17 Burst results for "Oklahoma Gold"

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"Is this story going? We've talked before about how Dr Bob Blackburn, the just retired executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society, at several reasons for wanting me to offer a new history of Oklahoma way back in 2005 when he first approached me with the idea. One was his desire for an Oakland a history book that more accurately reflected And wove together the diverse peoples who came settled, built and lived here in fact, hiss central thesis of Oklahoma history and what he helped my book, which, as you know, has become books would reveal was the challenge as well as the opportunity and potential for a state with many more types of folks involved in building it. Then perhaps most of us have realized Indefinitely than previous state history books have covered it's February is we record this episode of Oklahoma Gold, the annual Black History month While African American history in this state was not excluded in our history books going back, at least to the World War two era it was vastly under reported until recent years. Black pioneers, Lawman, outlaws statehood era legislators, aviators, victims of bigotry, Jim Crow laws, even lynching, the Tulsa whatever you call it, Race massacre, riot or war of 1921, African American military heroes, athletic and entertainment stars, civil rights luminaries. Political and judicial leaders and commercial Trail Blazers. All were scarcely mentioned in previous Oakland history books, if at all. I know that one of your joys in mind on Oklahoma Gold is to tell the little known for gotten and unknown stories of men and women who for a long time were overlooked by our regular histories. And as you know, we don't pick stories on here. According to a numerical formula or quota system. We don't choose a person because they're black or white. Male or female, liberal or conservative or not, we lift up Oklahomans who deserve to be recognized and whom we usually revere and want to extol his exemplars for the rest of us to follow, or at least learn from. If it's not the person or persons. It's the story of which they're part. And proving our beloved Dr Bob's original point. That comes very naturally if we know our material because all sorts of folks have carved their names into the history and hopefully the memory of this state. So this episode stands on its own merit not only because of black history month but because it constitutes a remarkable chapter in Oklahoma history and likely a unique chapter in American history. I think it holds particular significance for the month were in because it illustrates with one memorable sweep of events played out by a host of powerful real life even larger than life characters who actually walked among US giants who walked the land Not so long ago. In somewhat of a microcosm if you will. Range of the challenges and opportunities both that Oklahoma's African American community have so well faced up to and encountered in real history, though no person nor community lives in a vacuum and all my friends out there, whether listening by radio online or podcast. What follows is a story for all of us. Story, which I believe will make all Oklahomans who know of it proud for. It's a game. We're talking about this time around, Gwyn. Game like none other in Oklahoma or perhaps American high school football history, the colored team from the wrong side of the tracks versus the cracker team from the wrong side of the river. One team school was named for famed African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The other team's players had attended great schools and junior High's named for Confederate legends like Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. Neither team's players felt safe. Venturing into the other's section of race segregated Oklahoma City, the black team and not lost a game in five years, and it thrashed rivals from three states by scores like 47 to nothing 61 to 18 65 to nothing and 67 to nothing. And as many of our listeners know scores in the sixties, and that generation would be comparable to triple digits scores now the white team, meanwhile, at 17 straight conference titles and a half dozen large school state championships Never before had a Negro high school football team as they would have been called, then slugged it out against a white one in a school game in any class of play in segregated Oklahoma. The game was not even sanctioned by the Oklahoma Secondary School's Athletic Association. The O S s A. But that made no difference to the iconic head coaches Moses Pie, I Miller of all Black Douglas. And CB Spiegel of all White Capitol Hill. Good friends. For years, they had scrimmage, their teams all along in preseason play. Injuries and even hospital trips were not uncommon In these violent set, two's Miller and Spiegel set up the historic regular season clash themselves, What about school administrators and civic leaders and still segregated Oklahoma City? I didn't even know about it, Spiegel said. The gridiron was far from the only venue where blacks and whites lived, forcibly separated lives. Back then Jim Crow era segregation laws dating back to Oklahoma's 1907 statehood still prohibited what was called race mixing across society. African Americans were restricted to buying homes in their own neighborhoods. They could purchase clothing from white own stores, but not try on those clothes beforehand. Many white owned restaurants prohibited blacks coming into dine. Some allowed them tow quote, pick up their food to go in the alley, in quote as black, Oklahoma historian Bruce Fisher recalled from his childhood days. Clara Luper and other civil rights champions and not yet one African Americans the right to sit at lunch counters in O. K C drugstores and department stores. Meanwhile, white business owners faced economic boycotts, social ostracized ng impossible misdemeanor legal charges if they served black customers. And white ministers could be and sometimes were fired for standing up for African American constitutional rights. Well, The general public apparently held no such qualms as their leaders or laws about the Douglas Trojans in Capitol Hill Redskins facing off on the football field on a chilly fall evening in the 19 fifties, they bought all the tickets that Capitol Hill the whole school would sell over 10,000 of them. Including for thousands of rented portable bleacher seats. Those who didn't get tickets, watched on live television or listened on one of the two radio stations covering the game..

Oklahoma Oklahoma City Oklahoma Historical Society Oklahoma Secondary School's At football Oakland CB Spiegel Jim Crow White Capitol Hill Dr Bob Blackburn Trail Blazers Dr Bob US Tulsa executive director Black Douglas Frederick Douglass
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"Ago. But before our first Oklahoma Gold chapter, there was quite a journey here is hell. John J. Dwyer. The person Says, tells it the person who inspired us all things. Oklahoma history is retiring this week after 41 years at the Oklahoma Historical Society. And I'm talking, of course about the incredible Dr Bob Black. Oklahoma Gold is on Katie. Okay, because Of the gentleman named Dr Bob Blackburn. And how did it come to be John J. Dwyer? Going? I think the whole state should say Thank you, Dr Bob Blackburn. I certainly do. He was the one that came up with the idea. Originally for Oklahomans books. He mentor me through the last 15 years We met before each chapter and overview. I interviewed him. Countless hours, and I'm sure there's a lot of people out there listening right now that their interest in history has been kindled by Dr Bob Their passion for project has been enabled. And help to come to fruition by Bach. Dr. Bob Dr Bob Blackburn has given us all a vision for how history matters. We have lots of it in Oklahoma. We can learn from it. We can be proud of it. And we can move forward and build a better history. Even for those who come after us. Thank you, Dr Bob and God bless you, sir. Dr Bob Blackburn is Oklahoma gold. So tonight we are revisiting our first Oklahoma gold. There is Sanjay Dwyer in 2021. Looking back, it's Oklahoma goals. And we're masking up. Oklahoma is the land of second chances. Who were the people that made it so Will dig for the golden threads they've woven through Oklahoma history. The Red River Institute and Atwood's present Oklahoma gold. I'm good. Falconer. Lippert, Along with award winning author and Southern, as serene historian John J. Dwyer will find the Golden Nuggets of Oklahoma history here now. On Oklahoma Gold. Masking up in Oklahoma, John J. Dwyer. Tell me the story. Well, Gwen A lot of folks might be surprised to learn that.

Dr. Bob Dr Bob Blackburn Oklahoma Oklahoma Gold Dr Bob John J. Dwyer Oklahoma Historical Society Dr Bob Black Sanjay Dwyer Bach Lippert Gwen A Katie Red River Institute Atwood
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"News radio 1000 Katie. Okay with Falconer Libert, I am getting ready to have two guests. And so let me introduce to you my first guest, Amy, Tim. Sweet Way air continuing Oklahoma Gold. Now I will tell you up front. I'm having some switchboard issues, so I plan Two in just a few moments. Get Lee Tran on this Well, but Amy, are you there? Hello? Amy, are you there? Hello. I'm here yet. Okay, O speak to me again. Hello, Amy. Am here. Great. All right. I think that's the right line of Amy. Angry. Emily was born in Vietnam and immigrated to the United States in 1980. The fall of Saigon propelled her family to embark on a treacherous journey to America. She lived in Seattle most of her life and worked for a large corporations like Microsoft and T Mobile in 2017. When Amy's mother passed away, Amy quit her corporate career to write her mother's story. Snow in Vietnam or is her debut novel published in 2019. Since then, she has gone on to write snow in Seattle and snows Kitchen I novella and cookbook Amy is a Vietnam War survivor and a congenital heart defect warrior. Today. Amy is a full time Arthur. She resides in Oklahoma with her husband and son, and when she's not riding she volunteers for a child advocacy center and serves as president. Of the Oklahoma City riders incorporated. She joins me this evening to tell us about her writing and also Amy, We're so delighted that you are in Oklahoma. What did it take for you to write that first novel Snow in Vietnam. Well, Gwyn when? By mother passed away from lung cancer, my will just shattered and I the only way I could honor her was to keep her memory alive and to understand, uh, What it took for her to come here and give me the life that she did. So I took two years off to mourn and Tonto start interviewing, traveling, researching doing everything I can to understand our history and Joined multiple different writers groups and went to conferences and classes. What have you and then? Two years later, my book was published and I actually got a traditional publishing contract. But in the end, I decided to self publish my novel. And it isn't about your mom's life in Vietnam, or is it about your journey to America? What is it about? Yes. So the first book is about mum. Bombs escaped from Vietnam after the fall of Saigon, and it's our boat journey to the refugee camp in Indonesia. I was born nine months before the end of the war, and I also had a heart defect and wasn't supposed to live past five years old. And so my mom hustled to survive and find a way out of the country to find medical care for me. And so that's what the first book is about is just finding.

Amy Vietnam Oklahoma Saigon Falconer Libert Oklahoma City congenital heart defect Emily America Katie Lee Tran Seattle Gwyn Indonesia United States Tonto Tim lung cancer president
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"I've with you this evening. If that isn't obvious, Welcome to 2021 way have such a special Oklahoma gold to share with you tonight. It was about the desk Bull and before the Oklahoma standard Was the Oklahoma spirit. John J. Dwyer chose the most inspired. I think Oklahoma gold of all, and I can hardly wait to share with you with it next week. But if you would like to hear many of the podcast so that we have done the interviews over the years and over the weeks then you can go to John J. Dwyer dot com. D W Y R and see photos of our subjects. It's so wonderful. Oklahoma Gold has a golden thread which ties the Despereaux that we're going to do tonight to today, and then it has a golden nugget, which is a takeaway of inspiration to keep us going. What better one than the desperate little tonight Because we're in such a challenging time. And so I hope that you will be back next week at seven o'clock to hear this, And once again, we want to thank Atwood's for Sponsoring this incredible Siri Zits, a weekly remarkable story. Terra Wings theories celebrating Oklahoma's history and the people and events are award winning author historian John J. Dwyer chooses to highlight John J. Dwyer has won the Will. Rogers Medallion. It's a literary contest for literature. He's won it twice. He's written multiple books that you can see at John Jay dwyer dot com. And Ah, he has written a incredible book called The Oklahomans. Part one and very Soon. The Oklahomans part two will be coming out. Part of Oklahoma's part two will be an incredible chapter on 2020. And he has that way of Creating a three dimensional look at history at people at the golden thread and the golden Nuggets in this, Despereaux. Feature that he did for tonight. He ends it with a very moving story about a mother and her Children. And in order to raise their spirits, she Does something wonderful. And they all gather around and sing this him. I'm pressing ways and gaining every day. So bring Burnt black might be.

John J. Dwyer Oklahoma Oklahoma Gold Ah Despereaux Nuggets John Jay Rogers Medallion Terra Wings Atwood
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"Scram, Son Luke's favorite store. And when you shop there, you know why? It's just like coming home. Thank you. Atwood's now tonight on this year under edition of Oklahoma Gold John J. Dwyer is profiling an Oklahoman who has been singing it like It is her whole life and what a lifetime of music that started in South Oklahoma City. Here's John J. Dwyer with Chapter 14 of Oklahoma Gold. Oklahoma is the land of second chances who were the people that made it so will dig for the golden threads they've woven through Oklahoma history, the Red River Institute and Atwood's wrench in home. Are proud to present Oklahoma Gold. I'm Gwyn Falconer Lippard, along with award winning author and Southern as serene university historian John J. Dwyer. Will find the golden Nuggets of Oklahoma history here now on Katie, Okay? She was the Queen of rockabilly, John J. Dwyer. What is that? And who is that? Well, it's remarkable music and his remarkable woman, Gwen, she played a central role, in fact, in building Oklahoma's legacy as one of the great producers.

Oklahoma John J. Dwyer Oklahoma Gold South Oklahoma City Atwood Gwyn Falconer Lippard Scram Gwen Luke Red River Institute Katie
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"How much unknown Oklahoma gold there is right here. And indeed, Clara Luper. Some of our listeners have heard of her, but a lot. Haven't we all need to. She grew up in rural communities and segregated Oklahoma as an African American born in 1922. As a girl she saw sign outside a nearby town that Red Negro read and run. If you can't read run anyway, she experienced sitting at the back of trains not being allowed to try on clothes and stores and exclusion from restaurants, libraries, bathrooms and phone booths. 1957 the semi centennial anniversary of Oklahoma statehood. Clara Luper was ready to step out and do something about the unjust practices of Bible Belt. Oklahoma. She said later. I'm quoting clarinet I'm gonna share is many of her thoughts is I can think people rather hear from heard about her life and me And she said later, we could go in and cook at restaurants. But after we cooked, we couldn't eat. That's a bad thing to do, give a person the right to cook the food and then refused to serve them. They treated us African Americans as if we didn't belong to the human race. This was confusing to me how a person could wash your dishes. Cook your food set the table. Then you would not allow them to eat. This was hard. So my answer was yes. Tonight is the night history compels us to go and let history alone be our final judge. It's always her plan on that summer evening in 1957. What started at the old Calvary Baptist Church, 300, North Walnut and Oklahoma City, now a law office. It was at the suggestion of her 12 year old daughter, Maryland. Calvary was a church where Martin Luther King himself wished to become pastor just a couple of years before that, before he came to national prominence, but he was apparently not invited because of his then youthful age. Of 25. Well from Calvary Baptist Church. Flora and her in double a CPI youth group made their way on foot on the sidewalks, the large and popular Catch drug store in downtown Oklahoma City flagship of a 38 store chain throughout the southwest and Midwest. And there she and 13 of her students ages six through 17 sat at the lounge lunch counter where blacks were not allowed to eat and they ordered Cokes. Mel. They were refused service. So began in Oklahoma. The national sit in movement of black Americans seeking equal rights is whites and other races to admittance in public establishments. Bruce Fisher, the son of the famous ADA. Lowest sip You'll Fisher Ada was the first African American student admitted to the University of Oklahoma and Bruce, her son, a long time historian at the Oakland Historical Society. He recalled that quote Claire Luper did something with those young students that could not be done by force of law. She was not trying to change the law. There was no constitutional question of whether separate but equal was legal. What she was trying to do was change the customs the attitudes that it existed in Oklahoma at that time. So began Clara Luper pilgrimage as the mother of the civil rights movement. Years before the purported beginning of that in Greensboro, North Carolina, which didn't happen until 1961 Clara Luper said concerning the Johnny Brown Department stores, which many most people from Oklahoma that grew up anytime from the twenties through the eighties, would know about Johnnie Brown's the dominant kind of the WalMart. Slash Dillard slash pennies of those generations, she said. We're not mad at Browns were encouraging people to trade with them. We'll give them good for evil. Had read as many of our workers had that the quickest way to freedom is through non violence. Brown's again was a store that would allow African Americans to buy but you couldn't try on clothes. Because black skin might get on clothing and would rub off on white skin. That was the mentality at the time. Well, Clara's actions did not come without a cost. She was jailed 26 times for nonviolent civil disobedience. The people who opposed her, she said. We're all church people. I felt sorry for them, she remembered. I was not angry with them. I understood the system. I felt that this was their training back to their great grand parents. In fact, she followed Martin Luther King's example of Nonviolence, turning the other cheek. The black community, meanwhile, mostly reacted indifferently to her. Once you're used to discrimination, she said, Your parents have been discriminated against your grandparent's. You become a victim of discrimination. This is what happened to black folks. This is the way it's been. It's the way it's always going to be. There were jail ins. There were readings while we were sitting in. Our kids were preparing to live in the real world, so they were reading out of that experience. From our volunteers. We got doctors and lawyers, a lot of people that have gone to the top. In fact, one of the top brain surgeons in the United States, Roger County Started when we were down there sitting in. He wanted to be a doctor, and I said, if you want to be a doctor memorized all the bones in the body, the vessels, the veins and the arteries, and that's what he did. Looper also recall one of the kids who had the experience of reading during that time. Decades later, she was voted the best principal and you all the United States public schools. Looper recalls that many whites supported our efforts, including conservative white governor Raymond Gary. And here's what he said on the steps the south side of the state capital, which you're still there. Raymond Gary. I'm sure there are no special outside that is separate but equal rooms in heaven. God is no respecter of persons, prejudices, and we all have them are contrary to the will of God. Raymond Gary continued. Other nations Laffit us because the Constitution guarantees equal rights to all men. We preach one ideology, but we appear to practice another. Peaceful integration of schools on DATs. The end of that quote, the peaceful integration of schools and other public institutions championed by Governor Raymond Gary helped prevent in Oklahoma, but much greater racial strife and violence experienced by many other states across America. Clearer. Looper, meanwhile, remembered both the Presbyterian pastor and a Catholic priest among the many white people that caught seriously lack for helping out her cause. In fact, in her words, they were both run out of town for helping There were a lot of white people that wanted to see the change, she said. But if they would come out and support us, they'd be isolated from their friends and neighbors. There were many business owners but knew if they would come out supporters they would lose their white customers. Well for over 40 years, Clara Luper toiled teaching the young people of every color of Oklahoma, beginning at Dungy High School, just east of the Oklahoma City.

Clara Luper Oklahoma Oklahoma City Governor Raymond Gary Looper Martin Luther King Calvary Baptist Church University of Oklahoma Claire Luper Bruce Fisher United States Maryland Bible Belt Browns Slash Dillard Johnnie Brown Calvary Fisher Ada Greensboro
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"It's a food loose radio 1000 Katie. Okay when Falconer delivered here 43 degrees on this Sunday evening. And if you're looking for an incredible Oklahoma history story, you have come to the right place. November is National American Indian Heritage Month. To celebrate and recognized the accomplishments of the peoples who were the original inhabitants, explorers and settlers of the United States. Oklahoma Gold is a weekly remarkable story. Telling Syriza's celebrating Oklahomans history and our award winning author historian John J. Dwyer has chosen in honor of this special month. One of our native American Oklahoma heroes to share with you about And making this all possible. Tonight. We want to welcome our new signature sponsor of Oklahoma Gold, Atwood's ranch and home their stories. One I know you want to hear, and it's a great Oklahoma story. In the winter of 1960, Wilbur and Fern Atwood moved from southwestern Minnesota to Enid, Oklahoma, and they opened their first Atwood store. Then, as now, they provided farm and ranch supplies at discount prices in a family friendly atmosphere. Today at Woods is an Oklahoma success story. It's still family owned and headquartered in Enid covers a five state area with 66 stories and Stores and counting. Almost half of those are in Oklahoma. The commitment to value remain strong and for me at Woods is just like coming home. Customers shop with the always free popcorn,.

Oklahoma Oklahoma Gold National American Indian Herit Fern Atwood Enid Woods Atwood Falconer Katie United States John J. Dwyer Syriza Wilbur Minnesota
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"With you. 66 degrees, as you know, from 7 to 7 30 every Sunday night. We do a series called Oklahoma, Golde, And it was because of the topic and the Oklahoma Gold person tonight that I remembered that I had not talked to trait Thompson, the project manager. Of the State Capitals Restoration project in probably about a year. So welcome to 1000. Katie. Okay, Trade Thompson. You know I'm looking this and it says in July of 2014. Is when you were Appointed the project manager, and here we are 2020. That's right way. Are you feel like you've been working on this a little while? Yeah, You know, it's it's been a while. Ah, got a few more gray hairs as a result, but I look back, and we made a tremendous amount of project and we could see the light of the tunnel where a little over a year away from being done with this thing a little over a year, Okay. But up to this point, what is now concluded Because it I've heard. It's really cool. Well, most of the major infrastructure in the building is completely new. Now, you know, we have our brand new emergency power generator. We have a brand new mechanical room brand new electrical room. The vast majority of the old, decrepit plumbing has been replaced in the building. Most of the electrical wiring has been replaced. Much of the plaster on the inside has been has been restored. And now also, as this last March, we officially finished the exterior renovation so that what that means is Mortar joints have been reported for 177 original windows have been restored. We put a brand new copper roof on the building. We completed over 4600 stone repairs, so We have. We have made a tremendous amount of progress and we're excited for people to see their state capital again and is the of Visitorsentrance completed. It's complete. We cut the ribbon on it in September. So if you come to the capital now you'll enter in through the brand new visitors entrance on the southeast side of the building. And let me tell you, it's impressive. It's it is a wonderful new addition to the building. That's what I've heard. I've heard. It's spectacular. And so congratulations on that. Oh, has Cove It really kind of helped with this or hurt. It's really been pretty neutral for us, you know, back in March when it first hit The Legislature abbreviated their session, So the good thing for us from a construction standpoint was that we had a little bit more free range in the building, which we're always grateful Tohave. You know, we were able to get a head start on some things like the legislative chambers and some of the legislative committee rooms that we had scheduled to do for this interim, and so that was great for us. But overall, it's You know, it hasn't given us any big advantage. Well, that's too bad. Well, you know, even even advantage of a couple of weeks and time is something that will take because more time is always better than less. And so right now you're on track to complete on time. Yes, ma'am. We are. In fact, when we first started this project back to 2014. We anticipated that we would be finishing up in December of 2022 through efficiencies. Onda great construction schedule. We've been able to pare that down. So now we're looking at spring of 2022 that march April timeframe being completely done with the project. That's so exciting, Okay? So as I mentioned tonight, we did a historical feature on the story of Kate Barnard. And I remembered Years ago, going out to the capital, and there was this lovely bench with the nicest looking bronze woman sitting on it. And I went over and sat next to her and had quite a conversation. I have come to find out that that was Kate Barnard. Yes, I'm absolutely so What can you tell us about the bronze of Kate Barnard and where is it located in the capital. Yeah, This is a wonderful piece of Ah, statue that's in the building. You know most of statues in the building, you kind of, you know, step back and you look at you don't really get much interaction. But like you said. This is a statue of Kate sitting on the bench, but the great thing about it is she's off the one side of the bench. So it's not in common Tio to walk down the hall and to see kids sitting next to her posing for pictures. It's more of an interactive statue, which is great, and it's great for another reason. Because Kate Barnard, it was such an influential person in our state's history, though that's that you was commissioned by an organization called Friends of the Capital. Friends of the capital is a nonprofit group that raises money to do different projects around the state capital in the primary way they raised money is by selling those papers. Better on at the front of the Capitol as you walk up to the building, So for $300, you can. Ah, it's a tax deductible donation you can have you know your name your grandparent's name, whatever else Hedged on that on one of those papers, and all that money goes to projects of the building so that that she was commissioned in 1991. I'm sorry 2000 won And it's Ah, It's a wonderful piece of history. Of course. Kate is sitting there on the bench of the book in her lap, and that book is the third report of the Commission of Charities and Corrections. And it pays tribute to Ah, wonderful lady, but not only a just a nice lady, but also someone who is fiercely devoted to helping the underprivileged in Oklahoma. Everyone from For prisoners rights to Native American rights to Children's rights. She really saw the people that tended to get overlooked, and I was amazed that she is the reason that Oklahoma School Children get to go to school. Did you know that? Yeah, you know she was. She was a big advocate for education for Oklahoma's Children. In fact, she was also a big advocate for For doing away with child labor in in the first legislative session. Ah, she got really upset at, um at alfalfa Bill Murray when he was speaker of the House. Because he didn't pass the child labor law that she favored. And so in 1910 when he was running for governor, he pretty. She pretty much just followed him all around the state. Never where he was speaking. She would speak after him and say pretty much how terrible he was that he is in labor law, and it was one of the reasons that he wasn't elected governor that year. Well as I understand it, too, because of that bronze is so engaging, and as you said, she sits at one end of the bench and you can sit down. I had my picture taken with her as a matter of fact. Oh, she was 5 ft. £90 and that bronze is about that sizes. I recall. Yes, The bronzes is true. The life in terms of what her stature was, and she was. She was not a large Ah, large person. But boy, does she pack a punch? She packed a big.

Kate Barnard Oklahoma project manager Ah Commission of Charities and Co State Capitals Restoration Trade Thompson Katie Visitorsentrance Oklahoma School Tio Bill Murray
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"Industry. Well in 19 l seven she was elected. With more votes as commissioner of charities and Corrections and Oklahoma women became a state with no women voting, then the governor of the state himself, and they call her Oklahoma this angel on Oklahoma Gulf. So Kate Barnard 5 Ft. £90 is tonight's Oklahoma gold and the Golden Thread is yet to come. But did you know you can see her at the state Capitol? You are a likeness of her. The Golden Nugget is one that will make you think, and we will have the conclusion of Chapter eight. When we return. This is Oklahoma goal. Let me remind you if you would like to hear this Chapter eight or any of the other chapters of Oklahoma Gold, you can go to John J. Dwyer dot com. John J. D. W y e r dot com and they are featured on the website along with photos of WHO The Oklahoma Gold Topics are about. It is so special and so enchanting. I think you should listen to these again and see those pictures. But what about his storytelling? Well, as I said, There will be more the conclusion. Of Oklahoma Gold. Chapter eight When we come back, you're listening to 1000..

Oklahoma Gold Oklahoma Oklahoma Gulf commissioner John J. Dwyer John J. D. W
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"In fact, you'll find years of John's Oklahoma history articles complete with photo galleries on there. You can also learn more about people and topics of Oklahoma gold. And normally 7 to 7. 30 is the time for Oklahoma gold. Well, because of our computer problems this evening, we're going to have to have AH different episode. And you'll just have to bear with me tonight. You can even share your own comments. As questions make suggestions. Maybe you have a person. Of note that you would like for John J. Dwyer and I to feature on Oklahoma Gold. You'll find out more information about all of John's books, including preview videos and autographed copies, study guides and speaking appearances. And if you haven't been to a coma state yet To the Buffalo Junction. You are in for a treat. You need to go to what comas Oklahoma to the Buffalo Junction and there is a wonderful restaurant there. Most place where you can Have lunch. And if John knows you're coming, most like he will be happy to meet you and sign your books or whatever you would like to do. So you can find out all of these things by going to John j. Dwyer dot com. Many of my past Oklahoma history. Katie Okay, interviews was John are also featured on his website. John J. Dwyer dot com. Ads are audio's and videos of John's public history presentations. In fact, there's a very interesting one on his website right now that he made I believe to the Two Rotary or Qantas. I can't remember which one and there is actually a person in northwestern Oklahoma that wants to donate the land. For all of thie hero statue statues that have been tourney down around the United States. And he wants to have what is called. I believe Patriots Park and he wants to feature all those statues complete with educational information about each of the people. On the statue. And why it was controversial. Valli. This person was viewed as a hero at one point, and you can see that presentation at John Jay dwyer dot com as well. One of my favorite things on John J. Dwyer dot com, though, is an interview that I did with John, so probably Two months ago. And it was regarding The monument. As you know of the land run here that has the 45 different bronze statues here down by the river in Oklahoma City, down by the the canal. And John discussed. Why That monument is so important to Oklahoma history and why we should respect monuments. Put them in their proper perspective that also respect what they do for our history and all that, and so go to John J. Dwyer dot com and you can see That particular radio interview. Now when I say radio interview, you see a radio interview. John is very good. Providing a slide show that goes along with his audio interviews. And so not only like last week we featured push MMA Taha. Not only do you see pictures of pushback, Taha, you see all different kinds of illustrations of the story itself. And what it meant to Oklahoma history. So you hear his incredible storytelling style. It's called Historic Gold Narrative style, where he tells about three dimensional people sets the scene of the time stitches the golden thread of yesterday's history to today's events. And you know, it's really absolutely wonderful when we did the race to the moon two weeks ago. And he featured the first woman astronaut ever chosen. She was an Oklahoman named Jerry Cobb. She was chosen with the Mercury 13. They actually selected 13 women to train to be astronauts. And yet they were never allowed. To become a full fledged astronauts and go up to space. Not until Sally ride went up into space. Do we have women astronauts but of Sherry Cobb? Was from Oklahoma. She graduated from class in high school right here in Oklahoma City. And after she went through all the training and passed all the tests and everything. They decided they didn't want to send a woman up in space. And so she became a consultant. Now, that really didn't set with her because she was a pilot, and she knew how to fly all the fast planes in the big planes, And so from that she redesigned Being an astronaut. And became a pilot, missionary and flew food and medicine to the Amazon jungle. On the night that Neil Armstrong Walked on the moon. She said. That she danced on the wings of her airplane in the Amazon moonlight. That's the caliber of story that John J. Dwyer Is providing us here on the Oklahoma gold. I'm going Falconer Lippert, and we're going to see if the computer will come back here in a moment, But I Thankyou next week, we will continue with Oklahoma Gold and, as promised, John J. Dwyer will be joining us to talk about his Popular book, The War between the States, America's UN Civil War. You know, it may just be the You're listening to 1000. Katie, Okay? On the air and online at okay. Dr Carrick. Election Day is.

Oklahoma John J. Dwyer John Oklahoma Gold Oklahoma City John j consultant Katie Okay John Jay Taha Buffalo Junction Sherry Cobb Historic Gold Narrative United States Amazon Neil Armstrong Jerry Cobb Patriots Park Valli Dr Carrick
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"News radio 1000 Katie. Okay, Gwen thought and they're leopard here with you on this Sunday evening 88 degrees in Oklahoma City. What incredible weather we are having. But it doesn't compare to what incredible hour we have ahead of us. Oklahoma Gold is a continuing compelling storytelling. Siri's Of Oklahomans history, and I'm Gwen Falconer, Lippert. Oklahoma's history because it is as unique as it is, has a timely story for every important observance. Tonight's story on Oklahoma Gold is as rich a story as you will ever hear. Ah Galton thread to make you pause and a golden nugget that will bring you to tears. I guarantee it as it will be one you will be telling your friends and family Tonight. Oklahoma Gold is just in time for tomorrow's observance. Indigenous Peoples Day in Oklahoma City or Native American Day in Tulsa. It begins with a name you've heard. The county or a town in another state. Yet the person's story is so much more than just a county name. And at the end of this chapter of Oklahoma gold, you will be thinking. So that is how we came to be. Stitching the past to the present about the founding father of Oklahoma is our own national. Will Rogers Medallion Award winning author and historian John J. Dwyer. Who's historical narrative style truly conveys the reality of three dimensional people. A story honoring diverse men of honor whose alliance and connection brought us to our home. Okla. Homa and the Choctaw language. Okla means people and Hama means red. Today. Oklahoma means the state of red people. You can hear this story and the entire Siri's free again at our authors website John J. Dwyer dot com. And you can sign up for his blogged and receive updates and stories. Once a month. It's free and it will do to you what it's done to me. It makes me want to Nome or Oklahoma history. Tonight's Oklahoman. He knew bravery, beauty and honor when he chose this land. The founding father of Oklahoma. Here's John J. Dwyer with Chapter six of Oklahoma cold. Oklahoma.

Oklahoma Oklahoma City John J. Dwyer Gwen Falconer Siri Katie Tulsa Homa Nome Lippert
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"Oklahoma go. Oklahoman, Jerry Emma Cobb. Was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 1981 for her remarkable Missionary work to South America and the Amazon region. Later she described in her own autobiography, How she Danced on the Wings of the airplane in the Amazon moonlight. When she learned by radio That our astronauts had landed. On the moment. Oklahoman, Jerry Cop Now that's Oklahoma Gold. Feel like taking it again. Go to John J. Dwyer dot com where all of our podcasts are featured. You're listening to 1000. I'm windfall. Fox News. I'm Kathleen Maloney In a new video tweeted from Walter Reed Medical Center. President Trump says he's learned a lot about the Corona virus. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn't let's read the book school and I get it and I understand it, and it's a very interesting thing. I'm going to be letting you know about it. Doctors could clear the president to continue his treatment back at the White House by tomorrow, the Trump administration facing criticism for downplaying.

Oklahoman President Trump Amazon Oklahoma Jerry Emma Cobb Jerry Cop Walter Reed Medical Center Kathleen Maloney president John J. Dwyer South America Fox News White House
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"And it's a first It's going to be part of Oklahoma history. My guest tonight is John J. Dwyer, and he grew up in Duncan and has taught history and ethics at Southern Nazarian universities in its 2006. Dr. Bob Blackburn, executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society, called John's historical narrative thie Oklahomans the story of Oklahoma and its people. Volume one, The best book on Oklahoma history ever. Volume two, which covers modern Oklahoma history. What we are living right now, including this historic year of 2020 will be released next year. But what if you had John J. Dwyer tell you about Oklahoma City history. There's something very captivating when you have someone that through. A historical narrative style CA next. All of the things that have gone on before in Oklahoma history to today, we say stitching the golden thread of yesterday's history to today's events well, From now on on Katie. Okay. At seven o'clock, we're going to have a new Siri's called Oklahoma Gold. With the historical narrative style, setting the scene of the time what people were thinking then what they're thinking now and stitching the golden thread of yesterday's history to today's event. If you want to know more about John Jay Dwyer, you can go to John j dwyer dot com and see that he has written a number of books that have won the Medallion. The Will Rogers Medallion Award literacy contests for Western literature, and you could see all the different books that he has to offer tonight, though our golden thread And even a nugget to take away involves what's going on with us right now. And when Oklahomans actually experienced something very similar before So ladies and gentlemen, I would like to welcome you to the first chapter. Of Oklahoma Gold. Oklahoma is the land of second chances who were the people that made it so will dig for the golden threads they've woven through Oklahoma history. The Red.

Oklahoma John Jay Dwyer Oklahoma Historical Society Oklahoma Gold Oklahoma City Southern Nazarian John j John Dr. Bob Blackburn Siri executive director Duncan Katie
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"A treat for you. One of my very favorite guests is back tonight with a very, very special announcement. You know, over the past couple of years, it's been a real treat for me to have John J. Dwyer, historian and author on with Me to Talk about Special Oklahoma history stories. He actually grew up in Duncan and has taught history and ethics at Southern Nazarian University since 2006 Dr. Bob Blackburn, the executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society, called John's historical narrative, The Oklahomans the best book on Oklahoma history ever. And you know, I'm not really anybody important, but I sure would agree. And very soon volume. Two of the Oklahomans will be coming out both e Oklahomans and short grass. John's Desta Ble World War two novel won the national Will Rogers Medallion. Award literary contest for Western literature. The Oklahoma newspaper ranked his latest book, The World War, two Epic Mustang sequel to Short Grass, the best selling fiction book in the State last summer. And as the Oklahoma Hall of Fame journalist Patrick Maguid dances of the City Centennial newspaper. Perhaps it's the greatest American War novel since the Red Badge of courage. Now, why did Mike so excited about having John Dwyer on Because he is such a great storyteller, And not only is he a great historian and author, but he is great on the radio, so because of that, we have a very special announcement. John J. Dwyer. Welcome to Katie. Okay in Oklahoma City. Thank you. Great toe. Be back with you and The great folks that listen to this radio station in this program on Sunday nights, Quinn cannot tell people have this magic that we're going to announce unfolded. The last time you were on with me. You were telling me Oklahoma history stories and you were saying all kinds of interesting things. And then you told me a story about a famous woman in Oklahoma history and it totally captivated me. Because I had never really heard of her or anything, And it gave me an idea. And lucky for me When I talk to you about the idea you thought it was a good idea to and what is that idea? John J. Dwyer, historian and award winning author. He'll never like. Put me on the spot, right? Well, it's your big announcement. Yes, well, well and it is. I'll go ahead and say, because it was your idea that was too To began a weekly every Sunday night 7 to 7:30 P.m. radio program called Oklahoma Gold. Where we will explore the good, the bad, the outrageous the heroic and the inspirational of Oklahoma history called Oklahoma Goals. And the thing that's so exciting is the way you craft a story and the way you put it in perspective, and you put things in context of the times and all that. It just makes me sit on the edge of my seat and I can hardly wait to no more. Yes, I am a native Oklahoma. I grew up in hard more. I took Oklahoma history and all of that, but somehow I did not capture this incredible enthusiasm that you have for Oklahoma history. Well, you know, I think going on a lot of folks probably better listening that Would agree that that sometimes the folks that move away from Oklahoma for a while like I did for a number of years, you've grown appreciate it even more and you come back and things that you took for granted when you're growing up here. You realize when you go other places while I took these things for granted that are really quite special that other people don't have it. It's not necessarily the things that big shots on TV and media and elsewhere. Thank are important, but it's ah lot of the things where those that have stayed here and those visions come back. Think. Wow, This is the type of place where I want to raise my kids and my grandkids be some of the intangibles, the traditional values that you don't necessarily get other places. Better still flourishing in Oklahoma. I think it's maybe one reason why I almost anybody I've ever talked to. This moved here when from some other place that they had lived in Oklahoma before when you asked What's the preeminent characteristic of Oklahoma and its people close to 100% of the time? What I hear is that they're friendly and course you not talked about before. There's probably a lot of streams that go into it. What makes this friendly part of which a CZ you not talk about the tragedies. The the heart breaks the the just crushing blows that we've received through our history. The last generation or two, it is is molded and melted us into a people. Well, obviously, we're not perfect. We have our flaws, but I think it's a compassionate people of people of value community. And I think more than ever in this year of 2020 where everything American is being challenged and is coming under fire being assaulted, I think here in Oklahoma, there's never been a more important time to explore. What is our true history eyes? It's something where we just woke up one day and we're all here and there's nothing really special other than we have to be born in a certain time and place and This is just where we are, or is there a back story of this? Quinn? Is there a story in night, even a unique and powerful story of the people that came from all sorts of places in a unique way in rural history over a period of time period generations. As we talked about before. Why is Oklahoma preeminently the land of the second bird? Sometimes last chance that goes for over many generations. Many different people, groups, Rice's languages that have come here and I would just say that this is the time So look at our history and learn it ourselves so that we can teach it to those younger than us. But it really is a history that is unique. It is special and it was worse standing up being proud of and even if necessary, defending when it comes under fire. Well said Now I know that the Oklahomans Volume One has already come out. And soon the Oklahomans volume two will be coming out. The first part of next year's that that correct Yes, yes, actually, with all that's happened all the You know the adventures we had this year. It's going to be getting released on statehood Day, November 16 next year, Glenn, which is just a little over a year, why But we'll just put it out there right now for folks, they're listening that are interested. We're gonna have an incredible celebration party at the Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City. We actually did that when volume one came out But there'll be some exciting people there speak, not least of which Dr Bob Black, early longtime executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society, so we've got just a little more than a year before. Volume two comes out. But as we mentioned on this program before, between now and then we have a repository of stories. The You know the monthly Oklahoma history block that we put out many of the interviews you have done in the past. If folks go to our website, which is John J. Dwyer, it's middle initial J D W Y. E. R..

Oklahoma John J. Dwyer Oklahoma City Oklahoma Historical Society Oklahoma History Center Oklahoma Hall of Fame Oklahoma Gold executive director Quinn Desta Ble World War Will Rogers Medallion Dr. Bob Blackburn Duncan Southern Nazarian University Katie Mike Mustang Patrick Maguid Dr Bob Black
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Almanac what's going on still in music lovers in the west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history this week in nineteen fifty eight the recording industry association of America awards its first ever gold record for an L. P. for the soundtrack of the film Oklahoma gold albums at that time represented one million dollars in sales this week in nineteen sixty eight and an impromptu gathering it Joni Mitchell's house in laurel canyon outside of Los Angeles David Crosby Stephen stills and Graham Nash played together for the very first time the trio went on to form Crosby stills and Nash this week in nineteen seventy Casey Cason debuts the radio show American top forty four counts down the top Billboard hits the number one song on the first show was mama told me not to come by three dog night he hosted the show until two thousand and four when Ryan Seacrest took over this week in nineteen seventy seven six tie in with the date seven seven seventy seven by releasing their seventh album the grand illusion the biggest hit from that album was come sail away this week in nineteen seventy eight after a disco rific six months at number one the Saturday night fever soundtrack is finally bumped off the top spot by Gerry Rafferty city to city and this week in nineteen ninety seven was the first ever little affair concert organized by Sarah McLachlan the all female tour kicked off the show with the gorge amphitheatre in Washington state artist combinations verities each stop but Sarah McLachlan and Suzanne Vega played every show that year there's a look back at this week's rock Tampa Bay first of all HBO will show drama.

America L. P. Joni Mitchell laurel canyon David Crosby Stephen stills Graham Nash Casey Cason Ryan Seacrest Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega Tampa Bay HBO Oklahoma Los Angeles Gerry Rafferty Washington one million dollars six months
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"This week's rock almanac what's going on still in music lovers in the west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history this week in nineteen fifty eight the recording industry association of America awards its first ever gold record for an LP for the soundtrack of the film Oklahoma gold albums at that time represented one million dollars in sales this week in nineteen sixty eight an an impromptu gathering it Joni Mitchell's house in laurel canyon outside of Los Angeles David Crosby Stephen stills and Graham Nash played together for the very first time the trio went on to form Crosby stills and Nash this week in nineteen seventy Casey Cason debuts the radio show American top forty three counts down the top Billboard hits the number one song on the first show was mama told me not to come by three dog night the host of the show until two thousand and four when Ryan Seacrest took over this week in nineteen seventy seven six tie in with the date seven seven seventy seven by releasing their seventh album the grand illusion the biggest hit from that album was come sail away this week in nineteen seventy eight after a disco rific six months at number one the Saturday night fever soundtrack is finally bumped off the top spot by Gerry Rafferty city to city and this week in nineteen ninety seven was the first ever Lilith fair concert organized by Sarah McLachlan the all female tour kicked off with a show at the gorge amphitheatre in Washington state artist combinations very did he stop but Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega played every show that year there's a look back at this week's rock the following program does.

America Joni Mitchell laurel canyon David Crosby Stephen stills Graham Nash Casey Cason Ryan Seacrest Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega Oklahoma Los Angeles Gerry Rafferty Washington one million dollars six months
"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"oklahoma gold" Discussed on KTOK

"In music lovers in the west here to take you on a journey back to this week in rock and roll history this week in nineteen fifty eight the recording industry association of America for its its first ever gold record for an LP for the soundtrack of the film Oklahoma gold albums at that time represented one million dollars in sales this week in nineteen sixty eight and an impromptu gathering at Joni Mitchell's house in laurel canyon outside of Los Angeles David Crosby Stephen stills and Graham Nash played together for the very first time the trio went on to form Crosby stills and Nash this week in nineteen seventy Casey Cason debuts the radio show American top forty three counts down the top Billboard hits the number one song on the first show was mama told me not to come by three dog night the host of the show until two thousand and four when Ryan Seacrest took over this week in nineteen seventy seven six tie in with the date seven seven seventy seven by releasing their seventh album the grand illusion the biggest hit from that album was come sail away this week in nineteen seventy eight after a disco rific six months at number one the Saturday night fever soundtrack is finally bumped off the top spot by Gerry Rafferty city to city and this week in nineteen ninety seven was the first ever Lilith fair concert organized by Sarah McLachlan the all female tour kicked off the show with the gorge amphitheatre in Washington state artist combinations very did each stop but Sarah McLachlan and Suzanne Vega played every show that year there's a look back at this week's rock I.

America Joni Mitchell laurel canyon David Crosby Stephen stills Graham Nash Casey Cason Ryan Seacrest Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega Oklahoma Los Angeles Gerry Rafferty Washington one million dollars six months