above to still an operations and do so at margins that that will support the levels that we're at right now so i'm fully in agreement with what he just said all right coming up tan on bear. That's right the solar. Etf in mega-rallies this year. Should you buy or will you get burned or estimates that ahead but first bitcoin going absolutely bananas. What's the player crypto baller. Here he's ready to lay out. Its case stick around much more fast money straight ahead support for this. Podcast comes from boost with facebook. Who's podcast boost. My business with david fisher features unique perspectives and insights from some of the world's most interesting business leaders and small business owners. Check out the third episode where you'll hear the owner of magic fingers studio in brooklyn discussed the power of online community with the ceo of mono music group and co founder of verses. Listen to boost my business. Wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to fast money. We've got a bitcoin alert. The cryptocurrency making big gains this week up nearly fifteen percent and listen to what blackrock chief investment officer. Rick reader said about bitcoin earlier today on cnbc crypto currencies. Here to stay and say durable and you've seen the central bank sort of talked about digital currencies. I think digital currency and the receptivity particularly millennials receptivity of of technology and crypto currency israel digital payment systems israel. So i think that going is here to stay. Do i think it's adorable mechanism that i think we'll take the place of goal to a large extent. Yeah i do because it's so much more functional than than passing bar gold around. Wow so black. Rock is saying. Bitcoin could replace a gold one day became. I feel like of rick reader tune into fast money circa three years ago. He might have heard the same argument from you. Yes i think he would have. And you know it's nice. It's nice to see somebody like rick being able to say that because i'm sure he's done his research on this and it really reflects the mindset that change in mindset that institutional investors had now versus three years ago so three years ago i've talked institutional investors and they say hey pk. I can't invest in this. My risk management team won't even let me touch it. Now you have institutional investors saying. Hey wait i got a buy this thing i gotta be in it. And that's what we're seeing in the market and that's being reflected in the price and what's kind of interesting what we're seeing. There is in the relatively short term a bit of a coin shortage. So you're seeing institutions high net worth individuals buying coins taking them off exchange putting them in cold storage and they have a five or a ten year view on the and that creates a really a lack of supply. So that's what's been driving the price of the final thing. I would say though is that you have to have a long-term view on this. We did a piece on the show back in two thousand sixteen. Bitcoin was at eight hundred ninety nine dollars and we asked the question. Is it too late to buy bitcoin. And of course the answer now is no. It wasn't right but remember. Bitcoin went from twelve hundred down to seven hundred before it came all the way back all the way back up here so point is you've got to buy bitcoin understand. It's incredibly volatile and have a long term view two thousand sixteen bitcoin on on the show. Amazing coming up. Solar sox are on fire this year with a rally keep up. We'll debate that tradenet support for this. Podcast comes from. Wg you do you want more skilled and effective workforce. Do you want to build loyalty and increase employee retention. A partnership with western governors university could be exactly what you need over three hundred organizations nationwide already count on. Wgn for valuable education benefits that lead to better prepared and more capable workers with more than sixty accredited bachelor's and master's programs to choose from and shorter credential programs coming soon. Wg you has long been a leader and making quality higher education more accessible flexible online. Learning is the key. Students can fit schooling around their existing schedules and even complete courses and degree sooner than planned. Wg you makes earning a respected degree possible with just a computer and an internet connection partner with wgn today to make a smart investment in your companies and employees future learn more at wgn dot edu slash partnerships. That's wg you dot edu slash partnerships. Welcome back to fast money. Time move of the day the invesco solar ticker tan tian rising more than two percent record close. The fund has been on recently in hopes. A biden administration will be more friendly alternative energy on. You've been on the space. You had a fastpitch on this. That worked out well We're with for solar. Where do you go from here. Listen i still think there's room to run here. You talk about the biden administration. We've had some developments. In terms of tariffs one percent is still the renewable energy consumption in the united states. So i still think there's upside. But i think it comes at the expense of traditional energy solar run tan. Still think. They all civic. They all look good here all right time. For the final transfer on the horns. Steve grasso capri holdings basically doubled up. It's going to do it again. The general death knell small-cap exposure. But i wanted the s. l. y. fading the x. l. e. k. pro largest trust way to play e commerce. Pld all right. That doesn't always up next a jon. Gruden is the ultimate radio. It's very emotional for me. It's important to me. No this franchise means a lot to me. I did not want to lead in the first place. So why did the raiders. Train them to tampa bay. And why did the raiders. Spend one hundred million dollars to bring him back. I'm michelle to foia. And i investigate in sports uncovered john group the coach worth trading for download for free. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

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FOF #2885  Ellen, Madonna and RuPaul in Crisis

Feast of Fun

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

FOF #2885 Ellen, Madonna and RuPaul in Crisis

"The. Celebrities have always been welcome in our homes for their ability to entertain and help us escape the troubles of the world. But during the covert pandemic, there's been a reckoning and many celebrities that we adored before. All hell broke loose are now facing their own crisis over their inability to relate to people and at worse spreading misinformation that can cost people's lives. Today we're taking a look at Allen Madonna and Rupaul three beloved gay icons in crisis from Allen saying she's going to quit her show people don't quit saying she's. Secretly Amini to Rupa's mysterious disappearance from social media and even Madonna Spreading clack doctors claim that there's a Cova cure being kept from the public and that Demon sperm is out to get you plus the dubious health claims presented. Wack, as fact in Zach Ephrons, new net flicks, daddy son travel down to Earth solving the mysterious case of the Haunted Mirror and lifetime channel movies go gay an Asian what's next fats and thumbs we certainly hope. So Oh, I am faster for no I'm Mark Zalin and this is feast of fun. Occur. Yes Baby S. I love that curb I know given to us by Carmen Niagara and it sounds like her too which is the weirdest thing. It doesn't sound like Cardi B. No not at all she's. trademarked it right. She trademark she tried to trademark and wasn't able to. Yeah Poor Cardi I. Think Pork I. think she's doing great and she's definitely been kind of a visionary when it comes to what we are now facing she was ahead of the curve brings saying. I remember that I do remember that I was saying that for weeks and weeks and weeks. Yeah and now it's real. Now we're in and the thick of it and one hundred and fifty, thousand dead. The CDC estimates over half a million Americans may die before the end of the year lease wear masks, folks self isolate as much as you can we can beat this. If we all pull together many countries have beat it. So we'll see some things definitely changing and we may never go back to the way things were and sometimes for the better sometimes for the worse I wanNA breathe on people again. Fausto. Doorknobs. Breathing. More than anything and it's about breathing things and you can look a doorknob but as long as you like maybe take a little swig of Whiskey afterwards. Yeah you can't even. Go to go to church and drink from the Chalice Chalice. My favorite visionary pop star Bell Kelly's unknown Saad better known as Cardi. B. Said in a video way back in March that there would be a great reckoning with people getting fed up over celebrities coming across as out of touch or even spreading misinformation. The beginning of this was I think not. So Wonder Woman Gill does imagine. Video. Right under that, right? Yeah. I, do remember that and we were all like, oh. My God am I going to have a job and we're going to have food and we're going to have a roof over my head i. don't know what's happening right now unemployment checks are shrinking down and a lot of people are facing some really difficult challenges in terms of food and shelter and a home, and they thought singing John Lennon's imagine without makeup with poor recording. Would really whoop people over but people were like, no, this is not what we need right now and they're like imagine all the people and I'm suffering enough as it is. The beginning of all this stuff was ellen degeneres who began sort of this this trend of celebrities commenting on the crisis from the comfort of their lavish mansion, and normally we see this the entertainers on stage with them. In a TV studio. We don't see them in the insane amount of wealth and privilege that they live in, and so we're seeing ellen, you know in her gorgeous mansion with like gardening staff in the background. She's like this is like jail somebody's gotTa. Prune the hedges, right? Yes. She described as prison right and people like. Who Know you don't buy pruning. Your hedges do mean like her is that a sexual thing could be but she's got Porsche for that. Yeah. More suspense to been loyal throughout. She's standing with Ellen see that's what she sang on her instagram. Basically. What's happening though with? Allen. Though is I think it's people are out of work and I guess from a lot of her staff is coming forward now saying that she's not as Nice as she appears to be on the screen and a lot of them have lost their jobs or furloughed or something because she used a different kind of company to. Film her at home. So these people that have worked with her for years were supposedly left high and dry while a new company came into to film her at home, and so now that they don't have her around a lot of people have come forward and saying, Hey, it wasn't always a great environment to work in. There was a lot of Going on there was some producers that weren't very unkind to the people and at least one of the producers was even accused of sexual harassment. You know I've always had a love hate relationship with him. Yeah and that all started back when I was like twenty one years old was in one of the first lesbian, comedy? Music Bars and Austin Texas called chances you and. I was waiting in line and in front of me was very attractive blonde muscular person I was just waiting in line for the bathroom and I saw an attractive silhouette. Okay. That I assume you coming out his buyer parents actual now no I'm just describing what I saw and the figure turns around and scowls me because it chances there was only one gender bathroom at the Yeah. So both and women used. A lesbian bar anyone that was the place to be at that was the place to hang out and have fun and and be a musician, and I was a backup dancer music singer for Gretchen. Phillips two girls the Gretchen Phillips Experience. I was part of the music and the punk scene and ellen degeneres a very unknown comedian at the time who had just got her big break on the Fox. Sitcom. Open House who she played the Sassy receptionist very much in the spirit of Bob Newhart you know and she says that her comedy stylings. She owes a lot to Bob. NEWHART. Sure. She turns around manages like are you going to be waiting in line bathroom? When me I'm like yeah, there's only this is it you know she's like. She was like I want you here by her she didn't want me stand behind you testosterone on you well. As you can smell that she didn't. She didn't enjoy having to share that space with other genders. Ads. So. You assume. Right. Gave me the the very clear body language and reaction to you know she did not want me there and I was just like shrugged it off and I was like, Oh, my God this is that comedian from the TV show open house and the only reason I knew about this because my I was taking comedy class and my teacher at the time was a writer for the show and so he had us the show and I was like that's why I knew about her because nobody was watching. Maybe. Chewing Gum because I understand that if you're going to talk to, you have to chop gum because she's very sensitive to people's bad breath this is an island who was in the closet is ellen who was hustling to make an Hollywood. There's an alien who did not know what the future held and she had a lot of complex relationships with herself with other the public and. And then her career did really well, she got that Sitcom that was about to go off the air and she took a gamble and she decided to come out to Laura dern on the Sitcom. And for a lot of people who are familiar where with feminist com- comedy and theater and performance art of the late eighties and early nineties. You realize that this was a lot of culture. A lot of humor that was from shows like the five lesbian brothers in New York City. Lisa Crohn's work was manifesting itself into the comedy of the show. It felt fresh it fell new authentic to the stale kind of two and a half men. Three camera laugh track comedy became something. That, you could relate to again and so it capped Ellen show on the error for a couple more years I believe, and then it also bombed. It also tanked and Ellen went on the Oprah Winfrey show to talk about her story and half the audience was like feeling betrayed. They felt that she by coming out as as gay and she said Yep I'm gay on the cover of Time magazine there was a betrayal to her fans. And from there it seemed like Allen's career was was over was done and she just decided to take a gamble like all celebrities who run into Kelly Clarkson's doing this right now you know a lot. We take a lot of drag queens in quarantine doing talk shows to you know. When when an entertainer sort of doesn't know what direction to go in sometimes they think, hey, let's have a conversation with people and Ellen launched her talk show which was a huge success and add the core of all. That was her goofy dancy intro her personality that was like lighthearted that didn't put her sexuality, her frustration, her anger, her anxiety in center focus instead she had the daily sign off be kind to. One another and replace Rosie O'Donnell as the new Queen of Nice. But the people are saying that she's not so nice after. All right yeah they're saying that. His a toxic work environment that you know you can't breathe on her the. You're not supposed to talk to her on a lot of celebrities do have rules like that if they're on sad, don't bother the talent don't stare at them. It makes them uncomfortable. A lot of these people have a lot of insecurities and so you really have to handle them with with kid gloves. Now, she's also coming under criticism because she's not having any kind of control over what's happening on the production side They feel like she should be more involved. In fact, she came forward and said in a video recently that she would become more involved because she wasn't really aware of this kind of things. And from what I understand that this is a common element of a lot of TV shows in in California that a produced they're they're they're they're produced but then like the HR system is like part of the bigger company, like let's say if she works for I'm not sure if she works for Viacom or who she works for but they would have an HR department. But her the production company that makes her show wouldn't really have anything like that. So people really felt like they had no place to go to to to come with their concerns and part of that is you know when you're running a large company and Ellen productions they they have like a video game they have all these kind of online assets. All kinds of different projects and there's a lot of money there. You need to have an HR department because if your employees if your co workers don't have a place to vent their frustration inside the company, they're going to do it outside the company. They're to go on twitter and they're gonNA talk about it with the process of buzzfeed. Talked about this stuff but I think you know Ellen's troubles have been happening for a while you know Ellen in the past I think she was a very vital voice for lgbt people who felt they were not seen or heard or represented in television and the media, and in a lot of ways you know Ellen help to bridge those two worlds I remember her like sort of a criticising and Challenging. John McCain on her show for not standing up and support of marriage equality. And and. It seemed like, Ellen was Kinda be this progressive voice that was gonna move society forward but then you know last year She started interviewing Kevin Hart about the Oscars and becoming kind of an apologist and Allowing him to be a basically homophobic and a jerk, and then of course, you know she's challenging you Dakota Johnson saying Oh. You didn't invite me to your party. You didn't invite me to your party and I invited you party like g invited the party. Didn't go because she was hanging out with George Bush more criminal and you know and all throughout this and the people online were like well, her goal is to bridge the divide is kind to each other to give each other and it seemed like you know it Kinda worked for her. But then something orange and demonic took over our society. That's the Republicans led by Donald Trump and now we're facing one hundred and fifty thousand dead. So her message, her conciliatory. Centrist message doesn't ring true. It doesn't service or anything like that but you know it's interesting I. Feel like a lot of this kind of came out it was you know we were talking to. A comedian on the on the show, and she recommended another community that this person wants to know if you know anything about Allen Fosters, like loves to tell the story about it. You know when he first met her and that that that experience wasn't very pleasant and so she does we talked to the comedian and carly, and then she came out the podcast where like how mean is l. but I feel like people haven't really talked about that. Very much before, and then we did that podcast, and then I must have hit like a couple of people in Hollywood because you know there's people in Hollywood and production and places that listened to this show, and so I feel like that Kinda got there and so it Kinda like Greece that wheel for people to open it up a little bit I take zero ownership over Allen's lives or successive. No. Of course in however, we probably reacting to Xikai. To the to the fog. In the air that was wanting to examine Ellen DeGeneres as a hypocrite and part of it is like you don't mark and I have always noticed that some of the most. SUPERFICIAL SELFISH Dumb mean people that we've run across doing this podcast. Have this weird double dream. Come. True. They either want to be a talk show host where the guest interviews them. Or they want to be a guest on Ellen. Yeah. Either way they want a perpetual motion machine that gives them attention and money for zero effort money for nothing and your chicks for free. and. It some degree it's like, Hey, we all. Your Name and and You know you deserve to be loved. You deserve food you deserve shelter you deserve education and you deserve healthcare just by being you and don't let any politician or celebrity persuade you otherwise however when it came to Ellen, it became a situation where more and more people started realizing that the Queen the new Queen of Nice definitely became the queen of not so nice. Well, she says she's going to try harder right and I did yeah, and then she said, you know what? I think I'm just GONNA and the show I think it's time to end the show was that was a statement that was made by her grew using how some people are just like you want ask them to change and rather than have any kind of change whatsoever. They just up and quit it's just easier. And this is a you know a lot of that is stemming from that buzzfeed article by Christie, Lee and Doley who started interviewing former and current ellen show employees about the toxic environment of racism fear and intimidation, and as the started a snowball more people started coming forward that other show producers were sexually harassing a coworkers and guests on the show and it was just like it became this like you know a a very much a facade right on the air they're all like dancing and having a good time and when the cameras drop rolling, it's like. ooh thundering. Madness and sadness and Ellen hitting the ball and screaming at people and. Even like allowing one. In one meeting and one story they said. One of the show producers was super cruel and yelling at one of the new employees and she said, well, every show needs needs a needs a dog to bark did somebody to buy. and. And so now. The production company just, and this is all breaking news developing news. The show producer said that they the is going to go on and that they're doing everything possible to ensure that the employees the gas have fun. Because it's a show that brings so much happiness and fun. It should be a happy show to work on for sure. But you know you're also seeing all these thought pieces of like five. Lesbians Replace Ellen for the For the talk show. It's like everybody's like ready to have had her head on the planet but you know she's got a strong audience. She's got a wife that standing by her she's got how many hashtags did Porsche use the ice chest? Allen Has Check Standby Ellen. She's like fans of Allen please come together and support her in this moment of crisis. You know and it's like in the end up to. Her audience is her audience watching her show audience and join the show. But at the same time I think you know as as rotten, we've heard and experienced. At. Seen Ellen be a hypocrite as as she kind of attracts people who are kind of similar hypocrites. I want people to be better and to do better to have more diversity in the production staff you know. Certainly you know it. There's ways to for Ellen to have her cake and eat it too. Yeah, and. At the same time you know, she probably going to be the end of Ellen. I don't know it's it's what do you think is going to happen I don't think it's the end of at all, and now of course not she's she's a multi. Media floors of Nature Netflix specials or TV show she's I. Mean She's a cover girl for Christ's sakes sixty some years old you drive me cover over makeup. She's joining the apes. She's really good. She was really great. I think on with Jerry Seinfeld and riding around CODA was a great episode. One of the best episodes I would say her stand up comedy. Special. Started you know revealing much more complex person to me. I'm like it's a tricky thing because America doesn't necessarily want to see the real Alan and doesn't feel that she trusts the public with her true feelings and emotions also too when you're working on a production like that, I mean how many people are thinking about yourself your job let's say you're a waiter in a restaurant and you work with like thirty or forty people, right? Do you go by and say hi to? Every single person I did I mean I try to as well. I was always taught like you enter a room. You say, hello to everybody in that room like I'm not a person walks into the room and just walks by somebody who pretends not there. I wasn't raised that way. I'll never be not that person well, and I enjoy the process of entering a room I enjoy the process of getting to work and and you know all the jobs I've ever had I've had. Amazing Co workers and and part of that is you know they're amazing because I'm amazing person and I, I want to bring out the best in the people that I'm with and they bring out the best in me and so of Ellen feels or anybody feels at odds with the work environment that they're in an you know. It's a hard thing right now obviously in this pandemic but think about different ways to relate to the people that you're. It's tough right now we're also isolated at home. We don't get to see each other except on zoom meetings have the people are not even wearing pants. All right. Yeah. No I like those kind of meetings suck. But I think it's it's hard to go into work in in a place where leadership is dreading having to interact sway. GOING TO PACK UP HER GUCCI BAGS and call it quits and go live with her her gorillas in Africa. I don't know. I see a lot of talk shows who have deep pockets. Doing, pretty good at creating online content and I like. The one example is the daily show with trevor. Noah. Sure. It's been really shining certainly this what is it? The other the show this week tonight with. Forget his name, Oliver, John Oliver those shows are doing really well online and they're producing really. Compelling content however. You guys have a lot of money. You can put up a fabulous TV studio in your home. We do it why? I get some good lights and these guys can't invest enough fucking level lear her what is wrong with you guys they think that for the Internet is a different game altogether. hubris there and I don't get it. I I want good sound. Don't you I? Do I love their content You're certainly capable of buying a clip lamp and putting it behind your camera. I don't know. So it's up to see other people like Paul responded by just saying you know what you what you want you haters you hate it on me bitch by I'm going to everything because we really don't know why has disappeared. We don't know Newsweek is writing about it. Not to be outdone Michelle Visayan, also deleted her twitter account for a little while and then brought it back up because she's like Oh shit I can't do this. And she hasn't explained why she deleted it and neither has Paul Cameron Michaels do the same. We're not sure why these these entertainers associated with drag are deleting their their social media profiles and we're not when they come back they don't. I guess she's just like on a retreat or something. She's just like why she might. She's probably sitting around writing songs into recording studio socially distancing maybe she's fracking in Wyoming who knows maybe she was just taking some time off on hiatus. It's if you're not filming anything why be in Hollywood why hang out why update your social media? Of course she had you know all stars five was still filming filming but airing. While she deleted while she deleted it. So I was kind of interesting that happened is usually use that to you know just shake who lay who won. Actually yeah. Congratulations did not you know as far as I know I think it was interesting I you know maybe the listeners can help me out with timing there as I feel I, she deleted around the time that. The episode where she was talking to Juju be about recovery and being in like those kind of recovery meetings. rupaul kind of cried a little bit. You can kind of see her and like you don't really ever see her cry on that show or show any kind of emotion ru. Paul's was the episode roof halls family was there. and I wonder if like maybe that was like an emotional point for her that she made herself vulnerable to this kind of this this kind of. Opening up to her audience to the fans the people that watch the show and her family being involved and that maybe she didn't. Like the reaction that people because it really seemed like people didn't really care. You know what I mean this all. Right we're all handling crisis people who are in Recovery A. Struggling right now you just have to open your eyes and you can see your friends and family struggling and so seeing somebody who has just in was in the news just a year ago buying a mansion in California it's hard to have sympathy for that even though every person deserves sympathy and compassion regardless of how rich or poor they may be. It's just hard to relate to it when we're struggling with our own problems and you know Rupaul. Repulsive pioneer you know she was having a hard time before anyone else was twenty twenty. Because as you and the Queen got can't Aj and the queen got cancelled, not canceled not renewed, they didn't pick up a second season well. What is that? It's not. Like nothing was improved wasn't in production so it's not canceled. Picked up yet. It might live on maybe on lifetime or something netflix. Thing Net flicks did name and give the writing staff or the production staff access to watching the first episode of age in the Queen. But some very unpopular youtube bloggers got to see. A lot of the first season. Really. Yeah. and. We asked and begged for. Interview requests or copies, and we cannot get them to budge or react so. The only reason we were able to interview anybody from because we had a personal relationship with them, and then the Sherry Pie scandal hit with season twelve of drag race. It was the first time. The show had edited out a contestant from the series as much as they could as much as they could then. rupaul. the self saboteurs in the driver seat goes on NPR does a lovely interview with Terry, gross fresh air and at the very end terry gross innocently says what you guys are you and your partner George have a ranch in Wyoming. What's that like? Do you guys have horses do you? DRINK ICED tea. Do you have fun there as like? Oh, no honey. This is big business way make a lot of money licensing oil and mineral rights. Shreds rich. People are like jaws are dropped because they like the combination of awards I think it was something about like water extraction or water oil and mineral rights that kind of thing. So people knew that like what's fracking and then somebody laid the maps over of the Lebar ours rats with where things are fracking and they they do add up. And then to the point and that she's just kind of given up, getting dragged to host the show finale of season twelve. And then now there's rumors which I think they're completely ridiculous. But they are rumors nonetheless that she's not even showing up to tape the next season of repulsed rack rate. How could they do? How do Paul's drag race without Rupaul? They're doing in Canada. So. I don't know what's going to happen you know. It's an interesting thing. Of the show go on without the era, the house originator I. Think it would be unfair and I think they should keep the name repulsed drag race even Paul does decide to leave the show I don't know if they'll be able to. Say I own fifty one percent of this company and you use my name. Well. You know what would it just be drag race, right? It's not the same. rupaul add so much. Please resolve your if you're listening out there, reach out to somebody. Somebody Trust and talk about these things and please put a contestant on the show that has breasts. Or or put you know put people that are different than what you've been putting in past experiment. It's okay to. Play a little with the show format. You know have fun. Don't forget why you did this in the first place I'd said that to L. Fuck things up right what say that to to report I would say that to Madonna Poor Madonna we we went to see her. Madame X tour when it came here to Chicago and I thought it was a beautiful combination of a lifetime of a person who dedicated their career and their life very successfully to give attention to lgbt people across the world to have color to let Latin American and Latin Global Pan Latin culture. And to music, and it was just a wonderful show and it didn't even feel like. A Madonna show and felt like a celebration of well, he's Was In dot as Nadia. GINSBURG. WHO's GonNa Guess to this podcast does a phenomenal job of imitating Madonna and Cher when a rider and whatnot. And so it was because it was her quirky sides. She wanted to show a bit of a cabaret show a little bit of a pop princess show. But also you know that she's still got it and she has artistic chops and that that she's an artist who wants to shake things up 'cause the power of the artist is to disturbed things and boy has she been disturbing things in quarantine. We started to see Madonna's struggling with her her knees or hips. Tour. Chadha. Counselor tour and she's not she I'm sure as a dancer I in a musician second. For somebody WHO's body is giving out or challenging them. As somebody who myself struggles with my own body. With chronic back problems it is so debilitating and so depressing and frustrating, and you just have to reach deep inside and got a of is packs on your body. To just overcome this stuff and I can imagine that someone in Madonna shoes who's feeling so much pressure to perform to be out there. To be in this situation is a mind fund. So she started the pandemic in her lavish bathroom in a bath full of milk and rose pedals talk about corona virus being the great equalizer. Why is that a statement? Of well to statement of. Our statement it's kind of a statement privileged because you know somebody like hers probably not going to be that greatly affected by it. Whereas a lot of people you know there's whole families that you know they're getting together and having these family events and like the kid comes in the both parents get sick and one of the parents dies or both parents died then the grandma dies. So you know is that equalization in your book is that making the world equal I don't think so I think it's a lot of unnecessary pain and suffering but you know we have this idea in this world that everything happens. For a reason in the end everything's GonNa be okay and it's GonNa. Be along that lines of that toxic positively like no matter. What happens we're GONNA BE OKAY AND Well we have to really recognize people's feelings and what people are going through I. Mean you don't have to dwell and some of those feelings forever, but you have to at least come to some kind of terms with it. Yeah and you know we see Susan. Serandon of having this idea that like an imperfect Democratic Party who does have its own history of not supporting the people, the American people and putting a lot of money into war into the military industrial complex ignoring. The opportunities in abilities to? Bring in universal healthcare to properly fund schools. To Shrink the Police Department or fund the police. The Democratic Party hasn't lived up to the promises that they've had. So people like Susan, Serandon or Armie Hammer. The actor. said, it's good to have trump charge because it's making people value progressive ideas and they're still not valuing progressive ideas Bernie Sanders, we had to make it. We have we had pandemic going on we had people dying and our healthcare system stretched to the limits and being an expensive. We don't have masks and people are dying in the one person who is calling for. Universal Health Care Medicare for all Bernie Sanders. Still didn't get it I. Don't think that Bernie Sanders didn't get the nomination because of his ideas not being good or popular with the American public. I think he didn't get it because the American public had fear and insecurity over trump being re elected and so. Because of that fear, they went with something safe and proven, which is somebody tied to the Obama Administration. and. That's where we have Biden. Biden is by far perfect candidate but back to. Back to Madonna and now you might see on social media, the term demon spurring. Oh. Tasty. Tasty. All Sperm Demon sperm. But so there's this doctor called Stella Emmanuel. Who with a collection of of of idiots you know dressing and lab coats stood in front doctors or researchers, right? There's a a jerk off the street they say, Hey, put on this lab coat. Here's one hundred dollars stand there and pretend like you're a doctor and so this Stella Manual says that she believes that alien DNA is being of. Cures, she believes that there already is a treatment and a vaccine for covid nineteen and it's being held back on the public in order to help the Democrats the next election trump tweeted this too and trump is the one who's been pushing it and Madonna either inadvertently or last. Judgement or something she shared an honor instagram and of that, of course, instagram itself, Cap Madonna from sharing and showing that video Now. She's taking down, but he didn't take it down instagram to down. For I thought. Maybe it was one of those like you know this is dubious kind of claim but we don't know Madonna Madonna could just say you know what? I didn't really get it all my apologies I'm GonNa reflect on this now she's back to post down cards and You know she's also very into. A propaganda she understands what propaganda this from the state is, and is like she's sharing this with a critical is saying like look at this this is propaganda or did she just see a lot of her instagram is people of colored black people. You know her her beautiful children, dancers, musicians, these people that she's worked with an Africa. And Malawi and did she see this black woman as a doctor? It'd be like I'm going to share this because women power. Hopefully you know that she was like Oh wait. Maybe video for maybe she just wanted something controversial on our thing because you know Madonna you know, do things just to disturb you. and. That's where we leave to our top story of the day Zach. Ephron Zach. In crisis, a gay icon and crisis. Now, why do you say? Zach. Ron's a gay icon. I would say he's somebody who has been rumored to be in the closet as a gay man. Certainly makes no efforts or interest in women or He's been dating a girl I plays. Real friends he's had girlfriends but it recently he's kind of like. You know. said that he's not interested in playing the Hollywood game and in his series and interviews he said that if he stays in Hollywood and plays the game, he will not live long and happy life for Hollywood is a toxic environment, which is probably right. You know. So Hey physician can cure themself. So he's got a new series on netflix trailer. Wait so so he In crisis. Turn to the Internet started listening probably their faces funds nope not these. Pound this podcast named Darren Oland who is very much if whole foods was a podcast. This guy would be in person farm and he fell in love with him and he reached out to him and became close friends and together they decided to do a web documentary series called down to Earth and it's totally like a daddy son travel rob see like Zach is like he loves this guy now whether it's a sexual relationship or not there is like there's an intimacy that these two share you the cars together laughing they're slapping each other on the back you know they're playing games with each other. So really fun to kind of see that aspect of it because you don't really get to see too many inner general intergenerational relationships. In that respect. So in that sense like I think it's really sweet. And you see Zach struggling because he's I wanna live a healthier lifestyle. I want the world to be in a better place and I think that's where they wanna take this show and and show us these kinds of things but some of their claims are rather dubious. The show does a great job of bringing. Zach and his daddy to Puerto Rico to France to central and South America to Europe and focusing on the themes of. Nature Sustainable Living Green Energy. And it's it's light and fun. And full of pseudoscience and dubious claim for example, like there's one episode they do on water you know water is you know what we all need to survive and it's very important to have a good clean source of water. They talk about one one guy he's molly as you don't ever want to drink filtered water, it's going to be terrible for you. It's GonNa Leach things out of your by that kind of thing, and they're like, oh, well, filtered water so bad so bad and you see him agree with them and then they go to Paris the they have all these fountains of filtered water for people to Drake and Philip their bottles and go everywhere and they're like this is so amazing. This is wonderful. So it was like which one is it is filtered water. Okay or is it filtered water not? Okay. Distilled, water that you put in your iron so that calcium doesn't build up when you're ironing clothes don't drink that. No you don't WanNa drink to still because when you drink it, it does leach nutrients minerals out of your body to balance that water. All the water you buy at the at the. was. It the convenience store All has something in the minerals in it. Yeah. You always you always put some kind of winners like dishonored or something like that that might be filtered while they add some minerals in it to have a better taste. Now, actually some of those waters are garbage and some of them are really good and what people are doing on the Internet as they're buying Ph testing ends. And the ones that are very acidic is not going to be as good for years. One that's more alkaline just because of the human body doesn't WanNa be a lemonade is delicious, but it is acidic and you want to. Ph Balance and so on. So there's there's some. Stuff but they also say it's Like an acid stomach sometimes, they say like you know you can have a little bit of of of lemon juice in it because like even though it has acid, it's not as much. ACID is the acid that's in your stomach. So here's a list of from insider dot com of the ridiculous claims the show makes. And before I go into this, I think. As a society, we don't make a lot of space for man to have deep emotional relationships and to show affection and physical intimacy with each other even if it's not sexual right and I think you know, D-, do I think Zach Ephron and his Daddy. Have a sexual relationship I. Hope So. I. Said I think. WHO's the winner of Paul's drag race that? Loss to. Sausage Varsha velour said do not need to be gay to be a drag queen. But when you sue become a drag queen, you surely want to be gay And then. Goes for I. Think you know with these friendships I think you know part of it is like there's value in having that intimacy and we're so lonely as a society that when we find that that relationship and I want everybody out there to find their their their What's his name? Darren, Olien their Daddy. May Not be somebody you're sexual with but find those father and mother figures of paternal figures that nurture you and love you unconditionally encourage you to be playful and and look at the world with a sense of wonder and I think that down to earth shines at that I, remember having conversation with your mother who who, who says, she didn't have a good relationship with her own mother. So in her life, she found other mothers and she's like I've I have besides my original mother I have three other mothers. Who raised me and then I found this person was a mentor and then I found this person that person was a mentor and we if we can be that person for you, we would love to be more that. You guys wanted to a Netflix Netflix travel show. I'm all for it. See this covert is over. Well, that's a that's actually one project that actually asked for funding from NPR in Google this. We declined for one one thing we wanted to do with Larry Lafontaine is very similar to down to Earth where we were going to travel to Latin America and talk to lgbt people. Gender, non conforming people in Latin America about their way of life, and unfortunately that did not happen. Maybe it's a dream. It's something that I want to come true. However, it's really fun to look at the ridiculous whole foodie claims presented the show. The first one is goat's milk being somehow magical. And pasteurize Compared to cal now. So pasteurization for you folks out there that don't know is when you heat up milk so that it kills any kind of bacteria in it because you can. If you're if the the cow or goat has some kind of disease, you can get it just like how you can get HIV from human breast milk. You could get something similar from that kind of thing. So they were saying that they're having. Zach milk the teat himself, and then drink some the goat milk and told him. It's already pasture is now I think that they meant homogenized Jeff or something instead, which means that the fat manifest itself differently and goat milk that it does cow milk it doesn't separate inform a cream layer so does not be. Shaken up mechanically like cow milk in order to homogenize it but it doesn't mean that it's safe to drink untreated and even. People who do milk farm animals do warm up or heat up the milk. To to prevent illnesses and and sickness from it, and then the other claim that they make is a genetically engineered crops. Are Full of poison. They're killing the bees and that's why they're killing the bees and the thing about it. There's a lot of controversy and genetically modified crops is very complicated. One of them is we would have a lot more deaths on this planet and people would suffer a lot more without genetically modified crops. However also, corporations like Monsanto want to have a patent on our food supply and so anybody who grows corn anybody who grows we arise has the pay them a little money, a rights for that pattern and these giant monocultures have a devastating effect on the environment. You can't have like this one type of corn taking up thousands of acres of of a farm somewhere, and then nothing else is around what you need spaces for other things to live as I feel like genetically modified crops as patents should be owned by governments and not by corporations. For that reason because. Humanity deserves to eat and to live. You deserve to live and and. So. One good thing about genetically modified crops, which is actually the opposite of Zach Ephron and his Buddy Darren. Making the claim is that they actually rely less on pesticides because of their ability to be resistant to the the the the past, the the insect that is trying to eat it. So instead of having a pesticide that kills bees which are good and. Bad to other. Insects. Genetically modified crops rely less on pesticides for that. So genitally I would I would say genetically modified crops as long as we're having a good conversation and it's not allowing monoculture and giving people the ability to choose in the grocery store I think is a good idea to. He he also makes the claim that putting your bare feet on the floor resets or biological. I've heard a lot of people say that you know I don't know if that reset your biological flop clock or not but there is something about having your hands and nature. They say that happiness it can increase your happiness just being a forest can help with feeling low it brings you back to life gets good bacteria onto your skin so there's something To, be said for being natural in nature, but I don't know if it could really set your biological clock. When you traveling overseas, definitely going for a walk in nature walking children to nature. Is Good for you but. Thinking hassle sort of you know magical ability to reset your clock is a little bit of exaggeration I? Think the most dangerous claim they're making on the show is is the Vegan Diet can cure cancer. And we certainly seen famous rich powerful people. Steve Jobs from apple is a famous example of somebody who is facing life threatening cancer and decided to go on all fruit diet. Good thing is name of his company was like. Windows because he'd be eating window. Instead of Apple. Now, there's a lot to be said for Vegan Diet and a calorie restricted diet. They look at people throughout the world and they figure out who's got the lives the longest sentence people that live on a calorie restricted diet. So you know being having a body mass is important for longevity in general. Now, of course, there are some people with larger body masses that do live a long time. But when you look at people who are over one hundred years, well, over one hundred years of age, they're usually quite quite lean in active. If, starving to death means I don't get to live to be one hundred and feed me. Now. But you also have to look you know when you're when you're when you can be bigger like that. It's it's usually a symptom of something else you know I know for myself like I e because having Zayed Eighty. Immuno or depression and things are it's not eating because I'm like, ooh, I'm happy I wanna eat all the time. There are worse things you can do. Yes. There are definitely worse things and If you know having a box of chocolate chocolate chip cookies means you're put down the heroin needle crack pipe either goddamn monster cookies now, Susan Gerbil, who's on this podcast before she she's the psychic buster. Yeah. She and a group of friends from the skeptics organizations that she worked with. They worked on the WIKIPEDIA entry four down to Earth with Zaka fraud and they have listed like all these different articles being criticized for this and criticizing it for that for the Super Foods and. The veganism and the raw goat's milk all that stuff. What's the whole? Concept of superfoods and why is that like bullshit? Well, you know it. They're like this is like, how is like Kale a superfood compared to like? The ZUCCHINI. I they actually say like when you look at like something like Kayla's hailed as Superfood, they're like here attend things for you that are better for you than Kale. You know how do you judge that Parsley as more of a super food Kale I guess but you're not eating a big salad of Parsley. Parsley aside the. Parsley on top of. Twice baked potatoes and so when they say it's a superfood it's they also say it's because they have a large a marketing corporation behind them saying, this is a superfood. Berries go gee barrels and your diet should mostly be fruits and vegetables. Everything like your diet should be mostly that I'm not a Vegan but I play one on. TV. Occasionally. Like it's good to increase the in fact. One of the things we would love to do once pandemic. Ends hopefully land. Soon. is to start a new season of cookie drag Queens with all the recipe. That'd be fine. Go veg baby. No not that Veg to send us your favorite vegan recipe. There's a lot of vegan foods and recipes that people from especially Latin American culture that people have. No idea exists there even know about TV p Tex. Rise Vegetable Protein Governmnet Esau, which makes amazing tacos. and. tacos or everything. Negative ions make you feel better and there's you know how is this back Zach in the Vaca thing? and part of it s like I think that's the ionizer my father used to have this thing he would buy on TV cover pool setter say the the bracelet that balances you and magnets on it. But you can buy an ionizer for your home right and it's supposed to have that smell of after like a thunder storm right? Isn't that supposed to have brass. Time. I've ever smelled those things. It just smelled like you know. Like a hair salon. Not Smell good and so you know part of it is like a lot of that stuff is is if feels like sometimes like you know we're under attack the country because you like go on social media and there's always an ad for some bullshit product from some far off land they even if you order, it never shows up and when it does show up, it's just like snake oil it's garbage and my mother falls for it all the time to the point that me and my sister had to like have an intervention just keep her off Oh. Yeah. Our who she was getting all that stuff and it was like she, she doesn't even use it like it will just arrive and you know her balancing bracelet to sat there on the kitchen counter should I don't like wearing that? She gave it she'll give these gifts at Christmas and you're just like this is useless. I was like well, even like the hemp oil that she was buying and like I tasted it didn't taste like hemp oil the states like you know canola oil with a little. Oh Yeah. So it's not even real stuff. And that gives bring us to the case of the haunted. Mirror Oh. FACEBOOK Hanin Mirror. This is such a good story and I wanted to share this with you guys. There's on facebook where part of a queer. Swap meet like a place where lgbtq people can put the junk in their houses. They don't want to sell swap at give it away. We're ever neighborhood you live in the United States look for like a queer swap thing so Like minded people and this individual put it ad here with a big tall mirror said haunted giant mirror one hundred dollars a beautiful seven foot tall for sale probably from the nineteen twenties definitely haunted maybe even cursed I paid one hundred and fifty dollars for it. Today seventy dollars to move it, but it is haunted as fuck and I want it garden. There's even an elevator, my building I can help you. So, what made a haunted? So because the person who posted, it didn't explain what was going on everybody's imaginations went why I want to know and they're like this is like American horror story. It's the mirror that saw terrible things happen in front of it and you said I said while she she probably things is haunted because every time she looks into it she sees a monster. So I detective Fausto on the case. What did you discover and your? Study I started examining the comments and the owner said that they had downloaded a Tarot card deck and when they ask the APP about the mirror, they caught the card of death. and I'm guessing probably the owner didn't like how hard it was to clean this large old glass mirror and how dominated space in their home, and maybe you know they are the roommate had a bad dream and consults the Tarot card APP which is you know like fortune cookies, and Tarot cards and mirrors. Are, very, the death card and marriage very similar. Actually it's. It's about how we transform in life. When you look into mirror, you are challenged by what you're thinking look like but what you see. And the death card is very similar it's it's about something ending and a new thing changing. Death. In its finality, it's about transformation. Sometimes, it is death row to know the death card is not about death. The death card is about transformation sometimes you're transforming from being alive to being. There are different cards in the Tarot Card deck that talk about that. Oh. The death card in its essence is about transformation and even the the power power of a Tarot card deck isn't its ability to predict the future or find hidden spirits lurking around us. It's power is to spark your imagination to looking at things and challenges you face in creative new ways most of the time. This game of self solitaire can be fun and helpful but the danger lies when somebody is already struggling with negative thinking or depression and everything, they see including the Tarot Card deck even the death card becomes an ominous dangerous. Omen. Okay, and that's why it's so important to use these kind of imagination sparking tools with another person who can guide you into thinking about positive solutions to difficult problems. That's all. I, think Tarot Card can be an amazing tool to unlock new ways of thinking about things, but it's really important to do it with guidance with with somebody you trust. And if you're doing it by hours ideas in your head well and part of it as you know when you're struggling with something when you have, there's a lot of uncertainty. There's no leadership right now there is a lot of bad things around the corner we're dealing with a lot of death is so important to look for solutions to look for crave new ways to face the demons that we do have. So what happened in the mirror she sold it got all our money I should. Thanks, Internet. And I just thanked her and I said you know thank you so much for this adventure may actually think about that haunted mirror it was really fun. It made me think of Scooby Doo and what would you say if I brought that haunted mirror home gotta be get the. Out It. Was Awfully big. That's the kind of mirror. You WanNa get a little frisky in front of. The Gym that we work out at with face masks with safety, distance and hygienic. Protective measures is full of these giant Spooky Mirror. And over the years they had a lot more but they've broken and so I love the crazies spooky giant mirrors, but I don't like them in my home 'cause it's just a full of dust and they're just dino are large beer is very streamlined. Yeah we are. We have one of those mirrors that cost like twenty bucks. superlight super easy to move around. So that's why I wanNA, leave you guys with with that is is is that It just you know. Look for creative ways to overcome the demons that we face and it's okay to ask for help and think about tools to spark creativity. That's all be creative. Remember folks fees to fund is made possible because of fierce fabulous people like you become a plus member at Feast to fund dot com slash plus support the show. We couldn't do this podcast without your support and you can also join Patriot at Patriotair Dot com slash feast of fun. Yes. Honey s time to spend some. Monte, on the fun to we're on Patriot. We could get all the bunches access to videos and recipes new cooking with drag queens episodes, and no one else has seen and it's all there waiting for you. Next one is disaster arena. From season two and season three of dragging la the search for the world's next drag super. Monster. Maybe to make a one time donation, you can do that feast defined dot com slash donate and finally I guess farewell to talk show legend Regis Philbin he died of heart disease at the age of eighty eight. Yeah and before he even got in the ground people were like he was so annoyingly. Service people all over like on airline stewards or airline attendance and. Servers restaurants facebook and like the guy just died I don't care. He was a jerk. Hey, was it asked hall that's Regis Philbin. It he's like he's. How know if you're a server in a restaurant, he's GonNa ask you for some water is once again. I watched here. Can you break some water? Please? Oh, my God died. He was a talk show legend and God had super long career and just this inability to fill up time and entertain, and he did that show for eons. Kathy Lee. Then he did it with Kelly Ripa. She's all ripped up about it. Say she's married at market swallow. He's ripping her up. Baby ooh yes. Honey you and you know John Boehner he's Bainer he's in the news. The original Orange Republican. Rotten to the core who wants was unalterably opposed marijuana is now one of the top lobbyists. For the recreational marijuana. Industry and was talking about this with vivacious and who does a did some deep research? Yeah. She every every afternoon I think the three o'clock clock eastern time on twitch she does a DJ set So definitely go check it out guaranteeing dance arena quarantine denser innovations, nyc on which follow her as she was like saying Yeah John Boehner Gainer Bainer, he had to resign one of the top Republicans because his daughter married a Rastafari and now he who he was adamantly opposed against marijuana. Now he's a lobbyist for it. So you know how that goes her daughter's husband one time was arrested and put in prison for having possession, of marijuana. And the irony that this asshole now is making record amounts of money as a lobbyist lobbyists for the recreational marijuana Republicans. And Hallmark movies I'm sorry lifetime new movies announced some money that they're going to have a queer Christmas special and also in Asian Christmas special a but of Christmas to remember. I know it's called large Christmas setup, Hugo New, York, corporate lawyer, and his best friend Madeleine head to Milwaukee to spend the holidays with his mom kate who is also in charge of the local Christmas celebrations ever the matchmaker Kate agrees for Hugo to run into. Patrick. Hugo's high school friend and secret crush who has recently returned after a successful stint in silicone valley as they silicone valley's is getting plastic surgery. We got to rename that where people go to. Get silicone becomes, Silicone Valley. And so they try to hook them up and then but they're also coming up with their first Asian special like was called a sugar and spice holiday, and it's about a rising young architect returns to her small home town in Maine for Christmas her Chinese American family runs the local lobster bar and following the loss of her beloved grandmother who was legendary Baker. In the community, Susie is guilted into following her grandmother's footsteps and so you know she's going to find some love and in town I've always said you know, why should Tyler Perry have all the fun? No nowhere in the Taurus show does it say Tyler Perry she'll have all the fun well because Tyler Perry basically does these very sentimental morality tales of Romances and you know stories where everybody's not nevil or Bads just misguided although you know. I think at some of his movies there's some really rotten. They're just desserts and you know part of me is like the hallmark channel and those lifetime movies can be swing conservative but they're also fun to escape and just look at the ridiculous nature of it. It's innocent world where you know the worst thing that happens is that somebody Ordered the wrong croutons on their salad and you know so. We actually. We, wrote down all the food that was eaten in one APP mentioned mansion in the one episode of good which I have it here. Okay. One episode this episode. How many? Forty two minutes lowery two minutes. Okay. Bruecker Okay Ready Blueberry Bran Muffins Maple Glazed Salmon East raised glazed donuts a not with light Mayo and no tomato on the side cinnamon rolls homemade cocoa herbal tea camomile tea maple glazed salmon again resort auto buttered ASPARAGUS watercress salad guacamole popcorn corn ships, poached eggs over easy eggs grilled cheese croissants are peak ot's over twenty blueberry muffins camomile tea coffee tea pastries, cream puffs specific cream puffs lemon squares Swiss cheese sandwich on whole wheat a box of Chocolates Monte, Cristo Sandwich, which was most of the episode was talking about stupid. Monte Cristo P. Con Glazed Bundt cake a fruit Salad Brownies and cup of coffee. I think this was an episode and a half. That is. Maybe so but God were. Episodes. They should call it good. Good evening wet now I'm hungry. So you know. So we joked about it and this is what's next The the good fats, fans. And you know it's like a I think a fun to explore different. Identities and experiences in the hallmark channel and and the lifetime movies, and you know, let's make a Feast of fun lifetime movie about Yes about the drag queen and discovered her soul. She had a heart after all. That was like a one of the last things Carrie Fisher did was the Christmas Carol for the Hallmark Channel and she plays like the Ghost of basically the Jacob Marley. And she's like you don't want to be like me scrooge you want to learn you know. So she's Carrie Fisher is this overworking capitalistic money hungry, greedy advertising executive who died, and now she's haunting the young woman who she left within the woman. She's hunting machine good which to I think. They're like, well, it's fun because some of these hallmark channel things you have like retired actors like the one who played the the board queen she's now the queen of this like. Thing European country yeah, and she's like Christmas Prince Christmas pret- She's the Queen Mother. At So anyways Carrie Fisher. Plays this you know more or less dictated. All terrible. It's terrible and Carrie Fisher's like I'm just hi I'm having fun. You know whatever it must be fun to film these things I would imagine it also. So they're going to be more gay stuff with the smarmy crazy sentimental. Stuff coming your way. Thank. You guys so much for listening to Podcast I. Know I know times are tough but together, we can overcome. Share, will we stick together? We're community and we are strong. Five everybody.

Ellen DeGeneres Allen Madonna netflix Hollywood Ephron Zach Paul Cameron Michaels Darren Oland Rupaul Porsche twitter California John Lennon Zach Ephrons George Bush Mark Zalin Time magazine Carmen Niagara
#35 Hayden Wilson  inner work, coaching and learning

The Adam McCubbin Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

#35 Hayden Wilson inner work, coaching and learning

"Today's interview is with Haydn Wilson who is returning guest that I interviewed all the way back in March two thousand eighteen but before we get started tap guys Adam Kaufman here and welcome to the podcast aw for thirty percent off your next order if you're after delivered meal plans for performance loss style or even the white loss title Wilson on the podcast who came on the podcast episode ten in March two thousand eighteen and had some great feedback from fifteen percent off now without wasting any more of your time here the interview with Haydn Wilson so today I have a return and now twenty percents off your order and finally bone broth if you live here in the UAE and familiar with the benefits of bone not one that where we go into depth on the potential uses and benefits and health potential health benefits as well if you'd like to get a discount extra and fuel op is an option if you live in the UA and you can use the discount card best body twenty four the listeners and really enjoyed some of the stories that he told particularly that one about John D. Martini and just that evolution of that that relationship broth if you're not familiar with the benefits I have an episode interview that I did with Dane Henriot which was all the way back in episode there's definitely a point in my life where I just did not think it would be possible to have a growing business and a girlfriend at the same time and that was like a bit minted in your routine last time you'll get four thirty am six days a week you're riding you're focused you're doing lots of things but I just wondered how that is mastic range and shipped as his just about anywhere in the world if you want a discount on their online orders use the discount card six info now you do think it's probably did have an awkward start the conversation but I remember like you very rigid back on so welcome back to the podcast thanks it's a pleasure to be here and look forward to talking a few more stories yes apparently so I think last time we spoke I'm not sure but it just from social media I don't think there was a you had a special lady in your life you think originally one of my hangups was I had a girlfriend and I worked really hard and exposed the relationship full what it was and therefore I had to get negative associations with all with a growing my business to assert like I can go to a certain point but once it gets then things are going to start to hit search on your next order use the code six four six four at the online checkout or simply missed mentioned best body co if you're speaking to one of their south staff this will give you on anyone that that might have been in that position is just looking at what they want to achieve staying true to the values and I had a really interesting I'm glad you asked because there was definitely a point in my life I've really only like party super recently actually worked through it and on the work on it but you can definitely have a relationship and a business it's just it's more about flying a person that's more compatible and someone who is aligned with your value so my partner Liz in I should just incredible as far as you know pushing me in growing and supporting and challenging and really it's about for me and just loved the insights in the stories I think everyone enjoys a good story and and you're obviously a good storyteller I wanted to reach out experience and we're talking about Dr John Day Montana remember actually one one time I asked him because I'm looking to impale all areas of my life and is changed since since you've Negga girlfriend is that is that changes all that is such a great question because a lot of interviews wouldn't guy then despite the right person that wants to be part of that and extent cheerful who you are and I guess it's also that second Secondary Pot what you accept a relationship that runs in parallel parallel journeys oath expansion as individuals and it just happens to bay that you'll compatible at this point the situation working lots very focused had very detailed routines and I couldn't actually imagine stepping into that and and giving up your time but in and relationships being one of those and he was saying that you know you attract people into your life to try and help you impale potsy loss and the imagined and you start to say what what the relationship can do to the other areas you ll off as well and obviously yeah obviously if you're on the same path and what in time man for the time being and definitely the foreseeable future icon imagine anyone else being in my life and it's the Rock in it's all going to fold down but what I had to work around a what through was discovering that you can definitely have as on living perfect to Adam the mattamy says if you've got essentially the simen goals you both Alana terms of self development or whatever it is that you're interested in I think directly there is you know my sounding board of I'm writing an article law something I'll always ask her what she thinks and it's good to get that sort of subjective it can sort of empower other areas and inspire you to uphold yourself to certain levels as well we'll see second funny story that had how it is tell me to work harder or something like that which which is always a good thing so since eighteen months ago we chatted what is the focus now the main any big revelations with your personal development but also onto your business who you are and you're with that like I'm completely kinda like for as long as on as long as I'm serving than I'll be as only she sitting in my life and I said they asked me to ease is possible why next question but now I definitely say like I think it's great and I think it's just about like you the law wheel and relationship if you make a buck a whole pizza on different slices and if relationship And at one point in time it was it was dipping into what has been the difference between learning and self development so I would previously believe that if I was reading a book than us as well Yeah Yeah I think one of the biggest things that of really luck stepped into is do the work so I I at one point in time definitely I love reading I love growing I love ingesting different like myself I don't want to rely on anyone else and he said and I said to have a relationship though because he comparing myself has at work everybody said what you want is you WanNa have right that were confirming what I already knew which isn't really wasn't giving me a fully rounded view of an objective view of of it'll be a if that was no longer the case in all wouldn't want other of us to to maintain a lot of pine just for the sake of it's great to have fallen someone that does push me challenged me and someone that I can push challenge in someone who's Arkansas growing and the view because a lot of times ask you your friends or someone like that Mike should be coded answer better I think definitely with my relationship just tell me how reality and saw ops myself questions and question the knowledge that I might have been receiving and one really important question that that connect have at Kohl's is you Shutt- Shutt- my previous beliefs and my expectations and experience Bartha valid forms of learning. How do you know how do you notice that is micro learning where you're not really learning all pushing boundaries or trying to find anything that's counter to what you might have read Oland Loyd but I wanted to empower it and you know you attract people to fulfill the missing pot I want but I wanna I wanNA have the self reliance and impel paradigms of how I live and it sucks it sucks so much that you know you've got these beliefs and your truth right and then someone when you're really working with the coaching Al and the thing sanctuary dead awake two weeks ago three weeks ago liked the thing that I love most about women the listening to ask him or herself is how do you know and I love that question good it really exposes whether you've learned something from a book with you've lived you're heading towards your greatness and unless you're willing to go there and be courageous and exit defaced and I'm now no longer carrying around all oldest baggage and the more that honestly like the more that you work internally right because all it was very regimented I didn't WanNA travel US wanted to stay in focus on my business and then funnily enough traveled to at the time in Melbourne you can't look at the edge and and not disorder shoe like that's I've been other side is your potential and if the prepared to guard through the work then that's you know I wouldn't I wouldn't make much sense I and I'm part of the reason was because I was probably maybe five six years ago uh-huh getting added a competence on that retain is the best thing for you so it's pretty pretty grateful for that to school and then you can also get that external feedback because you have someone would not feeling good enough and all these feelings of self self loathing and lack of self love and all this stuff what I thought was an Elizabeth as different situations in different locations and so I always like all this travel thing ms trouble thin is actually not too bad so it goes to show united the here and you walk around the side of the House and around the back as like he didn't have a fully complete view and they're like chick like you'll missing a whole bunch of bricks and then I said I'm going to lend my girlfriend lives and now I look to and it was basically all you go up there and I got a coin and then I was shipped to relationship with my father passed away when I was eight years old ab- able to take instances of bullying instances of men awesome but really looking looking at things like the role of a mile in society is X. providing and protecting the more that you're able to have a big ripple effect and how people in all different areas of their lives yield relations really beneficial all of that journey is you know you've got like the learning side of things in the rating and ingesting but then there's actual self development and doing the work and and as part of that of just shy talk the more that I do that the more assistance aachen-based others because that usually if a completely honest I'm listening all that stuff's generally sort of hidden or reserved for the gills all this trouble stops not too bad and then like a month later travelled to Perth and got another close and then like a month after that traveled to Sydney and got another client they've got to make the money and all these conceptions around who we are and really I think I lost at a month it's been more of a was developing myself but what I've discovered is two things one is often we can fall into what I would call challenging of days societal belief systems like why sorry had an questioning myself and others as who are excited and inspired about maybe seeing a different possibility themselves and lastly prepared to do the work it is just like destroyed but I read about this in my book while I to be right it's looking at peering Iva appearing either the the now it's more like well is that really is that really the truth and so that's been probably like the fame of the lost item month is really just going deep took to look at something that perhaps you've might have avoided and you can always use the analogy that is as well as with strength training your inside of myself to create a ripple effect to then help other people who are asking questions who are ready for a greater level of tree bat before you almost looking in staking out things that confirm I think it's called the confirmation smell scientists looking for because looking when when you work with someone like that how do you get to that I guess to be vulnerable and to be a man it's sometimes it's area that is going to become a gaping hole in your in your development as as a strength but also yeah have them target your insecurities and to be willing to work on because not not everyone it's a hard thing to do yeah uh-huh you'll wake links again be holding you back in whether it's a deadly whether it's a squad or whatever it is if you don't take care of that pathology Oh that weakness in that indicate but except the hard times except the good times play judgments around them so really loss day months has made a huge focus on doing the work to point out you witness you got to use the word before courageous you've got to have some sort of strength you look either and say what's on the other side another that's the truth and then you cro- back luck you once once you leave and once you commit to like living authentic loss that's a great question and the answer is you just get sick of this shit you get sick of running the same sokoll and that is like to do that because as you know it's just it's not easy it's not exciting at a time but it is worth it but I think it thinking thinking your head and it's like false this false doorway and what ends up happening is you walk you walk through a door and Israel rotting sharing etc and one of the biggest things that I realized was and this and this goes back further than they must have been a lot differently like really you know would he be proud of me and and sort of hoping and wishing and whiting for his approval and when things would get really odd I'll be talking to frowned upon or just from society it's not talked about your feelings what how did you get yourself to that space to work with someone like that and and how like if these these are the things that keep popping up so I'll give you an example I would often ask myself what you touched on with that analogy with with peering over looking at the back of the House and you say the brick some missing it can be quite painful hind wasn't enough like the pine also some kind of sick masochist where I enjoyed the suffering I enjoyed the victim of staying stuff I will of greatness and saying potential on the other side like once you look over your if you WanNa make a truly congruent life which I do while out neverthe- reality like there's always new levels and are really wanted to explore like that guy and I also wanted to recognize parts just listening rating in all used to read a book and I'll just take it on his Gospel I'd be like oh well this this person said and that must be that must be the truth and then with myself was when I wasn't following values and so I stopped a now every time that my dad shows up in these kinds of representation of my dad didn't on that a lesson and so I just got sick of Ryan the same soccer way for three months it'd be fun and then three months later it was often seeking the approval of my dad and that could never happen because he passed away twenty plus twenty five years ago man's always look on doc and I am someone who likes growing but this does degrades this shit as degrade there's levels of like hell willing you ought to grow as you almost like you've got a friend of a house and like this is how any peripherals or whatever and it's like yeah this is the beautiful house and then like someone shows you data's going to grow I want to expand to be great in all areas of my life and leave as as fully as I can as Haydn Wilson Mantle a Lotta the belief system because people will talk about depression and what happens is depression is is dependent on your values and belief systems and so if you're telling yourself that you'll you'll moving to what's important to you and you've got I partly and not a doctor fully but this is just my opinion but depression Maine's that you'll missing a certain certain chemicals route a ninety degree turn or whatever it might be depending on on the the difficulty of the challenge but it really is everything if you are willing to learn from it everything is sections of how you say something longer do you say something as cause depression is a living towards fantasy it's it's purpose and you're doing things that are Allama values these things don't show up safer able to change the behaviors to change the actions of attacking to alter the I don't want to have these moments of impact evaluation and then CBS and then just heating wall hitting the same Financially I'd be like Oh you know I wish I wish my dad was around be so much easier victim and then when things were fine it's SORTA wouldn't show up and so sort of working with levels and then the medication they take rises levels those levels are determined independent on the story that you tell yourself and the story that you tell yourself only at sort of not many people are talking about in south love protocols for men all even open up that conversation and then starting to really tearing your lockout is through wished it would be and so when the biggest gap the more elevated the depression and so you if you've got depression and this is and so even if someone's listening that's that's not may like there's definitely areas because if you ever get to that point then you're telling the biggest lie there is like everything's complete now these gone doing the work right and then you like walk through it it's almost like when you go to the festivals of the Carnival and the circus and then you walk through the door and then just keep walking in I'm all you know depression and letting letting it like have its grip on your neck like it doesn't have to be that way and anyone's listing that is in that situation just also list it does not definitely does not have to be that way and you can definitely like just get real like that was the first always just getting real I don't WanNa live this way level of self awareness and you're working with coach the coach brings up and says Haydn this this is your issue here and then obviously you become aware of that that's the I don't want to be scared of eggs I don't want to forever leaving this fantasy that realization is incredible and without without being discreet south down anytime that like Debbie Pratt me it's just a little hint an endearing degrades switchback over this way will do do a long period of time it's ingrained in your so neural network you you reinforce it by constant behavior over time how do you I guess Tiv- but just I guess using like anecdotally what worked for you in terms of stepping away from that and then it's like getting curious like that is actually interesting and then it's getting honest and actually I wanted to babies why anymore the reason that a Lotta people get stuck and always getting stock is consciously and subconsciously and unconsciously always receiving more benefit from staying stuck in no winners back there's no drainage like it's a sheet back there and like that like whiteout coal is just like it sucks much because he's on everything I've been told change that behavior and I guess this is more of a broad question as well as if you're working with the client but also just behavior change in general a step in I guess reeling that you need to change something but what's something that's especially the behavior pattern that's been I guess self serving yeah so we only act if we say more positive than negative or more upside than downside man side Super Bowl if you've got depression your living in fantasy like you're trying to achieve something that's just not possible of course there are levels of clinical depression but if anyone's experiencing must story than getting real and ebbing device the reality and Shuming and taking responsibility Weisner technologies on how to deal with some of the stuff and if you're open to it that can dramatically change your life but August none from Ireland that the power his approval was when I was off track and so the best thing about understanding that at that at that level is the Anatolia takings approval was when I was unsure of myself and touches in an working on myself I felt recognizing realize I'm like that's kind of interesting and what I discovered was only time I was sick ridiculed if people went happy with my service and this is like riddles in like entangled bs that was just like part of my story and I'm like you know what ought to stop to explore what might be going on I'm in the mind because once you can change the story and change the links in your mom in and just new things will help this certain things that will hold me back and I needed someone who or I will designed to have some unheard good dabbled showed up in my life what would it be and then three months before and then he shop again and I was just like a Tuncay doing this like it's frustrating it's taking its toll I am at wind from if I do this then I'm going to get back on the situation describing it I I would do this and I'll get that so I would potentially get a really good way to awaken but if anyone thinks they're going to change their entire life I have a one weekend and just like completely turn their entire law firm all of a sudden you don't realize it but back signed bill would always just doing the same work overnight Oregon and I'm like hi con looks familiar but the Theo will arrive would would allow me have you know Kate my business to a certain level so I wouldn't then have to expand and grow and then in infinitely growing then the bank stock and so I was like you know what the hope of delusion of transformation and this this picture I guess online through the dimension and from memory a blade serotonin and oxytocin they stays like happy happy drugs opping Mont the unlike all people with depression around in one thing like it's a great starting point and you can really shift the way you say the wills but there's a progression to it and ongoing process of having a a really good first step is just a witness and getting honest with yourself so awareness and just realizing that keeps popping lobbies Oh as the first step see if you look at it as a whole like Nicole subside twelve wakes up to twelve months like that's when the greatest change happens well something actually like this is profoundly like a challenge you like why the Teich Hayed on my Velasco ratio whatever you have to do like look up trump's John Dean Matz Teini contact by south like there's just there's different success coaches and wakened transformation programs and ex die retraites and let them all really good but they're starting point the not the kind of doing the work and sounds like you know what a witness getting honest with yourself deciding not he's GonNa fly but I think there's an illusion that the transformation is just like overnight you got to go to a transformational your heart or catch whatever aw what are some things just awesome really good questions what can I do from hell at lock it today what is stopping me from getting there you know what Garri every single day to help stop to move towards that look like shakes asking someone who's like introspective questions is an amazing why you stick to it and you know the the more embedded the beliefs the biggest turnarounds almost like when you pull a bar back the fairly bullish back the further dash for validation for your dad I mean you don't have to get into full nitty-gritty bit just in terms of like what's overarching principles obviously there needs to be ed I'm going to mention a few of the companies that are recommend and a personally use for my health for supplements and training apparel it's my protein have offense the illusion of just like a a really quick transformation is you know it doesn't really serve anyone so just much preferred to look at a great and then review and reassessment process we like I is my Heidi starting to change because a little I think is like this illusion different twelve weeks for when I looked a certain way to twelve weeks now like if you can help you say that or if you look at it for your unlock wail that was incredible go wanted to be that way anymore one great things and I know desired my off change was Mondesir change was he don't want to look like what would I lock it what would desire to look lock then doing the fricking work which is different context because it's a lot of different things that might be going on but and within full-week until air until I lot is different older white foals off full weeks can have a six pack but in reality like it's transformations messy as an example looking like a held how would it be different would I get out of that and then just stacking benefit benefit benefit benefit of what that could look like changing my reality was much right other than the painting stock because I was like you know what I'm seek our was talking I was sick of was locked six-week transformation twelve week transformation is like and join five-decade transformation at like two I'm just looking at the data or data with I think Craig Hopper who I think you've interviewed before and I've heard him talk a lot he he ten whether it's rotting whether it's building funnel old building a sales process working on like contacting my program catching people as far as like habits retains rituals etc Aubain enjoying Usually wake up between almost turn off turn off that that self that voice that self criticizing voice I think a lot of like the I'm totally against this the last time we spoke you very regimented in in specific retains but has there been any revelations changes that you do feel daily practice under you did a Lotta journaling previously you still do that yeah I I definitely journal I guess I'm more fluid with not so much five anymore used to be like religious five o'clock but between six and seven on normally wake up mom and then I'll go and have a coffee on my coffee here at home we'll just a mixture of different things and yes some week as the question is a lot less regimented it is and stuff like that like it's stopped counting how many hours I worked your long ago because that's just a stupid number and so take dog for a walk then at breakfast dot work in those very much like a lawn nail it's actually a little bit different in finance it's actually quite refreshing to who culture and you should never never take a day off and not hustling grinding every second of the day you fucking not working hard enough I find that really the daily habits the doing the work the routines which which obviously big on what what I guess that probably leads into another areas I process all you know what is most important wake and getting some workout whether it's coming on interview like this or whether it's working on some L. I. Luck to live my life at the moment and I think everyone goes through different stages of off had definitely Tom's like when I was writing my book three fifty the Posted that and it coincides with what you your your point was as well it's like yeah you know you can't change your life in one weekend but it's and I'll probably do some journaling grading something like that and then between seven and ten is Thomas negotiated with with my girlfriend client marketing exercise and you know health aiding towards my goals and nutrition really counterproductive I found that was like a level certainly like a level of ambition and to some people like that's what they need not up coal but if you set the died a complete as many of them as as possible school myself but as a whole mom this certain stop like south work this is a series of about ten different things that basically Denver previously had a Mexican join it because you can move things around for right now it's still being able to Don having not having that constant voices opening system what underwear review at the end of the day do my generally journaling my gratitude working with the back gives you actually that perspective on what it is on in the last interview you said the phrase you said the right coach that that works for myself when I when I step away and I have that sort of perspective looking back at what I'm doing rather than just constantly being in there like you said before Ios also a more flexible in the actual doing of it but the day races in the wise and the the motivation behind how do you go about I guess taking those those mentors and I think last time you said you've had a number of paid on paid one some of the unpaid ones were just as doing more of the smarter things will do I really need to be doing that right now like what's urgent what's important and it's working on working on the stuff and can you the the next steps for Wilson got rid of good answer to this constantly searching for answers from someone else that little bit of chaos in your life that that adds that bit of elements that you want us to and it gives you a different thought on whether it's a blog post or a podcast or whatever it is I show up to four you at the right time and obviously you're someone who's open to doing the work and put your hand up and say okay this is where I need to improve hat are you putting in gym on every single day of just found that more productive wise twin supply myself rather than beat myself up not working hard enough are nate to do thirty am wake up every morning six days a week and on the seventh morning it was look couple of house light and three forty three game do that Rut a chance to come to you if you're constantly like you know it's it's five am I'm doing this at six am I'm doing this it's you know every minute of the day whereas if you have beneficial for you but in the last eighteen months what have you changed and started working with someone new to someone I guess Charen option and and we'll take out coffee and take him to the park and so just relax and chill and then using the workday starts about ten and then it's aw is working equating working time for money you trying to you know get you know bay more successful but but sometimes steps constantly in this hour every be confused I would try to ask other people what I think should do what should I do what do you think I should do and I'll see during our like what a balanced enjoyable and fulfilling lots for May looks like and for right now yet more laissez faire in my self early serve me if I'm keeping on asking all these external sources and so they don't want to really find someone who could draw out might in it was brought stuff done because you're not constantly like all you need to do more do more do more it's like well do I am questioning that like Oh Saifullah quitting everything like we'll do I or is it just you keep answers from everyone else on the outside be like what do you think I should do and as funny because I started getting some design answers and odd single methodologies as May and get them to stop awesome question the certain questions and so I've found definitely like the most beneficial is the the main things I want to try and get done if he would just when I'm at my best that's what I'm able to do and then there's a sputtering about the stuff that comes in and out as required depending on what a headband on all your mouth and have that removed as it's it sounds candidate but it helps you get more done because more point that that depends on your blake system whether that's a predetermined just revealing to yourself along the light us and how how this relates into is with everyone having their own set of unique values which is dictating them to a certain in myself because I can only say once hats as we mentioned before it's good to get someone else who's experiencing asking questions trust who last night and they're trying to figure out what's what's the easiest and best and most efficient possible to get to the what happens as always it's it's a it's a skill and I think that sometimes I just because you have a doesn't mean you know which questions asked yourselves that was the least amount of effort and the most men of her would for him on his heights values but doesn't take into account the people will enjoy pine the outside and just look on the inside and she started some really good questions to myself you know what am I what am I truly trying to sake that sounds like a lot of work you should you should start in a coma stool padres someone who can do X. Dot com store and I was like but that the whether you'll consciously consciously creating different pockets along that but anyway does I assume in point that people are trying to to achieve and that's what it is would I love as opposed to completely changing shifting and actually working working with my coach and she's like Yeah Stop Stop Sitting these answers Kevin that external stimulus assigned to us up questions if it's not just hiking blonde advice from people will then and it's not just purely listening to the questions I'm asking not someone who feed you answers is in the coaching consulting around not someone who'd feed you answers not someone says this is how you do it at tons of course like that's what you said even take into account any my lock so history or dislikes or the type of work that I want to do and I can't hit me and I was like well that's not then at an unconscious level they voiced giving is based upon what's highest on dead values the personnel asked much issues that stool that is just as strong as a more productive life made a bright yeah and I think giving yourself that little bit of leeway gives you a bit more creativity as well I found a model of what was what was the most beneficial was funding finding someone who can help draw out my inner wisdom because that way there was a master of like really good asking really good questions and that's definitely an area that I'm I'm very passionate about asking the rock onto questions and was like this and even the tiniest hint of debt is lot like I remember I remember one on the on the issue of of of mission and so I in my values and much more prepared to face different obstacles in the pursuit of what's most important may it might not be what's most important him that's why he would give up to work but to me it didn't sound like a little work taking a how can I stop doing in my existing paradigms 's by quit asking questions such as is it or is it true how do you feel like little question you know I've been at my best simple questions seemingly simple little questions like this and and against challenge the problem was anything even if people had good intentions they didn't know a couldn't have known may well unless I ninety like ten years have you then pick up those traits in your coaching so when you work on yourself yeah then then when you work with your clients you can start to Mike Yeah I guess not really want to do the work and it wasn't really value and as soon as I brought the press asking difficult questions it's been awesome yeah well she sounds sounds fantastic in terms of like an intuitive coach and the funny thing is it's not funny but in terms of your more available in the more system problems I can solve for other people and that's that's that's being Alba's how people solve the bullshit that work ready to to throw themselves in and and valued gone and I'm like it was and she was like well depression having that that down Saad the you know the Times that a tough is is essentially what you need to give you that contrast because loss about Austin and he was talking about darkness and quote unquote like evil and he sang having those those darkness having that taking a path an a a system and a methodology of how to do X. Mahamadou extra get what and that can be helpful but Arne Raisin is an not an just because I'm willing to to step into and Lokeren that's not at my house to Baylock Kazak destroyed my not a deep one happens kwan and then it's like maybe I didn't and then yet really for instance and I was like oh you really want to solve this because I could say that could really help him and speaking to my clutch light of that lead that no one finn stories in an issue they're going through in business in life in their relationships in you know this who are in the will deny it's it's invaluable I don't believe in the myth of in only doing one thing and yes I believe in Farkas also believe in inspiring and helping and and and that's what I think of a while ago you might have interviewed up poll check but I heard posting on on Aubrey Marcus's podcast. I said look all halcon socks and she's like well just me why didn't you want on that client and I said did and she has no why didn't you want us on that Klein anti-mine life like it doesn't have to be that while I had a lot of success of written a book of sparking onstage I have different podcasts trust is not like you can say my house is perfect there's always going to be four walls is going to be perfect and it's never gonNA be any issues but having that contrast and you finding that contrast gives you that the upside as well on a percent so with just moving gears a little bit interview different people don with different people being interviewed on podcasts had different jobs like this in different industries the skills uncovering you're like holy Shit you can that's what I do it yeah yeah I know that data at the date with myself but I tell you let me Shining Shaima win I need to stop doing some improvements because I don't want to live that way anymore and some people aren't ready to walk around doing the Pay Prophet now you've got deliberate life could you could you just take us through what what transpired why change what is it a different demographic much in the camp of bullying or sign like you can't be successful unless you do this one thing and in as many people as possible and I think there's specialists and generalists and I think a lot of a lot of people have went one way really bad is just having an attitude the deliberate life is exactly that choosing deciding and living deliberately on what orch if changed a little bit to your I guess you've rebranded you'll podcast Oye launched a new podcast since last time we spoke you doing still you all the world's because that's when you can make the best decisions from if you've only got one view then you can only ever if you yeah but that's the most efficient like I'm cool with that but for me what inspired me most is helping people with a variety of issues and helping an I wanna do and exploring different people exploring different ways of living and getting a holistic three hundred sixty degree objectives is that could that have been a reality and I'm like this is not right now it's not the right time and just threw Christians like that like why didn't want on the client like all wouldn't have thought to ask myself that but it was so can the the refocus with that yeah I just unlock to save people explore different areas of the law and on behalf and somebody will like that which is you know that's that's up to them auditing for congruent life if you can walk on the side of the House appear over that that's all I tell you whether that's been fitness with that being personal development without being like masculinity and men's health there's just so many different things and I think what got one way of doing things you would go like a one trick pony and that's great but if you deter off that off the plan don't look that particular I think when when you spoke about before you have the people that are practitioner they do one thing one way and I think a lot of times especially with social media and you then you can have a great loss and that is mine mission is to have a great loss and allow other people to have a great lash around me and Egypt wind with roll and then you decide to go back live that way wouldn't feel right but but I think the beauty of that is no matter how experienced that might mean less people in the short run but greater impact with the people that do serve That are trying to May side the people who come to me at Shaw live off of men a lot of the papal at cyclical but you find a lot of people who have that why eventually come back around and they come back I would much rather just bypass bypass the pot where you don't Love Your Business log what you're doing and Fond Du doing and create a path as breath leaving a great loss is living deliberate laugh which is way you're choosing everyday to be great let's dance with me whatever area that they're focusing on and then you know I think a lot of times people do that strategically but it's not necessarily the most open minded things that provide value number one I mean provocative Philmont than that when you can bury those things up and after Philmont and provide value the have united three and a half bedrooms when I have a hybrid area my house will have a backyard and found that yet when you can mix it up and pursues the on do one thing like I'm an expert specialist in this one particular thing now like what was it was getting good skill set a native ending if your somewhat controversial and polarizing in your your views and you say you despise all vegas or you Hyde paypal allocated jenny dot it's all if you put put yourself in one camp they they get sort of thrusts up into into that industry after three and a half years like even cross I couldn't even look my customers in the eye because I just knew what was living congruency like that's their old mantra if that's Tom you'll you'll get you'll get through the mud but it will be unrealistic to think that that's never gonNa Happen but yeah much prefer to follow on and they go and I don't want knives but there's a very popular Internet marketing masterminded guru and he was like the King of Internet marketing automate that when I'm just authentic and I share both on facebook with stories an Instagram that is to follow someone else's and just more of that and that means it sucks along the way at times that means such a long way at times but that is buried anyway that's just not really productive goal is to do something right yes so just just digging a little bit deeper into a know your inexperienced how good you get there's always going to be the side of the House that that needs work ethic broken it wasn't wasn't like within his budget and then she's like he's at the content you want I'm like not too happy to pay a premium price who happy direction and things start to become clear but the the worst thing you can do so much productive things just staying stuck because if someone's listening and and it's a little bit confused about what they should do perhaps on whether I should just follow one thing we'll do a bunch like dry just start to start to maximum moving in a specific go someone who's been online for awhile you've been doing a podcast since two thousand thirteen or whatever it was and thank via buck in return for your business but also just for engagements as well yeah for May and again harassed injury to show you how bad you WANNA and at some point you know you're GonNa make an objective decision and be like fuck like maybe this isn't for me and that just takes wisdom experience and is because that's that's what they've been taught and then now just regurgitating it will that's what's with them and not really aware of other systems and threes into effect height my business like I I did all the scammy tricks all the tactics are the older things and then return on investment for your time spent what platforms and this is probably a little bit more specific but podcast focus on where do you get the biggest rabid following but like I said like everyone on our that's followed that particular life ends up wanting to come back to the other side sorry I guess in posting you see you're consistent contributor online what's guess what for you now in two thousand and nineteen what what cost for me personally doesn't annoy insane more just being real mode of sharing authentically module journey and aw then you won't be successful but undisposed that good room I despise the whole like you know you should do it my way then it's the highway and the raise them a little bit the more people also real lucky attract like I'm just so honest and authentic to as much as I can in you can choose four bedrooms two bathrooms his days like this is the exact blueprint of what you can have or you can be like you know what I wanna try something different when I have a completely unique on like I guess on marketer a Koyo must just just from like there's obviously don't want to say the guru the essay repainted Donna from all different people who were both the same story off wasn't living grown lay it wasn't a business I wanted didn't end up enjoy myself and he's what I did instead differently advantages and disadvantages to both for May it's being a real I get and stress sharing stuff that's important to me I mean that's different tactics around posted this posted this time topped images do this use these days quotes in like I need more more well rounded like eight something custom made like a custom blueprint for how to do it like you say the key times which is just like you know this is the what again like thinking that being vulnerable disappoint right not just want anyone just think I'll just got there and just there's a certain point you're like Whoa Dude just relax a little bit but understanding different parts yourself that you can be vulnerable about over have whacky beliefs that on modest I'd just to try and get a client on just get able to enjoy what I believe which is you know when when you can I do and so I'm really resonates with out with a thin gray that's that's listen I'm here to help but I wouldn't be like strict every single great I'm I'm happy to be providing and sharing pot up module any I brought things because they mean something to me as opposed to the I can't wait to get clients from this understand like to build an authentic business where get people to actually really enjoy working with and get to do what I love every single day not attracting psychopath attracting able committee was created lucky can use different like using strategically easing if a business that definitely but I found like the more really the bank to sensitive not being too overly bearing just like dropping look like did he just a victim like you just using the I unite strategically thinking about am i going to polar someone in this particular post that might work for some people I maybe I'm doing away to summarize yeah just try and be as real an openness possible and the right people are attracted to that specific mediums right now that are working take a specific action and get the pissed off with you and or ticket writing fans and what comes off and that's awesome for people who want to mock themselves that why in God cross I about what you believe out with what someone else believes any fun and matchday that's that's like your niche or an talk around niche like find someone's highs Britain would than just use the news USA Social Media and degrading and the second thing I'd say Adam and this is really important as well is the and depending on what someone listens to the could be completely different but if someone's listening to Desmond Nineteen what just ask yourself you don't just do it because I do it but taste element to it I and then I moved into the strategic business ought to things and in that realm great Rawda but with the purpose of of the purpose of what I what I do my writing for help me make people feel and big right and this is the daily practice in it he has a lot more f bombs in when he delivers the very very very dry delivery very funny but just the ED stand up and that's awesome but if I'm doing it for the purpose of gaining clients and helping someone in the business requires a different skill set and that's what I do believe it's important to understand persuasive copy and rotting and that's a big shift as well because I am a great raw attract the wrong type of people and so from media instagram and so long form content ultra all the our names at all tried some of the difference between writing and copyrighted and copywriting a specific appetizing language and so really understanding Hal funnels use what I call vulnerable vulnerable marketing to think something we'll try and exploit an dislike thing that you dispute the emotions and feelings all over the computer cable and that pop up client because like I'm I'm definitely I have an online on definitely not any sort of Guru Mrs certainly much more people traffic dudes that are just like you and traffic in Saudi oh that like what everyone else is doing but if everyone else is doing it I just find it looks exactly the same as Elsa and sorry for me I've found yeah less less podcast life system that the Papal Rada analog men that that content really connected with me and I'm like well that's great you can either ingested do something with it like value find your highest value and when those two collide then that's correct niche Packet a little pocket of the world that you can get to do you know if if you'll go video then maybe you general is the way to go if you WANNA connect with amazing people than mega podcasts away if you lock to share through the Kamei anyway I can say through it I'm just using that trying contract and that's cool that's cool that's social media it's being able to polarize able to get the our sales funnel can be influenced with specific words and helping people move through a funnel using persuasive language in an really bookshelf behind here and it's books by the Mosses of appetizing copy that the earliest book is like nineteen in some some areas I'm so skewed man because of a lot of online advertising and marketing and content I'm ready to change things so yeah that's been a both but yeah expression and one's business who would you say that goes on replaces I much prefer to someone with who has the signed endpoint is May and that is these pointing Tom John He wants to share thank you then that Scott as well you know I'm much more of a person on the I'm now be financially independent and he wants to spread his message but he's goal is to teach people and then I know other people online you do this five step system and I can I can certainly say like a need in Oregon area for Barth in life odd as much brought which is the appetizing copy which is based upon my marketing advertising and my pieds methods and styles funnels and he's not a huge business head and stuff he's got people that handle that full him but he's he's he's goal is to help teach people and he's got more money John now that you know you look to in terms of might not necessarily work with them as coaches but their content as a consumer whether you can shoot me which is like a different like separate when when worlds collide someone can walk to come to me and I'm GONNA help with their businesses and take and help people grow but someone else to give specifics I lock alike falling some Guy what the instagram Youtube podcasts who who are the guys that used to regularly go to online for Philemon Bing and just self development looks like there's a little like smoke and mirrors and the like if you do this then you get that actual help that's given and so this probably if I look at one of my mental is Dr John De Montigny he is very much he's a taped show he's not he's not different on a market for the people who are willing to do the work and the people who are willing to do the work or the people who seek at an eighteen year I'm not wanting my Las Vegas whatever program it is an online it's the same sort of thing so we're we're leaving in the sign parallels and so I think that if you were to only look at what's happening right now then you're brought to was sold to a checkbook people want to talk to people then then you've got you've got people who are like just facebook ads goes mm-hmm and their goal is to get you into a program an eight like I said like there's definitely like horses for courses different times stuff from the old school anyway I'd much rather mass of the principles of human communication human behavior twice persuasion awesome jump into check it out when you think if you like apply we can work together and vice versa much rating my organic influence and all that stuff that you always cold internet marketing but in reality stop spending around for one hundred plus years copy Rondo back in the day the talk about how they have put an ad up and then they ask for you to pretend the coupon and they just a rehashing it with the new new master's yeah exactly so with at Voss for last time we spoke about you know signed as what we're doing online you get you see an ad then replied to the ad so instead of sending a coupon you send your email address then you go to the next stage like highly sought after this value in that and so some of the mental that I fully now is not so much guys doing on agenda coupon venue got into like a high that try and get you into recurring return revenue of the entire product that's the key what we should be focused and to taking the next step into their learning all all development as well I would say the best someone comes to me like I'd much prefer to build a business able come to me and ask my health for a specific problem or something they going through challenge as opposed to sign like you'll Perkin I can fix just letting the organic things because actually an expression and you know it's that great but then there's the station long I mean it's probably hundreds of slang awesome online ov disbands offhand like the the information sharing having done research on buys is it's probably because you're off track with what that value is and often that's the most productive method of in the book sells mentioning before like crazy but they almost the exact same thing like it just happens to be the mediums change talk about let's I like direct response you know stepping out of that model trading off money in terms of crenshaw docks and an other things but I guess with with what we've just recently been talking the consistent theme Onairmafia Personal Garth Shaven and success which finally enough is is what I'm about then so I would say fun at what you values on I think that Hayes caught quite an aggressive and smart marketer unluckiest off but as far as like new age paypal to do is find out what their personal values are because that's always going to be more or less because I do change but for now most people have like a consistent values out what's important to you as an individual then to have the power to Vandross what's important to other people as individuals so once you find out your values like that becomes now that can become a tool and you're about to find out what's important and what other people's values because once I have that then they can create their personal blueprint of what's important to them is find out what those values 'cause it's GonNa give you a fingerprint a unique one thousand percent custom to you blueprint it dependent on the latest guru and lightest hack allies change and what's the facebook algorithm doing like unacceptable guys that like people that are just many chat that's GonNa be a really good dictator of things that inspire you things that you want to spend money on things that you'd locked to spend time on things you can see a pile the the new guys just applying it to whichever medium it is whether it's hostile instagram youtube or a book etc skins or Rosser reaves or my personal life John Cables like guys like they've just been around for for Young's and books still anthony the mixture of my mind is pretty screwed up and I can't seem to control it mixing in with attorney my business results helping they get a lotta value of people who not long ago went live that way that I wanna live with in terms of I'm not if you cross either day like let's get to work but most important criteria that would really exist is someone's ready and willing to do Sciacca he's he's the catalogue you can buy just like you get central landing page optic which email address in and then it says once you buy something the product is delivered or the book is delivered and explore and allow someone to enter into my mind ask certain questions and destroy what I previously thought was true hi depress of what it costs not just monetary but most are like I'm willing to crush might limiting beliefs on willing to guard tops people that that you are wanting to work with that you do work with and perhaps just any case studies stories about people that you have I'm only looking you WANNA find people who've been doing it for years systems have been around for decades like learning from God's like Eugene School or Code Eh what inspires you yeah yeah let's go to Vass what just talking about your on coaching now in your your business specific who who were the the Oh and that just gives you a really good central pillar almost like a lot house just to God you of like way you should be doing what you should be fired two stolen if something doesn't feel right is like super scary but once you say it like withstood whole fame of the pump cost is like once you see it you can't not do Guy the Chad chat goes on to say that as a very productive long-term business model because that's GonNa Change even now not that many people using chat selling a bad like if you're not then no-one no-one can help you the person who gets the best results is the person who's like I'm ready to go like I'm I'm willing to in two thousand nine with the book the bowl of the pox heading what advice would you give your clients and for listeners every is much more directed to would that like basically like in internet marketing sell the sizzle but steak and says unlucky specific results that I've personally seen from people who are willing to do that I mean we've taken a guy from hey time to me earning about two someone who's authentic than I didn't touch that I'm getting touch with myself like let's have a chat Makomo into into the whole like take a step above but even then like if you if you steal back and welcome back like this I wanna find the principles of an industry and the principles in terms of now but in terms of lack are you thinking of doing another book or you want enough Oy find for me the most fun people to work with the most fun people are people who think they like if up the mice like I think they screwed up enough I'm not enough I want more but I don't know why I self south blindside south blaming others south Dan and and then if I choose I can share with family members will work with colleagues who have Blah we'll just have the internal knowledge and so in two thousand nine hundred my biggest and philosophy take take them from seventy thousand a year to three hundred thirty that's the thing that translates Transformation takes time it just the tools we have now is just incredible like this I used them create spice which is now Amazon company but I use credit spicer distributor Tweeden the the results yes the best paper anyone listening the best person is someone who is like you know what I want to actually I'm ready to do something about this now amount of pain in the US yet so what's what's what's been the the follow up from from the book your books out for Wha what how's that received and I it's about working with people who rely on and you know what I always believe they're able or law and to the rock touch and if you purpose and that's that's what's out there retrieving and I just think for it to be out there in in different homes around the world which is just incredible like I was looking to that host which offset may unfixable but I can tell you it's it's not the case and a lot of the people that that I really enjoyed awake we're about five K. and that was I don't want to give timeframes because it gives an unrealistic expectation site and listening definitely got big plans to to rotting I love the written would OJ Mendan- an Hey is a buckled relied on cross them and and different ones in different sequences to elicit emotion a certain why it's like the ultimate puzzle and the ultimate of achieving what you might want to achieve and if you're a catch at certainly valuable to have the power within to not only drill the greatest in the world which is much popular book read that that wasn't the one I read I but he's ice I think he's got about nineteen different books but I definitely really feeling like if you WANNA times them message but if you don't dump 'cause if you're using the using this trick tactics to get you people you know o'clock can sell it around the world through I can tell it through Amazon I can sell it through type like these tools that we have available it's just incredible and so it just foam am in creative expression and a lock that people couldn't raged I've always been a bookworm hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of books really well like a start happy with house receives and despair requesting and it's really most connecting with the muscle the sign but you know we did that in about sixteen fifteen wakes now another waitress Iva threes reputation payment them for their until I lost unless a cataclysmic traumatic event happens much people have a consistent theme that runs through would that be a lot of people don't attract in book form and I can also be in someone down the road and I can also bay in Indonesia and the US I and then New Zealand and then like toolkit is twenty six tool belt and depending on how he put them together like you can listen like completely different responses you can have high you can have loved you can house question agenda like they really enjoyed the book which is great as the purposeful may modesty brought it to try and get it was demise that the written word is just so versatile like think about this twenty six twenty six letters in English language and yet we can fly and you can make statements you can be angry you can be sad that you can be happy you'll you can you know just using these like twenty six letters it's like a flaw in effect that they could read this and then it leads them to do something else so you never actually know the true impact of what it is that with completely not I don't even have to be there and this isn't like a scale ability thing but the scientific content is like I can talk to you like I can be in your house right now it's kind of I mean depends on the content you're talking about but it's somewhat evergreen you can have it sitting on the shelf Ten fifteen years and you can have an impact essay published in nineteen thirty five nineteen eighty whatever well like this is just been lying this information so exactly right looks at different points and helping splash someone to maybe not give up all maybe get them give them hope or maybe stopping dead and himself so much or in Salon for asylum then then you're gonNa have issues when you ask them do something odd like to actually do that yeah exactly yeah plans I want to run a lot more and so we got coppell I've got a couple other like pick lighting at the moment the book allow them to take responsibility that lauch would've sold at the finances liberalism so they health

Haydn Wilson Adam Kaufman US Oland Loyd Al Klein Melbourne three months eighteen months twelve weeks six days three hundred sixty degree twenty five years fifteen percent five six years thirty percent ninety degree twelve months eight years five-decade
RE-RELEASED EPISODE: ANG BABAE SA DAAN | TAGALOG HORROR STORY

Stories Philippines Podcast

14:42 min | 5 months ago

RE-RELEASED EPISODE: ANG BABAE SA DAAN | TAGALOG HORROR STORY

"Uh-huh! This episode is sponsored by inker. podcasting is so much fun, and now it's easier than ever to start your own podcast with anger. Everyone is passionate about something. For example I love talking about spooky stuff now. Thanks to winker, you can spread the word about the things you love, and maybe even make some money doing it. Starred your podcast for free with anchor using the anger APP. We're by GOING TO ANCHOR DOT FM. They'll even distribute your show for you. You'll be heard on spotify apple podcasts and many more of your favorite podcasting platforms. Anger also provides tools to allow you to record and edit your shell from your computer and even from phone. And, no matter how big or small your audiences, you can make money from your podcast. It's everything you need to make a podcast one place. I use inker, and it's been the best podcasting platform I've been a part of so join me start your podcast today by downloading the anger, APP or go to Anchor Dot FM. We all have something to say. Thanks anchor. Sound can be. Abundant. Darling Square land. Loss. By. PUTTING DIG UMBRELLA HEBREW. ME STOLA MAR by? Normally nobble high. WOODSON UP ON THE LEAGUE IN A. Row, some girl! He meets old did after. All. Our Oland Salman. The United States. Below. Not Alami Nonunion, Lola. Dick. Book. Allama even do my them beat. You Sunday league not painful. Illness. Indian Holly. Team on that Adam demand. For. Dan Dow. oxy Stay. Demon the Malayan Fearful Capella. Email to the one. LAMMI. ATN Amine unique. Mata. Get ill. MOHICAN mcmullan. Homing. Find Me. Boggle Molin. Bye, bye! bought. Now is skinny. It's. A. Mighty wind. Now Union Lavar. Aluminum posting now Illo Sadan. Mohican pain. May Nikon Tottenham. Dally dallied googly somebody Leamington Bahaji ISKIN that. Alone. So by? Now you. Muscle so emily I've been on. Alongside goodbye. Made along lefty lucky. Dumas. Malone bit in new. York Kimmel Allah. Boo belong below among. Maddow wa. Salah. Make along. 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Special Mayo Clinic Q&A episode: CDC recommends wearing cloth masks in public

Mayo Clinic Radio

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

Special Mayo Clinic Q&A episode: CDC recommends wearing cloth masks in public

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Qna I'm Dr Halina Gazelle. We're recording this podcast on Monday April six beginning another week of the cove nineteen pandemic back with us. Today we are privileged to have mayoclinic infectious disease and vaccine expert. Dr Greg Poland Dr Pullin. Thanks for joining us again. Of course it's wonderful to have you here since we last spoke the big news comes from the CDC with the recommendations for masking. And I'm wondering if you could bring us up to speed. This is a really important strategy to be talking about you know in the US. As of today we're talking about roughly a third of a million cases in the US and getting close to ten thousand deaths so the idea here is how do you layer strategies in a sense more and more strategies to decrease the risk of transmission from person to person. So that's one point. The second point is we should really distinguish between medical masking. That's a whole different category and public masking if you will with cloth mass we don't WanNa be taking surgical and ninety five mass away from healthcare workers that are on the front literally versus making our own cloth buying clot mass for use in the public. The third point is the reason to do this. Even though they're not quite the same efficacy as medical mass is that they do have efficacy and they are not only a way of decreasing breathing in the virus primarily through large respiratory droplets but also a behavioral reminder that there's a pandemic and life is not the same right now and a reminder not to put our hands in our eyes nose or mouth into. We've washed our hands with also some dangers that we should talk about in terms of using and now I tell us about those again so some of those dangers would be once. A mask gets wet. Maybe from our exultation. It really begins to de-criminalize ineffectiveness in filtering any sort of respiratory particulate matter. So that's one thing it would need to be changed the second thing. Is You do yourself no Favor if you wear a mask and then touched the mess either to adjust it or take it off in the wrong way so has medical professionals were taught how to put a mask on how to take a mask off that this would be unfamiliar to the public and I think the key thing is that you want a mass. That's you know comfortable but still tight fitting over the nose and mouth. Sometimes you see people wearing a mask. This goes above their upper lips. The most important thing is once that's wet once you going to take it off you take it off through however you're holding it onto your head you do not touch the front of the mass and then that mask needs to be washed before it would be used again just washing with soap and water in your laundry machine. Whatever it is is is quite satisfactory. You don't need to go to any extreme lakes Greg. Could we just go back to the beginning? A little bit. You talked about medical mass versus mass at the public. Might wear such as cloth mass. What does it mean for something to be an n? Ninety five mask so the idea behind an N. Ninety five mask is it has a filtering ability down to an actually below the size of the Corona Virus Corona viruses about point one two microns in diameter and ninety five protects. Down two point one with ninety five percents efficiency which which is where it gets its name. That's not the same as a cloth. Medical massacre the cone mass that you see nor is it the same as a as a Komai cloth mass the purpose of face coverings. I feel like sometimes. They've talked about protecting patient. Sometimes protecting the public from me. What is it? Is there a difference among the mass. About what purpose they serve. Probably the the most important function of the mask when you're talking about outside the medical setting among the public is if If I had coverted nineteen and I might not even know it by the way so. It's not like I'm sneezing and coughing and have a fever. But it's apparent that you could transmit the virus when you are a symptomatic or pre-symptomatic so in that case were preventing me exhaling the virus or respiratory particulate matter out onto the public and into the air where others might get infected the massar pretty effective in that the other side of the coin if you will is protecting those who are not infected from becoming infected by breathing in contaminants air contaminated with virus respiratory particulate matter. So why did the recommendations keep changing just last week? We weren't advice to wear masks and now we are. I think for a couple of reasons You know in fairness what the government and medical institutions are wrestling with is. They're trying to thread the needle in the best way possible because it does get a little confusing. We don't want the public to think that the recommendation is for medical masking that would be detrimental to us as a society healthcare providers and patients who are sick with the disease need those mass. Okay so we're talking again about a cloth masking that we would do in public. The second point about that is concern among many that. The data is at least controversial and in some ways as to how much benefited offers and people are concerned that if we go to a cloth masking recommendation that people will drop their level of preparedness by social distancing by hand washing it cetera. And we don't want that to happen so And then thirdly the the the issue of how Dos your desk how you take your mask off safely. Clean it so for all those reasons. There was controversy and discussion back and forth over a couple of weeks at the national level as to whether to make a public recommendation. And I think they've done the right thing. I've looked on the Internet trying to purchase a mask and I have found that you can't order one right now if individuals are going to use a type of fabric. Is there any type of fabric? That's better than another or that. They should choose for their to make to make their makeshift mask. Yeah we can. We can make a couple of general observations. None of us are fabrics scientists but we can make some general recommendations. One is the tighter the weeds the better. The second is the more the layers the better. Of course you bump up against the ability to breathe comfortably if you have too. Many layers The other thing is that people can go to the CDC website where they do have some discussion about this and more importantly they actually talk about an illustrate. How did make your own mask? Which I is important. People understand and again. Don't make something. That's not protective. And that would give them false reassurance. You know I've noted that in other countries wearing masks seems to be more common when we've had some of these viruses in the past. Do you think Americans are really going to get on board with this as a great question? We have sort of seen that. Asian countries tend to more readily wear these. I've observed for decades when I travel particularly over into China and and and to the Pacific Rim countries. I think that more than likely when when all of this is cleared up and we look back. I think we're going to more readily mask in the wintertime. When we have a lot of wrestling Tori viruses circulating and I know I know people are very concerned about Kobe. Nineteen and rightly so but every year we face epidemics bigger than this. I mean just this year in the US just the US. We're talking about thirty million people who were infected with influenza. Five hundred thousand of them. Were so sick. They were hospitalized and thirty thousand ten thousand like Kobe. Thirty thousand have already died of influenza including over one hundred fifty children. So I think we're going to probably pay more attention to vaccines compliance and I hope as public Sort of a cultural milieu. Where you don't go to school or work when you're sick and you mask during that time of of heavy transmission. Yeah that going to work. When you're sick is a tough one it is. Do you have anything else? You'd like to share before we closed after Poland The only other comment. I meant to make some general comments about masking so the the tighter the weeds the more the layers and there has been some studies looking at hypes of of fabric for example high-quality woven. T shirts tend to be better than for example scarves con towels that are liquor with tight. Weaves tend to be better so there there are some materials that appear to be better than others in the few studies that have been done and again you can find that on the CDC website. This is great information you shared with us today. And I appreciate Dr Greg. Poland being present with us on Mayoclinic question and answer and Dr Pull. Oland is an infectious disease expert and a vaccine experts and he has been visiting with US regularly. Stay well until the next time we meet again Greg. They do you to Mayo Clinic. Acuna is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org. Then Click on podcasts. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu.

CDC US Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic News Network Dr Greg Dr Greg Poland Dr Halina Gazelle N. Ninety influenza Poland Dr Pullin US Dr Pull Acuna China fever Oland
CDC recommends wearing cloth masks in public

Mayo Clinic Q&A

11:01 min | 8 months ago

CDC recommends wearing cloth masks in public

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic. Qna I'm Dr Halina Gazelle. We're recording this podcast on Monday April six beginning another week of the cove nineteen pandemic back with us. Today we are privileged to have mayoclinic infectious disease and vaccine expert. Dr Greg Poland Dr Pullin. Thanks for joining us again. Of course it's wonderful to have you here since we last spoke the big news comes from the CDC with the recommendations for masking. And I'm wondering if you could bring us up to speed. This is a really important strategy to be talking about you know in the US. As of today we're talking about roughly a third of a million cases in the US and getting close to ten thousand deaths so the idea here is how do you layer strategies in a sense more and more strategies to decrease the risk of transmission from person to person. So that's one point. The second point is we should really distinguish between medical masking. That's a whole different category and public masking if you will with cloth mass we don't WanNa be taking surgical and ninety five mass away from healthcare workers that are on the front literally versus making our own cloth buying clot mass for use in the public. The third point is the reason to do this. Even though they're not quite the same efficacy as medical mass is that they do have efficacy and they are not only a way of decreasing breathing in the virus primarily through large respiratory droplets but also a behavioral reminder that there's a pandemic and life is not the same right now and a reminder not to put our hands in our eyes nose or mouth into. We've washed our hands with also some dangers that we should talk about in terms of using and now I tell us about those again so some of those dangers would be once. A mask gets wet. Maybe from our exultation. It really begins to de-criminalize ineffectiveness in filtering any sort of respiratory particulate matter. So that's one thing it would need to be changed the second thing. Is You do yourself no Favor if you wear a mask and then touched the mess either to adjust it or take it off in the wrong way so has medical professionals were taught how to put a mask on how to take a mask off that this would be unfamiliar to the public and I think the key thing is that you want a mass. That's you know comfortable but still tight fitting over the nose and mouth. Sometimes you see people wearing a mask. This goes above their upper lips. The most important thing is once that's wet once you going to take it off you take it off through however you're holding it onto your head you do not touch the front of the mass and then that mask needs to be washed before it would be used again just washing with soap and water in your laundry machine. Whatever it is is is quite satisfactory. You don't need to go to any extreme lakes Greg. Could we just go back to the beginning? A little bit. You talked about medical mass versus mass at the public. Might wear such as cloth mass. What does it mean for something to be an n? Ninety five mask so the idea behind an N. Ninety five mask is it has a filtering ability down to an actually below the size of the Corona Virus Corona viruses about point one two microns in diameter and ninety five protects. Down two point one with ninety five percents efficiency which which is where it gets its name. That's not the same as a cloth. Medical massacre the cone mass that you see nor is it the same as a as a Komai cloth mass the purpose of face coverings. I feel like sometimes. They've talked about protecting patient. Sometimes protecting the public from me. What is it? Is there a difference among the mass. About what purpose they serve. Probably the the most important function of the mask when you're talking about outside the medical setting among the public is if If I had coverted nineteen and I might not even know it by the way so. It's not like I'm sneezing and coughing and have a fever. But it's apparent that you could transmit the virus when you are a symptomatic or pre-symptomatic so in that case were preventing me exhaling the virus or respiratory particulate matter out onto the public and into the air where others might get infected the massar pretty effective in that the other side of the coin if you will is protecting those who are not infected from becoming infected by breathing in contaminants air contaminated with virus respiratory particulate matter. So why did the recommendations keep changing just last week? We weren't advice to wear masks and now we are. I think for a couple of reasons You know in fairness what the government and medical institutions are wrestling with is. They're trying to thread the needle in the best way possible because it does get a little confusing. We don't want the public to think that the recommendation is for medical masking that would be detrimental to us as a society healthcare providers and patients who are sick with the disease need those mass. Okay so we're talking again about a cloth masking that we would do in public. The second point about that is concern among many that. The data is at least controversial and in some ways as to how much benefited offers and people are concerned that if we go to a cloth masking recommendation that people will drop their level of preparedness by social distancing by hand washing it cetera. And we don't want that to happen so And then thirdly the the the issue of how Dos your desk how you take your mask off safely. Clean it so for all those reasons. There was controversy and discussion back and forth over a couple of weeks at the national level as to whether to make a public recommendation. And I think they've done the right thing. I've looked on the Internet trying to purchase a mask and I have found that you can't order one right now if individuals are going to use a type of fabric. Is there any type of fabric? That's better than another or that. They should choose for their to make to make their makeshift mask. Yeah we can. We can make a couple of general observations. None of us are fabrics scientists but we can make some general recommendations. One is the tighter the weeds the better. The second is the more the layers the better. Of course you bump up against the ability to breathe comfortably if you have too. Many layers The other thing is that people can go to the CDC website where they do have some discussion about this and more importantly they actually talk about an illustrate. How did make your own mask? Which I is important. People understand and again. Don't make something. That's not protective. And that would give them false reassurance. You know I've noted that in other countries wearing masks seems to be more common when we've had some of these viruses in the past. Do you think Americans are really going to get on board with this as a great question? We have sort of seen that. Asian countries tend to more readily wear these. I've observed for decades when I travel particularly over into China and and and to the Pacific Rim countries. I think that more than likely when when all of this is cleared up and we look back. I think we're going to more readily mask in the wintertime. When we have a lot of wrestling Tori viruses circulating and I know I know people are very concerned about Kobe. Nineteen and rightly so but every year we face epidemics bigger than this. I mean just this year in the US just the US. We're talking about thirty million people who were infected with influenza. Hundred thousand of them were so sick. They were hospitalized and thirty thousand ten thousand like Kobe. Thirty thousand have already died of influenza including over one hundred fifty children. So I think we're going to probably pay more attention to vaccines compliance and I hope as public Sort of a cultural milieu. Where you don't go to school or work when you're sick and you mask during that time of of heavy transmission. Yeah that going to work. When you're sick is a tough one it is. Do you have anything else? You'd like to share before we closed after Poland The only other comment. I meant to make some general comments about masking so the the tighter the weeds the more the layers and there has been some studies looking at hypes of of fabric for example high-quality woven. T shirts tend to be better than for example scarves con towels that are liquor with tight. Weaves tend to be better so there there are some materials that appear to be better than others in the few studies that have been done and again you can find that on the CDC website. This is great information you shared with us today. And I appreciate Dr Greg. Poland being present with us on Mayoclinic question and answer and Dr Pull. Oland is an infectious disease expert and a vaccine experts and he has been visiting with US regularly. Stay well until the next time we meet again Greg. They do you to Mayo Clinic. Acuna is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org. Then Click on podcasts. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu.

CDC US Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic News Network Dr Greg Dr Greg Poland Dr Halina Gazelle N. Ninety influenza Poland Dr Pullin US Dr Pull Acuna fever China Oland