28 Burst results for "Olaf Scholz"

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:09 min | 2 weeks ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Backs you with news in San Francisco All right thank you Brian I try not South Korea nuclear envoys are setting up meetings to discuss North Korea U.S. has Russia's making little progress in Ukraine and that morale is low U.S. also saying that a heavy stream of heavy munitions is moving into Ukraine and that forces even in the east and south are being beaten back by Ukrainian forces Germany is starting saying today that sanctions against Russia can only be lifted after its forces leave Ukraine German Chancellor Olaf scholz is confirmed what we've been reporting that he has officially invited Indian prime minister Narendra Modi to the G 7 summit next month Shanghai's latest day to today case count COVID is below 10,000 for a second day New York City's health department says COVID risk is increasing urging indoor mask wearing again In San Francisco I met Baxter This is Bloomberg art rich All right let's get back to our guests with the house out at Dana de ora is coochie investment officer to invest net and PMC taking a look at the markets Thanks so much for sticking around with us Dana Now the thing is currently talented as being the adviser to the adviser as it were to invest in PMC So what are you getting from the advisers What are their concerns and how are you fulfilling them Yeah thank you for asking that Because certainly you're absolutely right advisers at the end of the day are our clients and they are representing the interests of retail clients across the United States and even globally And for sure there's a few concerns mounting Obviously one is what is the expectation for equity markets for the rest of this year The fact that there's no hiding the fixed income markets are as bad as so you're in a situation now Reside in this market it's neither is performing for you So certainly questions around Where do you take shelter and then add to that that attacks increases potentially back on the table We know senator sinema does not support that but you see Manchin and Schumer talking about it So certainly now questions again around should we be looking at tax efficiency So higher inflation supply chain challenges new risk from slower growth in China given the COVID situation there We talked about the fed earlier and some of the earnings that we've seen have been kind of mediocre and guidance maybe a little disappointing as well Do you want to be exposed to the U.S. equity market overweight U.S. equities at the expense of some of offshore opportunities or are you less inclined to put your money to work in foreign markets these days I think it's a short term versus a medium long-term view So if you take in that medium long-term view I think you want to be diversified Equities in the U.S. are still valued pretty highly Notwithstanding the selling that we've had this year And diversification in general right We're going to be hit hardest by another potential COVID outbreak at the end of the day You don't know where recovery is going to be best We have interest rate increases here versus some of the countries For example Japan are not necessarily going to increase rates In fact interesting development last week with China interest rate they didn't end up doing more stimulus which was kind of expected But diversifying the medium to long term short term that kind of the geopolitical certainty may make you feel safer as a U.S. investor in U.S. stock I just want to get back to what you were talking about with regard to tax increases of the possibility of them What would be the consequence of well I suppose a minor tax rise how would that be viewed by the Federal Reserve for one I think it's interesting because it's kind of being touted as it will help us to fight inflation and really because we want to reduce the national debt that will be inflation fine which I think at a very fundamental level is understandable to people But does a tax at this point actually had way on inflation in the near term or really really questionably over any given period I don't know that I see that you know certainly the data doesn't necessarily suggest that that's the case You're talking about I don't think I'm sorry Now you were just talking about revenue increases today the treasury indicated that it's expecting to pay down government debt this quarter which is kind of a reversal from what treasury thought previously they thought that the net borrowing was going to end up happening in the second quarter But we've seen a surge in tax revenue and so maybe if growth remains strong there will be less inclined to lean in to higher taxes Is that a fair assessment There's a lot of politics around this Your points are great because it's important for folks to understand that tax revenues are pretty good right now both at the federal and the state level That's why it's states are looking at ways to return that money to their constituents right They're looking at removing gas taxes and things like that to help with inflation from that perspective So there is an argument certainly to be made that we don't need a tax increase right now And there's a reason to think it won't go through Republicans won't support it Senator So see what happens but it's interesting that it's even being bandied about in this market Very quickly Dana tell us about the value trap Well I guess help me with where you're concerned is on that I'm actually proponent of value at this point I think value the valuations are more attractive The danger of value investing very quickly in ten seconds Well certainly you can knife if you're doing value in I think a tilt towards value is still recommendable Dana thank you so much for joining us The aura that co chief investment officer to.

U.S. Olaf scholz Dana de ora Russia senator sinema San Francisco Narendra Modi South Korea North Korea health department Baxter Manchin Dana fed Bloomberg Shanghai Schumer Brian New York City China
Ric Grenell Talks U.S. Involvement in Ukraine

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Ric Grenell Talks U.S. Involvement in Ukraine

"Let's talk a little bit about how things are looking in the Ukraine. It's a little difficult to know what's happening on the ground because we have this fog of propaganda, including a kind of single narrative coming at us in the United States from the media. What's your take on how it's going? Are the other Ukrainians successfully holding out or is this a case where Putin has just overriding the country? Where's the next? Thanks for having me. It's really an honor to be here. Look, I think that the Ukrainians are surprising Putin. They're surprising the Europeans and their surprising Senate Democrats. We have to remember that there's been a Titanic shift in what's happening in Europe. You now have the Germans. Think about that. The Germans in a post Merkel world, the Germans have admitted that they really caused this. Their admittance is, we got to scramble to pay our 2% NATO Bill, which we haven't been paying. And for God's sake, we've got to stop the Nord stream two pipeline. There's not enough media attention on this shift in a post Merkel world, the socialists, Olaf scholz, who was the minister of finance, came forward and really said, you know what? This is probably causing a war. Our dependence on Russia are racing towards Nord stream two and an over reliance on energy. What we do know is that the Germans are now really admitting that that is not just a pipeline of energy. It's really a pipeline of influence.

Putin Ukraine Merkel Olaf Scholz United States Senate Nato Europe Russia
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 2 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Destructive and even more deadly The situation could spiral out of control Meanwhile German Chancellor Olaf scholz has issued a statement saying he held a one hour conference call with French president Emmanuel Macron and Chinese president Xi Jinping and that all three agree diplomacy as a road to solving the war in Ukraine Hong Kong government has announced that chief executive Carrie lam will hold a news briefing at 11 local that's the top of the hour just a little over 20 minutes from now This amid speculation that she may have to shift the planning on the mass vaccination program this month There have been media reports that the city will have to focus on the high death rate in the elderly community reports say that the testing program may have to be moved into April And Pfizer will soon submit data to U.S. regulators on a fourth dose of the vaccine CEO Albert bourla on Bloomberg's balance of power says as well as a variant vaccine We need to wait until the full set of the data But we are trying to bring something that it is a new version that will cover equally well The old and the new variants all variants pan variants And he says all the data is not in yet So they'll wait Elon Musk has asked a judge to end the SEC oversight of his Twitter post under a 2018 agreement He says it's being used to trample his free speech rights In San Francisco I met Baxter This is Bloomberg Doug All right Eddie thank you Dan Schwartzman's here for a look at global sports.

Olaf scholz Emmanuel Macron Chinese president Xi Jinping Ukraine Hong Kong Carrie lam CEO Albert bourla Pfizer Bloomberg U.S. Elon Musk SEC Bloomberg Doug Twitter Baxter Dan Schwartzman San Francisco Eddie
Italy and France First to Push Russia From SWIFT Banking System

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Italy and France First to Push Russia From SWIFT Banking System

"This until I read this piece. Credit goes to Italy and France, for changing their minds on swift first. Leaving Germany as the last major holdout. The do you see the number of people protesting in Berlin? It's like a 100,000. That's serious. 100,000 people, in Berlin, all over the world there are protests. I'll tell you, I would love to speak at a protest. Anybody wants to start a big rally here. I want to speak on it. It's one of the few things that could unite everybody. That was a prelude to Chancellor Olaf scholz's speech to parliament on Sunday that's yesterday. In which he announced the most radical overhaul of German security and defense policy, since 19 45. That

Berlin Italy France Germany Chancellor Olaf Scholz Parliament
Germany commits 100 billion euros to new armed forces fund

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Germany commits 100 billion euros to new armed forces fund

"Germany commits one hundred billion euros to its new armed forces fund following heavy criticism from its NATO allies German chancellor Olaf Scholz says the country is raising its defense spending above two percent of its GDP with a special military fund Schulz's announcement which came during a special session of Germany's Bundestag Sunday morning was the latest in a series of major shifts in German defense and security policy in response to Russia's invasion the government also announced it would be sending weapons and other supplies directly to Ukraine the move is significant for Germany after it has faced criticism from the US and other NATO allies for not investing adequately in its defense budget I'm Naomi shot in

Olaf Scholz Germany Nato Schulz Russia Ukraine United States Naomi
The Latest: EU leaders plan summit on Russia-Ukraine crisis

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

The Latest: EU leaders plan summit on Russia-Ukraine crisis

"European leaders plan on in person emergency summit on Thursday evening in Brussels to discuss the tensions between Russia and Ukraine Europe's moving quickly to decide next steps on Russia's moves on Ukraine E. U. council president Sean Michelle says in his invitation letter to the twenty seven leaders thought the use of force and coercion to change borders has no place in the twenty first century while German chancellor Olaf Scholz has already planned to hold a ninety minute virtual meeting of the group of seven leaders on Thursday afternoon that meeting was announced last week Michelle has praised the heads of state and government to ensure reduction of sanctions against Russia until it's suspected plans to invade Ukraine I'm Charles Taylor that's my

E. U. Council Sean Michelle Ukraine Russia Olaf Scholz Brussels Europe Michelle Charles Taylor
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"And <Speech_Male> does it strike you <Speech_Male> that however, <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> current crisis in <Speech_Male> Ukraine does shake <Speech_Male> out that this <Speech_Male> could be seen, <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> when combined <Speech_Male> with a newish <Speech_Male> government <Speech_Male> that this could end up <Speech_Male> being seen as <Speech_Male> something of a <Speech_Male> watershed moment <Speech_Male> for Germany and its <Speech_Male> foreign policy, that <Speech_Male> for better and <Speech_Male> for worse, <Speech_Male> as we've been discussing, <Speech_Male> Germany <Speech_Male> might end up <Speech_Male> seeing on the world <Speech_Male> stage like a more <Silence> normal <Speech_Male> country. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> At the point <Speech_Male> yes, <Speech_Male> I think we don't <Speech_Male> want Germany <Speech_Male> to become <Speech_Male> if you like <Speech_Male> the old <Speech_Male> militarist country <Speech_Male> that we once <Speech_Male> knew. I think <Speech_Male> that it's really <Speech_Male> quite pacifist <Speech_Male> Germany <Speech_Male> is a country <Speech_Male> that we're very happy <Speech_Male> to associate <Speech_Male> with. But <Speech_Male> I do think <Speech_Male> that Ukraine, <Speech_Male> which was <Speech_Male> used to be described <Speech_Male> to me by <Speech_Male> German <Speech_Male> politicians <Speech_Male> as the <Speech_Male> country that will define <Speech_Male> our future <Speech_Male> relations with Russia <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> Ukraine is going <Speech_Male> to actually be key <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> defining <Speech_Male> Germany's own <Speech_Male> attitude <Speech_Male> to the rest <Speech_Male> of the world. It's <Speech_Male> going to be a watershed <Speech_Male> moment <Speech_Male> for this <SpeakerChange> government. And <Speech_Male> I think for Germany's <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> John, do we get <Speech_Male> any sense yet of <Speech_Male> how Germany's <Speech_Male> actual people <Speech_Male> feel about how their <Speech_Male> new <SpeakerChange> Chancellor <Silence> is handling this <Speech_Male> crisis. <Speech_Male> Will <Speech_Male> his poll ratings have gone <Speech_Male> down since <Speech_Male> he was <Speech_Male> elected <Speech_Male> if there was an election <Speech_Male> now, the SPD <Speech_Male> would lose, <Speech_Male> but in a way, <Speech_Male> polls come and they <Speech_Male> go and <Speech_Male> his margin of victory <Speech_Male> was so <Speech_Male> slight. <Speech_Male> And the opposition <Speech_Male> conservatives are <Speech_Male> in no position there <Speech_Male> in a complete mess. <Speech_Male> There are no position to be a <Speech_Male> threat for some time. <Speech_Male> So we're here with <Speech_Male> this government to stay. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> there's an element <Speech_Male> of come on. <Speech_Male> Why can't you be a <Speech_Male> little bit more <Speech_Male> assertive <Speech_Male> on the world <Speech_Male> stage, but then they're not <Speech_Male> quite sure what assertiveness <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> means <Speech_Male> and in Merkel, they <Speech_Male> had somebody who managed <Speech_Male> to be instantly <Speech_Male> recognizable <Speech_Male> instantly a global figure <Speech_Male> that made them proud, <Speech_Male> but at the same time didn't <Speech_Male> really deviate from the <Speech_Male> standard German position <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> moving away from <Speech_Male> this queasiness <Speech_Male> towards <Speech_Male> that kind of military <Speech_Male> action. But Merkel didn't <Speech_Male> get there in a day, <Speech_Male> it took her quite <Speech_Male> some time a few years <Speech_Male> to really <Speech_Male> earn that <Speech_Male> stature and <Speech_Male> it may take that <Speech_Male> child with Schultz he <Speech_Male> is no charismatic <Speech_Male> figure. And I don't think he <Speech_Male> ever will <Speech_Male> be. So <Speech_Male> they're going to have to <Speech_Male> live with him, <Speech_Male> but I think what they <Speech_Male> want from him <Speech_Male> is a quiet <Speech_Male> confidence and reliability. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They're hoping that that will <Speech_Male> come, but <SpeakerChange> that certainly <Speech_Male> hasn't come yet. <Speech_Male> Quentin and <Speech_Male> John, thank you both <Speech_Male> that was Quentin peel <Speech_Male> of chatham House <Speech_Male> and political <Speech_Male> commentated John kampfner, <Speech_Male> John's latest <Speech_Male> book why the Germans <Speech_Male> do it better <Speech_Male> is available <Speech_Music_Male> now in paperback. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it for this episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the foreign desk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we'll be back next week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and look out for the foreign <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> desk explainer available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every Wednesday. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The foreign desk was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> produced by MSO <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Christy Evans, Christie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also produces <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the foreign disk <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> explainer for me Andrew <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Miller, thanks very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much for listening <SpeakerChange> until <Music> <Advertisement> next time, goodbye.

Germany Ukraine Merkel Russia Quentin peel John kampfner Schultz chatham House Christy Evans John
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:24 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"This is a circular <Speech_Male> conversation that goes <Speech_Male> back pretty <Speech_Male> much all the way <Speech_Male> through. <Speech_Male> I mean, you could think of <Speech_Male> Ronald Reagan and <Speech_Male> a staging <Speech_Male> of Pershing missiles <Speech_Male> in Germany <Speech_Male> back in the <Speech_Male> day. But certainly <Speech_Male> after German unification <Speech_Male> in 1990, <Speech_Male> there was a sense of <Speech_Male> right. Germany, <Speech_Male> it's your time to <Speech_Male> step up. <Speech_Male> And in 1998, <Speech_Male> during Kosovo, <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> did and <Speech_Male> German <Speech_Male> forces were sent <Speech_Male> into action in <Speech_Male> anger for the <Speech_Male> first time <Speech_Male> and Oscar Fisher, <Speech_Male> who Quentin's <Speech_Male> already mentioned, <Speech_Male> did that, he <Speech_Male> got that through parliament, <Speech_Male> but the only way he got it through <Speech_Male> parliament <Speech_Male> was by being incredibly <Speech_Male> emotional <Speech_Male> and evoking <Speech_Male> the memory of <Speech_Male> Auschwitz. <Speech_Male> And saying, as <Speech_Male> people are being <Speech_Male> massacred, do we <Speech_Male> as Germans want to walk <Speech_Male> on the other side. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> that's how we got it through. <Speech_Male> And again, and again <Speech_Male> and again, there have been speeches <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> the Munich security <Speech_Male> conference and elsewhere <Speech_Male> saying come on Germany at <Speech_Male> the time. There was a <Speech_Male> former president called Gao, <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> made a speech that <Speech_Male> was very <Speech_Male> exhorting Germany <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> turn over <Speech_Male> a page and to become <Speech_Male> more of a <Speech_Male> player globally. It's incredibly <Speech_Male> difficult because <Speech_Male> historically Germans <Speech_Male> can not and should <Speech_Male> not say, come <Speech_Male> on guys, it's all over <Speech_Male> 75 years <Speech_Male> time to move on <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> the memory of the water, <Speech_Male> the memory of the Holocaust <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> also something that needs to always <Speech_Male> be said the memory of the <Speech_Male> eastern front <Speech_Male> is so <Speech_Male> deep in Germany's mind. <Speech_Male> So as soon as anybody <Speech_Male> says, <Speech_Male> time to move on, we've got <Speech_Male> to be able like everybody <Speech_Male> else. People <Speech_Male> not just in Germany, <Speech_Male> but around the <Speech_Male> world, freak out. <Speech_Male> So they can't <Speech_Male> do that at the <Speech_Male> same time they're being <Speech_Male> told, you <Speech_Male> can't hide <Speech_Male> behind that <Speech_Male> either. You've got <Speech_Male> to be a normal <Speech_Male> country again. <Speech_Male> So they're trying to <Speech_Male> navigate that. I think <Speech_Male> sometimes they do hide <Speech_Male> behind it <Speech_Male> too much. And <Speech_Male> this crisis is really <Speech_Male> going to <SpeakerChange> sorely test <Speech_Male> that once again. <Speech_Male> Quentin is <Speech_Male> there a sense <Speech_Male> though in which Germany <Speech_Male> hopes possibly <Speech_Male> self <Speech_Male> servingly, but <Speech_Male> I'm also wondering <Speech_Male> whether they might have a <Speech_Male> case that they're <Speech_Male> curious <Speech_Male> place in the world at least <Speech_Male> as they see it <Speech_Male> might be a diplomatic <Speech_Male> advantage, <Speech_Male> especially in a situation like we <Speech_Male> face over Ukraine <Speech_Male> if Europe <Speech_Male> works together. <Speech_Male> Could you envisage or <Speech_Male> could we see or <Speech_Male> could it even be effective <Speech_Male> a scenario in which <Speech_Male> you have Germany <Speech_Male> basically <Speech_Male> playing the <Speech_Male> good cop role <Speech_Male> versus a <Speech_Male> country like France <Speech_Male> or perhaps the <Speech_Male> United Kingdom <SpeakerChange> <Silence> serving as <Speech_Male> bad cop? <Speech_Male> I think we're seeing <Speech_Male> that already. We <Speech_Male> are seeing an element <Speech_Male> of that happening. <Speech_Male> The question <Speech_Male> is whether that is <Speech_Male> a persuasive <Speech_Male> enough element <Speech_Male> to get <Speech_Male> Vladimir Putin to <Speech_Male> hold back <Speech_Male> from whatever <Speech_Male> his <Speech_Male> strategy is to <Speech_Male> destabilize <Speech_Male> Ukraine. <Speech_Male> I mean, if Germany <Speech_Male> looks at, <Speech_Male> for example, <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> international reputation. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> actually incredibly <Speech_Male> high <Speech_Male> internationally <Speech_Male> that Germany <Speech_Male> is seen <Speech_Male> around the world <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> a nation to <Speech_Music_Male> be admired, <Speech_Male> particularly <Speech_Male> both for its <Speech_Male> economic success, <Speech_Male> but also <Speech_Male> for its unwillingness <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> go and bomb <Speech_Male> its way <Speech_Male> to success in <Speech_Male> the Libya <Speech_Male> or Iraq or <Speech_Male> you mention it <Speech_Male> where the Brits and the <Speech_Male> French have been <Speech_Male> all too willing to <Speech_Male> rush in. <Speech_Male> So I think <Speech_Male> they do <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Male> that they've got an <Speech_Male> influence, but <Speech_Male> just at <Speech_Male> this moment, <Speech_Male> the aggression <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> Vladimir Putin <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> reviving this <Speech_Male> debate within <Speech_Male> Germany about <Speech_Male> whether they shouldn't <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> become <Speech_Male> rather more asserted. <Speech_Male>

Germany Oscar Fisher Ronald Reagan Quentin Kosovo Munich Ukraine Vladimir Putin Europe France Libya Iraq
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:15 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"And what the Americans are trying to do is to stop points scoring between the Germans on the one side and the hubristic Brits on the other and the French who also seem to be sort of perceived to be doing their own thing, but actually behind the scenes when it comes to drawing up sanctions, apparently all the sides are incredibly united. Quentin the word John used there are one of the words Jean used their screen ish is one that comes up a great deal. Is it fair to say do you think that still underpinning German foreign policy is just this? There's a reluctance. There's an inclination towards risk aversion that they'd really rather not have to do this if they could avoid it. I certainly think that the pacifist streak within German politics runs pretty deep. I was very struck by it over the years. I mean, if you go back to the hostility to the Iraq War, that was very profound within Germany. And on a famous occasion, there was a confrontation between yoshkar Fisher, the former green foreign minister and Donald rumsfeld the U.S. secretary for defense at the Munich security conference where Josh Kofi said to Donald rumsfeld, we are a democracy and you taught us to be a democracy and our policy reflects a deep feeling within Germany that we don't want to ever go to war again. And that was exactly the same message interestingly that Olaf Schultz tried to get across to Putin in Moscow, where he said my generation in Germany never wants to see another war like this. And he slightly embarrassed Putin into saying, I don't think he believes it, that he didn't want to go to war either. John, we have nevertheless seen once or twice in recent years, most notably during the Eurozone crisis involving Greece that Germany is not necessarily militantly reluctant to throw its weight around when it feels its interests are threatened, but does Germany in a situation like that proceed on the assumption that this enormous economic heft will do the job in itself. Yes, in a word, Germany does see its economic leverage as in Gregory and Paul, as you say, during the fiscal crisis, the Euro crisis, it was behaving in the Greek mind very bombastically and belligerently at the Germans would simply argue we were trying to save the Euro and we were trying to save the European economy. And I think they would regard that approach, although maybe not always rendered as sensitively as it could have been as having been vindicated. And now they're saying, also, look to the Russians. Do you really want sanctions applied in this way? And when the Russians invaded eastern Ukraine or had their proxies do so in 2014, when they annexed Crimea and when they shot down the Malaysian airliner, all of that led to very strong European sanctions, led by Germany. So they are capable of being incredibly tough. But yes, they're incredibly reluctant to go to the war, but that said. And that's where I said, right at the beginning, the thing about Back to the Future..

Germany Donald rumsfeld yoshkar Fisher Josh Kofi Olaf Schultz Putin Quentin John Jean Munich Iraq Moscow U.S. Greece Gregory Paul Crimea Ukraine
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:38 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"You put the two things together, the deep reluctance shared by members of the coalition, that's to say both the social Democrats and in particular the greens to export arms to any conflict zone and put that together with the desire to really maintain a bit of a myth of a special relationship with Russia. I think that it's difficult for Berlin to realize quite how much of a kickback there is for that particularly in countries like the Baltic republics who feel the pressure of Russia constantly on their borders. Actually Quentin just to follow that up. Do you think there is any kind of special relationship between Germany and Russia and was that the reason why Germany seemed to have until really quite recently this perhaps somewhat naive idea that Nord stream two could somehow be regarded as entirely separate to the Ukraine crisis. Yes, I think it's a bit funny enough like the myth of the special relationship between the United Kingdom and the United States that it's exaggerated, I think, in Germany, how important Germany is to Russia, just as in London, it's rather exaggerated how important the UK is to the U.S.. So I think that there is an element that is very inward looking still in German foreign policy. And hence the sort of refusal to realize quite how infuriating German attitude has been on insisting on going ahead with this gas pipeline called north stream two. John Olaf Schultz and Elena baerbock, the foreign minister, have obviously not been properly in office very long, and they have rather been heaved in at the deep end where foreign policy is concerned. Do we have any sense yet really of how between them they see Germany's place in the world. And is it much different from how Angela Merkel saw Germany's place in the world? I mean, it's a three party coalition which is a very rare thing..

Russia Germany Baltic Quentin Berlin United Kingdom United States John Olaf Schultz Ukraine Elena baerbock London Angela Merkel
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"And Merkel, I guess I'm trying to understand whose mantle Olaf scholz and Elena baerbock have found themselves inheriting. So I think there's not one person, but I think you kind of mentioned important one. So come out now I was the first German Chancellor and indeed the first foreign minister as well. And I think the one important direction he gave Germany was what we call the kind of binding to the west and the United States and Western Europe. And that's very much still the important thing for Germany. The kind of playing an important role in Europe and now in NATO as well. Villi brande was an SPD Chancellor came later. And I think he's one important moment was basically the falling to his knees in Warsaw. So some people may know this kind of historic image of the German Chancellor and kneeling in front of the water uprising memorial. And what he really conveyed with this was this historical guilt with regards to what would you and the Holocaust, which as we discussed at the beginning is still so important in German foreign policy. And that's still also very much influences how Germans think. One other tenant of German foreign policy, I think, is also and we're seeing this right now actually in the current conflict, is this idea of considering Germany a mediator to some extent between east and west and a country that can talk to Russia and has a relationship with Russia both economic and diplomatic. And then just finally, I mean, Angela Merkel, she was she was definitely never interested in kind of defense and security policy. She was pushed into an important foreign policy role, just because she was Chancellor for so long. But I think what she did was impose or create a certain style, which is the kind of not too rash, not too fast, think a lot before you act, don't get too excited in a way that maybe in a manual Macron or a post Johnson gets. And I think someone like Olaf shows the new German Chancellor's modeling himself after her. So this is more in style than in foreign policy direction, but also is important. Ulrika, thank you. That was ulrika franca of the European council on foreign relations, you're listening to the foreign desk..

Olaf scholz Elena baerbock Villi brande Germany Merkel SPD Western Europe NATO Warsaw Russia United States Europe Angela Merkel Olaf Johnson ulrika franca Ulrika European council on foreign re
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"So this is definitely a popular idea. I'd say probably especially since 1989. The idea isn't so much as to not have a foreign policy. But the hope is or was a bit that foreign policy and interests weren't quite so important anymore because things would kind of develop in the right direction anyway. It was this kind of liberal dream and globalization bringing everyone together. So it's this view that foreign policy is maybe more of a managerial effort, something where you don't have to push too hard but kind of guide the inevitable processes that go in the right direction anyway. I'm afraid that that's no longer the case, but I think that was the hope and the thinking particularly after 1989 and many Germans still kind of hoped that they could just hide from foreign policies security and defense policy and not have to do anything to keep the status quo as it is, but that's unfortunately isn't really an option anymore. In terms of its relationship with the rest of the world, how big an adjustment was reunification because for the decades up to that point, of course, you have Germany split in two and it can reasonably claim that that is its primary preoccupation, the fact that there's this enormous fence down the middle of it, its people divided across an ideological frontier, et cetera and then after reunification, there it is, this enormous and powerful and wealthy country sitting literally as well as figuratively at the heart of Europe. Once they're then realization, do you think that with this position does actually come a responsibility to engage? I don't think so. I think what happened after reunification is rather an increased push towards europeanization of Germany's foreign policy in particular. I mean, I think that the policymaker of this time realized that yes, there is a little bit of this German problem in Europe, namely that Germany is a bit too big for Europe..

Germany Europe
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"It is a little over two months since Germany's current government was sworn in. Olaf Schultz, Germany's first new Chancellor for 16 years and annalena baerbock, Germany's first female foreign minister were probably both hoping for a quiet ish introduction to the job, figure out the coffee machine, write thank you notes for the bouquets, that kind of thing. President Vladimir Putin of Russia had other ideas. The crisis that Russia has engineered over Ukraine shoved Schultz and beer bok into the spotlight where they appeared to wilt. As the rest of Europe and the wider west arrayed itself squarely behind Ukraine, promising diplomatic support and shipping weapons, Germany to the fury and bewilderment of many of its allies, was notably more reticent. A half hearted offer to send Ukraine 5000 helmets attracted more sarcasm than gratitude. Germany is by most measures a major power. 84 million people, the world's fourth largest economy, the EU's second largest military. But Germany remains reluctant to act like a major power. There are obvious historical reasons for this, within relatively recent memory, Germany acting like a major power has twice gone badly for Germany and everyone else in the vicinity. Germany's rigorous self examination in the decades since World War II is admirable, but sometimes looks more like an excuse for introversion than a reason for it. Is at time Germany unshackled itself from its past, where foreign policy is concerned. Should Germany accept more of the responsibility usually understood to come with its level of power. Or is the value for Europe the west and the world in having one country of Germany's heft that doesn't want to throw its weight around. This.

Germany Olaf Schultz annalena baerbock Ukraine President Vladimir Putin Russia Schultz Europe EU
Putin: Russia ready to discuss confidence-building measures

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Putin: Russia ready to discuss confidence-building measures

"Russian president Vladimir Putin says Moscow is ready the further the talks with the U. S. and NATO speaking after talks with Germany's chancellor Olaf Scholz Putin said Russia is ready to engage in talks on limiting the deployment of intermediate range missiles in Europe transparency of drills and other confidence building measures but emphasizes the need for the west to heed Russia's main to moms the statement comes after Russia announced it's pulling back some troops from exercises that have raised fears of a potential invasion of Ukraine I'm Charles Taylor that's my

Olaf Scholz Putin Vladimir Putin Russia Moscow Nato U. Germany Europe Ukraine Charles Taylor
"olaf scholz" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:08 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"International concern. But there's a problem. Satellite providing all this information carry only small reserves of rocket fuel which makes them slow and not so easy to move around. They're sitting ducks in space, vulnerable to attack, so some countries are looking at how to give them more power by going nuclear. There's a number of reasons to use nuclear power in space. Benjamin Sutherland writes about technology and defense for The Economist. For one thing, people want to be able to have spacecraft that are faster and more maneuverable. You could get a nuclear powered spacecraft from a fairly low orbit up to a geostationary one, which is nearly 36,000 kilometers above earth in just a few hours. To do that, it was a regular satellite that's burning rocket fuel would take several days. So there's a big difference in time. There's also a lot more interest in traveling to the moon and Mars and with a faster spacecraft you could get to those destinations much much easier, much faster. Another important benefit is that you would be able to protect satellites from attack if you could maneuver them more deftly. If you've got abundant power on your satellite, you can change its trajectory all the time and essentially render it unpredictable. What sort of attack do you mean? Well, in November, Russia blew up one of its own satellites more than 500 kilometers above earth. That was quite a shock. This is what's called a direct descent missile. It was Russia's first such test. It was a success. It spread a large cloud of debris through a number of orbits, infuriating more than a few people worldwide. So that was a pretty intense move on the part of Russia demonstrated not just technological prowess, but also that it was willing to put his own spacecraft at risk in order to make a point. China had done the same back in 2007. So this has really contributed to a growing feeling that space is becoming a war fighting domain. In the United States is looking for ways to protect its satellites, the United States also has the greatest vulnerability of any country because in order to fight in an over the horizon theater, it would really need the reconnaissance and the communication relays from those satellites. So in light of the fact that Russia and China have shown they can destroy their own satellites and end, therefore, kind of anybody else's, the idea now is to go with nuclear power, but hasn't nuclear power been used in space and satellites for years? Yes, but in a very different way, many decades ago, scientists developed what they call radioisotope thermoelectric generators. These devices generate a little bit of power from the heat that comes from the decay of radioactive isotopes. So there's no new kind of reactor. They've been put into the Voyager spacecraft launched in the 1970s. They've been put into rovers sent to Mars. In the amount of heat that they give off allows you to generate a small amount of wattage enough for what would power a lightbulb or two or three on earth not much more than that. So that's not going to solve what The Pentagon considers to be this problem of needing a lot more power to move spacecraft out of the way of incoming missiles. So is The Pentagon doing anything about it? So America's Pentagon has initiated two programs to solve the problem. One is developed by darpa. And the other one is from the defense innovation unit, which has put out a request for proposals in September. Later this month are expecting to announce the first two winners. These are probably going to be systems that will use nuclear reactors to generate what's called electric propulsion. You essentially add electricity to a gas to ionize it and get that gas to come out of a thruster and that provides a bit of thrust. That's one approach, a very different approach is underway at darpa. They're using a small nuclear reactor in order to heat liquid hydrogen, which will be super cool to pretty close to absolute zero. And when that liquid hydrogen expands, it's going to expand with terrific force into a hot gas. It's going to shoot out of a nozzle, and that's going to provide just an incredible amount of thrust for very fast movement. Both China and Russia are also looking at the technology. So there's something of a race going on. Darpa wants to be testing this in orbit as early as 2025, which is just an astonishingly short timeline, especially for a project that was only recently announced. And the other issue that comes up when thinking of using nuclear power in space is the risk posed by shooting nuclear kit up into space in the first place. Is that being addressed here? Yes, absolutely. In fact, the concern is essentially what if the whole thing blows up on a launchpad? Now that actually is not that much of a risk. Obviously, an explosion on a launch pad is dangerous, but it wouldn't be more dangerous than just the explosion of a conventional rocket. They are not turning the reactor on. It's not going to be started up until it's in orbit. So this virgin uranium will not pose a radiological hazard. There is probably a bigger risk than a nuclear accident. And that is that if you get a lot of nuclear power up into space, you can generate a lot of electricity and that electricity could be used potentially to jam communications and essentially shut down the ability of satellites to do anything remote sensor transmit information without a need to actually physically destroy them. That could potentially knock out communications for satellites and large swaths of different orbital regimes, depending on how many of these systems were put up every indication is that Russia is developing these orbital weapons. But presumably once this technology is developed, it's going to have more use than just military use. Yes, absolutely America's space agency, NASA is very interested in this technology. They're putting a lot of money into it. They expect to have a prototype ready for testing in 2026. And the idea is that future iteration of this prototype could be used for a trip to Mars in the early 2030s they'd like to be able to send up a robotic cargo mission and get there in 6 months or less with this type of propulsion and then following that, the idea is to put astronauts on Mars using the same type of engine. Even closer to home, NASA wants to have a small nuclear power plant placed on the moon by the end of this decade. And in fact, they've put out a request.

Russia Benjamin Sutherland Pentagon darpa China America NASA
"olaf scholz" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:52 min | 3 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"In last night's crisis meeting, mister Schultz spoke up, adding to calls for deescalation. But in his tenure so far as Germany's leader, mister Schultz hasn't been doing much speaking up, his critics, on the other hand, have started to say plenty. It's a tense time to say the least for Germans and for the international community to learn what kind of leader he's going to be. So there's a narrative that's emerged around Olaf Schultz in recent weeks. That's of the invisible Chancellor, the leader that you never see that you never hear from, and it has been striking that mister Schultz has only been in office for a couple of months, has had very little to say on the biggest questions confronting his country in chief among those, of course, has been the role that Germany is playing in the ongoing crisis over Ukraine. Tom novel is our Berlin bureau chief. That's started to change this week with a sort of madcap flurry of diplomacy starting with a trip to the United States on Monday, continuing this week with a series of discussions with European leaders and culminating in a visit at the start of next week first to Kyiv and then to Moscow where all our shops will meet Vladimir Putin for the first time in his capacity as Chancellor. And what is it that's provoked this change, this flurry of diplomacy, as you say? Well, I think, in part, the sharpness of the criticism on the domestic side, there's this notion of invisible, does not present in the debate, a complete absence of leadership, and then internationally, especially in the United States and also in parts of central and Eastern Europe. There's been this argument that Germany is somehow an unreliable ally in NATO that it can not be relied on to play its role in bolstering the west's response to this crisis in Ukraine. And this takes on a number of dimensions, Germany's ongoing refusal to deliver defensive weapons to Ukraine, the saga of the Nord stream to gas pipeline, and then a general sense that you get in some quarters that some parts of the German elite is simply too receptive to sympathetic to Russian ideas about the security architecture in Europe. You mentioned the Nordstrom gas pipeline. How does that figure into all this? So this is a running saw between America and Germany's government. It's a gas pipeline that runs at the bottom of the Baltic Sea directly from Russia to Germany. It flared up again on Monday when Olaf Schultz met Joe Biden in Washington. Joe Biden said, unequivocally, that should there be further Russian aggression against Ukraine than the United States would ensure that the pipeline is dead, that no gas overflow through. Olaf Schultz, in the press conference, was asked several times directly whether he agreed. And he resorted to this nomic formula of saying that everything would be on the table and that all allies would act together. But he refuses to utter the words Nord stream two and for some observers. It is a little frustrating to see a German Chancellor who appears to be on board with the American approach to this, but refuses to give this explicit assurance that Germany will kill the pipeline if there is further Russian aggression. So why has the German response been equivocal in all these ways on Ukraine? In my view, some of the criticism has been overdone. It's pretty clear that if there is an act of unequivocal aggression by Russia against Ukraine, that Germany will be fully signed up to whatever package of sanctions and other measures is put in place by the European Union, the United States and other partners to respond against that. There are, of course, quibbles over exactly what that package would contain because different countries have different degrees of vulnerability and exposure to the Russian economy, Germany is very reliant on Russian gas, and that would have implications there. But I don't think there's any sense that Germany has become a fundamentally unreliable. I think the problem here has actually been more of communication. The fact that Olaf Schultz has been at least until this week, completely absent in the international debate about how to respond to this is a big problem, and it contrasts rather sharply with the approach that was taken under Angela Merkel, who is absolutely key in shaping a European response when Russia annexed Crimea and stirred up trouble in the Donbass back in 2014. So far, we've seen no last shots play this very sort of passive role as if he was just one among 27 leaders in EU countries. And I think that's the problem that a lot of people both inside Germany and outside have had with the role that he's been playing in this crisis so far. And why do you suppose it is that it's been difficult for him to find his voice in this? One reason is simply his personality, he's always been the sort of reticent sort, doesn't go in for grandstanding big speech, huge rhetorical turns. But I think there might be another explanation for this. In Germany, coalition governments are the norm. This one has three parties, which is especially potentially fractious. And the parties have different views on Russia and what Germany's response to it ought to be at the end of last year. All that shops was figuring out what sort of Chancellor he wanted to be. And then along came this crisis and it was very difficult, I think, to find the sort of voice that Germans and in particular Germany's international partners were seeking from a German Chancellor. When what they might have been seeking was a crisis management expert like misses Merkel. Yeah, and for me, the contrast is really, really telling. I mean, in some ways, it's a little bit unfair. The previous flare up of the Ukraine crisis was in 2014 when Angela Merkel had been in office for 9 years. On our shorts has been in office for about 9 weeks. I think the thing to look at is the way in which Angela Merkel marshaled a European response on sanctions. She worked hand in glove with Barack Obama's administration at the time and crucially she was the one European interlocutor that Vladimir Putin trusted. And over the years, she would speak to Putin regularly. Now there's been none of that Olaf shops has only spoken to Vladimir Putin once. That was the congratulatory call in December after he took office. And of course, will change next week when he goes to Moscow, but it all feels a little bit too little too late. Michael was not a visionary politician, but she did become Europe's in effect crisis manager in chief. What we may be learning about all our Schultz is that although he was very good at coming up with plans and executing them, he really struggles in the face of crisis when it's not obvious what sort of response he wants to deliver. So how do you see this developing then in terms of who is Europe's crisis manager in chief? Well, one thing that's been very obvious in the last couple of weeks is that Emmanuel Macron's president has been seeking to in effect fill the gap that's been left by Angela Merkel's departure been very active in diplomacy speaking to Putin regularly going to see him in Moscow this week. Not every country in Europe will be confident in immanuel Macron as a representative of Europe Emmanuel Macron's not always trusted in some Eastern European countries that are closer to Russia. And I think Olaf Schultz belatedly has realized that a German Chancellor needs to do more in this crisis and simply offer bland assurances that Germany will be a reliable partner, but there is now a residue of skepticism about whether he can hope to fill the shoes that were left by his predecessor, and that I think is the big task for Olaf shots going forward. Thanks very much for your time on. Thanks, Jason..

mister Schultz Olaf Schultz Germany Ukraine United States Tom novel Russia Joe Biden Vladimir Putin Angela Merkel Kyiv Moscow Baltic Sea Nordstrom EU Eastern Europe Europe Berlin NATO Crimea
Germany urged to 'wake up' over Ukraine-Russia crisis, before it's too late

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Germany urged to 'wake up' over Ukraine-Russia crisis, before it's too late

"Germany Germany Germany Germany faces faces faces faces heavy heavy heavy heavy criticism criticism criticism criticism over over over over where where where where it it it it stands stands stands stands with with with with Russian Russian Russian Russian Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine tensions tensions tensions tensions ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of chancellor chancellor chancellor chancellor Olaf Olaf Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz Scholz Scholz first first first first visit visit visit visit to to to to Washington Washington Washington Washington while while while while Schultz Schultz Schultz Schultz says says says says Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow would would would would pay pay pay pay a a a a high high high high price price price price in in in in the the the the event event event event of of of of an an an an attack attack attack attack the the the the German German German German leaders leaders leaders leaders response response response response to to to to Russia's Russia's Russia's Russia's aggression aggression aggression aggression against against against against Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine has has has has drawn drawn drawn drawn criticism criticism criticism criticism both both both both abroad abroad abroad abroad and and and and at at at at home home home home this this this this government's government's government's government's refusal refusal refusal refusal to to to to supply supply supply supply lethal lethal lethal lethal weapons weapons weapons weapons to to to to Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine increase increase increase increase its its its its troop troop troop troop presence presence presence presence in in in in Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Europe Europe Europe Europe and and and and declare declare declare declare which which which which sanctions sanctions sanctions sanctions it it it it would would would would support support support support against against against against Russia Russia Russia Russia has has has has left left left left many many many many U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. officials officials officials officials questioning questioning questioning questioning Germany's Germany's Germany's Germany's stance stance stance stance the the the the country's country's country's country's heavy heavy heavy heavy reliance reliance reliance reliance on on on on Russian Russian Russian Russian supplies supplies supplies supplies of of of of natural natural natural natural gas gas gas gas and and and and former former former former chancellor chancellor chancellor chancellor Gerhard Gerhard Gerhard Gerhard Schroeder's Schroeder's Schroeder's Schroeder's ties ties ties ties to to to to president president president president Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin Putin Putin are are are are also also also also areas areas areas areas of of of of concern concern concern concern a a a a shell shell shell shell seeks seeks seeks seeks to to to to reaffirm reaffirm reaffirm reaffirm U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. German German German German ties ties ties ties I'm I'm I'm I'm Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Shannon Shannon Shannon Shannon Germany Germany Germany Germany faces faces faces faces heavy heavy heavy heavy criticism criticism criticism criticism over over over over where where where where it it it it stands stands stands stands with with with with Russian Russian Russian Russian Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine tensions tensions tensions tensions ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of chancellor chancellor chancellor chancellor Olaf Olaf Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz Scholz Scholz first first first first visit visit visit visit to to to to Washington Washington Washington Washington while while while while Schultz Schultz Schultz Schultz says says says says Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow would would would would pay pay pay pay a a a a high high high high price price price price in in in in the the the the event event event event of of of of an an an an attack attack attack attack the the the the German German German German leaders leaders leaders leaders response response response response to to to to Russia's Russia's Russia's Russia's aggression aggression aggression aggression against against against against Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine has has has has drawn drawn drawn drawn criticism criticism criticism criticism both both both both abroad abroad abroad abroad and and and and at at at at home home home home this this this this government's government's government's government's refusal refusal refusal refusal to to to to supply supply supply supply lethal lethal lethal lethal weapons weapons weapons weapons to to to to Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine increase increase increase increase its its its its troop troop troop troop presence presence presence presence in in in in Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Europe Europe Europe Europe and and and and declare declare declare declare which which which which sanctions sanctions sanctions sanctions it it it it would would would would support support support support against against against against Russia Russia Russia Russia has has has has left left left left many many many many U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. officials officials officials officials questioning questioning questioning questioning Germany's Germany's Germany's Germany's stance stance stance stance the the the the country's country's country's country's heavy heavy heavy heavy reliance reliance reliance reliance on on on on Russian Russian Russian Russian supplies supplies supplies supplies of of of of natural natural natural natural gas gas gas gas and and and and former former former former chancellor chancellor chancellor chancellor Gerhard Gerhard Gerhard Gerhard Schroeder's Schroeder's Schroeder's Schroeder's ties ties ties ties to to to to president president president president Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin Putin Putin are are are are also also also also areas areas areas areas of of of of concern concern concern concern a a a a shell shell shell shell seeks seeks seeks seeks to to to to reaffirm reaffirm reaffirm reaffirm U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. German German German German ties ties ties ties I'm I'm I'm I'm

Ukraine Germany Russia Moscow Washington Olaf Olaf Olaf Olaf Scholz Sch Schultz Schultz Schultz Schult German German German German Schroeder Europe U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Eastern Eastern Eastern Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vla Chancellor Chancellor Gerhard Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Shanno Eastern Europe Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Europe Chancellor Gerhard Gerhard Ger
"olaf scholz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:18 min | 5 months ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems C three AI This is enterprise AI From NPR news it's all things considered I'm Audie Cornish And I'm Mary Louise Kelly After 16 years of Angela Merkel's leadership Germany has a new Chancellor Olaf Schultz was sworn in today and a ceremony in front of the country's parliament and Piero Berlin correspondent rob schmitz brings us this profile of Schultz and the challenges he'll face as Germany's new leader Replacing Angela Merkel was not easy for Germans For the past year the country seemed an endless debate who would best represent a way forward from the leader whose calm stable approach to crisis after crisis came to define how to lead effectively In the end they settled on the familiar Essentially Schultz is a pretty boring guy Siemens is a reporter who has covered all off Schultz for years He is somewhat cool somewhat distinguished with a distant unapproachable personality In Germany this is a compliment and it's exactly what Germans wanted in their next leader Last week after Angela Merkel's military send off included hand picked music that summed up her character zeman's paper de Spiegel asked its readers to guess which songs would suit Olaf Schultz Sticks as mister roboto was among their top choices And it Schultz's robotic method approach to solving society's problems that is paved his way to Chancellor For 7 years as the mayor of Hamburg Germany's largest port city Schultz helped transform a rundown harbor district into a thriving cultural center as labor minister he beefed up the Kurds are by program where the state makes up for lost wages when a worker is laid off and then as finance minister he used that very program to keep Germany's economy afloat Through it all he earned the nickname Schultz so Matt for his Android like demeanor and technocratic approach to governance as Siemens He likes to discuss and debate but then he acts unilaterally He's a strong leader who can get things done In a state of affairs in Germany shows that the country could use some strong decisive leaderships as economists Marcel ratchet We are in the midst of a very deep crisis the pandemic which now with the fourth wave is hitting Germany very very hard Schultz has already announced new rules restricting access for unvaccinated Germans and bows mandatory vaccines for all Germans early next year But fracture says as far as challenges go for Schultz the pandemic is just the beginning And at the same time Germany has to tackle two huge long run challenges for climate protection and the digital transformation of the economy So it's this double challenge Schultz's new government vows to phase out coal burning by the end of the decade and it aims to modernize the country's notorious bureaucracy from one mired in paperwork to one where people can get things done over their cell phones But before his government can tackle these big topics there's an even more important challenge for Schultz's new three party coalition government says suda David wilp of the German Marshall fund The bigger challenge is of course you know managing the coalition He has to make sure that he can keep sort of the young revolutionaries in check within his own party and make sure that this coalition of seemingly strange bedfellows stick together for the long haul to make sure that these goals are met in terms of modernizing Germany Schultz's social Democrats are governing alongside the climate change focused greens and the business friendly free Democrats and each of these partners has its own agenda getting all of them on the same page fast will be crucial for Schultz not only for the sake of Germany but for the sake of the European unions as David wilp She says the looming threat of Russia on the Ukrainian border is just one of many thorny international crises that Schultz will have to quickly weigh in on But it's going to have to be sort of the first mover on these challenges because France is going to be very busy as it gets into its election cycle next year And the UK is out of the European Union So it ends up being in Germany's lap yet again to be in the leadership position within the EU But if Olaf Schultz's background is any indication taking out a leadership position is something that comes naturally to him Rob schmitz and pyramus Berlin The world was shocked last month by images of desperate people from Africa the Middle East and as far away as Cuba trapped behind barbed wire in Belarus trying to cross the border It was a migrant crisis the U.S. says was manufactured and a kind of geopolitical weapon that The White House is becoming more worried about And VR's Franco or Dona's has more When thousands of migrants from Iraq and other war torn nations were stuck in a cold forest and Belarus the president of the European Commission was in Washington Ursula von der leyen was making the case to President Biden at Belarus was using the migrants as a weapon against the.

Schultz Germany Angela Merkel Olaf Schultz NPR news Audie Cornish Mary Louise Kelly Piero Berlin rob schmitz de Spiegel Olaf Schultz Sticks mister roboto Siemens zeman suda David wilp parliament Hamburg Marcel German Marshall fund European unions
 Deal to make Scholz German chancellor clears final hurdle

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Deal to make Scholz German chancellor clears final hurdle

"Three three Ponti Ponti deal deal to to form form a a new new German German government government and and the the center center left left leader leader Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz has has cleared cleared its its final final hurdle hurdle setting setting the the scene scene for for shields shields to to succeed succeed longtime longtime chancellor chancellor Angela Angela Merkel Merkel this this week week Germany's Germany's environmentalist environmentalist greens greens say say their their rank rank and and file file members members approved approved the the agreement agreement reached reached last last month month with with eighty eighty six six percent percent voting voting for for it it in in a a ballot ballot the the other other two two parties parties Schulz Schulz his his center center left left social social Democrats Democrats under under the the pro pro business business free free Democrats Democrats overwhelmingly overwhelmingly approved approved agreement agreement act act weekend weekend conventions conventions the the coalition coalition aims aims to to modernize modernize Europe's Europe's biggest biggest economy economy step step up up efforts efforts against against climate climate change change and and introduce introduce more more liberal liberal social social policies policies I'm I'm Charles Charles the the last last month month a a three three party party deal deal to to form form a a new new German German government government and and the the center center left left leader leader Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz has has cleared cleared its its final final hurdle hurdle setting setting the the scene scene for for shields shields to to succeed succeed longtime longtime chancellor chancellor Angela Angela Merkel Merkel this this week week Germany's Germany's

German German Government Gover Olaf Olaf Scholz Scholz Ponti Ponti Shields Shields Center Center Angela Angela Merkel Merkel Schulz Schulz Germany Charles Charles Europe
Social Democrats narrowly beat Angela Merkel's alliance in historic German election

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Social Democrats narrowly beat Angela Merkel's alliance in historic German election

"Social democrat. Party in germany narrowly won. Sunday's national election projected results showed and claimed a clear mandate to lead a government for the first time since two thousand five and to end sixteen years of conservative-led rule under angela. Merckel the left. Social democrats were untracked for twenty six percent of the vote ahead of twenty four and a half percent for merckel cd. Ucs you conservative bloc but both groups believed they could lead the next government with need major block. Commanding majority in both reluctance repeats their awkward grand coalition of the past. Four years. Most likely outcome is a three way. Alliance led by either the social democrats or merkel's conservatives agreeing new coalition could take months and will likely involve the smaller greens and liberal free democrats. We are ahead in all the surveys. Now the social democrats chancellor candidate olaf scholz said in a round table discussion with other candidates after the vote. The spd's rise heralds a swing left for germany and marks a remarkable comeback for the party which has recovered some ten points in support in just three months to improve on its twenty and a half percent results in the 2017. National election schultz his conservative rival on in lash. It signaled his blog was not ready yet to concede though his supporters was subdued. It hasn't always been the first place party that provided the chancellor lash told the roundtable i want to government where every partner is involved where everyone is visible not one where only the chancellor gets to shine. He said in an early attempts to woo. Smaller parties attention will now shifts to informal discussions followed by more formal coalition negotiations. Which could take months leaving. Angela merkel in charge in a cadillac rome.

Merckel Olaf Scholz Germany Angela Merkel SPD Schultz Lash Angela Merkel
"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

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"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

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"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"They.

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on Was jetzt?

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Lufthansa and German government agree on $9.8 billion rescue package

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Lufthansa and German government agree on $9.8 billion rescue package

"Germany is offering Lufthansa and nine point eight billion dollar bailout we get more from Bloomberg's mark mills the package involves an initial twenty percent government stake in Lufthansa the could rise in the event of a takeover the plan which requires European Union approval and will almost certainly be challenged by rival airline such as Ryanair give Germany an effective veto over company strategy German finance minister Olaf Scholz says the company's investment would be temporary and he stressed that the timing of the next it would depend on the pace of Lufthansa's economic

Germany Lufthansa Bloomberg Ryanair Olaf Scholz European Union Finance Minister
"olaf scholz" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"olaf scholz" Discussed on AP News

"Germany's parliament is approving an enormous package drawn up by the government to cushion the economic impact of the corona virus outbreak no only because a building on a series of measures that will allow the government to offer aid totaling more than 1.$1000000000000 parliament's approval is needed to loosen legal limits on running up debt the government wanting to break with 6 years of balanced budgets to borrow what finance minister Olaf Scholz cools a gigantic sum to finance a wide range of packages and to call the unexpected shortfall in tax revenue Schultz who is Germany's vice chancellor presented the package in place of chancellor Angela Merkel who is in quarantine what is not tested negative for the coronavirus I'm Charles de Ledesma

Germany Olaf Scholz Schultz Angela Merkel Charles de Ledesma finance minister chancellor $1000000000000 6 years
German lawmakers to vote on economic aid package

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

German lawmakers to vote on economic aid package

"Germany's parliament is approving an enormous package drawn up by the government to cushion the economic impact of the corona virus outbreak no only because a building on a series of measures that will allow the government to offer aid totaling more than one point one trillion dollars parliament's approval is needed to loosen legal limits on running up debt the government wanting to break with six years of balanced budgets to borrow what finance minister Olaf Scholz cools a gigantic sum to finance a wide range of packages and to call the unexpected shortfall in tax revenue Schultz who is Germany's vice chancellor presented the package in place of chancellor Angela Merkel who is in quarantine what is not tested negative for the coronavirus I'm Charles de Ledesma

Germany Parliament Olaf Scholz Schultz Angela Merkel Charles De Ledesma Finance Minister Chancellor
German Chancellor Merkel in quarantine as recession looms

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

German Chancellor Merkel in quarantine as recession looms

"Of me wanted Germany's chancellor Angela Merkel has tightened restrictions on movement that in order to contain the spread of coronavirus predicts big again and says this comes as Merkel herself is in quarantine at home for at least two weeks more than two individuals took not to be allowed to meet up in a group restaurant and hairdressers have to be closed minutes after the announcement America currently to self at home because she was in contact with a doctor who was tested positive in Billund Bergen on Bloomberg daybreak Europe now and according to the finance minister Olaf Scholz Germany may borrow as much as three hundred fifty billion euros to help stem the economic fallout of the pandemic the ministry reportedly estimates that Germany's economy will shrink by five percent

Angela Merkel America Billund Bergen Europe Olaf Scholz Germany Chancellor Bloomberg Finance Minister