40 Burst results for "Ohio"

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

00:59 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"He's such a great guy. He's not always abnormal. Well, yeah, he's not only a great guy. He is legitimately a great coach. And I didn't know him when he was a gardener Webb. I had known of him. And when he went to butler as an assistant and he was an assistant to Brandon Miller when Brandon Miller had to leave, leave the team. And I was at I went to butler for an event. And I spent a couple hours with Chris holtman and I was blown away. And it started really keeping in touch with him far more often, but really watching him go on to see practice and had him down at The Bahamas, all that stuff. I just think he's one of the elite younger coaches in the country, and we're going to be here in his name a lot. Every job that opens up, you know, they're going to be knocking on his door, which is a good problem to have to stay where you are when somebody else knocks on your door. You've done around some great coaches. What's one thing specifically that blew your way and talking to him? You remember? I think he's got he's got an uncanny attention to detail about what's important with his guys. So fonds like he's got a he's got a devotion to his core principles with a willingness to adapt to what's happening around him. So he's not rigid in anything, but he's not going to compromise his principles. And I remember a few years ago at butler, it's probably more than a few now. He's been at Ohio State for a while now, but his best player, he felt needed to be suspended because he wasn't he wasn't living up to what a best player should do. He didn't do anything wrong. So it wasn't like he committed some violation or something, but he just wasn't living up to the standard. That Chris felt like he should be set up for herself. So I remember talking to him about it and he said, I think I'm going to suspend him. And I don't know many coaches that would do that. And he did it because he goes, it's the best thing for him. And the kid came back from it, they were better team for it. But I just don't know that many guys that would have done that and done it in a manner he did. And when somebody asked her, who are the best coaches out there, there aren't being talked about enough. He's always the first guy I mentioned. Wow. Brad was coaching the big south when he was a gardener Webb. And I remember in the first time he played and we'd speak after games and he called me up, he said, they got going to he's a really, really good young coach. I've got to know him pretty well because Barry Collier is a dear friend. But I watched him practice it in film session this fall. And that the smart board that's right on the court and he taught and he got his points across funds, but he also led his players teach themselves by asking them questions and literally saying, what do you see there? What in perfect case scenario, what would we do there? Basically, he was letting them instead of giving them a fish. He was teaching them to fish. Yeah. I mean, it was really and his practice his staff and very, very even keeled, but very intense, like a quiet, you know, a quiet intensity about he's impressive. I mean, they're going to be in fact, especially when they get suing back. They're going to be a factor. Your point about instead of giving them a fish, teaching them a fish, you know, in the old days, the way coaches did it, at least my coach, he would shove a fish down your throat if you didn't like what you did. Bring my army Mike shove it somewhere else. That sounds weird. Film. Fonds when we were playing film was a lot different than it is now. Film now is shorter. It is less less taxing on the player. Let's put it. And it's sometimes a lot more positive in nature than what? That's a good point, because film right now is the players after game. They get all their clips and come right to their iPad. Yeah. Game's over and that video coordinator is sending their clips with captions to look at. And they know if they've been viewed right after game and then they're brought in the next day, one on one with a coach just for their clips and the team clips. It might be ten, 15 minutes. I mean, it's not the watch the whole half. Yeah. And you know, where half of the guys are falling asleep in your hit the guy that you're hitting the guy next to me, gosh, I wake up. You know, he's gonna kill our asses. Right, right. I mean, it's just it really is. And a lot of ways, they're probably watching more film because they're actually watching it. Yeah, they get more out of it now. For sure, thank you. Yeah. I mean, so it's a really good thing. One quick word. All right, we got Syracuse, Villanova, Tennessee. Texas tech. Just I know J you're preparing for those games a little bit for this weekend this weekend for the Jimmy V, which obviously knows a specialist even more special, I think we put one coach by Taos battling. But just off the top of your head, first thoughts on the GPV in those games. Well, I think they'll be really good games, you know, Texas tech is not played the toughest of schedules. They just lost a Providence, but they had Terrence Shannon junior back who's their leading scorer. They've got a bunch of transfers in. They've been killing the glass. I mean, they're dominating the glass in the games they've played. But again, they haven't really played great competition. And Tennessee has to go to Colorado, at Colorado before they head to New York. So it's kind of an odd road trip for Tennessee. So maybe Texas tech will get a different Tennessee team because they got to play a game right before that. That's across the country. And then the old school big ease part of Villanova Syracuse is going to be really fun. I think that'll be, you know, like I never know what to expect from Syracuse, honestly, because it's one of the best shooting teams that mayhem has had in a while. I think the defense is probably driving a little bit crazy, but, you know, when you can score, I would rather watch them score a bunch of points and give up a bunch of points, then not score any and not give up in it. If I get a vote, I would prefer that I would prefer that, you know, sort of the three overtime game they played against Indiana than watching them go to Virginia and have Virginia beat them 50 to 37 or something. How would you feel about the 24 turnover 33 points off the 24 turnovers if you.

Brandon Miller Butler Chris Holtman Webb Barry Collier The Bahamas Texas Tech Tennessee Ohio Brad Chris Terrence Shannon Syracuse Mike Villanova Villanova Syracuse Colorado Providence New York Virginia
Murder charge for Ohio deputy in Casey Goodson Jr. shooting

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 19 hrs ago

Murder charge for Ohio deputy in Casey Goodson Jr. shooting

"Yeah yeah hi hi sheriff's sheriff's deputy deputy has has been been charged charged with with murder murder in in the the shooting shooting nearly nearly one one year year ago ago of of Casey Casey goods goods and and junior junior Jason Jason made made the the now now retired retired Franklin Franklin County County sheriff's sheriff's deputy deputy who who fatally fatally shot shot Casey Casey good good to to junior junior has has turned turned himself himself into into law law enforcement enforcement after after being being indicted indicted by by a a grand grand jury jury and and charged charged with with murder murder and and reckless reckless homicide homicide he he was was finishing finishing up up work work with with the the fugitive fugitive task task force force in in Columbus Columbus needs needs attorney attorney says says Goodson Goodson was was gesturing gesturing with with the the gun gun as as he he drove drove in in that that the the former former deputy deputy acted acted within within his his lawful lawful duties duties when when he he pursued pursued good good sent sent to to investigate investigate the the felony felony weapons weapons offense offense he he witnessed witnessed relative relative say say good good said said was was holding holding a a sandwich sandwich not not a a gun gun as as he he was was trying trying to to unlock unlock the the door door to to his his grandmother's grandmother's house house and and autopsy autopsy found found goods goods and and was was shot shot a a total total of of six six times times once once in in the the buttocks buttocks and and five five times times in in the the back back within within hours hours of of the the announcement announcement good good since since family family held held a a news news conference conference to to say say they they have have filed filed a a federal federal civil civil rights rights lawsuit lawsuit against against meat meat and and Franklin Franklin County County M. M. of of office office space space this this is is mother mother Tamela Tamela Payne Payne says says she's she's overwhelmed overwhelmed by by joy joy after after a a year year of of fighting fighting for for charges charges in in a a case case where where there there were were no no body body cameras cameras and and no no witnesses witnesses I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

Casey Casey Jason Jason Franklin Franklin County Count Goodson Goodson Columbus Franklin Franklin County Count M. M. Tamela Tamela Payne Payne Joy Joy Jennifer Jennifer King King
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

00:42 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Not only legal, totally legal. You know what? You don't even project it right and think, hey, what are we going to do if we win court storm? Because I didn't know how our fans would react obviously. We've had teams court storm on us and on their floors. It's really a great respect for the opponent. I think it was pretty organized. I was just worried about, you know, when they started storm and we had all the duke players and Holly rose in the middle of it and I said, hey, let's just get everybody off here safely and then celebrate. And I think our staff did a good job with that. Don't choose to people's court stormin on him when they beat him. So it's nothing new. The lowest point in history do basketballs when they hit a half court shot against us and they storm record. And I said, they couldn't get any lower than that. It.

Holly Rose
Ohio State ices out No. 1 Duke in final minutes, wins 71-66

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Ohio State ices out No. 1 Duke in final minutes, wins 71-66

"Ohio Ohio state state held held top top ranked ranked Duke Duke scoreless scoreless over over the the final final four four and and a a half half minutes minutes completing completing a a rally rally from from a a fifteen fifteen point point second second half half deficit deficit in in at at seventy seventy one one sixty sixty six six victory victory for for the the Buckeyes Buckeyes said said Keith Keith scored scored a a career career high high twenty twenty points points get get stops stops on on defense defense on on you you know know your your diligence diligence from from points points so so you you know know we we are are set set to to tighten tighten up up our our defense defense and and get get stops stops you you know know we we did did that that and and we we got got the the W. W. E. E. J. J. Lovell Lovell hit hit two two free free throws throws with with one one of of six six remaining remaining giving giving the the five five into into Buckeyes Buckeyes their their first first lead lead since since early early in in the the first first half half Lindell Lindell finished finished with with fourteen fourteen points points eleven eleven rebounds rebounds for for the the Buckeyes Buckeyes Wendell Wendell Moore Moore junior junior had had a a team team high high seventeen seventeen points points for for the the blue blue devils devils who who moved moved up up to to number number one one in in the the poll poll by by defeating defeating Gonzaga Gonzaga over over the the weekend weekend I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Buckeyes Buckeyes Duke Duke Keith Keith Ohio W. W. E. E. J. J. Lovell Lovel Lindell Lindell Wendell Wendell Moore Moore Blue Blue Devils Devils Gonzaga Gonzaga Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

01:00 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Bill isn't doing this game. What's up, what Bill is upset? This is a watchable. It actually might have been kind of entertaining if it's going to be that horrible. It actually might be somewhat entertaining. You know, I could have repainted the rims at halftime for both teams. What is the halftime speech when you come in, you go, look. Are you talking to me? My team sucked that. But I mean, can you imagine what the coaches say and say, all right, right now we suck. So we have to make them suck worse. And he did, you know, I think Washington state did a really good job of making Arizona state sock more than they did. I mean, the speech for all is he, we couldn't be any worse. You know, yeah, exactly. It was bad. We want to staff when Bobby played. Yeah. Yeah. All right, now he's one of the most fiercely competitive human beings that I've seen in terms of just internally competitive. Like, how do you like to me? That's a hard thing to deal with. But you know, I think we've all been through situations where things were really bad in a game, maybe not. I've never been through the 29 point thing. In a 40 minute game. But what I would say is, like, Bobby, Bobby Hurley's teams over the past have been really good offensively. They put a lot of points on the board. So that's an anomaly. I mean, I think he's probably upset about it, but he kind of got to flush that one and move on. You know, I mean, how do you get mad at miss shots? You know, who doesn't have to move on? Was this all Chris Holman? Because he'd just be dick and he's getting ready to open up Big Ten play, which is like crazy. You get a chance to enjoy it for a little bit. And then you realize, you know, you got big template. No matter what you're trying to accomplish at work, it takes a team coming together to make it happen..

Bill Bobby Bobby Hurley Arizona Washington Chris Holman Dick
Michigan moves into top 4 of CFP rankings; coachless Irish 6

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 d ago

Michigan moves into top 4 of CFP rankings; coachless Irish 6

"The the latest latest CFP CFP rankings rankings still still have have Georgia Georgia on on top top now now followed followed by by Michigan Michigan Alabama Alabama in in Cincinnati Cincinnati the the Crimson Crimson Tide Tide will will take take on on the the Bulldogs Bulldogs in in the the SEC SEC championship championship game game on on Saturday Saturday Michigan Michigan goes goes against against Iowa Iowa for for the the big big ten ten crown crown and and Cincinnati Cincinnati will will host host Houston Houston in in the the AAC AAC title title game game the the Wolverines Wolverines moved moved up up with with Saturday's Saturday's forty forty two two twenty twenty seven seven win win over over Ohio Ohio state state dropping dropping the the Buckeyes Buckeyes from from the the top top four four Oklahoma Oklahoma state state will will be be fifth fifth going going into into its its big big twelve twelve championship championship game game against against Baylor Baylor Notre Notre Dame Dame is is now now six six followed followed by by Ohio Ohio state state Mississippi Mississippi Baylor Baylor in in Oregon Oregon I'm I'm the the ferry ferry

Cincinnati Michigan Crimson Crimson Tide Tide Bulldogs Bulldogs Alabama Georgia SEC Wolverines Iowa Houston Buckeyes Buckeyes Ohio Oklahoma Baylor Baylor Notre Notre Dame Ohio Ohio State State Mississi Oregon
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

00:41 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"I love guys that can impact the game in other ways. And that dude is a monster on the offensive glass. And so, you know, traditional North Carolina teams, I like the fact that when they take a shot, it's a 50 50 chance of asking why he's going to come out with an office every now flip back. And so I like that I like that basis for their identity and I just think all the rest of the pieces will start to fit in as they play more games and get more comfortable playing with each other. I think Kentucky could emerge, maybe as that 9th or tenth team that we could be talking about in March. Yeah, I kind of look at it from you get asked the question which teams can win it. And then you get the kind of amorphous question of give me a team that can make a run. And you go, okay, what does a run mean? Does a run mean get to the sweet 16? Because for mid major, usually that's what it means. More does a run mean challenging for the whole thing, getting the final four and beyond. Like, I think Kentucky and Texas can continue to get better. And if they stay healthy and sort of peek at the end, they can win four games in the NCAA tournament, but I think though I think the list of teams that can win the whole thing, I think Seth read them out. And that's it. I think the champion is going to come from that list. Maybe with Villanova if they do extraordinarily well. But that list of I think 7 or 7 or 8, whatever you read, I'd be shocked if the champion didn't come from the top of that list. Agreed. Yeah, it's going to be interesting. I'm interested to see. We're getting into the season. We've had some games canceled. Washington, I guess Nevada now had some issues. I mean, you know, knock on wood, hopefully, you know, we can kind of navigate this. The one thing before Chris Altman comes and joins us, this coming week, the V classic. Madison Square Garden. Got four really good teams. Villanova Syracuse circus had a good win. Got ugly. I mean, we saw two games yesterday. We saw game. Nebraska NC state. And Syracuse in Indiana. I am convinced both teams in both games want it and lost it. And neither of them even.

Kentucky North Carolina Villanova Ncaa Seth Chris Altman Texas Villanova Syracuse Nevada Washington Madison Square Garden Nebraska Syracuse Indiana
Michigan beats Ohio State 42-27, ends 8-game skid in rivalry

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 5 d ago

Michigan beats Ohio State 42-27, ends 8-game skid in rivalry

"The school record with five rushing touchdowns believes you get the number from the list again press number two Ohio state forty two twenty seven Michigan carried a one point lead in the and please state the vehicles on trips inside the tent the Walgreens defense forced two statements to open the second half price counted my husband would push the lead to fifteen heading to the fourth quarter until myself I'm I'm not going down you know we got a win win this ballgame I just kept telling myself that and just looked it up but then back my mind Michigan improves to eleven and one when the big ten east will play in its first of the big ten championship game Ohio state seventy the Michigan

Michigan Walgreens Ohio
Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

00:23 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ohio" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Talked about it a little bit last night is, man. Coming into the when we did our first podcast, I was convinced that 7 to 8 teams from the ACC would get to the NCAA tournament. I'm not so sure now that they're gonna get 6. I think four. Yeah. And that's mind boggling to think of. And like right now, it would be duke. It would be due for me Virginia tech, North Carolina and then somebody fighting for the fourth 5th and 6th positions. I'm still blown away and how soft the ACC is this year compared to the Big Ten. Yeah, look, I agree with that. I think that, you know, look, the Big Ten struggle in that big east Big Ten challenge, the guy the games. But the top of the Big Ten is separating. And there are other teams that are emerging to Big Ten. I think I'm always going to get better when they get healthy. I think they're going to be sort of a Michigan state getting a little bit better. I can't figure out Michigan. I thought we talked about a fan's all weekend. Michigan, a little bit like Memphis in a different way. The pieces don't fit. Like in the last year, you lose Michael Smith. The only strongest round. You lose Isaiah leverage. You lose Franz Wagner. You lose guys like beat the post that could lay off the ball that could make a play that could make a shot. And let's face your spacings connected to your ability to make shots. Hunter Dickinson look, this interested yesterday. A lot had to do with no one like he's not gonna be open forever. It's hard to get in the ball and then as opposed to like say perdue at post from the top. By the time they get it reversed, by the time that guy on a wing heads it from Michigan, he's no longer open. So I'm not from Michigan is going to be there, but I do think that there are emerging teams in the Big Ten. Perdue and I saw him in person at the mohegan sun. I joke around. They're like Noah's ark. They got to everything. I mean, like, and those two big guys are so good, but Jaden, ivy is so good. And the ball never gets stuck like, I sent Matt paid her a text message after the game. I said, I could watch your team play for hours. Like, the ball never gets stuck. I mean, boom, boom, boom, boom, they don't take bad shots. They share the balls to fund like 43 averages, 5 assists the game. I just does what they do. I mean, they just blow me away. I mean, anyone else in that ACC Big Ten, like Virginia tech, you buy in a more now. Obviously, Ohio State me, but anyone you're saying, you know, I think there might be better than we think. I think North Carolina is better than people thought. You know, they've had a couple of struggles. They lost both those games up at the mohegan sun that really good tournament. You're talking about Seth. But then they ran, they ran Michigan, kind of out of there. You know, it's not the score 95 points variety that it was a couple of years ago when they were when they were really good. But I think they're going to get there. And I like their personnel. I think they're figuring it out. I mean, you know, there have been some teams I've seen where you're seeing unselfish players play selfishly, if that makes sense. So Oregon was the prime example. So I'm trying to be, you know, state this the right way because the players were really trying to do the right thing. But they just weren't doing it. And they run their stuff in practice, but then when they get real into real game situations, they weren't doing it. And the ball was sticking and guys weren't moving. And they get mired in it. And instead of having, because all the transfers, maybe they've got the leadership deficit where there's nobody to grab everyone and say, come on, let's get together. We're okay. And guys go into sort of individual mode. Not in a bad way, but they Superman stuff and trying to take it on their own. And I've seen that with a few teams, but I think some of them are going to figure it out. But you're not going to have a whole lot of time to figure it out once you get to January. Then it's going to be kind of in a foxhole and trying to survive it. You can't figure much, you know, you're not going to be figuring it out. The fundamental stuff I don't think you're going to be figuring out then you're going to be getting better, but you're not going to figure it out. The team that's curious to me is Michigan state. We all thought early on that Michigan state was a top 25, maybe even top 15 caliber team, and they've been so inconsistent. The thing that has been consistent for them is they've been continually turning the basketball over..

Michigan ACC Franz Wagner Hunter Dickinson Virginia Tech North Carolina Michael Smith Ncaa Perdue Memphis Isaiah Jaden Noah Matt Seth Ohio Oregon Basketball
Liberal Caller Fails to Notice the Dramatics in His Own Party

Mark Levin

01:59 min | Last week

Liberal Caller Fails to Notice the Dramatics in His Own Party

"But rob and Cleveland Ohio disagrees with me so of course rob I want to hear from you Rob come out in here Thanks for calling I'm Larry O'Connor You're on Mark Levin Larry how are you buddy Good man Happy Thanksgiving Happy Thanksgiving to you I call into these shows a lot I go by liberal rob I'm very left leaning on things when it comes to social but specifically I'm conservative Okay Every time I hear somebody filling in or even Mark Levin everything's so dramatic and everything that's wrong with the world is it's the leftist system Democrats They're trying to comment you made about they don't want you to have Thanksgiving and hold hands Do we have to get that kind of I guess straw man fallacy Do we have to get that kind of dramatic with it to I mean is it something that I mean you've already won over 99% of your listeners you're almost like kind of barking up the tree freaking to the choir Hey rob I'm gonna let you finish but just so you know do you know the Atlantic Are you familiar with the magazine the Atlantic I heard of it I don't know The Atlantic is considered like the gold standard for liberal thought in this country It's they've got all the smartest journalists It's a big full of think pieces It drives the intellectual left in this country And then frankly there's a lot of my friends who are on the right who read it and respect the ideas that are in there This is a headline This is an article that just published today in the Atlantic The headline is deprogram your relatives this Thanksgiving Sub headline Maybe you'll change a heart or a mind or maybe you'll need to report a relative to the FBI Now now rob I understand you want to call it and say oh you right wing radio host you're all full of hyperbole and you're angry and you're saying that But do you see what I mean when I say that they don't actually want us to have a harmonious Thanksgiving Do you remember how Barack Obama wanted kids to go back and start lecturing their parents about politics at the Thanksgiving

ROB Larry O'connor Mark Levin Larry Mark Levin Cleveland Ohio The Atlantic FBI Barack Obama
Update on the latest sports

AP News Radio

02:00 min | Last week

Update on the latest sports

"AP sports I'm guessing Coolbaugh Georgia continues to top the latest CFP rankings but there's a new number two and number four Ohio state has moved ahead of Alabama for second with Cincinnati holding the other semi final slot in Michigan sitting just outside the picture in fifth the Bulldogs and bear cats are the only unbeaten teams in the rankings here Cincinnati coach Luke Fickell it is what it is I think we've kind of said that from the get go and it doesn't really matter until the very end of the season in other college football news Penn state coach James Franklin has agreed to a new ten year contract that will guarantee him at least seventy five million through two thousand thirty one in NFL news the Titans cut former all pro running back Adrian Peterson after just three games the giants have fired offense of coordinator Jason Garrett also in New York a person with direct knowledge of the situation says number two overall pick Zach Wilson will return as the jets starting quarterback Sunday against the Texans in college basketball number one Gonzaga handled number two UCLA AP correspondent Dave Ferrie reports Andrew name hard scored twenty four points in top ranking zagra improved to six and by whipping number two UCLA eighty three sixty three to capture the empire classic hi Amy how Cass tried to keep the Bruins it finishing with nineteen points before UCLA fell to five in one it was the first meeting between the two teams since their epic battle in the final four last spring in NBA news warriors star Klay Thompson practiced at full speed on Tuesday on the court the Knicks were able to regroup after squandering a twenty five point lead against the short handed Lakers a manual quickly nailed four three pointers in the final period to bail out the Nixon A. one oh six one hundred victory we need a room ready to you know make that second push so we just you know want to withstand an act in the NHL the lightning have eleven points in their last twelve games after blanking the flyers for nothing Zach Bogosian scored for the first time in sixty three games and Corey Perry snapped a thirty seven game goal drought guessing Coolbaugh AP sports

Coolbaugh Georgia Luke Fickell Cincinnati Ucla Zach Wilson James Franklin Dave Ferrie Zagra Bulldogs Jason Garrett AP Adrian Peterson Alabama Penn State Ohio Michigan Titans Gonzaga Texans Giants
Cincinnati moves into College Football Playoff position

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last week

Cincinnati moves into College Football Playoff position

"Georgia continues to top the latest CFP rankings but there's a new number two and number four Ohio state has moved ahead of Alabama for second with Cincinnati holding the other semi final slot the Bulldogs and bear cats are the only unbeaten teams in the rankings Cincinnati plays at east Carolina on Friday then meat used in the American athletic conference championship game on December fourth Michigan is fifth followed by Notre Dame Oklahoma state Baylor Mississippi in Oklahoma the final CFP rankings will be revealed December fifth I'm the ferry

Cincinnati East Carolina Georgia Bulldogs Alabama Ohio Notre Dame Oklahoma State Bayl Michigan Oklahoma
CVS, Walmart and Walgreens are responsible for role in opioid crisis, jury finds

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

CVS, Walmart and Walgreens are responsible for role in opioid crisis, jury finds

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting a jury holds three pharmacy chains responsible for their role in the opioid crisis a federal jury has returned a verdict against CVS Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies saying the recklessly distributed massive amounts of pain pills fueling the opioid crisis into Ohio counties in the lawsuit lake and Trumbull county's blamed the three chain pharmacies for not cutting off the flood of pills that caused hundreds of overdose deaths and cost each of the county's about one billion dollars according to their attorney damages

Mike Rossi Lawsuit Lake Walgreens CVS Walmart Trumbull County Ohio
Ohio Attorney General Sues Facebook Over Impact on Children

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:12 min | Last week

Ohio Attorney General Sues Facebook Over Impact on Children

"To it. I called you originally, because last week you did an important thing about Facebook. And I'm not one to mindlessly condemn the Facebook now meta. I know many of the people who work there, they don't intentionally some of them try and do this. But what you have alleged in court on behalf of Ohio and the Ohio pensions is important. If it's proved, which is that Facebook intentionally put children in harm's way. And in Mayan kind of began to quiver because, you know, I do worry about that. Tell us what the lawsuit is about and what you're seeking to prove on behalf of the people of Ohio. Well, the theory is fairly simple and it's pretty traditional. If you're a big company that's publicly traded, you lie to the public lie to investors and then when it's found out there is a drop in us stock price, companies liable. For their deception. And that's what happened here. We saw in September and October a huge data drop from leaked documents from inside Facebook. We had whistleblower testified in Congress and the upshot is Facebook new that a third of teenage girls were experiencing mental health issues as a result of their social media usage. And they didn't care. They told the rest of us that they were implementing community standards to make sure the trolls and evil people weren't spreading bad things and hurting people on their platform. And it turns out that they didn't do that. They had rules for some of us, like you and me you. But there were other people who were having large followings and the right political profile who the rules did imply to them. And most tellingly, I couldn't believe this, but they conducted an internal review with legal counsel. And that review, which was also leaked, said, we're not doing the things that we say we're doing publicly.

Facebook Ohio Congress United States
 Kidnappers release 2 of 17 missionaries abducted in Haiti

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Kidnappers release 2 of 17 missionaries abducted in Haiti

"A U. S. based church organization says two of the seventeen members off a missionary group who kidnapped more than a month ago safe and in good spirits after being freed in Haiti Christian aid ministries says it could not give the names of those released why they were freed all of the information the Ohio based group says while we rejoice this release also with the fifteen people who are still being held the five children in the group of sixteen American citizens and one Canadian including an eight month old the mission was were kidnapped by a gang on October sixteen with the leader threatening to kill the hostages unless his demands were met he wanted one million dollars per person although

U. S. Based Church Organizatio Haiti Ohio
College Football Playoff picks after Week 12

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

College Football Playoff picks after Week 12

"Coming into the game Ohio state was ranked number four in the college football playoff rankings Michigan state was number seven in looking to show it deserve better but by half time it was already no contest Buckeye quarterback CJ Stroud had thrown six touchdowns we had a great week of practice the preparation they did some good things on defense so we knew we had to be prepared for and really everything that we thought we were going to do without a doubt so it was good just to come out there and execute a high level by the end Ohio state had registered a fifty six to seven blow out in addition to the sixties style too for four hundred and thirty two yards and positioned himself as perhaps the

Cj Stroud Ohio Buckeye Michigan Football
Ohio governor signs new congressional district map into law

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

Ohio governor signs new congressional district map into law

"Republican Ohio governor Mike DeWine signed into law a new map of congressional districts that will be in effect for the next four years the wind said in a statement the Senate legislation he signed makes the most progress to produce a fair compact and competitive map the measure cleared the state legislature along party lines after breakneck sprint through both chambers this week under this year's U. S. census results Ohio lost one seat in Congress starting next year the new law creates at most three safe democratic districts out of fifteen U. S. house seats in a state where voters are split roughly fifty four percent Republican and forty six percent democratic the counties that are home to Cleveland and Cincinnati were divided three ways each one district that includes the western Cleveland suburbs now stretches to the Indiana border three hours away the Princeton gerrymandering project gave the map an F. grade Jan Miller with the league of women voters in Ohio said leaders had trampled the state's constitution rather than purely represent a highlands I'm Jennifer king

Mike Dewine Ohio U. S. House Senate Legislature Cleveland Congress Jan Miller Cincinnati Princeton Indiana League Of Women Voters Jennifer King
Landrieu back in spotlight tackling infrastructure, equity

AP News Radio

01:01 min | Last week

Landrieu back in spotlight tackling infrastructure, equity

"Mitch Landrieu will be heading the task force coordinating more than a trillion dollars in federal infrastructure spending as mayor of New Orleans Mitch Landrieu oversaw billions of dollars in infrastructure repairs when he took over the recovery from hurricane Katrina he's been out of the national spotlight since twenty eighteen although he was sometimes mentioned as a possible candidate for the democratic presidential nomination particularly after a speech supporting the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee now the former Louisiana state lawmaker and lieutenant governor has been tapped by president Biden as the head coordinator of his infrastructure plan during a visit to Ohio with the vice president labor secretary Marty Walsh another former mayor says he'll be serving alongside Landrieu going to make sure that all of this money gets spent in the right way on high quality projects with American made materials there's political risk to a role managing billion dollar transportation projects Andrew Coughlin and former deputy mayor under Landrieu said his skill with logistics will be a strength in his new role Walter Isaacson the New Orleans born historian says lead you loves the geeky details of infrastructure and bringing people together Jennifer king Washington

Mitch Landrieu President Biden Marty Walsh Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Robert E. Lee Landrieu Louisiana Andrew Coughlin Ohio Walter Isaacson Jennifer King Washington
The 'Moderate' Democrats We Need to Defeat Next Election

Mark Levin

01:39 min | Last week

The 'Moderate' Democrats We Need to Defeat Next Election

"Tom milanowski Democrat New Jersey Lauren Underwood Democrat Illinois Sidney axe need Democrat Iowa Abigail spanberger Democrat Virginia Conner lamb Democrat Pennsylvania Carolyn Bordeaux Democrat Georgia Ron kind Democrat Wisconsin Lizzie pennell Fletcher Democrat Texas Hele Stevens Democrat Michigan Tom O'Leary Democrat Arizona Sheri bustos Democrat Illinois Matt Cartwright Democrat Pennsylvania Jimmy Gomez Democrat California Susie Lee Democrat Nevada Susan wild Democrat Pennsylvania Kim schrier Democrat Washington state Elise a slot Nick Democrat Michigan Stephen horsford Democrat Nevada Chris Pappas Democrat New Hampshire Colin allred Democrat Texas Elaine lauria Democrat Virginia Mike Levin Democrat California Charlie Crist Democrat Florida Peter defazio Democrat Oregon Tim Ryan Democrat Ohio And as they say the Amnesty provisions in the filibuster proof reconciliation package which only needs majority support the

Tom Milanowski Lauren Underwood Sidney Axe Iowa Abigail Spanberger Virginia Conner Lamb Carolyn Bordeaux Ron Kind Lizzie Pennell Fletcher Hele Stevens Pennsylvania Tom O'leary Sheri Bustos Matt Cartwright Jimmy Gomez Illinois Susie Lee Susan Wild Kim Schrier Stephen Horsford Michigan
Rep. Jim Jordan: Conservatives are Winning

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:33 min | Last week

Rep. Jim Jordan: Conservatives are Winning

"Democrats object to more states in 2017 than Republicans did last week, but somehow we're wrong. Democrats can raise bail for riders and looters this summer, but somehow when Republicans condemn all the violence, the violence this summer, the violence last week, somehow we're wrong. It's very easy to lose faith my Friends to give up and say that's it. The crazies, the radicals are taking over. But then you hear speeches like that and you are reinvigorated and you realize there are some good men and women left in the swamp who are fighting and fighting to save our republic. That, of course, was congressman Jim Jordan, the ranking member of the judiciary committee representing the beautiful fourth district of Ohio and we are deeply honored to have him with us for one of our one on one discussions here on America first. Congressman Jordan welcome. Good to be with you, Sebastian, and thank you for having me, and thank you more importantly for all you do to protect freedom in our constitutional system and this great country. So it's good to be with you. Well, thank you for those kind words. We have so much discuss. You've got a new book coming out next week. We'll talk about that as well. But I'm going to do things a little bit differently on this one on one. I usually wait until deeper into the conversation to ask this question. But because of your role as an inspiration to those who, you know, fighting at school board levels of fighting across the country. Let me ask you this question right now. Are we finally beginning to win are the results in the Commonwealth of Virginia, maybe a taste of what is to come congressman? I think you're exactly right. I think it's going to build. I said this when Merrick Garland, Merrick Garland came in front of the judiciary committee a few weeks ago, I said, what you did when you guys spied on parents set up this snitch line on parents. I think that's the catalyst for a great reawakening for freedom in this country for the judeo Christian ethics and values and principles in this country that make us the greatest, the greatest nation ever. So I do feel confident and then we saw those results in Virginia sparked by moms and dads, having the courage. And one thing we all know courage is contagious. One mom stands up and defends her son or daughter and says, I don't want this racist hate America curriculum taught to my kids. One mom does it, then it's two moms and it's dads and it's and pretty soon you have a Republican governor in Virginia. And that is going to spread across this country. So yeah, we're Americans. We got to be optimistic and I am very optimistic. Yeah,

Merrick Garland Congressman Jordan Judiciary Committee Jim Jordan Commonwealth Of Virginia Sebastian Ohio America Virginia
Federal Investigators Launch Civil Rights Probe Into Southlake, Texas Schools

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Federal Investigators Launch Civil Rights Probe Into Southlake, Texas Schools

"I want to pivot here to a story that is, it's really, it's a massive story. It's out of southlake, Texas, federal investigators, this per NBC News launched civil rights probe into southlake, Texas schools. Now you will remember that south Lake became one of the hotbeds in this CRT school board battle that has been raging across the country with concerned parents. Now yesterday Charlie did an amazing job covering memo gate as we are thus dubbing it. Where it is now become clear that despite Merrick Garland's claims that there was no FBI, you know, surveilling of parents, that is indeed the case, a whistleblower has come forth. Some of our favorite representatives like Jim Jordan out of Ohio have been leading on this issue, actually, we have Jim Jordan's going to be joining the show here soon for a long form discussion here shortly. It's also got a great book out, recommend everybody checking it out. So Jim Jordan's been out front on memo gate. Now, we find out that there's something brewing. And I don't love the direction. There's two simultaneous concurrent streams that are running counter to what we all thought we learned after Virginia. After even New Jersey was too close to call an election night. After Republicans swept races all across the country. Even in Seattle. What were the messages? That we thought we learned? Well, that CRT is dumb, and that parents don't like it, and that it's a losing issue for Democrats. And that Republicans get rewarded when they fight things like CRT. When they don't take a neutral stance in the public square, but fight it with everything they've got and they say, listen, I'm going to exercise state power and not cop out on some, you know, we believe in small government, which we do, but these are not mutually exclusive things. The government as constituted in the United States of America is designed fundamentally to protect the rights of its citizens. And to predict the right to protect the rights of parents. And what conservatives too often do is they hide behind that as a excuse to do nothing

Jim Jordan Southlake Merrick Garland Texas Nbc News South Lake Charlie FBI Ohio New Jersey Virginia Seattle United States Of America
Who is Currency Comptroller Nominee Saule Omarova?

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Who is Currency Comptroller Nominee Saule Omarova?

"One one four solly omarova Born in the Soviet Union she had to be a member of the youth Leninist communist group She had no choice she reaches a certain age and then she's no longer a member She's no longer obviously a citizen of the Soviet Union And she testifies under oath I am not a communist In charade Brown a punk at puke putrid in every respect An American Marxist if there ever was one out of Ohio comes to her defense Now the other day I play two clips for you of Soleil Amaro And this is from March 2021 long after she left the Soviet Union Long after she was in the Lenin communist youth group March 2021 the woman who would be excuse me the birthing person who would be the head the comptroller of the currency for God's sakes And by the way the Biden administration couldn't find anyone better in the entire country for this slot Nobody better Cut 22 ago Traveled industries and firms that are in transitioning And here I'm thinking about this primarily call industry and oil and gas industry A lot of the smaller players in that industry are going to probably go bankrupt in short order at least We want them to go bankrupt if we want to tackle climate change Cut 23 go To imagine what would it be like if instead of being just the public option for deposit banking this would be actually the full transition In other words there will be no more private bank deposit accounts and all of the deposit accounts will be held directly at

Soviet Union Solly Omarova Youth Leninist Communist Group Lenin Communist Youth Group Biden Administration Ohio Brown
 Ohio retirement fund sues Facebook over investment loss

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ohio retirement fund sues Facebook over investment loss

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a major Ohio retirement fund to sues Facebook over investment losses the largest public employee pension fund in Ohio has filed a lawsuit against Facebook now known as Maeda alleging it violated federal securities law by purposely misleading the public about the negative effects of that social platforms and the algorithms that run them the Ohio public employees retirement system filed the lawsuit last week in federal court in California the lawsuit contends Facebook knew its platform facilitated dissension illegal activity of violent extremism but refused to take corrective action data

Mike Rossi Ohio Facebook Maeda California
"ohio" Discussed on 5-4

5-4

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on 5-4

"Terry outtake. Hey everyone I'm Leon. Faulk CO creator of slow-burn and fiasco on today's episode of five to four. Peter Reaction and Michael Moore talking about Terry Ohio. A case that clear path to the police tactic we all know is stop and Frisk intended to be a quick check to identify hidden. Weapons or contraband. It's known as stop-and-frisk but communities of color say targets many and unfairly at that you're not Tober of nineteen sixty three a police officer in Cleveland. Ohio saw two men walking back and forth past a storefront in a manner. He found suspicious so he approached them. Patted them down and discovered they had guns when the men were prosecuted for carrying concealed. Weapons defense lawyer argued that the stop and Frisk had been illegal but in nineteen sixty eight. The Supreme Court ruled at the officers. Actions did not violate the fourth amendment. This is five to four podcast about how much the Supreme Court sucks..

Terry Ohio Frisk Supreme Court Peter Reaction Cleveland officer Michael Moore
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Hello and welcome to part two of more intelligent are episode on the technology of a I and the ethics surrounding it in this second part. We're sharing a conversation. I had with Bernhard debbeen. A journalism professor at Ohio University and the Director of the Institute for Applied and professional ethics. If you have not yet listened to part one I really recommend doing so since it always a lot of the groundwork for what Dr Teen and I discussed here. And as I mentioned in part one we decided to publish this conversation in full because of how wide ranging it ended up being and we felt that you can't distill a proper discussion of ethics into justice series of soundbites. I recognize this format won't be for everyone that's fine but I hope you give it a chance. Could you might find it. Enjoyable on P. And this is Ohio today right here. If you don't mind just start by introducing yourself what you do here. My name is bound heart deb. Eighteen I'm a professor of journalism. I'm also the director of the Institute for Applied and Professional Ethics and I am also serving as the director of studies for the Honors Tutorial Program in Journalism I teach in the school of journalism mostly in the area of ethics but also teaching classes on Environmental Journalism Science Journalism Qualitative Research and related things. Mostly things that have to do with either more theoretical or conceptual issues or ethical stuff in that direction. Great so we're talking about artificial intelligence today and everyone I've interviewed. I've asked them the same question because I find it so fascinating. How different people answer it so differently but do you have a definition of AI? Or could you give us your you know your definition of it. I'm not sure that I have a good definition of artificial intelligence because it's a moving target The idea has been around for quite some time and For a long time it was a lion with the idea of creating an artificial Intelligence and artificial capacity of processing that would be indistinguishable from Human brain activity along. What people know as the touring test So for a long time it was defined as if you cannot understand or can't see the difference between what a human brain does and what An artificial intelligence does Then it passes that touring tests so to speak and We would have a fully blown artificial intelligence by now. Things have changed a little bit and I think a lot of it has to do with what always happens in that type of technology development and that is that It became much more differentiate. It and much more small scale so a lot of what we have today. As artificial intelligence development is really looking at a very specific problem rather than a general problem solver which was the original idea of artificial intelligence. You know having a general problem solver that can be fed any any problem and And then it would spit out an answer and you would be as or even more impressed as with a human answer so to speak so looking at how it's being applied today and where that might go on a real sort of high level. What do you see as sort of the core or central ethical concerns with the adoption of the technology to me? The core is probably transparency in a very general sense because we don't know what the Algorithms and Im- implemented values are that are at the bottom of what an artificial intelligence does so there's a high level of transparency which we have already with computer technology or any type of complex technology so whenever you have complexity you automatically have lack of transparency and usually that's compensated for by some mechanisms that help us to deal with such as. Let's say graphic user interface is good example for dealing with complexity and at the same time creating a certain level of transparency that allows you as a user to deal with a computer With artificial intelligence we have a situation where we as users probably have absolutely no idea why the system is doing what it is doing how the system is doing what it is doing and so on and so forth so it becomes very opaque and at the same time whenever you have Complex processes and decision making which artificial intelligence ultimately does you have values and ethical decision at stake. And so what happens in effect? Is that we delegate decision making to a system that is pretty opaque where we don't know which values which set off Potential preferences are used for the decision making and that may or may not be problematic. We don't know and that many fields of application you know anything from medicine where you have a lot of those systems already in place To let's say you know. Resource exploration are like oil exploration or things like that? This is where the first expert systems which early on artificial intelligence were developed. And they're they're really good but We have to keep in mind. Each time we do that. We implement the engineers who develop that they implement values into the system and the system starts working based on these values and almost always. They are not reflected there and not thought about in ethical terms their thought about in other terms such as you know profitability or you know finding something that we wanna find So we have this problem that we are creating a level of intelligence. That's fairly independent and various sophisticated but it is not Ethically trained so to speak and as opposed to at least many. Yeoman's I wouldn't say all you who are ethically trained or ethically In tune but as a human you have at least a potential to be ethically aware and to ask yourself questions about your the ethicality off your decision making and things like that so before we get further into the specifics I'm hoping you could take us a step back and put this debate in a little bit of historical context because if you look at it in terms of this is a technical advancement And with technology over the course of human history most most technologies most new technologies have brought with them some pot of ethical concerns and questions and considerations that we can debate whether they were adequately addressed at the time or over overtime but the idea that a new technology presents.

Director professor of journalism Bernhard debbeen Ohio Institute for Applied Ohio University professor Dr Teen Yeoman
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> so if I had to choose <Speech_Male> one takeaway <Speech_Male> from reporting <Silence> this story <Speech_Male> he'd be that <Speech_Male> as consumers. <Speech_Male> We all <Speech_Male> need to be asking <Speech_Male> bigger questions <Silence> more often <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because this technology <Speech_Male> will be used <Speech_Male> in some pretty damaging <Speech_Male> ways <Silence> and we'll have to deal <Speech_Male> with that <Speech_Male> even Paul <Speech_Male> as optimistic <Speech_Male> as he is <Speech_Male> admits that <Speech_Male> there will be some pain <Speech_Male> points in the short <Speech_Male> term and <Speech_Male> yes we should be aware <Speech_Male> of all the waste <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> can be <Silence> used <Speech_Male> but for <Speech_Male> him. The question <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> should the fear <Speech_Male> of that. Negative <Speech_Male> potential <Speech_Male> outweigh <SpeakerChange> the hope <Speech_Male> of something. Better <Speech_Male> so yeah. It's <Speech_Male> the unknown of <Speech_Male> how it could <Speech_Male> be used. But <Speech_Male> you can let your mind <Speech_Male> wander. Just choose not <Speech_Male> to a lot of times because otherwise <Speech_Male> shift trouble. Sleeping <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> example. I always give to make people <Speech_Male> feel better because <Speech_Male> I usually. It's not it's <Speech_Male> not a good way to end. It <Speech_Male> is the Internet <Speech_Male> and in <Speech_Male> like Nineteen ninety-five <Speech_Male> again. The Internet was <Speech_Male> twenty three years <Speech_Male> old at that point but <Speech_Male> when it became <Speech_Male> widely <Speech_Male> used in the public <Speech_Male> with Internet explorer <Speech_Male> and Netscape <Speech_Male> and AOL. <Speech_Male> You could <Speech_Male> have looked out to the <Speech_Male> future and said man. <Speech_Male> This could go so wrong. <Speech_Male> And you <Speech_Male> know you could think about eventually <Speech_Male> social media <Speech_Male> and bullying and <Speech_Male> you know what it would <Speech_Male> do to people's <Speech_Male> psyche and <Speech_Male> the creation <Speech_Male> of the dark web <Speech_Male> or elicit <Speech_Male> things happen all the time <Speech_Male> and would you <Speech_Male> in nineteen ninety <Speech_Male> three ninety four ninety five. <Speech_Male> Would you stop <Speech_Male> the Internet? Would you say <Speech_Male> let's just not <Speech_Male> do it? It's it <Speech_Male> could go too many bad <Speech_Male> ways <Speech_Male> but then you look at all the <Speech_Male> amazing things <Speech_Male> it's done and how it's <Speech_Male> connected the world and <Speech_Male> Janesville communicate <Speech_Male> and brought people together <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> you think where <Speech_Male> some place you <Speech_Male> can sit here all day and <Speech_Male> theorize <Speech_Male> about this dopey and <Speech_Male> things and they <Speech_Male> may come true <Speech_Male> but I could give <Speech_Male> you ten <Speech_Music_Male> times as many amazing <Speech_Music_Male> things that it could do <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> the end of the day. We <Speech_Male> don't really have <Speech_Male> a choice. It's GONNA move <Speech_Male> forward one way or the other. <Speech_Male> My feeling <Speech_Male> is we'll <Speech_Male> try and do our small <Speech_Male> part to make sure it <Speech_Music_Male> moves forward <SpeakerChange> in a

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"The engineers who develop that they implement values into the system and the system starts working based on these values and almost always they are not reflected. There are not thought about in ethical terms. They are thought about another term. Such as you know profitability or you know finding something that we want to find and So we have this problem that we're creating a level of intelligence that's fairly independent and very sophisticated but it is not Ethically trained so to speak and I suppose to at least many. I wouldn't say all you who are ethically trained or ethically in tune but as a human you have at least a potential to be ethically aware and to ask yourself questions about your the ethicality off your decision making and things like that so in this quest design machines that are more human. Will we ever break through this barrier or are these systems destined to simply reflect back the ethics or the intent of those who built them? And if so. Where does that leave the rest of us? Where does that leave? Government's ability to regulate creed is leave private companies responsibility to protect consumers and the rest of society. But these are big questions then. No one can fully answer yet. They're certainly trying. There's a lot of research being done in these areas but Dr deb eighteen and I spoke for nearly an hour and a half and it still felt like we only scratched the surface but again perhaps the answer lies more in the question itself than any specific conclusion with that in mind. We're going to do something a little bit different for us. We're going to publish my conversation Dr deb team in its entirety. We're doing that really for two reasons. One we went way beyond just a high covering a lot of these same issues have come up with technology of all kinds and throughout history and too. I feel that a discussion of ethics shouldn't be trimmed down to just a series of soundbites. No matter how thoughtful you are about it so checkout part to this episode if you WanNa hear that full unedited conversation.

Dr deb
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Tried to emulate human intelligence. So they can only do what humans can teach it to do so. Everything else has been programmed every piece of software. We've ever uses been told what to do by humans. These are machines that don't sleep that can learn from data levels we can't comprehend and they can learn to do things that humans can solve problems. Humans can't so it's different because we've never created anything like it before and you know the quote I always go back to his Sundar. Pichai from Google says. It's the most profound thing humanities ever worked on it's more important than electricity or fire because it can change everything so when you look at these major problems we have to solve climate change in poverty and hunger and cancer and like really difficult things that the human race has been working for decades to figure out and we can't say I in theory can there's no limit to what it can eventually solve. So we've just we've never created anything like it and then when we're done creating it as when it just really gets started because it can improve learn on its own and that's the stuff you see in the movies this idea of general intelligence which we're not there yet and that's a lot of people think that's what it is and they're just frayed of it because it's not a right now is still program to do. Very specific things and learnt from Dayton keeps getting better at those things. It doesn't think of other things to solve. It's not consciously US doesn't use imagination and creativity but it will probably in our lifetimes and when that happens then everything changes. And here's what Else Sets Paul. Apart and this is big. He recognizes the enormous opportunity. Ai Presents and seizing it but he also recognizes the danger of the technology. He asked big questions ethical questions human questions and he wants people to confront these big questions before they just jump in blindly because they I can go very wrong. If it's if people don't approach it the right way it'll give people superpowers which is what we said on stage and they have to be. You have to start from the ground up thinking about the ethics and the morals of how you use it so when I go give talks oftentimes and even when we spoke to the students here though you the questions rarely focus on marketing. After I give a marketing I talk. They always go to what is going to do to society. What's the government doing about it? What do you think about? This is ethical to use facial recognition and profiling people. They just they start connecting the dots and understanding the bigger impact and the more time. I've spent an AI. The more you realize how much of an impact it will have on society and humanity and so our small piece of this world is marketing but marketing touches every consumer and so to me. It's just critical that as we talk about how to do marketing smarter and make it more effective. We don't do it on ethical ways. Because you're gonNA have the ability to do it and I know from having talked to big brands. They struggle with trying to understand where the line is. What is ethical? And what's not and so I just feel like nobody was probably coming to the conference thinking. Oh I hope we have a topic on ethics but I was not going to let people leave without listening to a topic on ethics and will do that again. This year. Like it's GonNa be a staple in we're GONNA start cutting a lot more content around it because I just I feel like otherwise you could look at. What we're doing is just teaching people to better predict and influence consumers and that's not at all what we're in it for so. I I think is a chance to kind of raise. The Bar of what marketing is and the standards that uphold. It can go the opposite way real fast. And that's really it the speed and scale inherent in a high tech. That's what makes it dangerous. Here's Karen Jim. Software is much easier to deploy as technology than other things and a in particular once you find powders. In some kind of data you can then like us. Those patterns to make thousands of decisions at a very rapid rate and it can affect many many many people. And it's it's it's a little different from like actual physical objects that you might have to manufacture for example like you can just deploy it over the Internet like this decisions that facebook makes for example when they are using machine learning those decisions get deployed to like over a billion people. I actually probably more. I don't know how many users they have but whatever like billions billions of people or Youtube another example of unintended consequence of Youtube recommendation. Algorithm is that it's it's become like a pretty intense tool for radicalization. Because if you end up falling into a youtube our the whole you keep going and going and going and you end up getting radicalized. There's there have been studies that show that tears organizations for example. Actually use this to their advantage where they will try to make their content seem related to like very benign content. And then you could just accidentally trip into this like whole that radicalizing you a what. I think is so unsettling about Karen's youtube example in particular is the fact that the danger how it went wrong it was completely unintentional like this kind of outcome is bad enough. And it's not even someone using this technology to purposefully do bad things and before we get too far it's fair to point out. Just how complex so out of these algorithms are what Youtube and facebook and all the other social media platforms are trying to do just in terms of the technical challenge. It is not easy so some respect is owed just because of what they're attempting to do but going back to Paul and Cairns point the speed and scale of the negative consequences are what make this also problematic failure and reiteration are fundamental to technology development. But what happens when the failures can be felt immediately by billions of people and moreover how do you control the bad actors people? Who are out there using this technology with some malcontent. In today's era of fake news. One particular example of this kept coming up in almost every conversation. I had deep fakes right. Fake content fake videos. Lots of things that appear to be real. That aren't deep fakes. Are I would predict as an almost certainty whether next year or four years from now or five years now. This election or the next on the fakes will be an enormous issue. That was Nikos and Paul again and then that last voice was of Mike Kaput who has worked on Paul's. Pr Twenty Two thousand eighteen for about seven years and is now the director of the Marketing Institute and just to quickly explain. What deep fakes are? In case you're familiar. They're basically fake videos generated by a I powered software that makes them indistinguishable from authentic footage as Nikos explains this is made possible by a particular type of AI called GAAP NS or generative adversarial networks. So you can watch a video. It could be Donald Trump doing something controversial wrapping beat boxing. And you in time less than five years. You won't be able to tell the difference of whether or not that video was real super scary when that stuff starts going onto the web so you're GONNA have to regulate that so what can be done. And WHO's responsible for protecting the rest of us from these? Harmful applications of the technology for my responsibility needs to be shared by everyone this stuff impacts whether you're interested in the technology or not. That's okay like not everyone geeks out about this stuff. But it's going to have an impact whether you're technical or not the Internet certainly has a huge impact on you and this stuff will too so I think we're all going to have to get a lot smarter and a lot more curious about. Okay how do we move forward responsibly? In a world where. It's a lot harder to kind of tell okay what's actually true. What's not what is human generated. What's machine generated and things like that to me? This gets to the heart of the debate. The Big Questions Mike and Paul and the whole pr. Twenty twenty staff and lost. The People I met at the conference are asking. Those questions are really more important than anything else hearing those questions. That's what impressed me most about Paul. And how he framed the whole topic of Ai for the hundreds of marketing professionals in attendance and in a lot of ways Mike asking how do we move forward? Responsibly is the answer to his question. Keeping the conversation centered on what is right and what is wrong and keeping that conversation going. Through new unique circumstances that's ethics so since expiration of this new tech of A. I really ended up as an ethics discussion. I wanted to bring in another expert from right here at Ohio University. My name is bound heart debuted teen I'm a professor of journalism. I'm also the director of the Institute for Applied and professional ethics. I asked Professor Deborah Team to start by breaking down when he sees as the ethical issues at stake with Ai to me. The core is probably transparency in a very general sense because we don't know what the Algorithms and Im- implemented values are that are at the bottom of what an artificial intelligence does so there's a high level of transparency which we have already with computer technology or any type of complex technology so with artificial intelligence. We have a situation where we as users probably have absolutely no idea why the system is doing what it is doing how the system is doing what it is doing and so on and so forth so it becomes very opaque and at the same time whenever you have Complex processes and decision making which artificial intelligence ultimately does you have values and ethical decision at stake. And so what happens in effect? Is that we delegate decision making to assist them. That is pretty opaque where we don't know which values which set off Potential preferences are used for decision making and that may or may not be problematic. We don't know and that many fields of application you know anything from medicine where you have a lot of those systems already in place To let's say you know resource exploration there are like oil exploration or things like that. This is where the first expert systems which is early. Artificial Intelligence were developed. And they're they're really good but We have to keep in mind. Each time we do that. We implement.

Paul Youtube Mike Kaput Ai facebook Karen Jim director Dayton Google US Sundar Nikos cancer Twenty twenty Donald Trump boxing Professor Deborah Team
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"I would love to see something like that where you know that. Someone's going to be there and it's GonNa be long then we stopped at Alpha Delta Pi. Whose Banner said ask her what she's asking for for Hashtag? Ad Pie believe survivors. We chatted with Elliott junior studying psychology. Can you describe in your own words what you think I think the culture around sexual assault awareness is on this campus I would say for the most part like especially through. WPA people are so supportive. And we're doing a really good job to spread the news. Get Word Out Oh you especially is doing a lot of new stuff to help Like the APP. They came out with with the safety. Stuff I think is super super helpful I really want more people to like actually download that encourage more conversation around it But I definitely definitely I think the first couple months of school are rough because so many new people are here so many people are in a new environment and don't know what to do don't know who they can trust us So it's tricky but I definitely feel like oh you has a really good community as a whole and lots of people can rely on absolutely. Can you speak now from your perspective as a sorority woman. What kind of steps you in your chapter and can take you know to make this a more friendly environment for survivors? I I definitely think something really important is just making sure you're talking about it. You're talking about what to do if you're in situations where you feel unsafe. You're you're talking about people you can rely on before we wrapped up. We made a stop at Ryan Sorority Alpha O.. macron pie where I was given a full tour and invited to sit down with the chapter chapter president in two other women so as already women how what steps do you guys think you can take a little things. Big things like banners this year. What do you think you can do due to continue facilitating this culture of believing survivors and making women We need to make sure that women who have been affected for anyone who's been affected by sexual assault on campus feels like they are heard welcomes via community because feeling ostracized shot or ashamed. That sort of thing you know is a productive. We want people to be able to grow from their experiences and search move-on Yvonne rebuild their lives. I think within our community Iraq's it's still making sure that we watch out for other women in waters on and it's not only that are watching out or women anywhere if you're like out and see woman who's intoxicated like of making sure that every woman who's Greek associated affiliated knows that it's our responsibility to watch out not just far sisters but for any woman on this campus for anyone you encounter and I think too it's important you don't just hang banners that we shall offer things the big community here at Ohio University and if we can mobilise when it comes to those like it's on us events or take back the night things that are big statements. I'm going to go a long way. That was Katie Bolinger president of Ao Pie at Ohio University. What Katie said not moment about mobilizing in taking care of one another sparked something within Ryan that I hadn't yet seen in the time I'd spent with her? She shared a story about an uncomfortable situation. She had been in that though it was somewhat quickly. Resolved left an impact on her. I didn't join a Until my software here but my freshman year spring semester. I got drunk at a party. I spilled my drink on the stewed and He and a bunch of his friends came came up to me. And we're just aggressive just like trying to see how the Party and I started crying because that was the drunk and just like freaking out on this woman came up to me. She like intervene Rabin in the situation. Basically like tongue these guys to fuck off you know basically it was just like okay lever alone. That's fine. She turned me and she said look like where do you live. I told her dorm. I was goes okay. Let's get I'm going to take back to my house and get you cleaned up and you'll go crowd and she brought me back here and like sat apnea one of these tables and got me water and food in tissues and all these women that I'd never met like kind of descended down on beat Em. We're like you'll be okay. You'll be okay. Who's going to walk her home? WHO's GonNa do this? Who's going to do that? And then a year later I went through formal recruitment and I ended up in this chapter and that woman who intervened ended up being my chief big And like is you harmon is like my hero. She is literally like a shining shining angel but so when TV talks about how like we don't only need to look out for sisters. We need to look out for everyone like that was that living embodiment of that. Like they didn't know me. I did not event and when she said I'm going to take you back to my house. I thought it was the end up like some Random House on Congress to get into like further for my destination the no she walked me here. After after hearing ran story it shed light for me on where her passion for her sorority came. From in the situation she described she was clearly nervous and wanted to weigh Out which came from an unexpected place a complete stranger who happened to be a sorority woman. One of the most prominent qualities I see in ran is her courage judge and outspoken nature her willingness to step outside of her own world and consider other safety and happiness. Sometimes that was demonstrated in clear public way day like through her sexual assault activism but it also became clear to me when she brought me coffee only the second time we met when she regularly texted me to check check in and just talk about life when she invited me to her birthday party. It was so clear to me that she was genuinely considerate. Thoughtful person who I saul was inspired by the women's she surrounded herself with in her sorority. And that also translated directly to activism in the way she cared enough to constantly educate it herself in areas where she wanted to make change in all the discussions. I had with students. Since it's on US I grew curious about the other people on college campuses working toward into safer more accepting culture. I wanted to hear about their work and their perception of the issue. My name is Kip Castro Director of survivor advocacy program here to University Eighty the survivor advocacy program or sap is a campus resource that provides a supportive environment for survivors to talk confidentially with trained advocates giving Kim's experience with the issue of campus assaults. She had a new perspective to offer me on the topic of the Red Zone that provoked the idea for banners last fall. I think a a lot of universities are free to talk about it because if you talk about it you're going to get reports you're GonNa hear stories you're GonNa hear about situations that are happening. which can lead to media media frenzies where it looks like? You have this huge problem on your campus that no other campuses experiencing and we've kind of seen that out of Harvard University where we're getting national media attention because of the number of reports which if you don't realize that that's actually a good thing that people are finding the resources to report whether that's confidential reporting reporting or reporting to police or to title nine like if students survivors or finding the places that they feel comfortable in reporting to. That's a good thing. Even though it means that our numbers are going to look a lot higher than other institutions. So since I've been here I've really seen a recognition of that in an appreciation. Shen of kind of this work. Even though it means that people could question this culture Because we know that that we he wants to be a university that's not brushing under the rug or not pretending we have zero reports on. Because that's really unsafe to do it that way. Kim is a two-time Ohio University Alumna who acquainted with student life on campus though her office work separately from student organizations. She's always eager to help young activists however she can are are you involved at all with WPA Greek life sign of things. Yeah so I have been in contact with Rianne of WPA president A little bit here and there She's really interested in kind of finding ways the WPA can get involved in this work so we've.

assault Ohio University Kim Katie Bolinger Alpha Delta Pi Ryan Sorority Alpha O.. Elliott Iraq Yvonne Harvard University Ao Pie Rabin Shen Rianne Ryan Congress University Eighty Kip Castro
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

08:54 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"There is no singular way to define activism for some activism means taking to the streets to march in protest or gathering signatures for petitions. Maybe these are time sensitive. 'cause like a political election for others it defines their day to day experience and identity. It's an ongoing fight. Against perceived injustice for rain ends worth activism is part of the fabric of her education activism means challenging herself to confront her ignorance even on issues she studied experienced invoiced. It's a continuous cycle of learning and growing and using her growth to find find new opportunities to make change and this continuous cycle starts with honest an often uncomfortable conversations Part of the reason that I wanted to get into sexual sexual assault activism it's because and especially sexual assault activism in sorting fraternity life is because you have to have those kinds kinds of tough conversations to move forward and you have to identify problems in your community before you can find solutions and if we don't talk about the problems if we don't address them if we pretend like they're not bear whether you're talking about hazing or sexual assault or substance abuse if you don't identify and acknowledge edge that they're happening then they'll never stop happening. I met ran over the summer in Athens. And we formed a perhaps unlikely connection that developed during the first few months of school Ryan is in a sorority something. I never once considered as a college student. It wasn't that I had a completely negative view of Greek life. Because truthfully I didn't didn't know much about it. I just sort of mentally separated myself from girls who were in sororities. Because I determined we wouldn't have much in common and that they had enough friends anyway so when I first met ran I was pleasantly surprised at how easily we conversed we are both seniors which sparked the immediate discussion about out anxieties of Post Grad life. But we were also able to talk about deep an uncomfortable topics. The reason I followed Ryan's Dernie in the first place was to who understand her role as a student activists confronting sexual assault on campus. So much of our discussions centered on her personal connection to the issue and how she hoped to make a difference for ran her activism is intertwined with her sorority and her role is vice president of public relations for the Women's Panhellenic Association which is the Governing Body for ten member sororities on campus that oversees over eighteen hundred members. The two of US met at an event that drew hundreds of students from from across the nation to Ohio University. This August. This was the first ever. It's on US National Student Leadership Summit a weekend conference that gathered fellow. Hello student activists together to discuss the issue of sexual assault. Students attended workshops and Ellis Hall listened to keynote speakers and Baker Center and bounced the ideas off each other on how to create a campus culture where abusive behavior is not tolerated. I just WanNa take a minute and ask everybody to look around the room. It's really really incredible. How many people have come from far and wide from Miami New York California to be here this weekend that was tracy ventures the executive director of? It's on us. Which is the National Nonprofit Organization that organized the summit and chose to hold it at Ohio University? It's on S. was founded in two thousand fourteen as an initiative by the Obama Administration meant to educate and engage college students on the widespread issue of sexual assault on Campuses Ryan and I were to about a dozen of how university students present the rest of the more than one hundred. Ten Dis came from all over the country and brought with with them their own experiences as advocates survivors and staunch supporters of the cause high I Made Sheridan. I went to the University of Minnesota. Twin twincities hi. My name is Ben Kayla. I attended spelman college located in Atlanta Georgia. Which is an ATC you? My name is Adriana Brandon. I'm about to be a senior at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. It's located over near Pittsburgh. Everyone my name is David Sanchez Pronouns. He him his. I'm from the University of Utah and I'm the campus organizer there. Hello my name is Celeste. Arrowhead I am at the University of Maryland College Park. Those five students are all leaders on their campus affiliated with. It's on US during the conference. They had a panel discussion. Were the fielded questions from audience members about how to raise awareness or on the issue of sexual assault and how to reach college age individuals in addition to the panel and other speakers they were three workshop. Sessions offered each day of the conference On topics like how to be a better bystander. I was blown away at the vast array of experiences. I heard from students while we chatted in between sessions. Here's here's Dr From Baylor University essentially. I'm here to one. Obviously engaged with other students from across the country on sexual show bounce issues awareness and prevention that only talking about the issues themselves also finding out ways to educate People back on our college campuses across nation on how to engage. Inform them on these issues in to just to learn lessons from They're called chances on what his work was. Not that worked there. The weekend's keynote speaker was Lynn Rosenthal. who was the first ever senior adviser on Combating Violence Against Women appointed to the White House as someone who had chosen sexual assault activism as a career? I knew she would have inciteful advice for students hoping to make change after Roland speech and Baker Ballroom. I had the chance to ask for some advice. I would say to come to events like this immerse yourself in the work read. Study talk to your friends. There's there's no substitute for one on one conversations and you know organizing is really about just talking to people in a very intentional way about the issue and that's how how you mobilize your friends and colleagues on campus Lynn's emphasis on the importance of conversation was exactly what I experienced during its on us. I had never considered myself an expert on the topic of sexual assault prevention but after hearing from so many other students I realized there was so much. I didn't know that I thought I did. I wondered what other students were experiencing. And what had brought them to the conference in the first place. So I posed the question to ran. I think me being at this campus is is multilevel on the first level. I'm a survivor myself. And I Did I was assaulted on this campus and so it was important to me that on show not only myself but other people that Ohio University can be this incredible place where incredible things happen and you know I still feel safer. I still feel welcome here because of that the other level would be as my position with. WPA It's important to me that sororities and fraternities on our campus. This one feel empowered to take a stand and then to take a stand not only our own community but for other communities as well and so last last year unfortunately after we had the high rise of sexual assaults at the beginning of the year which is very common on our campus Sorority women a and fraternity men put up banners on their on their home on their fraternity houses and they organized rallies and we made a stand that it is not Oughta okay and that at least in our community. We're GONNA make it stop and we hope we can make it stop in the Greater Bob Cat community so I wanted to come today because the WPA is really invested in leading survivors. No that that was not a one off thing. That's our passion. That's our belief that we are supposed to be supporting women on this campus abyss whether you're Greek affiliated or not and so. I came here today to gather information for all of the other vice presidents on. WPA So that we can move forward the next year and think of what other things can we do. How else can we support students in the days after the? It's on a summit. I couldn't stop thinking about how those Principles Lynn mentioned the importance of conversation the value of how much I saw those Iran. I wondered how she was going to use her knowledge from the conference to accent her. Impact beyond the Sorority fraternity community. So I decided to follow her her story through the first weeks of the semester. I wanted to be her shadow to learn more about her activism and what drives this clear desire to make positive change on the community..

assault Ohio University Lynn Rosenthal. Ryan Sorority fraternity community Athens US Indiana University of Pennsylv University of Maryland College University of Minnesota Dr From Baylor University University of Utah Pittsburgh Atlanta Adriana Brandon Ben Kayla Women's Panhellenic Associatio Ellis Hall Sheridan
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

10:33 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Things that I am passionate about so it could be. You know for example will a position in church the principals and the concepts that I've learned in a spiritual sense I could be about working in the garden. I enjoy gardening so if I have a conversation with somebody and they are asking me like oh well how do you do this and you know I I just really kind of go into that teacher mode and just say okay okay. Well let's talk about this and let's kind of work out You know the things that you're curious about and I'll do my best to help you understand what has worked for for me. The field of meteorology is deceptively complex and it requires a lot of skills in math and logic was all that in front of eighteen into twenty one year olds who are also in the business of figuring out life in general. What obligation does Janet field toward her students? First of all. I think it's my role to bring out the best in them so I recognize that not all students are going to be a plus students But I don't want to diminish finish the students who aren't at that level and the experience that they get as well so I really want regardless of where they lay on that spectrum of whatever whatever it is if it's like a just natural gift or if it's a you know a true love or maybe not so much or trying to get through. I want the students to understand things better at the end of the semester than they did at the beginning of the semester wherever they are on that spectrum I truly like to live by the motto of there is no such thing as a dumb question because anytime a student has a question. That's an opportunity to enhance the hands or augment their understanding and even if it's a very basic question that question needs to be asked in order for that student to put the pieces together to try to make the bigger picture Fila and to make those pieces. Connect and click in their obligation to Jannah is to be prepared for class How's your uses a hybrid of the flipped classroom model where students ingests the lecture material in advance of the class meeting then worked collaboratively in groups to apply what they've learned and grow to understand what the didn't from the lecture? It's an effective tool for teaching complex field. So we're going to unpack impact this a bit because it unveiled so much about. How janitor remained so effective? Teaching in illustrates. Would a winning professor student relationship looks like here's how it works. powerpoint lectures posted on Friday in the following weeks first class session. Each student takes a quiz to see but they've grasped then form into groups and take the quiz against one. They submit their individual quiz which enables them to have some accountability. She says then they turn turned to their group Quiz Results and brainstorm the answers for what they got wrong. I find that when you recognize something that you don't know and then you go back and you research that thing that you didn't know you were much more likely to remember it in a longer term that if you just put down the class talks through the quiz questions to everyone's on satisfaction Anjana surveys the group about the material. They found most challenging through polling system. They access through smartphones. It creates a word cloud God. I'm not even trying here that everyone sees in the classroom screen. The most commonly misconducts appear larger generates says on the board and then systematically unpack each one in what she calls many lectures because it's not necessarily even a cohesive lecture from one topic that verges nicely to the next is kind of chunks of. Let's talk about this that you didn't understand. Let's talk about this and then let's piece it all together. The weeks next class put students into groups that answer multiple choice questions collectively sometimes. All groups submit the same answers sometimes. The answer's differ. The latter is a lot more fun. She says it's and it's really kind of fun when there's diversity and the answer is because then I can say okay well group a you know you chose answers. Let's talk about that a little bit. Why what made you choose the answer? C. Need and when she sees the light bulb go off for one student or as a group that is pure magic. You know here's a map or here's a series of maps look got these maps of temperature and of wind at the surface and upper air wind patterns halfway through the atmosphere. And tell me where in the country Would you expect a mid latitude cyclone to form. And so then they have to kind of work through this process and that discussion that ensues also with their luther teammates. I've seen that bring together the lightbulb sue and then sometimes there are questions where the whole team is struggling and then I can go and you know I. I walk around as they're doing these assignments and I ask them how they're doing having questions. And it gives me the opportunity then to talk to the whole team about okay. Well let's look at this. Yes and what are some opportunities or what are what are some clues that you can look for to help you solve this problem. Gifted teachers put a lot of time into building. They're teaching format tweaking them when they needed to ensure their students get the most out of class. Time does Jonathan. Today's digital distractions hamper her her ability to connect to students. She like James. Say No this is because of another strategy. She uses the open door policy. The door to her office is open while she's in the building. Not only during office hours in students take advantage of it mostly to talk about concepts in the class but sometimes he's just to talk so I work really hard to try to maintain that face to face communication. I think it is easy to sort of fall into that trap of let me just do all of my communicating via email and that would diminish. I think the relationship that you have with the student student because there is something to say for that actual face to face time with those students and what you want about the students and the. Hey how's it going. You know the informal conversation and that happens when you are just you know spontaneously meeting with somebody or somebody walks into your office before. They even get to the questions that they have. Have you know that sort of five minutes of what's happening in your life kind of opportunity really allows me to feel a little bit more connected On a personal level to students Gifted teachers don't hide human side from their students either. They don't limit sharing what they know to the course material when asked they will share what they know about life skills to the freshman especially though are oftentimes just kind of trying to find their way trying to decide if the major is right for them trying to work through the social navigate that social scene of being at a university working through separation from family. And there's a whole lot of non-academic stuff that's going on in a freshman's life. That oftentimes comes at the expense of their academic experience. So be they are just sort of feeling. The water is trying to figure out how a college test is. What is expected of them in class? What is expected for the homework? How do they succeed succeed in getting good grades but occasionally I will have students that come to me as freshmen or or sometimes even sophomores and say I was a straight A. Student in high school and now I have a d. in your class and you know I'm feeling like I don't know what's going on and how can we get through this unusually? What ends it's up happening? Is We have a discussion on. How are you studying? And what kind of time are you putting into this class and I recognize that. This isn't the only class that you have But how are you prioritizing is in your time and you know what are you. What are you spending your time focusing on and so forth? Paradoxically perhaps Janice case. If a student who is also advise advise e is putting in the time and effort and is still struggling Geno will be plane about the reality of that. Student's future is is truly gift to be able to relay this message without diminishing the student self confidence and I have had to say to some of the students who advise you know. You're sure this is the second time you've failed calculus one. You know if you can't pass it your third time you can't continue on in the major and that's just by virtue of the way. The degree is structured So I I try not to paint the picture of. You can't do it because I feel like even if the student can't do it I feel like that's something they need to come to a decision on their selves. And I don't think it's my my personal place to make that judgment So I believe that everybody can. I want to be that person that squashes somebody's dream. You know I want people to be able to feel like they can dream. Big Dreams are sort of you know delusions of Ranchera so to I think I think we all can benefit from reaching a decision point and a and a reconciliation within ourselves. Much better than what. If somebody else tells us that we shouldn't be doing something works as well look proposition. Remember what Tim Vickers said. At the beginning of this episode combs occurs. I feel like I could burke. Gifted teachers yearn to bring about a true understanding for their students. Yeah they won't stop until the information is made clear and they used their best tools to do it. They come in prepared to make their knowledge relatable and they share that craving craving for knowledge with the ones sitting before them ready to know about our world actual understanding of what these terms needs that we can look. There's something awakening meaning. They awaken in students. And I don't know how we can under estimate the value of that when we're talking time of not just recruitment retention and and students finding theirself their passion their way and I just can't stress how hard teaching it gets harder and harder and harder Uh the responsibilities and to see how these people do the so relatively effortlessly gift.

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"At Ohio University popped up the position they were looking for mets the balance teaching as an important component in their faculty not just in their this opportunity did have but I wanted that research to be well-balanced students but really she's game to teach you about anything she knows I think it's Abou so position in church the principals and the concepts that I've you do this and you know I I just really kind of go into that teacher mode and just say okay for me. The field of meteorology is deceptively complex and it requires allegation does Janet field toward her students first of all I think it's my role to bring out initiative the students who aren't at that level and the experience that they get as well true love or maybe not so much or trying to get through I want the I truly like to live by the motto of there is no such thing as a dumb question because that question needs to be asked in order for that student to put the pieces together to try to how's your uses a hybrid of the flipped classroom model where students ingest the it's an effective tool for teaching complex field so we're going to unpack here's how it works powerpoint lectures posted on Friday author individual quiz which enables them to have some accountability she says then they research that thing that you didn't know you were much more likely to remember it in a longer term through polling system they accessed through smartphones it creates a word cloud board and then systematically unpack each one in what she calls many lectures piece it altogether the weeks next class put students into groups that answer it's and it's really kind of fun when there's diversity and the answer is because then I can say okay well group is pure magic you know here's a map or here's a series of maps look would you expect a mid latitude cyclone to form and so then they have to there are questions where the whole team is struggling and then I can go and you know I yes and what are some opportunities or what are what are some clues that you can look for to out of class time does Jonathan. Today's digital distractions hamper her the door to her office is open while she's in the building not only during office hours in communication. I think it is easy to sort of student because there is something to say for that actual face to face time with those students and as Lee meeting with somebody or somebody walks into your office before they even get to the questions that they have gifted teachers don't hide human side from their students either they don't ain't find their way trying to decide if the major is right for them trying to work through the social non-academic stuff that's going on in a freshman's life that oftentimes comes it is expected of them in class what is expected for the hallmark how do they succeed and now I have a d. in your class and you know I'm feeling like send I recognize that this isn't the only class that you have but how are you prioritizing advise e is putting in the time and effort and is still struggling and I have had to say to some of the students who I advise you know just by virtue of the way the degree is structured I feel like that's something they need to come to a decision on their selves and I don't think it's my that person that squashes somebody's dream you know I want people to be able to feel decision point and a and a reconciliation within ourselves much better than I said at the beginning of this episode combs occurs. I feel like I could tools to do it they come in prepared to make their knowledge relatable and they share that craving meaning they awaken in students and I don't know how we can under estimate stress how hard teaching it gets harder and harder and harder.

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

13:30 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"With no maybe not even consciously but intuitively what they're good at and they'll try AMC myself from it is that they also care very much about teaching a lot of preparation in your organized and you've put time into it ingenious or charismatic or inciteful but I do try and show up prepared talking in terms of the psychology of my motivation it's much less my thinking eight more on so that's that's a big part of the reason. I think I prepare as much as I do. Honor Society Teaching Award and the University's genetic or Sally Brown award is Tim what he felt was at the core of his obligations to students the consumers that is to deal with the students fairly and consistently in terms of grading policies they get involved in class and put forward a suggestion or possibility so at least a kernel of insight into what the if we see teaching as an opportunity to make ourselves look sophy you would think so but James says no in the sense I in a particularly good position philosophical training is learning to look disposition after studying philosophy to be able to plug something a person that I think for the most part students are just fumbling around very good things to say and I would sort of give the students a compliment here in terms of interacting with students in the class even with the Digital Age Those Digital Distractions No surfing the web the one place you do see it is you have to stay on top of them like students today are just incapable of following along one as I did twenty years ago so James Puts that idea to rest he's long since lost any sleep over the performance aspect of teaching right suppose individuals. I've been doing this for thirty years and I it's not James Introversion side makes teaching difficult better so it is a case of highs and lows many a character in the Canon of philosophy dialogue with that craving for knowledge with the students it makes me think that one I need to know it's just a natural need human beings we just love teaching career a lot of Google as a threat and I think google hiring wisdom acquiring critical thinking skills you can't get that just by reading who have thought about it and maybe profs who've had some extra training and how to think about that's true why else would people pay to go to a place to learn with in through others eight of an elephant in the room what's the value of a degree in philosophy the teacher philosophy but if they're owning students to teach you to what then is of tech jobs the startup culture and the more professions centric models of higher education standing the why behind the study of business finance engineering medicine what really thinks in the next few years and he gave this in twenty seventeen he thinks specifically and precisely because of that ability to engage in critical instance financial planning you're getting computer algorithms such as the data out much greater utility than people think James doesn't disparage profession center careers air about medicine because we care about our own lives and the lives of loved ones engineering it's learning to play the cello or spending time with friends or traveling so this foundation of basic values Mr critically reflect on what really matters the most to you and related it to an anecdote involving two philosophers to illustrate the point it's about him in the politics that he had a habit he was at a habit of wandering and studying the sky and the heavens that he walked into a dry well he fell into a well and had to be rescued in reason to try and study patterns in the sky he was able as he put down money to reserve the right to rent the olive presses at a low rate student sitting in the chair she faces as a professor being a guide in really enjoyed trying to help other people understand concepts and Ryan spoke while growing up and then went on to Penn State to study meteorology she and the job.

"ohio" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on WTVN

"Don't live in denial Ohio that is the campaign that nationwide in a lot of partners have put together to help convince us that we need to be doing things to keep our kids off of drugs we're talking the opioid educational lions and deny Ohio campaign with Jennifer Martinez he's with the alcohol drug in mental health board of Franklin County Chad jester is with the nation wide foundation he is its president we were talking about the need to get rid of prescription drugs that are in the cabinet that you don't need that they've been there for a long time we also need to recognize Chad that there are people who still use these for legitimate purposes and we certainly don't want to demon eyes having medications that you need that's exactly right yeah we don't want to demonized these medications are many people in the state of Ohio who have a chronic pain challenge it is absolutely appropriate that they have prescription opioids and take these drugs on a daily basis year round our message to those individuals would be properly secure your medication so if you have young people or visitors to your home make sure those medications are secured and out of reach especially for young people so as you meet with people and they get the message of denial Ohio did deep you see some jaw dropping her eyes getting big the the level of recognition that we're not going to make this problem go away but there are some relatively simple ways that we can help put a dent in it yeah absolutely you know it's it's a very low threshold to try and get some of these prevention measures in place talking to your kids having the drug disposal bangs getting rid of old medication those are all things that take a few minutes and yet can do you a world of good in terms of preventing the next generation I'm going down the same path I hope folks of heard the the ads or seen the print to ads for did not Ohio some gray. messaging in their Chad in terms of how widespread this is I think I mentioned earlier it's all over the place and that's a good thing but talk a little bit about the the the physical piece of the campaign the physical piece of the campaign really up centered in Franklin County in central Ohio but the media market for central Ohio is a region of the state going down to the eastern part of the state southeastern part of the state so a large portion the state has seen radio TV billboards the state of Ohio is an investor in the campaign as well in in April we softly launched paid social media campaign with the state's support so the campaign is now in every corner of Ohio and and give us one or two examples of what if you haven't seen the ad or heard it couple of the messages the messages are really straight forward and hopefully actionable by folks so it's find out what meds are in your home either secure them as we were talking about or dispose of them properly secondly talk to young people in your life it's not just about your child but you could have grandchildren you could have a niece nephew you might be a coach you might be working in the community as a volunteer and have that opportunity is secure an adult to make an impact on a young person's life will come back a little bit to denial high before the show was out here but I I do want to switch and I know this isn't the specialty area of either of you but one of the things that we haven't done a typically the past assassin longed for law enforcement officials in with us from the treatment side of things Jennifer is as you look at a collaborative effort and tackling this is some thoughts on on where to. police in a law enforcement comes into the whole whole picture it's interesting because the mentality of our first responders police in particular has begun to shift around us we at Adam sponsor what we call a crisis intervention team training where we teach first responders how to interact with people have an addiction or mental illness and when I was facilitating the training about three years ago there was very much this mentality of it's it's not our problem that's an EMS problem that's that social work problem and over time that has begun to shift because they're seeing people in their own lives we're struggling with this and they're realizing the importance of being able to get people into treatment as opposed to arresting them I I frequently her now we can't arrest our way out of this problem yeah you you stole my line out there because that several times from a law enforcement at at multiple levels. did you mention nor can a little bit yeah to go down and talk to about that so gnar can is the opioid overdose reversal drug and it is a medication that can be administered through and nasal injection if you will have like aspirin or something along those lines but it blocks the opiate receptors in the brain and it can reverse an overdose pretty much immediately so it is something that the majority of our first responders at least locally are carrying and in ministering to people that they are seeing in the community who might be experiencing an overdose and do mental health drug addiction boards such as yours do you do you get involved in helping the community access these these kinds of products we absolutely do there are a couple of different providers where you can get Columbus public health Franklin County public health have some ability to provide those to first responders but at Adam beach we knew that this was a problem in our community and so about a year ago we started a campaign where we you trained all of our staff we trained all of our providers and we make sure that they have access to an Archean regularly we will be back to talk more about Ohio's opioid epidemic and the efforts to rein it in our guests Chad jester vice president.

Ohio three years
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"None of them ever actually splendid, they all collapsed down to a black hole. And, and if the laws of physics were slightly different and the balance of gravity and fusion, different. That's what would happen. And so actually this connects to a class of philosophical arguments that astrophysicists have cosmological, particularly call the anthra- pic- anthropic principle that why do laws of physics, you know, the strengths charges of electron masses of electrons, protons their strength of their interactions. Relative strengths of interaction of electromagnetism versus gravity? It's why do they have the values they do? And one of the philosophical questions or answers is well, if they were much different from the way they are. We would never be able to form complex life in the history of the universe because stars claps the foreign black holes or stars never four or something like that. And the primordial soup of hydrogen helium form the big bang, would never form more complex Adams. So people can't take that as an argument for why laws of physics have to be within the sort of rough regime in which we live, because beings, like us would not be around to. Perceive that the universe is like that, and study it, so I'm not a strong believer in the anthropic principle, but at a weak version, yes. Yeah. So many people are made deeply uncomfortable by these sorts of arguments. But I think that is actually a big philosophical debate, and cosmology, that comes up well beyond, you know, explosions of stars or anything that high study, but. One of the big worries. When recent studies of. Subatomic physics and things like string theory, which you may have heard of is that there are effectively almost infinite possible number of combinations. And why do we live in the university? We do why the answers is because we're here. Again, I take a weaker view of that, but it is sort of uncomfortable that we can we can we can determine what the laws of physics with our, but it doesn't mean that we have any understand why say, the massive electron has to be what it is. Just just some constant that appears in the equations, and boom use it and it works. He while. Yeah. With all our talk today about proof and all the work researchers like chore. Not put into moving down that road of understanding, you know, sometimes with, with what just seem like these tiny incremental steps. There will always be bigger questions. More pieces to fill in the puzzle. I don't know. Kim can we leave it there? Is that is that we're place to end? Yeah. I think it seems appropriate leave it right. Where we all are on the edge of understanding with a little bit of knowledge and a lot of questions. All right. Thanks to hire university, Ryan shortage, or through all this, and to George berz for the great stargazing experience, we had in this episode was produced by U, P tuner, and you Kelly respect. And it's always a big. Thank you to WB studios in Athens where this was recorded and to Adam rich sound, engineer and all around awesome. Dude. Thanks, everyone for listening professor neck would probably want me to remind everyone at this point that there is some non zero chance that they're entirely wrong about all this. That's just how it goes. With speeds, the hair are endless possibilities. Unless it's just aliens yesterday that have most papers and to all of this unless just. We try not to say that out loud.

WB studios Ryan shortage Adams professor Adam rich Kim George berz Athens Kelly engineer
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

14:14 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"And you spin it too fast it'll fly off. So that's one of the best pieces of evidence that the supernova explosion that occurred almost thousand years ago, left behind not only exploding nebula, but a single compact object, which is the neutron star. Okay. So. You wanted some proof that these relatively tiny city size objects can be created in supernova explosions. So what do you think? I mean was that enough? I mean, yeah, I think so it's still seems a little circumstantial, though, would it surprise you then to hear that this line of evidence around the crab nebula, and these Chinese astronomers and this spinning object, that this is sort of as good as gets when it comes to proof about what's left over from supernova. Yeah. You know that just seems so weird to think about it just seems like so often, we not we but other people astronomers talk so confidently about space. You just assume that they have this definitive proof. Yeah. Well, I got news for you. Because when it comes to the other outcome of a supernova explosion that a black hole might be created. The evidence is considerably more limited. Oh, great. Yeah. But let's get back to square one with black holes first black holes are a prediction of general Titi, that, if you compress matter, eventually, compress, it enough, that light can longer scape Albert Einstein made this prediction, when he formulated, his general theory of relativity, that the pass of that the locations of stars located behind the sun would be affected by the presence of the gravitational mass of the sun. And so, in nineteen nineteen two expeditions were made to South America and Africa to observe. The Sandra solar eclipse, and so during an eclipse, you can see stars when the sun is blocked out obviously, and what they did was. Is no Twitter. Some of the stars close to the sun appeared during that clips. And then looked at those same stars six months later when the sun wasn't in the picture and just compared to observe Asians. They found that the locations of stars were distorted because the Paz's of light taken by these distant stars around the sun, we're bent. And this matched the predictions of Joe relativity. And that's what made Einstein household name. So if you just crank up the gravitational field you get to a point where not only as the light path bent, but the light can no longer even escape. And so this is the defining characteristic of a black hole. So explains that at this point black holes were really just theoretical. They were mathematical curiosities he called them. But in the early twentieth century during the same time, astronomers were looking at that crab nebula and tracing its origins back nine hundred years more and more people started studying what happens when these massive stars collapse. So these neutron stars were known to be one outcome. But later, it was determined that there was a maximum mass than you start at have of around two to three solar masses to three times, the massive our son. We don't know exactly where that boundary is even today, there's some, hints and people can argue about it. We know it's more than two because we see two solar mass neutron stars these models all predict that. There's a maximum mass. And so if you were to pile more matter onto neutron star, eventually would not be able to support itself under its own gravity, and then it would collapse. And so then the question is what else can happen. And the conclusion is that the neutron star if you keep on adding stuff onto a neutron star. It will collapse the form a black hole, and so Kelly. This theory was just tossed around without much supporting evidence until the mid nineteen seventies with the development of x Ray astronomy, which allowed astronomers to see x. Ray sources out in space for the first time and what they found or these star systems where you have to stars sort of an orbit together called binary systems. Oh, that's like Star Wars where they had to sunsetting same time. Yes. Yes, tattooing the fictional. Planet was in a binary system. So, so, yes. Think of those two sons from Star Wars and. A few of these systems instead of two stars..

Albert Einstein Twitter Joe relativity Ray South America Paz Titi Africa Kelly nine hundred years thousand years six months
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"And then the core starts to collapse it forms. What is known as a neutron star or black hole, and the process of formation releases enough energy that the rest of star explodes. And when explodes it really explodes a supernova can be so bright. It produces enough light to be briefly as bright as one to ten billion Suns. Ten billion Suns. Yeah. These things are big, and they are bright. And so the cow event. What tore knocks all is one of these. Yeah. Exactly. But now that we have this general idea of, what supernovae are. There's just one more part of the story. We kinda need to cover before we get back to the cow. Okay. What's that? Well tournament said that when these massive stars collapse and caused these huge explosions. They also form one of two things either a neutron star or a black hole. You've probably heard of black holes, or, or at least have some idea of what they are. So let's talk about the other one, I neutron stars. Yeah, you're going to have to explain that one to me. I think. Yeah, so neutron stars as I understand them. Are these super dense objects out there in space, and they're made up of nearly entirely neutrons and tournament explains that? Their properties are really extreme because it's so compact. So when I say compact, I mean, something approximately the size of a city that it's something that is about forty percent. More massive than our sun. But compressed to about the size of a city, and that means that they're so compact at the protons neutrons, protons electrons, recombine to form neutrons. And that means they're very dense, but they're also spinning very rapidly and have extraordinary magnetic fields. Okay. So question if neutron stars are so small relative to regular stars, which are, obviously way bigger than a city. How do they even know that they exist? And how do they know that they are in the center of these giant explosions? Yeah, that's a great question. And it's a turns out evidence supporting all this actually dates back, nearly thousand years. So in the case of neutron stars, we have a lot, better direct evidence, neutron stars can be formed in the explosion. So one example, is with a thing known as the crab nebula, which is a large cloud of gas and dust about sixty five hundred light years away in the Taurus constellation, it turns out that around the in the year, ten fifty four Chinese astronomers had recorded the parents of a very bright star that appeared in that spot in the sky. And the star was so bright that it could be seen during the day for several weeks. But it's up to faded and this description really lines up with what we believed a nearby supernova would look like to the naked eye in the early twentieth century. It was determined that this crab nebula was expanding that if you compared photographs taken decades apart you could see a little bit bigger each time. And so if you did the very simple calculation of how big is this nebula and how fast is expanding activities? You how long it's been since explosion occurred, and it was about nine hundred years earlier perfectly matching up with the reports by those Chinese astronomers in ten fifty four this nebula, then was subsequently studied in great detail, and after in the mid twentieth, century after discovery of radio waves is founded, there was a star near the center, this nebula that was rapidly flashing that is it was rotating thirty times. Per second. So we could see a light, blinking on and off thirty times per second. And so what we think is going on. Is that that light is associated with the neutron star in the center? And the reason they know it's a neutron star is really because of how fast it's spinning. Yeah. Thirty times per second. That is so fast..

sixty five hundred light years nine hundred years thousand years forty percent
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

14:07 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"So let's do. We'll show you some stars. Hey, there listeners, welcome to another episode of Ohio today radio, I'm Pete sooner. And in this episode we're going to talk about space. That's Georgie birds and astronomy instructor who took a group of us on a little stargazing. Walk back in April. Let's start with the constellation. That is the all time favorite of everybody all the grandparents on the porch, point out to the kids, the big Dipper. Yup. There it is. Thank god. It's visually obvious. As it is so Kelly respect is here with me. Hi, kelly. Hey Pete, Kellyanne. I helped produce the show and for this episode because it's about space. We're going to go through all of this together so you ready Kelly. Yeah..

Kelly Pete instructor Ohio Kellyanne
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"Yeah. Practice as a verb means to perform an activity or exercise skill repeatedly or regularly in order to improve or maintain one's proficiency at colleges and universities to subsets of students which on the surface may seem like opposite kinds of people both practice as part of their daily existence their bodies and mental toughness are tested every day, and they engage in this challenging endeavor, despite the very strong likelihood that they will never reach the level of success. They seek maybe never even earn an income from it. So who are these two sets of practitioners of practice? The are student artists and student athletes. I hate and I need her happiness. And I think we often. Blowback she'll see all faces her meet senior Lauren Glenn an acting performance. Major. Any he weighs nearly as much as hordes. He weighs going for Justice. Sixty. And then we have. So we have eight guys. The first go five back next ten back and re rod a senior sports management major. But more importantly, a university baseball player and a highly ranked better he plays first base to they are spirited students optimistic positive putting countless hours practicing their techniques away from time spent in sanctioned rehearsals and team practices. They practice at home in Atkins students on campus, finding the character's voice in motivation and in the batting cage at the sports complex swinging. Baseball's happily doing it over and over again. They've got spunk. And they've got swing. Some might say there's an unspoken sense that student artists and student athletes are at their core two very different kinds of people with different someone say opposing worldviews yet when we asked Lauren and Rudy to talk about what practice means to them. We discovered they are more alike than they are different in so many ways, especially when it comes to their worldview three big ways in which they were similar jumped out to us. I'm Kelly respect in in this episode of Ohio today radio we reveal these three big ways in which Lauren and Rudy share commonalities. What is practiced for each of them? How is it defined? What happens in those inner sanctums where mistakes are made and learned I sat in on one of Lawrence, performance classes, the students were working on scenes assigned to them from the classic theater cannon think Shakespeare checkoff in the like students waiting to perform their scene setting chairs group to the side of the studios large open floor space and watch their studio mates perform their scenes. What's the first thing? You say about him what his sons. Marry me off when I was eighteen an OTs terrified. And I got nothing. Right. I just think of Nick. Criminals. Pacific. You were young. Everyone in Lawrence studio class practice or rehearse their seen throughout the semester. And then performance to theater faculty for the final you get casted in said role, and before you do present it in that rehearsal process as the actor. What your homework is. You're doing research on your character. You're reading the play you're going over you're seeing multiple times. And who is in that particular scene with your who's not if it's just you by yourself doing a monologue. You're also just really being as details. You possibly can with your homework setting. What's the season? Like, what are you wearing? How does your character react up until that moment of your scene? And then if you have a partner rehearsing, and you're just really getting a feel of just listening and respond to what your partner saying. And how that affects you as an actor and also as your character, and since it's is educational setting even in class or even in just the rehearsal process for a show your directors. Also, obviously, helping you along the way if you have. Troubles. Or what they see that you could further expand or explore pawn with your partner, even just you by yourself, and you know, after a while, you're still doing your homework outside of class or outside of the rehearsal room. Just being familiar with you're seeing and just fixing issues at the director has seen for you. And then in the end your piece, and that all together performing on the stage or in our case for our final performing it for our faculty members and whoever else wants to show up for schilling. Denis's house for a final peace. I meet Rudy outside the weight room at the university's football stadium at six o'clock on morning and late December during finals week the team was arriving to compete in. What's called the Bob cat challenge. It's where the baseball players organizing teams and compete against one. Another in physically taxing ways, including marathon push-up outs and sprinting races the players were wide awake that morning and very focused.

Lauren Glenn Baseball Rudy partner Denis Atkins schilling Lawrence Ohio director Nick Kelly Shakespeare
"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

Ohio Today radio

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"ohio" Discussed on Ohio Today radio

"To hire. Today. Radio a podcast. Bob cat stories told one tail time. I'm peachy. And this episode we traveled to a place has been attracting thinkers learners, and all those seeking broader view of the world to a remote area New York for more than one hundred and forty years. It's a place that has also without much to liberate effort on anyone's part attracted numerous so higher university students studying journalism design photography for an enriching and breakneck summer internship program in the world of newspaper production, an experience you'll see is as unique as the place it self. This is should talk. My name's Dave munch. I'm a two thousand nine graduate from Ohio University. I went through the vis com program specializing in photojournalism on now, I currently work as the multimedia producer for Chautauqua institution. And I also serve as the photo editor for our daily newspaper the Chautauqua daily which publishes six days a week during our summer season should talk institution is a place really committed to lifelong learning for many people, pre professional development, we have in in house opera company theater companies school of music school dance school of art. We have all of these schools were young people are training to grow into the world into the relevant professions in our newspaper. The Chautauqua daily follows that model to pre she the rest of this story, you I need a little background on Utah quo founded in eighteen seventy four as the Chautauqua lake Sunday school assembly. It was an educational experiment focused on summer courses for Sunday school teacher. Here's the rural setting on the shore of New York's lake Chautauqua was thought to enhance the learning experience. Its success was immediate. And it's expansion was rapid by eighteen seventy eight abroad and curriculum in academics arts music and religion, led to a structured correspondence course for those who couldn't travel to Stockwell and that program success spurred its participants to hold their own Chautauqua style gatherings at locations across the country. By the turn of the century. The movement had swept the nation and traveling tent Chautauqua would tour hundreds of cities and towns each year. If you've heard of Chautauqua already these traveling tented events are likely the image. You have in mind, although popular these circuit Chautauqua, which focused more on ener tain -ment an education strayed far from the original mission and values of the camp along the lake so this is very much the kind of old town, so to speak where these were I don't know how much, you know, about the background shit taco. But this was a camp like a meeting can't campground. These were all tent plots that turned into log cabins that turned into houses. So these have been sort of set in stone for very long time as you walk around the seven hundred and fifty acre community that history is palpable. It's seventy five hundred residents can see up to one hundred thousand guests after the grounds each year to take in the world class opera, dance theatre, lectures, and music. Over the course of the nine week summer program. But should talk is very hard to accurately describe it's a lot like Athens in that way, and like Athens, it seems to pride itself on its unique characteristics. Perhaps this is partly why students as well as some alumni from Ohio scripts college who have made up as much as half of the Chautauqua dailies staff over the years have flocked here to intern at the paper where they can practice their craft in a unique yet familiar environment. What probably is the greatest benefit for our interns that we provide a really rigorous real world workload that they can expect an in many of them. We told them very early on that this is the hardest. You will have ever worked up to this point reporters come in day. One get their beat notes and have a story do in two days. And they've never been here before photographers have photo assignments to shoot the very first day they show up and it doesn't stop their shooting. Tigers shooting three to four photo assignments a day six days a week for nine straight weeks on reporters turning out one two stories a day every day doesn't stop when I visited late off. Guessed the season was nearing its close. The Reverend Jesse Jackson was speaking that morning and things were coming to ahead at the paper as some interns had to return home to prepare for the new school year leaving the paper slightly short staff during its crucial final weeks. Luckily, I was able to catch up with a few of the remaining Bob cats. My brain is very tired. We had late night layout last night. And we're here until like one thirty. My name is Gina Rayo. I'm a rising senior, and I'm in the school official communication's pursuing a publication design degree. I do a lot of interactive design as well and a minor in marketing. So what I do here. The shot. Talk daily is design editor. And I hope with some of the illustrations and just everyday process of laying out the paper. It's just been a lot of really good practice. I would say like I feel like I like move a lot faster to the pages than I did at the beginning of the summer and like a good way. But I feel like I'll take some of that back to school with me for my senior year like just knowing like if I can handle this. I can definitely handle the workload to come. Money is holding Kirsch. I'm a second year. Graduate students studying photo journalism. I am interning this summer at the Chautauqua daily as a staff photographer. Hold on. I walk the grounds. We came upon the heart of Chautauqua the giant forty four hundred seat Tampa theatre where much of the programming takes place. We check us out. Yeah. Yeah. This is the amphitheater. The giant disco ball for the Avak hover band was playing tonight. Jackson Abba cover band in the same day. Being year has been interesting because I've been able to just practice graffiti every day, I wake up I come here. We work six days a week, and I making photos, and sometimes it's the same thing that I pretty much made photo of yesterday, we shoot a lot of lectures, and a lot of performances so I have to photograph in the same building with different person speaking to a crowd, but that's also kind of exciting because I have to find a way to do that in a new way. But home says there are other unique challenges to feel most other internships, there might be four five interns. The most probably in different departments definitely not living together. And here the entire newsroom as interns. There's twenty five of us. We're all trying trying to figure stuff out and make our best work and improve ourselves, and we're all living together and trying to get along. And enjoy the summer to you heard that right in. Addition to working together as many as sixty hours or more per week, these interns also live together, I think Dave put it best. You put thirty pre professional journals and students, and you make them live in a house together and work side-by-side six days a week for ten weeks. They all get to know each other really well, besides unparalleled access to speakers and performers like Jesse Jackson and yoyo mall. It seems this element is really what sets the whole experience apart from your average internship. Not only are these students technical skills put to the test. But they're giving a crash course on how to work with one another with all the professional and personal stressors that are so common out the real world. And this shared experience is what makes this internship, truly should talk on these Bob cats to share a remarkable and fully unique experience. And then have the time to process it reflect on it and grow from it together. This idea is what this place was founded on and it's these enduring values that make it what is still today. This is should talk. Special. Thanks to Dave much and the daily's editor Sarah talk and the whole staff for welcoming me into the newsroom this episode of Ohio today radio was recorded on site can should talk with New York and in the WB studios in Athens, Ohio. Visit Ohio today dot org slash radio for more episodes of the show or find us on itunes, Google podcasts or spot fine.

Chautauqua daily Bob Ohio Chautauqua institution editor Chautauqua lake Sunday school Dave munch Athens Jesse Jackson New York Ohio University school teacher ener tain -ment Tigers Tampa theatre Utah Gina Rayo producer