17 Burst results for "Ohio Weekly"

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Campus at the nationwide and Ohio farm bureaus. Four aged center. So it's right there in Columbus, easily accessible for folks to attend, and it will take place on the 16th from nine until 12 30 regional meet marketing and processing summit called the Meeting M e A. T I n G. Ivory Harlow, our guest, she's organization director with Fairfield County Farm Bureau. Thank you very much. They do more. Our Ohio Weekly next Many farm families like to plan ahead. But is there such a thing as too far ahead? Ryan Conklin is an attorney with right and more and Ryan, the downfall of any and all plans is that they sit on a shelf and collect dust. Does that go for succession? Plans as well? Absolutely does go for succession plans Time What we look for with clients. You might put plans together when they first have Children, and then they sit there for about 10 20 years and think about 10 20 years. That's a long time on a farm. That's a long time for major fans. The events of major life events to happen. How far ahead, though, is considered to be too far ahead. For these plans. Plans should be set up to accommodate the next 5 to 10 years started looking too far in the future can really bogged down the process. You can go down. Number of rabbit holes where you start planning for every possibility with that said what types of changes in law or family circumstances call for a fresh look at a plan A good one. Right now. It's something that's a pretty popular in farm bureau policy circles as changes in tax law that's a really good opportunity to pick up the phone or go into your attorney's office and talk to them about what changes need to be made. In your plan, but as far as family circumstances, if you've got a son or daughter that decides to come back and take over the farm or start helping on the fire. You've got other Children that would be considered off farm ears. Now you need to look at that plan in the context of helping the farm survive. If you have a matriarch or patriarch passes away, that can be very disruptive Divorces. You might be another good example as well. But, you know, ultimately, um, what we encourage clients keep in mind is the goals that they set for their plan to begin with. And as those life changes come along. Just making sure those goals are still worthwhile. Brian Conklin is an attorney with right and more, they focus their efforts on providing legal counsel.

Brian Conklin Ryan Conklin Columbus Fairfield County Farm Bureau Ryan Ohio about 10 20 years 12 10 years G. Ivory Harlow 5 Four aged nine first 16th 30 regional Ohio Weekly
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Ohio Weekly. I'm Ty Higgins and this week talking about H two Ohio with Clark Hudson. He's the program coordinator for the initiative in the Western Lake Erie Basin. Now even more farmers in northwest Ohio are eligible because the H two Ohio program has expanded, adding 10 additional counties in that part of the state. And those deadlines are coming up pretty soon, Clark, What are we looking at? As far as when we need to get signed up for the mommy watershed. We learned a lot of valuable lessons. We tried to implement all all 10 of our practices at the same time, and we were trying to implement nutrient management placement practices. At the same time, we were trying to develop nutrient management plans, which is really an untenable situation. So for the 10 counties, we kind of had a Mulligan. So we decided that we're going to to slow down the pace a little bit, and we're going to just developed three practices this first year and then we'll roll out the remaining practices for three year time period starting next year, So we separated out the nutrient management practice, and they have to develop that and completed prior to signing up for any of the other practices. So the deadline to apply for nutrient management practice is October 15th of this year. We also to help us set up for those additional practices next year. Get some things in the right rotation and get some areas where they can utilize those practices We did also, we also are rolling out to other practices that are not dependent on the nutrient management plan. And that would be our conservation crop rotation, small grain practice where they would plant a small grain this fall Biennial harvested next spring or summer, and then that opens up a summertime. Dry season window and they can utilize that Manure Inc practice or that fertilizer placement practice without having them being able to enroll that this fall. If we don't have any. Those issues we lose a year essentially have our manure Inc practice. So we thought it was really important to do that. That practice and the other practice, which is not dependent on the nutrient management plan. Being completed is the cover crop practice or over winter and cover crops so producers can also sign up for over wintering cover crops. Now, those two practices have a little bit different deadline. The deadline for those to get signed up as September 15th because the over winning cover crop has to be established and planted by October 15th. So we have to have time to figure out where it's going to go. Make sure that the producer can get the seed. Make sure they understand what you know what blend they're using that we didn't want to crowd that date any further than that. So we have two different dates for the for all three practices. Are good up to September 15th. And if they just want to do the nutrient management plan and get ready for sign up next year, they've got all the way until October, 15th to sign up for that so time. Obviously of the essence. How do they get involved? They go straight to the soil and water office. What do you recommend? Absolutely. I would recommend they're gonna They're gonna be signing up through the Salt Water conservation district in the county that they Have traditionally worked with or if they farm in multiple counties. We want them to sign up in a single county. The county is all understand this and they're going to be able to work back and forth on the on the back end, so to speak to help with implementation, But we want them to sign up in one county, and we're only allowing the sign up acres that are Physically in those counties or acres that are in the Western counties that didn't get signed up in the last sign up. So if a farmer farms and friends and I live in Seneca County, and if a farmer farms in western Seneca County and in Hancock County, he can sign up all of the Lakers and Seneca County But if he has part of his acres are outside of the 24 County area. Those counties those acres would not be eligible at this time, so I would recommend that they call their soil and water conservation District First. The districts are mostly doing this on an appointment basis because it does take some time to sit down with the producer. Make sure that you're not losing. They're not leaving any acres out or missing something. Get that application done right the first time, get everything else done and then and then sign that application and then we'll move him into the enrollment phase, But but they certainly can make an appointment with the local salt water conservation district and then go into that office by the 15th hopefully And get this application process completed, mentioned another major component of this earlier in the conversation, and that's always the Ohio Agriculture Conservation Initiative. That's something that Ohio Farm Bureau's involved in, along with a myriad of other organizations in agriculture in conservation and environmental in academia, really, quite a list of organizations throughout Ohio that have come together. But certification program in place. Where does he fit into the H two? Ohio Equation has a very important role in the equation. Um, primarily because they are the commodity groups that are also working with these farmers. There. They Corn and soybean, the life talk commodity groups, the agribusiness groups and the environmental groups that also have taken in this and the universities that have mistaken this so their roles have been invaluable in helping us promote this program, getting the word out their producers. But primarily the role that they have taken on by agreement with with the administration is one of the components of not just age to Ohio but of House Bill seven, and some of the other. Because, as we now have, you know, in our rules that there will be a certification program for agricultural producers in Ohio and still voluntary certification program and that certification program is going to be administered by O A C. I Which keeps it as out of a nonprofit. It does it kind of gets it out of the way of some of the issues of being involved from a state agency, which other states have done. Their certification programs are managed through one of their state agencies. But we determined in Ohio that it would be ministered through, always see eye and that certification program while being voluntary at this point for anybody in the state. It is required that you go through the certification process to participate in HTA, Ohio. So it's not required at this time that you get a quote unquote passing score. If a producer gets its kind of enjoy it at a decent level, But they're not quite passing. Then that obviously gives us room to use our practices to help them. Um, do a better job and get a higher score. The next time they go through the certification process, So, um, but that is probably that's the biggest role that always has. The CIA is also helping us. Um, with trying to just get background information on on a more general level at like a watershed level of what kind of practices farmers are using, and and already what kind of conservation practices that they're doing. And what kind of an impact is that already having on reducing the.

Seneca County Ty Higgins September 15th Hancock County Ohio Farm Bureau October 15th CIA Clark Hudson Western Lake Erie Basin October, 15th 10 counties next year Clark 10 manure Inc northwest Ohio 24 County two practices first time this week
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Federal funding state funding private funding partnerships on every level communities engaging, so it's going to take some time. And there's not one answer to fix it all. But all of the combined total will get up there at the end. I believe Said to that's generous director of state policy with Ohio Farm Bureau and Tom Reed, Broadband consultant with re consulting group. Thank you both so much for your time. Appreciate the insights. Thank you. Time take care more our Ohio Weekly after this Many farm families like to plan ahead. But is there such a thing as too far ahead? Ryan Conklin is an attorney with right and more and Ryan, the downfall of any and all plans is that they sit on a shelf and collect dust. Does that go for succession? Plans as well? Absolutely does go for succession plans Tight. I, uh what we look for with clients. You might put plans together when they first have Children, and then they sit there for about 10 20 years and think about 10 20 years. That's a long time on a farm. That's a long time for major family have been Two major life events to happen. How far ahead, though, is considered to be too far ahead. For these plans, plans should be set up to accommodate the next 5 to 10 years. If you start looking too far in the future can really bogged down the process. You can go down. Number of rabbit holes where you start planning for every possibility with that said what types of changes in law or family circumstances call for a fresh look at a plan A good one right now, if something that's pretty popular and farm bureau policy circles as changes in tax law, that's a really good opportunity to pick up the phone or go into your attorney's office and talk to them about what changes need to be made. In your plan, but as far as family circumstances, if you've got a son or daughter that decides to come back and take over the farm or start helping on the fire, you've got other Children that would be considered off farm. There's now you need to look at that plan in the context of helping the foreign survive. We have a matriarch or patriarch that passes away that can be very disruptive. Divorces. You might be another good example as well. But, you know, ultimately, what we encourage clients keep in mind is the goals that they set for their plan to begin with. And as those life changes come along. Just making sure those goals are still worthwhile..

Ryan Conklin Ohio Farm Bureau Ryan Tom Reed both about 10 20 years 5 first Two major life events 10 years one Ohio Weekly Broadband
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Is Tom Reed, broadband consultant with Reed Consulting Group and generous director of state policy with Ohio Farm Bureau. Welcome to you both. Thank you Glad to be here for having us So, Tom, I've been doing this a long time. I've never had a broadband consultant on what does a broadband consultant do? Well, boy, it's high time tie that you Have a broadband consultant where, uh, a large and influential group Now broadband consulting really shouldn't exist because these issues that we're facing should have been addressed over the last 30 years. There was Universal Service fund from the FCC that spend $100 billion since 1990 to solve this problem. And the money is missing in action. So the whole broadband consulting industry is based on the failure of past policy. So what we're trying to do is identify areas of need and where broadband does not exist. So so many of the mapping solutions that have been pursued identify where broadband is And what we've always focused on is where it broadband is absent, because that's what we're trying to fix, and there's a shocking information that we've ended up revealing is that about half of the populated area of Ohio cannot even get Speeds at 10 megabits down and one megabit up, so that's the lowest threshold that anybody wants to try to measure As 10 megabits down, one megabits up and half of the populated area of the state can't even get that and we knew a lot of the problem was in southeastern Ohio, so we were not surprised. That we found that a lot of the problems in southeastern Ohio surprising us has been northwestern Ohio, where we thought the services were in much better shape, but it looks a lot like southeastern Ohio in terms of the lack of broadband availability. So the the focus for us now that we've identified these areas is, uh, really defining service areas and then the matchmaking between ISPs that want to serve those areas truly want to serve those areas and the funding programs because there's a lot of different funding programs out there. I sp I imagine in an Internet service provider correct. Correct, Jenna. We have worked with Tom a time or two. He has been a great resource for some of our development of policy. Absolutely we had Tom come in last year for our state Committee for policy development to to influence our policy on broadband. We've always had, you know, policy supporting Getting broadband extended to rural Ohioans. But that was pretty much it because this isn't our specialties. We're not experts in this area that we did have complement to consult with our group. As an expert to say, how can we get a little bit more specific with our policy? What was it about his insights that prompted Ohio Farm Bureau. We've been working on broadband for years. But of course, we had many challenges in 2020. We'll talk about in a bit. But what were some of the insights he brought to the table that had our members thinking just how much more important this issue became. Well, First of all, he came highly recommended. So when I reached out to Ohio Broadband office, Peter Voter, Berg immediately said that I should have Tom Reed come in, based on his experience specifically in Southeast Ohio. I know that Northwest Ohio also Struggles with this, but Tom can talk about you know, the the infrastructure itself were really good with Hey, there needs there's a funding need, but we can't really get down into the nuts and both of the issues, which is what Tom brought to the discussion. Tom, you've worked with us, of course, but other partners across the state. What other organizations? Does your work involved? So this started in Buckeye Hills Regional Council, which Council of governments that covers eight counties in southeastern Ohio, pretty quickly the other, a local development districts joined in. So now we represent about 34 counties in Ohio, then also started working with broadband, Ohio Innovate Ohio and Ornette. So kind of taking on a statewide focus at that 0.1 of the terms that I heard you used last year when you talk to our members about real broadband in Ohio is digital desert. What is that? Digital desert is where we project there just is no broadband. So all those areas the half of the populated area of the state that's blow 10 1. Basically, we're saying there's no broadband there at all. And this states back to the problems with the copper cables. So you know we were very fortunate that way back in 1934. The U. S. Congress said that rural America needs to be on a level playing field with urban America in terms of telecommunications capabilities, so this is not a new goal. This is a goal that the country has had since 1934. And it's the only reason we ended up with telephone services in these rural areas and the copper cables that were installed back in the fifties and sixties. They really have served as well. It gave us reliable telephone service for a long time, but their way past end of life now and in a lot of areas. Regular landline telephone service doesn't work anymore become very intermittent. So, yeah, we don't have broadband and a lot of places. Even the telephone service is failing because that infrastructure has never been updated. And that's where we really end up with this digital desert is where the only thing serving those areas is this old, decrepit copper. That's way past end of life and there is no shortcut. We have to replace that infrastructure, and that's where we're just mystified. Between 1990 2020. There was $100 billion from the SCC specifically to upgrade rural infrastructure that was spent with the telephone companies, and for the most part, it just did not have any impact. One thing that really caught my attention during your presentation was just how expensive getting the infrastructure up to par would be. People don't think about those polls, every couple 100 ft, down the road and what it takes to get those up to snuff, so to speak. Yeah, There's there is that issue of the poll infrastructure as well. Overall, we believe it's about a $3 billion subsidy problem in the state of Ohio, and that sounds like a huge number of people's heads explode, and I say $3 billion that's equivalent to building about 150 miles of highway. So you leave Columbus. You don't even reach either side of the state in 150 Miles, So we've built a lot more highway than that. We can solve this, too. It's similar to building a water system. They build a water main down a road passing the homes and then the homes paid a tap in. What we need is the subsidy to pass the homes with the fiber backbone, and then it becomes actually a profitable network. After that, that the fees that the consumers pay. Once they've connected are enough to actually support the network and make it a profitable enterprise talking rural broadband this week on our Ohio weekly, That's Tom Reed. He's a broadband consultant with re consulting group and generous also joins us. She's with Ohio Farm Bureau, Our director of state policy, Jenna, how long has Farm bureau had broadband as a.

Peter Voter Tom Reed Jenna Tom $3 billion 10 megabits 2020 Ohio Farm Bureau $100 billion Reed Consulting Group Buckeye Hills Regional Council Ohio 150 Miles 1934 FCC Columbus Southeast Ohio last year one megabits Farm bureau
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Is our Ohio Weekly. I'm Ty Higgins from a battlefield to a farm field. This is to the beat of agriculture today. In our weekly segment, you're going to experience the story of one soldier who felt a sense of duty back in 2000 and one, however, after a series of life changing events, he still has that same feeling of direction. But in a different type of field, Matt Sharp from Native Hut in Ohio, and I am the owner operator of VDs Ranch. I was in high school and 9 11 happened and I remember just watching that go down. And I just kind of thought for our generation like this is the time for people to step up. I left for basic training, and then I went to airborne school. Immediately following that. From what it sounds like I'll go down the Fort Bragg and get signed into the 82nd airborne and then we're going to I'll be back up for Thanksgiving. Well, whenever I arrived in my unit at Fort Bragg, The guy said. Normally, we'd have you outside in the sandpit make any of you all kinds of crazy stuff. But here's the packing list. We're going to Iraq next week. So I called my mom and I'm like, Mom, I'm not coming home for Thanksgiving. We went to Iraq for four months, and that first night I remember hearing a firefight going on out in Baghdad, and it was, you know, I just laid there looking at the feeling of the tent like This is what I signed up for, like It's time to do what I signed up to do. I've had bullets were praised by my head so close you can feel the wind. You know if I was six inches to the right it would have hit me would have been shot if someone's injured and they're laying out there where they're inspire. You know, bullets are flying. Someone's going to run out there and get them. You know that people don't think twice about it. It's just they don't know It doesn't even cross their mind that this could be the last decision I make on the services to run out here. To help my buddy..

Matt Sharp Ty Higgins Baghdad Iraq VDs Ranch 2000 next week Ohio four months six inches twice Fort Bragg one soldier Thanksgiving one today 82nd airborne Native first night 9
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"The description of this hour. Ohio Weekly at Ohio Farm bureau dot org. Dr. Robin Wilson, professor of risk Analysis and Decision science at Ohio State School of Environment, Natural Resources, Dr Aaron Wilson research scientists at Ohio State's Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center. And Dr Mary Deutsche assistant professor of agricultural economics at McGill University in Montreal. Thank you so much for being with us this week. Thanks to thank you, Doc. You Our Ohio Weekly continues after this use traffic and weather for Columbus used radio 6 10 W T V and a man was shot and killed early Saturday marking 103 homicides this year in Columbus, according to police. Officers were dispatched just before two a.m. to an apartment on Wedgewood Avenue in the hilltop area for an unknown complaint. The Columbus mayor has applied to make the arena district and outdoor drinking area called Dora or the designated outdoor refreshment area, allowing patrons to purchase alcohol inside the zone and then carry them throughout the area. Hugely popular arena district hosts concerts, basketball hockey and is the location of nationwide stadium. And that bear moseying through the state was seen in Akron Saturday at Goodyear Heights. Metro Park. You know they're letting the bear pass through asking Ohioans to help ensure the bear remains unharmed by removing bird feeders, keeping pets inside and keeping garbage inside till trash day. I'm Sandy Collins, I want to introduce you the Thundercats Technology Thunder Cat Technology is a premier provider of I T solutions.

Sandy Collins Wedgewood Avenue 103 homicides Goodyear Heights Aaron Wilson Mary Deutsche Robin Wilson Montreal Akron Metro Park Ohio State School of Environme this year early Saturday Ohio Farm McGill University this week Ohio State Columbus Thundercats Technology Byrd Polar and Climate Researc
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Things go well, Prices are down. When prices are up, you may be having difficulty with weather and not have the the yields that you would of hope to have in that ear. It just seems like there's always a struggle, and the resilience of our customers is always amazing. And we really try to understand. What is going on and really trying to work with our customers will not Last thing we ever want to do is, you know, take a vehicle back or put someone in hardship and we try to always accommodate put it in programs to really help folks. As we know good people can have bad times. And we really want to work with folks and in any way we can to help them help. Will. Heilman is president and CEO of Farm Bureau Bank? Our guest this week on our Ohio Weekly? You know, we have seen tough years in agriculture ever since 2000 and 13. We haven't seen anything. Real positive to say as far as the economy is concerned, and then on top of that, 2020 gave us a global pandemic, which kind of added insult to injury. What's the state right now of the economy? Well, I think that the AG economy is similar to the economy is hold. This has been a really challenging year of some folks have surprisingly come out of this very well and other folks have had Had really big challenges, and it's been difficult to predict. I mean, if you look at the agricultural economy overall, I think this was the second highest earning year, um, on record, but it was largely due to some transfer payments on the government for the relief for all of the trade issues and another thing, so it's certainly great that relief was there, but You know, you look at the core operations. It was still a really tough year. And are those, um, payments going to continue? I think most of us would guess they probably aren't going to be at the same level. You know, economy price of commodity prices are coming back. But it could still be really tough year and you know that. You know all your listeners certainly know better than me Those payments very lot, depending on what you grew up. And so some folks were able to To get payments and other folks weren't and, um you know, we had all the covid challenges. I mean, just everything that happened with slaughterhouses early on. It's just you have to continue to be flexible. And I think 2021 is going to continue to bring that uncertainty. I mean, hopefully, vaccines will get rolled out. The virus will start. Um Go down and the second half of the year we'll see some real positive impact, but that's still six months away. And I think we're still going to see some tough times for a lot of our folks, and it's been tough for a year and some people for years and just you know how long can you hold on and that's we're starting to see is just more folks are running out of savings. More folks are just, you know, we're able to handle a couple bumps in the road. But you know, just one pump too many and released hope We get things back on track. Mission. One word that we use a lot of agriculture, Unfortunately, and that's uncertainty. Uh, farmers are used to that. They know how to deal with those, uh, bumps in the road as you call them. As a bank, though that's probably not a word You like to use too often. You need to know what's coming in and how you're going to be able to, uh, to work with farmers Year in and year out and be able to also keep that bottom line of the bank and in good standing order as well. And you mentioned In in 2020 that assistance farmers received from the federal government, you know, and that's been happening over the past couple of years, whether it be negative trade issues, or covid 19. Does that change the way when when farmers get those those payments to those assistance, the stimulus packages If you will change the way you look at a balance sheet as you work with a farmer, and how will the industry be impacted? If those assistant efforts do fall off here as we come into a new administration? Well, the answer folks always hate to hear is the one I have. What you said depends and it really does look at individual circumstances. But certainly the those payments never hurt. You know, we never look at as someone said, Oh, you got those payments, so it's a It's a bad thing. I mean, it's cash that's coming into the operation. It's helping you continue to make those payments. And you know, they certainly are looked at the shore up the financial strength of one of our customers, and you know the real challenges like you said. We aren't sure they're gonna come next year, but hopefully, commodity prices will go back up. And so that's always the crystal ball. You have to look at. We tend to look backwards that are making credit decisions more than going forward. So if you, um, pager bills, you've tried to do the right thing when you hit those bumps on the road in the past, Um it's going to be a lot easier to get credit going forward. If you've had some challenges in the past is going to be more difficult to get credit going forward. I mean, it's uh We always start with character is kind of the first thing you look at it to borrow and character really means those folks who paid their bills back and certainly if you've had those payments and help you pay your bills is going to help you give more credit in the future..

Will Farm Bureau Bank next year 2021 2020 2000 13 six months this week first One word one a year one pump second highest earning past couple of years second half Ohio Weekly Heilman 19
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Like many sectors of the U. S economy, the negative impacts of 2020 hit American Agriculture heart. The pandemic close added to weak commodity prices and agricultural trade war and especially broad and severe adverse weather events over the past several years, while net cash farm income in 2020 was above the average net cash farm income for the 2013 through 2019 period. Increased government payments to farmers accounted for a substantial portion of that rise, Although that certainly helped alleviate the immediate need for relief due to the pandemic, the future remains uncertain. As you might imagine. Those in the farm banking world are keeping a close eye on how their customers are fair. What's the near and long term outlook for agriculture? As far as AG makers are concerned this week on our Ohio Weekly, we talk about the farm economy with the CEO of Farm Bureau Bang. From the Ohio Farm Bureau studio. This is our Ohio Weekly, highlighting those who grow our food, fiber and fuel while examining issues that are important for farmers and their neighbors throughout the Buckeye State. Our Ohio Weekly is supported by nationwide nationwide is on your side. Now, with this week's news feed. Here's our Ohio Weekly host Ty Higgins. If you need yet another reason to despise 2020 and be glad it's gone, then check out last year's grocery bills. The latest consumer price index has the final 2020 numbers showing that food prices at the supermarket last year. Jumped higher by an average of 3.5%, agricultural economist in food price tracker.

Ty Higgins 2013 2020 2019 3.5% Farm Bureau Bang last year Ohio Farm Bureau U. S Buckeye State this week Ohio Weekly American past several years
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WTVN

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"All those things very much are detailed in the provision of the power signing board, the least does some protection. But this is now going to become a power generation station and consequently you need to negotiate a number of things in the stipulation. In order to protect those things. And that's why Farm Bureau's involved so much in those things, Brandon, which is talking about working with the company, transparency, those things to understand. Do you know the management plan here? Do you know the purpose of this field tile? Not only in this piece of ground where your station is going to be, but the entire watershed. Education. Outraged responsibility are huge in this process. How many solar projects are in the works Right now across Ohio, Dale right now, before the Ohio power signing board, there are 40 of them. There's probably about six or seven. They don't know about yet that our members have called and said we've gotten contacted by these companies about at least agreement. Can you give us some help? And we do that quite a bit. A lot of education outreach briefings are being done by County Farm Bureau's They're all across southwestern Ohio, northwestern Ohio. North Central and now we're seeing basically Eastern counties in the traditional oil patch that are working on lease agreements. As a matter of fact, there's a project just four miles south of cadres of Nottingham. That has been established here just a few weeks ago, and it's going through the process, So we'll see this all across the state talk about the scope of these projects. How many acres are we talking about? The smallest one, um, is about 320 acres down in Brown County. It was called Nestle Would the largest one basically is a combination of three different projects right next to each other, called hard and one hardened, too, and hardened three, which encompasses About 300 acres in size. Not all 3000 acres is going to be in a solar array. But when you take a look at the setbacks and protections basically, they are there because of that. You're taking a look at probably around 65% of that ground, least maximum, which will be basically under solar pants. That does bring up what Brandon talked about. As far as what type of land are these solar panels being built on is this prime farmland is this marginal farmland are these, um, empty parking lots from from companies gone by I What are we looking at? As far as What's being taken out of production. To get the economy is a scale you need for utility grade or utility size solar. You're talking about the best technology. You get 4.47 megawatts per acre of ground, which means that's why you see somewhere around 1000 acres with regard to that. They are all looking for low hanging fruit. They're taking look at open flat ground with good access to transmission infrastructure. And if that's a large section, basically in northwestern Ohio Now you know why they're there? You are starting to see companies who specialize on different types of topography. Uh, taking a look at rolling ground taking look at abandoned strip mined ground, brownfield, those particular types of things Each company has a specialty, where they focus on a certain type of geologic, geo textual structure. And farm ground, especially the flat stuff really lends itself into that. But you're starting to see other developers coming into the state where the rolling hills to strip mines the brownfields basically Part and parcel. These projects to that's something we really challenged the developers onto some of our conversations with them over the last couple of years is how can they develop strategies to help work with landowners to identify areas where you're not taking your most profitable farm grand ground out of production, if at all possible, right? We've really stressed that are their strategies where you can work with landing or you can work with that farmer. To identify marginal ground and avoid putting your solar array on the least profitable part of the farm really makes the most sense, right? And so that is something that we've tried to work with the developers a lot and just really stressed that message of We move into the future would really like to see more strategies around that piece of it. Yeah, When you take a look at that many farmers are taking look at identifying that piece of ground, which is marginal police profitable and now you're seeing. When you see these maps of this project, it goes out over an area and it's a patchwork through a number of different properties with regard to that. No longer basically one exact square. But there's also other challenges with that, as you're taking, look at identify marginal ground as you're going through and you're creating that pattern and that pass work. You have to deal and work with more neighbors. More good neighbour agreements, work with more local government officials and be more transparent and more responsible in responses and different things with regard to that. Dale Arnold is director of energy policy with Ohio Farm Bureau also joining US this week on R Ohio Weekly Farm Bureau's senior director of state and national policy. Brandon Kern daily You mentioned Don't sign a lease on the hood of your pickup truck. A and I have to imagine these leases are pretty complex and pages and pages long. What does the least look like for a farmer? And can it be a lucrative income source? It can of its negotiated and you understand what Basically it entails. Energy law is much different. It's an I tell you. We have a lot of members basically. To work with us. People are finding out why we have a legal referral list and network..

Dale Arnold Brandon Kern 40 3000 acres Ohio Farm Bureau Brown County Ohio Nottingham 4.47 megawatts Brandon R Ohio Weekly Farm Bureau North Central County Farm Bureau southwestern Ohio this week northwestern Ohio Dale Farm Bureau about 320 acres four miles
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"It will also go directly to the fares. You know, growing up on a farm. I know especially county fairs where that was our vacation. We couldn't afford to go anywhere. But the county fair was everything. What is the state of our Ohio County fairs this summer? They are they back or we good there. Well, I wouldn't say we're good there. I would say that every bit helps. So there's $50,000 is going to be put to good use to make some improvements on the fairgrounds and really hire those that may not be have been on the payroll due to short end on the budget in 2020, so we're gonna start seeing that recovery. But you're right. County fairs are so important for rural Ohio. It is a source of pride. And it's really a chance for us in rural Ohio to share our message and share what we do with those fairgoers that maybe never stepped foot on a farm. So the chance to really showcase what Ohio Agriculture is all about. Not excited to get back out there. This shit absolutely tie and I don't mean to throw you a curveball, blood. I know you're seeing this. I'm seeing this. We're all seeing this. The state of formula and being sold in Ohio here. I understand. You know, farmers don't make a lot of money and to be able to retire. Sometimes it is selling chunks of their land. How does Ohio rank as far as you know, even where I met in New Albany? You go out to Beach Road. I remember those beautiful farm fields there now big distribution centers and big data centers with Facebook and Google. Yeah, I'm in Delaware County. So you go around 23 from Worthington to Delaware. You're seeing the same exact thing you know, it is. It is an issue, but the more generations we have away from agriculture them or that those kids that inherited farm see maybe a knopper to nitty to make some money from people that want to turn those farms into up the road here. There's a brand new Menard's. That was a farm just three years ago s o u know we are seeing that happen, but If we get more and more young people involved, and there's legislation and Columbus right now that would help older farmers connect with younger farmers. Give them both tax breaks to work with each other and keep that land in agriculture. Toby Able Tonto, you to grow as much corn and soybeans as we need to hear in Ohio to keep those farm families thriving for generations to come. Well, tie. If there's anything I can do. We've known each other a long time. I'm all about the farmer. So we appreciate your time this morning host of our Ohio Weekly Thai Higgins, You can check him out right here every Sunday morning and 16 W TV anti You're the best Thanks for your time. Thanks. Boxer. You two all right? It's a 46 radio 6 10. W TV END sports. Well, it's been 104 years since we've seen the start of a major league baseball season like this one for the first time since 1917 there have been five no hitters thrown in the first two months. Detroit Spencer Turnbull pulled it off last time to the Tigers win over Seattle. It's the second time the Mariners have been no hit in a span of two weeks. As for the Reds and Indians bad news for the Reds, they lost to San Francisco for two. Former teammate Anthony De Sclafani. Now with the Giants shut down the Reds, allowing only one run in seven innings. Good news for the Indians know they stop before games kid with a 65 won over the Angels. Jose Ramirez homered in a five run, tried first. They eventually blew that lead, but Josh Naylor solo blast of the eighth, snapped the tie and wanted for Cleveland. The Clippers also want taking out Toledo 6 to 11. Other note, the Indians announced they'll be allowed to go to full capacity for games at progressive field Beginning June 2nd hockey News came out continuing the Blue Jackets nominee for the King Clancy Trophy. It's given yearly to the NHL player who best exemplifies leadership on and off the ice. And yea playoffs. Eastern Conference Playing games were last night Boston Be Washington and Indiana over Charlotte. It means Boston advances in the postseason. Charlotte is out. Indiana now means Washington for the final spot in the East and the PGA Championship. Getting set to tee off tomorrow morning on Kiawah Island in South Carolina, from the central high Ohana dealer. Sports desk. Maverick Ortiz Radio 6 10 w T V N 8 48 Now into the news from next door with Scott Channing Scott, I feel like I haven't seen you all morning. You've been so busy. What do you working out? For nine o'clock. It's been all right. I hear Brandon. More states and business is dropping their mask mandates. After the CDC announced anyone who's fully vaccinated can go mask. Listen most settings after Layla cover Badji in clinical professor of emergency medicine at Stanford University, says it's probably okay when you have decreasing covert cases and increasing vaccination rates. It is safe because the vaccinated are protected against serious illness. If they get Cove it and they have a low likelihood of spreading cove it because the studies have shown that they have a low viral load here in Ohio, the covert 19 health orders officially expire on June 2nd in Texas Governor Greg Abbott's going a step further banning local governments, including schools from enforcing mask mandates. And a new initiative in Columbus will fix your car's broken headlights or tail lights for free. But that story coming up at nine o'clock, All right, Thank you, Scots. And now when the traffic and weather together from temp start heating and cooling products, here's Johnny Hill got a couple of issues we're working on. One of them just reported to us Rome Hilliard Road north of I 70 at Tribune, Renner had a report of an injury accident just into us. Be careful. Is the medics head up there north off of Fisher and better 70 westbound, little sluggish into downtown accident Still tying up London Grow Ford Road near Roar Road. Careful if you travel south on off of 33 on Hamilton Road, heading down for Rickenbacker and an accident yet to clear on schlock near Carl Traffic sponsored by the Ohio State Western Medical Center, the experts at the Ohio State Election Medical Center and Heart and Vascular Center Are leading the way by offering complete heart failure care including heart transplantation without ever leaving Columbus. Trust your heart to Central Columbus is on Lee Heart Hospital ranked best by U. S. News and World Report Traffic and Weather together powered by 10 Star and custom Air I'm Johnny Hill on NewsRadio, 16 wtbs all you need today. Oh, is it's gonna be a good day today 83 Partly cloudy 61.

Jose Ramirez Anthony De Sclafani Josh Naylor Delaware New Albany 2020 $50,000 Tigers Facebook Google Rome Hilliard Road Ohio State Western Medical Cen Worthington Hamilton Road Kiawah Island Ohio State Election Medical Ce Delaware County Reds Angels Johnny Hill
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Benefit exclusive to Ohio Farm Bureau members here in Ohio. We grow possibilities by investing in the soybean checkoff. Farmers can concentrate on running their operations, while the Ohio soybean Council creates new opportunities for future generations. The soybean checkup works to get new soy based products on the market builds relationships with international buyers and partners, with researchers to increase yield and on farm profitability. Learn Maura at Soy Ohio dot org's last year, we grow this message brought to you by Ohio soybean farmers and their check off. Where can your Ohio Farm Bureau member benefits take you? No matter the destination, Avis and Budget rental car will get you there. Did you know that Ohio Farm Bureau members can save up to 30% off base rates and are eligible to receive other rental car discounts like dollars off or a free upgrade? So before you put that car and drive log onto o f b f dot org's slash safe Things and click on the Avis or Budget logo. Exclusive to Ohio Farm Bureau members. Are you a small business owner supporting and involved with agriculture, such as farm equipment, food processing, grocery store or restaurant service? Do you continue to search for reliable and affordable health coverage, then searched no more. The Ohio Farm Bureau has taken action to offer a new self funded medical plan to save on expenses. This new health benefits plan, administered in part by medical mutual offers great rates, expanded WellCare fixed monthly payments and a variety of plant designs to meet your needs. Specialty products available to employees include dental vision and disability at specially discounted Rates. This plan also includes a 24 7 nurse line and a physician. Consultation service for your convenience search. No more visit. Oh FB Health benefits plan dot org Receive your exceptionally discounted quote today. That's O f B health benefits plan dot org. Our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins continues after this the news, traffic and weather station news radio 6 10 w TV end Thank you for listening to our Ohio Weekly. I'm tight, Higgins. Ah lot goes into growing food, fiber and fuel and more times than not, farmers rely on operating loans to get from planting season the harvest time..

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"From agricultural land owners. The majority a whopping 87% are non operator, landowners or in Oh, Els. They're increasingly identified as a group of landowners that have to be addressed when discussing environmental issues on agricultural lands. That's why American farmland trust conducted the non operating landowner survey. Dr Gabrielle Rest. McNally is the director of American Farmland Trust Women for the Land Initiative. Dr Rush McNally. Welcome to our Ohio Weekly. Thanks for having me. What type of data was this survey looking for? Our focus was to really kind of fill in gaps around these as you mentioned Knowles, as we like to affectionately call them really trying to understand. Their views on conservation on do better understanding relationship with their farmers on so we conducted a survey randomized survey across 11 states to better understand some of their perspective that often go missing one. We're talking about the agricultural landscape. We tend to focus a lot on farmers and know a bit about what they're thinking. If you want to come to contribution, but not necessarily these not operating landowners, So the survey was conducted 27 2016 2017, and we've been aggregating and looking at the results and report our report came out earlier this year. Or some of the major findings. So you know we did these 11 states. So there's lots of really interesting meet associated with each of the states. But I'd say, really kind of where The rubber hits the road is thinking about kind of results in aggregate. Esso one of the things that we found that I think is really critical that perhaps some of your listeners have heard sometimes when farmers were asked, you know, why don't you do more conservation on your rented lands? There's a perspective that the My landowner who I rent the land from doesn't want to see conservation happen. What are results show is the facts, not necessarily case so many of the majority actually say. Of our respondents said that they were very supportive of conservation. And we're willing to take steps to support their farmer and doing that, through adjustment to lease thinking to the lease agreement. I'm thinking about ways to intent devising support conservation practices. Things I cover crops reduction, intelligent. Lots of other strategies on DSA really kind of I think key finding was saying was was basically Pushing back on this sort of thing We hear in farm country a lot that, you know, rented ground. We simply don't have support for support for conservation on those crab on those acres, and our results say that that's not necessarily true. I'm across the board. Want to drill down on that a little bit in just a bit. But I really was drawn to the relationship aspect of of these rental and lease agreements. The landowners you surveyed they typically knew the farmer. They worked with pretty well. Most cases they were a relative or a neighbor or a friend. And the agreements being made were pretty long standing ones. Yes, very much so. No. And there was you know, One of the key pieces was this sort of trustworthiness that that was one of the most important elements of the rental agreement was trustworthy Nest of the renter. And so what we found is that the Noles really trust their farmers buy n large and really look to them for guidance and insight on what to do with the land that they own. So That relationship is important and long standing. As you know, one interesting kind of peace there is that. Generally speaking, the leases are verbal agreements. It does very a bit by state. So say in California, the There's a lot more written Lisa's but much of the middle West of the verbal agreement on DSA. Oh, there are you know, pluses and minuses associated with that. But we have these a longstanding leases but generally speaking their verbal lease agreements and there annually renewed, um Which is interesting, given that a lot of relationships are very long standing there still kind of a short term lease environment, and some folks sort of in the conservation community would argue. You know, we might want Maura written leases that clearly articulate some of the sort of conservation goals. To give a little more security for the farmer and the landowner. But certainly we found that trustworthiness is really critical and important, And there's also a really sort of nice foundation laid between the landowner in the renter. Yeah, everything that you gathered. It does all connect to conservation and preservation. I was blown away in Ohio 62% of land leases were done by verbal agreement, and there has to be some red flags. There's we look at farmland years down the line from now. Right? Absolutely. And I think that kind of goes toe you know the future planning and I'd say again, we found there's this really miss to support conservation. But you know how we actually operationalized that on the landscape can be done well, she released or in renegotiation, renegotiating the lease agreement, such as, like, you know, adjusting to cost share. Um, some, you know if you're going to adopt cover crops, or like negotiating, how you might cover both the risks and the benefits of of adopting a new practice, so things like written Lisa's could really help sort of provide support, both for the farmer who might be taking a risk with a new practice. And the landowner who wants to see some revenue associated with that, although again, our findings suggest that while the revenues associated with that rented farmland are important, it isn't necessarily the number one and most important thing for those Knowles. They're also thinking about stewarding that land for a long time. And that was another interesting finding was The importance of keeping land in farming for now and future general generation. So even if the Noles air off farm and don't live on the farm anymore, operated, or maybe never did. They still have an appreciation of that land and its value in farming and the legacy that it serves. You know, we often talk about those legacies. And we also talked about often the average age of the farmer 57 here in Ohio that the average age of a landowner is 70 years of age in the state. And that means that land's gonna be changing hands. Dude to new owners. We're gonna be seeing that quite a bit over the next few years, most likely to the next generation of that family. As more years passed. How likely will that farmland stay in agriculture and what's being done to make sure that happens? That's a really great question, you know, and I think that's a little bit of the you know, trying to better assess that that was one of the really interesting finding. From our study was the variability in terms of succession planning So many farms have you noted, You know, we have this aging demographic, both of farmers and landowners. And yet there's still a lot of work that needs to be done to put succession plans in place A Z. I think a lot of your listeners might attest to, you know, talking about succession planning can be really emotional and really intense for folks because it gets it. It makes us all think about death and dying, and um, and also because so much of farmland Shut up in our family history and legacy. It could be quite emotional for people to talk about what happens when you know my parents passed and that land is no longer used in the same way, for instance, So you know, one of the things that we're integrating say with, you know, American farmland trust. We think a lot about this so thinking about how do we put Eastman's on land to keep them in farming so that as they changed hands, we can maintain that land in farming for now and into the future. One of the rules that are women for the land program does really gathering women farmers as well as landowners, and we're starting to do we do this sort of peer to peer network learning circles where women gather with technical service providers and game skills and resource is to help kind of support them in making more decisions with their farmland and being more empowered with knowledge and information on how to.

Dr Rush McNally Knowles American Farmland Trust Women Ohio Lisa Land Initiative Ohio Weekly Dr Gabrielle Rest director Noles California Eastman Maura
"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Ohio Farm Bureau members. Water Every drop matters. No one knows that better than Ohio's farmers. Clean water is important to every farm and to every farmer. That's why Ohio Farm Bureau has invested millions of dollars to help farmers protect this vital resource and in the process, protect the future for everyone to learn more about farm bureau's clean water initiatives and for information on becoming a member. We invite you to visit farmers for water dot award today. Where can your Ohio Farm Bureau member benefits Take you no matter the destination, Avis and Budget rental car, We'll get you there. Did you know that Ohio Farm Bureau members can save up to 30% off base rates and are eligible to receive other rental car discounts like dollars off or a free upgrade? So before you put that car and drive log onto o f b f dot org's slash, savings and click on the Avis or Budget logo exclusive to Ohio Farm Bureau members Are you a small business owner supporting and involved with agriculture, such as farm equipment, food processing, grocery store or restaurant service? Do you continue to search for reliable and affordable health coverage, then searched no more. The Ohio Farm Bureau has taken action to offer a new self funded medical plan to save on expenses. This new health benefits plan. Administered in part by medical mutual offers great rates, expanded WellCare fixed monthly payments and a variety of plant designs to meet your needs. Specialty products available to employees include dental vision and disability at specially discounted rates. This plan also includes a 24 7 nurse line and a physician consultation service for your convenience. Search. No more visit. Oh FB health benefits plan dot org Receive your exceptionally discounted quote today that's O f b health benefits plan dot org. Our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins continues after this Ohio's talk shy, shy. Giant news radio. 6 10 w. T. V N Thank you for listening to our Ohio Weekly. I'm tight. Higgins. Well, vaccinations for covert 19 had begun around the state and around the country. Of course, every state has its own plan, for which groups get the vaccine and at what point Talk about that and.

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"She's a local legend, nationwide mutual insurance company and affiliates. COLUMBUS, Ohio. No matter where your travels take you, Ohio Farm Bureau membership benefits will follow. Before you check in. You should check out the wide variety of options Farm Bureau members have when it comes to hotel discounts from names like Red Roof in a motel. 6/30 iconic brands offered the choice and Wyndham, you'll be able to find the comfort level. That's right for you to learn more on how to save on your lodging needs. Visit o f b f dot org's Flash savings, another valuable member benefit exclusive to Ohio Farm Bureau members. Are you a small business owner supporting agriculture such as farm equipment, food processing, grocery store or restaurant service? Do you continue to search for reliable and affordable health coverage? Search no more. The Ohio Farm Bureau has taken action to offer a new self funded medical plan to save on expenses. This new health benefits plan, administered in part by medical mutual offers great rates expanded, well care and a variety of plans designed to meet your need. It's a specialty products available to employees include dental vision and disability, especially discounted rates. This plan also includes a 24 7 nurse line and a physician. Consultation service for your convenience search. No more visit. Oh FB Health benefits plan dot org's receive Your exceptionally discounted quote today. That's O F B health benefits plan dot org's Oh FB Health benefits plan dot or g'kar More of our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins Next your station.

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"Mutual insurance company and affiliates. COLUMBUS, Ohio. To some. That sound means the day is ruined to a farmer. It's the sound off life sustained. Every farmer understands the value of clean water. Ohio Farm Bureau understands it, too. So on behalf of our members, we've invested millions of dollars through research and action. Help improve clean water. For all of us. Learn more on how you can join our efforts. Visit farmers for water dot ord today Are you a small business owner supporting and involved with agriculture such as farm equipment, food processing, grocery store or restaurant service? Do you continue to search for reliable and affordable health coverage, then searched no more. The Ohio Farm Bureau has taken action to offer a new self funded medical plan to save on expenses. This new health benefits plan. Administered in part by medical mutual offers great rates, expanded WellCare fixed monthly payments and a variety of plant designs to meet your needs. Specialty products available to employees include dental vision and disability at specially discounted rates. This plan also includes a 24 7 nurse line and a physician consultation service for your convenience. Search. No more visit. Oh FB health benefits plan dot org Receive your exceptionally discounted quote today. That's O f b health benefits plan dot org. Stick around Our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins continues following these messages this summer. Give your kid a chance to get ahead while learning like a college students with Georgetown University Summer High School sessions explore our online programs in over 35 subjects at summer Dodger. Which town dot e. D u Free healthcare hundreds to more than $1000 per month and disability compensation and tens of thousands for college tuition. These are just some of the U. S..

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"For M V P this year. Go ahead, Caller. My money's on the Epson ICO tan Color printers. Dude, It doesn't use cartridges and comes with a ridiculous amount of ink. Sir. It saves me a ton of trips to the Store, Sir. You know, every piece and for most valuable player, not most viable printing, right? Uh B p e no sports sports sports clubs. You go take just filling Chill available at Walmart Sam's Club in Office Depot. The covert 19 vaccine is coming soon to your acne pharmacy. Acme is working hard to support your health. They're specially trained pharmacy teams have partnered with the C, D. C. State and local health department to provide covert 19 vaccines to you and your loved ones free of charge. Visit actually markets dot com to learn Maura and sign up for updates on vaccine distribution, timing and scheduling. Handle clean restoration and we're gonna save you Got it down to a science. Absolute state of our way restoration bring reconstruction disaster strikes. Handle cleaning restoration, and we're gonna save you. Who's traffic? Whether sports Columbus is news radio 6 10 W TVN. You're listening to our Ohio Weekly. I'm tight Higgins this.

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"ohio weekly" Discussed on WTVN

"FARMING Ohio Farm Bureau together with farmers Our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins continues after this Columbus is news radio 6 10 w T. V N Another round of covert 19 checks will be going out to the vast majority of American households very soon. The $900 billion covert stimulus package includes up to 13 billion and funding that directly benefits agriculture and that help reaches even farther across the farm spectrum in the bill passed earlier this year. My entire Higgins joined by a Brandon Curran. He is the senior director of State National Policy with O F B F Hi, Brandon. Hi. Hi. How are you doing? Fine. You've been following this very closely over the past week, and I mentioned that there are some sectors of agriculture that will see some support This time around that maybe didn't see it the first time. What sectors are they? Yeah, I think that's probably the most important component to the bill. To be really honest with you, Ty. I mean, if you look at, um you know, livestock producers in particular, I think are really going to see benefit here that they hadn't seen an earlier phases. There's been a lot of coverage in the news about disruptions in the supply chain. We all know that And for those producers when those backups have occurred, they really, you know, felt the impact of and so if you have producers who have felt the impact in terms of Of having to depopulate. You know their livestock not being able to move them to the market. There are provisions in this bill. They're going to allow them to recover up to 80% of the market value for those animals, So that's gonna be a tremendous help for producers who found themselves in that situation. Similarly way you know, have many operators across the spectrum do work on contract on before you know those growers who experienced this Russian contracting. Their contract was canceled when the contract was delayed because of those logistics supply chain issues that were created in the middle of the covert crisis. They're also going to be able to seek some relief up to 80% of the losses that they incurred. From those canceled contracts or delay contracts earlier in the year, so there's air. There's a huge benefits again, Both of those examples covered in this bill that weren't addressing all in earlier release packages. Mentioned that food supply issue we saw earlier in the year and and Gary was one of the first ones that we saw have issues at the front end and the back end of the food supply chain. Nearly $1 billion of this bill going to support a dairy donation program and supplemental dairy margin coverage payments for small and medium sized producers across the country when you look at those, especially in non specially crop growers, they got some things earlier this year in that first bill. Well, that Support Continue? Absolutely. You know, we see in this bill some additional supplemental payments for that seat hat program. Um, earlier they were, you know, growers were able to, um, recover, you know 80% of their losses. This is just gonna be a straight on a per acre payment for in this bill, so a $20 per acre payment. For those growers. That and the situation, so that's you know, continued support from Congress. You have clearly showed that they recognize you know how big of an impact the pandemic has had on on agriculture and Grover's Cross country, the correlation between the issues you and I were talking about in this bill, and the priority issues that came out of our annual meeting just a couple of weeks ago are amazing. We talked about the Meat processing and the livestock producers seeing trouble dairy producers on one of the policies that came out one of our priority issues for 2021 is rural broadband. What are we seeing in this bill as far as that's concerned Yeah, a lot of important work being done in this bill for you know, just rural communities in general, which we obviously supported Farm Bureau. $7 billion will be allocated in the relief package for broadband development, including 300 million for rural broadband on specifically 250 million for tele health issues. I know that that's something that people across rural Ohio have continued to be concerned with. Access to broadband being able to, you know, take advantage time. Health. Certainly in the wake of covert has become top of mind for a lot of Ohio. And so I think that's really important work that that farm here is very supportive of Finally, we thought very hard earlier this year for the P p p the Paycheck protection program. Many Ohio Farm Bureau members took advantage of that in the first bill is that part of this new package as well? Absolutely. There's gonna be another infusion into the p p p p program. I think this is really important as well for rural communities and are partners, not just farms who can absolutely take advantage of this, But you know our partners across the food spectrum. If you look at the situation that we are partners, for example in the restaurant industry are facing. It's really just dire and certain in certain circumstances. And so a new $284 million infusion into that. Program will provide a significant level of help for small businesses across the spectrum, and there's more focus on small businesses. So they've reduced the size of the number of employees that they're targeting this time around out of 300 employees and you know, so they're trying to target the smaller mom and pop operation small business in particular who are really in need right now. Brandon current, a senior director of state national policy with Ohio Farm Bureau. He's still going through this bill and finding out all those little nuggets that could help the agriculture sector. Of course, at the national level. The American Farm Bureau also going through this and they'll be updating us and we'll be updating you on. You can actually click on the link on this post, and you can get all the details from the American Farm Bureau federation. Braden Appreciate your time. Thanks for the insights. Thank you. This week is a big week for from you remembers all across the country and it's gonna be a little bit different than the usual American Farm Bureau annual convention. As this year's convention is going virtual with that said, it means everybody involved in farm bureau and those curious about the organization can join in for free and see what.

American Farm Bureau federatio Ohio Farm Bureau Ty Higgins FARMING Ohio Farm Bureau Ohio senior director Brandon current Brandon Curran Farm Bureau. Columbus depopulate Braden Grover Congress Gary