29 Burst results for "Office Manager"

Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

Fancy Free Podcast

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

"You are listening to the fancy free. Podcasts where my guests. And i tell our most embarrassing funny stories so that we all feel less alone and our imperfections and forge connection through vulnerability in humor. I'm joanne jared. And i am your host and today i have with me. Caryn tap lee. Karen is a fellow physician. She is an obstetrician gynecologist fellowship trained in integrative medicine and has transitioned out of traditional practice and is currently selling mercedes-benz as she completes her mba. So i think she's addicted to school. She calls it her covert career. She's a total car. Check and you guys. This is so fascinating. She started off her higher education with a ged. so karen. thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Okay absolutely we'll fill in the blanks a lot of questions but first of all. Just tell us a little more about who you are and what you do. That is currently a moving target. You're right by tradition chaining. I'm an obgyn with a fellowship in integrative medicine that i got at the university of arizona down in tucson and i finished that in about twenty eighteen i was also establishing a medical spa at the same time i started off like a lot of. Obgyn's i went into a private practice. I where i was doing july only my husband was career military in the navy and so my first job out of residency was in oregon and he was stationed in washington. We had been separated for the better part of our marriage because of machine training and everything. So i tried to make it work as we tried to make it work as much as we could then. I finally decided to transition up to washington where i took a traditional employed job where i was taking q. Three call seventy two to ninety six hours at a time out about three and a half years into that. I finally went to our office manager to take some vacation time and is told that i didn't have any because i only accrued vacation time when i was physically in the office seeing patients

Joanne Jared Caryn Benz Karen LEE University Of Arizona Obgyn Tucson Washington Navy Oregon
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | 5 months ago

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
Dr. Fata: King Midas

Dr. Death

04:24 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Fata: King Midas

"Four months later in september of two thousand eleven. Dr fatah's practice hired a new office manager. George karachay. i was born in detroit Living near Actually motown on west grand boulevard. George was in his early fifties tall with dark hair and glasses. He had worked in healthcare for more than thirty years and from an early age health. Care was very important to him. He used to play on this on the lawn of henry ford hospital when i was a kid and i often wondered what was inside. What did they do their before. He's interview hit. Never heard of doctor fata but of course he knew all about crittenden hospital. Where dr fata sent his patients. It had a reputation for serving posh clientele. George was honored to accept. Dr fatah's offer. The scale of the office was bigger than anything managed before he knew that a lot was expected of him but he was excited to be part of it. All the position was a rare. Find a six figure salary which is a lot for an office manager great healthcare coverage a twenty minute commute for his first day at his new job. He left his house early enough to leave. Plenty of time to get settled. My best sudan and is dr fodder said you know. We're very formal here. And so i. I remember driving to the clinic and i saw it for the first time on the outside nasa site to see it was grand on the outside with its covered. Porch and windows on the outside michigan. Hematology oncology didn't look much like a healthcare center it look like some sort of ski lodge some some resort. You see on side of a mountain where the rich and famous went to doing their winters. So i like this is incredible. The parking lot was already packed with cars when he made his way to the front of the building. I opened the door. And i was just in. Awe was on in so many different levels. The opulence of the center fifty foot ceilings grand piano artwork on the walls. Something that you would normally see at the detroit institute of arts. The soft lighting. The waiting rooms at were filled with fine furniture. It all looked more like the lobby of a swanky hotel. It was supposed to be the jewel of crittenden hospitals outpatient center and it really was. He looked around at the staff doctors nurses from other hospitals and universities all and crisply iron uniforms for marketable. George thought to see so many people from different disciplines all there to care for patients. Though george was new to the field of oncology. he wasn't a stranger to cancer. My own mother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. And i was taking care of her. While i was working for dr fata so i know what it's like to be given that news in a patient's room and to go through the caretaking of a patient and i really believed in the field of oncology and hematology as he was looking around taking it all in jordan started to feel a bit nervous. I day jitters. But he realized that he too got to be part of this impressive operation working alongside folks that were saving lives. I closed my eyes. And i said to myself remember this day. Remember this day right away. He was put to work meeting. The staff getting to know the equipment around dr fatah's four clinics the infusion room where patients received chemotherapy was a sight to see. It was like a parking lot for chemo. Chairs kema chairs and rooms cumin chairs in the you had single a chairs you had once in a group with four and time. It was far as the eye could see. Saw the sea of chemo chairs. The waiting room stayed filled with at least thirty patients at a time. Busy was an understatement. Barber shop where one person is in a chair and then sweep off. The air and the next person would get in a chair. There was never a moment where that chair wasn't being used and running and humming and the equipment and spies all had to be there or else machine. I called it would start to break down.

Dr Fatah Dr Fata George Karachay Crittenden Hospital Dr Fodder George Henry Ford Crittenden Hospitals Outpatien Detroit Detroit Institute Of Arts Sudan Nasa Michigan Pancreatic Cancer Cancer Jordan Barber
"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"Do here love worse and that's exactly what I went to my head like who ran about that lionhead forgave when Detroit Don Yeah like that dad costume I made so like we had football pads and are like spray painted them and added some like fuck in designs and whatnot June made those crafted them well, I mean. The the football pads were just black football pads but then I had like Silver Kanda hairspray to give it that Detroit dawn effect and I spray painted the sunglasses that were featured in that episode. But that that is like the biggest pretzel of each week because it's sure as office manager. You know it's going to be expected that people are GonNa hit you up for travel and you're going to have to do you know XYZ every single day. But then you also have like the unique requests that are thrown on that are like, Hey, I need a patriots visor in New York City, where where are we going to find that modell's right around seven avenue one of the few places that sells nfl geared just went under due to cove it like every day it gets harder. There's another day where we had to find Antonio Brown steelers Jersey like long after he was off the steelers and I'm. Like where am I going to find this? So next thing you know I'm an UBER TO JERSEY and found this random kid on on offer up who sold me his aunt Tonio Brown Jersey and I had to take a photo with him like Jersey Swap Style and I put it on the concur APP for what Jihad. Is See like paid petty cash eighty dollars to Jeremy for his Antonio Brown Jersey. That's incredible. Yeah. Who did the in Tonio rounders? That was Dave Yeah. I would think that was that was last season but appoint being every season every week there's a unique request. Hey I'm doing dolphins for my mortal lock. On fortunately, that was probably my worst showing I was like, what am I gonNa do with the dolphins that's tough and we had to settle for Dolphin balloons but I mean we have a green screen behind us. So it's like the possibilities are limitless what the folks at Dolphin balloon going to do. So I was very disappointed with my showing that week, but it's like every week it's like and then the other thing for example, the Detroit Don Costume, you put all this work in. Like. I'm waiting for the paint to dry hoping like overnight, it will set. So it doesn't ruined Dave suit the following morning and we get in there and Dave picks switches as pick immediately after hearing that STU finer had the same Detroit lions picks..

Dave Yeah Detroit Tonio Brown Jersey football Antonio Brown Jersey steelers Silver Kanda modell Don Costume office manager New York City STU finer nfl Jeremy lions
"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"Can take you can coast and like take your foot off the gas as you see, fit throughout the week when you know something's maybe not going at going to be busy but you're right a lot of times you just have to stay on your game and like be ready for anything like a minute man almost like you never know when there's GonNa be a phone call. Hey. I missed my flight or hey, we have a delivery going to the old office that we need someone to be there for or hey, we're filming at this studio and we need to bring Jib the freight and the freight elevator scheduled to close in ten minutes on a need you to sweet talk the freight guy into stand and extended his evening. So we can get our camera equipment upstairs. So it's really just being like you said a utility tool yeah. Five player tool. I like to think that I don't specialize in anything like I'm not really proficient in one category but I think I have a little bit of skills in a lot of different categories that helped me do the job that I do on a daily basis. So you're events coordinator now go between intern and that was there something else? Yeah, I was managers. Manager. Yes. So basically, what that entailed was just booking all the travel for the content team as well as production people or maybe Dave Erica that ever came up Danielle pretty much does Erica's booking and travel, and then I would take care of Dave's. We now have Kevin, helping out with private jets and that sort of thing Kevin Davis Guy Yeah. Yeah and so so you're doing all that Spider Yep. Did Office Manager Brett give you a bad name. No I think if anything he kind of fell on the sword for me in a way at several steps to the way I mean, this is a thankless job like for me coming in at twenty three years old and just. Kinda, given the keys and keep it running keep everyone travelling, keep our company just like mobile with in terms of like booking travel and stuff like bread turned it over to me relatively early on and I'm glad he did because I. I learned a lot about how to do it but yeah I. Mean it was it was definitely intimidating to start to just be like have everyone in. The company hits you up and say, Hey, I need a flight for this and then not only that when something went wrong or there was like you know people would miss a lay over like sleep in and missed the flight than it's just about like cleaning people's mess up at that point for sure and I guess is there is like a legendary story like office manager Brat, he had some. Very historic fuck ups. Yeah. We're any of those actually you that you could fess up to right now did you lose Dave's close from Italy I did not lose his clothes from Italy but I did lose his clothes from Tennessee bookstore we went and when during Dave's Frankie replacement trial period, he had taken me to a Nascar race at Bristol and we stopped at a University of Tennessee for some pizza reviews. The first trip we made I stopped we made rather was to..

Dave Erica Kevin Davis office manager Brett Italy Tennessee Bristol events coordinator University of Tennessee Brat intern Nascar Danielle
"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"That's unbelievable. Everyone pumps up the cell service but now Miller lite, they're they're not so bad either in that. And that category you know. All right spider. So he gave a little gave a little portion right there about what you do, what's your technical position tag? Were you technically so I think as of last year, my title is live events coordinator something of that nature live events, specialist Basically, it was like the borstal classics and the rough and Rowdy and that sort of thing just try to help with the on site production and getting the events off the ground and that sort of thing, and then covert it and it was kind of like no. On onsite events and then it Kinda was on boxing stuff. So it was kind of more not travel. All New York. But yes, still Kinda same operations production. Behind the scenes, Kinda stuff for for the beginning because do you get do give out your real name yet Daniel Diario government I, attach my name on everything I. Think. I don't like people on twitter that are like I don't know I have nothing to hide everything. I'm comfortable saying from my legal government name. Okay. I wasn't sure if you just want to let people know you're spider like you know whatever people feel comfortable with calling the I also think it adds a little a level of credibility when like a real name is associated, ensure not just like a random account chirping you tell you this spider is about a good of a nickname you can have. It is very on brandon like plays into plays into it. So and how did you get it? Obviously, it's from Goodfellas, but you remember the moment that it was born. Yeah. I. Think it was my third week or so in the old office your New York. lugging waters as an intern trying to keep the fridge stock and. Dave. In Big Coward doing the rundown and of course, that offices like the size of the studio so I mean any little movement there. You're in the background there looking at UC and like who who, what's going on. There was this guy And big. Cat. was like does this guy have a name yet? We're calling him spider. because. We share the name Dan or would it would whatever it may be or maybe yeah was the goodfellas reference I'm just Kinda, fetching shit for people all the time yet but it's Kinda lasted it Kinda. Stock and I've hope obviously you're you're probably twenty two at the time twenty three. Yeah. Where you've seen goodfellas with that. Yeah Right. So you knew that was Michael Imperialist characters. Joe Patchy Kills Okay Yeah, all right. I mean that's I'm just happy to be. I, mean I think it's A. I don't know it's a great movie to be associated. To the Teddy Form is flattering. Russia say but you are. But I do think you're Kinda underselling what you do here because I mean to an extent, something needs to get done a thankless job that you know moving this fucking crate from here to here like you're the guy. Yeah. Yeah. I mean I don't know it's like It's pretty much like a a seven day a week kind of job I mean granted you.

Goodfellas twitter New York boxing events coordinator Daniel Diario Miller Joe Patchy Michael Imperialist Russia intern brandon Dave Dan
"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"To the dog walkers Barstool Sports. Big Episode Today, I am joined by the ten thousand dollar man you know as spider spider, scrape the have you how are you doing? Well, thanks him. Glad to be here. So I I've been meaning to get you for a while because as a behind the camera guy I mean listen I respect the fuck out of all the behind the camera people because. People I I was behind the camera to once you know I was I. was I was a production assistant in my old job at a sports company and a lot of Shit so lot. It's a lot of shit and. while. You're recording. You think it's taking up time they gotta go back to at the shit you know and I know you're not an editor, per se but your job does not end when everybody goes home. Yeah. I mean it's basically like filling in all the cracks of what you wouldn't think of behind the scenes production things whatever. The town's going to need just getting in front of it whether it be like a a ride to the set or like launch when get there. So just trying to think of everything before it's a era. Swiss army before we really get into it though I wanNA talk about Miller lite spider. Obviously I live in Chicago you live in New, York? Yup? So it's hard for us to get together. What was great was over quarantine I enjoyed there was one Tuesday you popped onto our our zoom and we shared a miller. lite over your it was great because obviously in the pandemic things are different. So in the socially distant world, people are looking to stay together. That was great to connect with someone like spider why don't get to see much you know. So that was great Miller lite great tasting less fillon obviously, it's a beer Chicago but should be the beer of the United States..

Chicago Barstool Sports production assistant Swiss army Miller United States editor York miller.
"office manager" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Take it ever awesome. Donnelly is not just my co host on this show. She is also the office manager are awesome effort Awesome ever. Cem ever awesome medical practice any, you urology specialists. We are a urology specialty practice. I am a board certified urologists and the founder of our practice. We have four doctors for Pia and nurse practitioners, including the awesome Leonora Brown's right nor Brown, and we also added a new one. So we added a new one. She's going to have a growth. We have a physical therapy have to physical therapist pelvic for physical Like Jeff Sex therapy, we'd offer professional counseling. And if you have a urologic condition, and you want a real simple approach That may not work for you Don't come here. If you want a pill. That's right. If you want somebody to take care of you and find out for the long run, what's going to be best for you? Whether it be nutritional counseling, In addition to medications that are traditional addition to surgeries that traditional O, r, you know, approaches that tried to take into account multiple different types of approaches to the body. Just the kind of thing that we really enjoyed doing very proud of the product that we put forth. That's right. We have lots of patients. We see all the time over and over for their injections or to follow ups. But it's nice because when I before I started with you and urology, I thought you're all he was like a one time thing. No TV neurologists have a surgery. You're done. You're done with our group. It's so holistic and so evolved that a lot of patients stay with us. In fact, In fact, we have we have one group around town. That's Matt because they think we steal their patients. Well, maybe we do way. Do not. Are you kidding? He's gonna call back. I can't take it. I said have you referred us Because we're good, and then your patient stay with us for something that we do better than you, and now you're mad at us. Technically, it's not stealing If they hand us the patient, and the patient says they want to come great. So we do all these amazing hormone testing and treatment. We have a ton of patients. You just stick around just for that. We're not trying to steal anybody, but we do it. You're really going to get in any case, because I'm pretty sure he listens every week. Okay, So that was a joke Just to catch on are usually mention I'm a comedian. You know, this time of year is a lead up to it's one of my favorite time of the year. Christmas in just a mere two months is going to be the seventh annual pre Thanksgiving mystery vasectomy a thon means we work Saturdays. Yep. Nobody is willing to Sunday this year on Monday and every other Monday through Friday that it is the Super Bowl Super Bowl of vasectomies around here. We do almost 20 vasectomies in two days. That's just per provider. Your wife gets Moses. Yeah, and chocolates. All right. We have TV going for the kiddos. Somewhere years ago, I learned that for some reason. Men like to get a vasectomy on the Friday before Thanksgiving, and I think it's so they don't have to help her out. But I am certain of that. And this year when nobody's traveling and everybody is going to stay at the house, I cannot think of a better time to get your vasectomy. And if you want, avoid the rush, get her right now. Yeah, Just call it now, anyway. Don't wait so that this sector Mathon, But it is fun to say, I'm I'm surprised at the number of misconceptions been have about the vasectomy and a lot of known not to prepare, and some of the things about one of the aspects of.

Leonora Brown Donnelly office manager Matt founder Pia Moses
"office manager" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Our with Dr Mystery and Donnelly. Hello And welcome to the armaments. Health hour. I'm Dr Mr Your host here is always with my co host. The underappreciated but wonderful. Donnelly finally learned your lesson. You maybe Cragen and now I'm appreciated. Hello, everybody. Only, it says, I appreciate it. Luckily, the office that the job of office manager for our practice is still filled. So we're not looking for a candidate. This time. I'm a board certified urologist, and this is a men's health show. This show is brought to you by our urology practice and a U urology specialists. We've been in practice since 2007 where worldwide worldwide Mr Worldwide and we have an anniversary coming up. We sure do way have really enjoyed tryingto expand the scope. Nature of urologic practice, really cutting edge stuff that we provide everything from robotic surgery to minimally invasive BP H er on large prostate procedures. We have, I would have to say one of the most comprehensive male fertility programs in the country. We have poured sort of fellowship trained erectile dysfunction experts. And tell people what that means. The lay people who don't know what fellowship train means. That means that after your four years of college and after your four years of medical school, and after your five years of residency, there's more Dr. Chris Yang spent an entire extra year. Learning about penises, learning nothing about how two men he had help men get erections. Wow, That's what good is the 30 28 years of training, and then he became a doctor. And then and then it became a doctor. It's incredible care that you're going to get in our practice and we are open for business. We're seeing patients via Tele medicine in In the clinic taking all those added precautions. Toe keep you safe and to keep us safe. Donna, why don't you tell people about our practice and where offices are? That's right. You can call us during the week at 5122380762. We're located in central Texas. If you're listening from out of state, this means nothing. Nothing to you, But we're in a round rock, north Austin, South Austin and Dripping Springs, Texas If you are, though, out of state and want one of these amazing second opinion. Prostate cancer discussions with Dr Mystery you can reach out to us. You can email us that armor Men's health at gmail dot com That's armor. Men's health at gmail dot com. You can see our fabulous website by going to our merman's health dot com Dr. Mystery is His real name M I s t a r y. It is not a fake name. It is not. It is gimmicky. Perhaps maybe not. Fake. Donna is a fake name. Her real name is Philip Lula. Oh, So, Donna, I thought what we talk about today is the types of treatment options that people have if they're interested in getting testosterone about every man Listening right now. Okay? LBJ is very excited. So, like 100, different ways. So what? I'm not going to talk about his injections, topical gels. Because those are two things that a lot of men knowabout right. That's pretty common, so I thought I'd talk about two different ways. The testosterone is delivered that not a lot of people know about but is Amazingly effective and useful in certain scenarios and easy That's right. The first one is called the test. Oh, and it is a testosterone you put in your nose. That is fascinating. Is it like a spray It is like is like a little gel You put in your nose and I'll tell you when I first heard about it. I was like this is not gonna work. You know, there is no way this is gonna work. Know what is going to put this nose? Is it thick? I mean, what is that? How is it? It doesn't run out. It's thick enough to stay on the inner, inner inner mucosal membrane of the nose. It has to be applied twice a day. So, for all those reasons, I was like these poor guys they bought a patent is something that's never going to work. And then a couple of interesting things happen in the first one is that the nose became a very discreet and effective way. To be able to absorb testosterone in the body without having any transference to a partner, which has been the biggest downside of creams, right? You don't want to put it on your chest, then you know, not be able to rub up with somebody just woman. Unless you know she got a little too much testosterone, although we do give testosterone women for a variety of reasons, the new test Oh also ends up having another benefit, which is incredible. Which is that on this show? We always talk about how taking testosterone may drop your own bodies, production of testosterone. And could help contribute to making you infertile. But the studies are showing that no test Oh, this nasal based testosterone doesn't do that, And it's because there's something about how it's absorbed through the nose and the dozing on twice a day basis allows for non Interruption of something called the H P T access the Hypo Thalamus, pituitary testes access. And so this is really groundbreaking, interesting stuff because we have a number of patients that come to us. With low testosterone who are interested in maintaining their fertility, and we've given them medicines like claw machine on Astra's all hcg in the past, But some of them may be 30% of them. Don't respond like they would testosterone and we're kind of limited But now we have this added bullet for armamentarium. Which is that the test Oh, You're full of big words. Today. I'm working on my wife's doing the word a day thing, so she'll use that word like 14 times. That's just like Michael's important Bush part Akshay, parked in front of the other type of therapy that we have been doing in our office for many years is the use of the bio T subcutaneous testosterone pellets. Interestingly, I thought that Most all urologist were bio T kind of providers. But as I look around and you speak to the company, that's not the case, many urologists and many pellet providers are putting in. Kind of off brand or compound ID pellets that are not as widely produced as something like what we use bio tea. Also in the past, they were similar to sotto Pelly that's called Soto Palace. And what's beneficial about the bio T pellet is that it's inserted subcutaneous Lee takes about It's in the buttocks. It takes about 15 minutes. It's done with a local anesthetic. And it is a set it and forget it kind of disastrous. Wow. As soon as we dial in your dose, you're going to get these bio T pellets put in After that your levels are going to shoot upto what we consider a good normal level for you, and they're going to stay there for six months. You don't have to keep coming in. You don't have to keep coming in. You don't have to keep applying anything. Even if it's to your nose and you like it. It's not going to involve injections is not going to involve Repeat office visits, you know to the office? Because, really, we only see you once every six of the very first time you get it done. We see you at a month to make sure that your body's responding to appropriately or if you need a booster, and then every six months if you're feeling good will kind of, you know, reiterate that dozing I think that most of our patients we have ah, greater than 90% re pellet ing rate, meaning that patients that get it or really happy with it, the cost our patients which we can also do for women, so women on testosterone and estrogen replacement after menopause. They're also candidates with women the pellet only last three months, right, So they have to come in a little more often, And it's about $300 every three months and with men it's about $600 every three months, six months. Jobs are every six months about $100 a month 100 pretty afford, which I think is very reasonable, and there are a number of low t clinics and hormone clinics that charge up to $2000 a year for their services that you could get for it. $1200 a year s O. If you're paying a lot for your testosterone, or you think that there would be interested in exploring a better way to do your testosterone Now, why would I do that, pal? It's not just because of the lack of having two Manipulated or TTO. Give yourself the dozing regularly. But by giving yourself by having a steady dose, you avoid the peaks and troughs that, eh? A ninja action regimen. Can it can it include a lot of men will feel really good at the beginning of their injection and not so good at the end of their injection. We also see lower incidents of of Ah side effect called Paula Satti Mia, which is where your red blood cell count increases so A number of our patients who developed Polly psyche me or high red blood cell counts on Injectable testosterone to doctor, So do not do so on the pellets. We also see in some patients less of a of a change in mood. So some people report some emotional changes.

testosterone Donna Dr Mystery Texas Dr Mr office manager Donnelly Cragen Mr Worldwide menopause Dr. Chris Yang Philip Lula Paula Satti Mia Austin sotto Pelly Soto Palace Lee H P T Polly partner
Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

"So the question is, is fish oil with PRM's more effective than fish oil without it. Including, PRM's and a fish oil supplement may be awaited, distinguish your product in a very crowded marketplace, and then to sell it at a premium price. But there doesn't appear to be any published research in humans showing that taking a supplement containing PRM's would accomplish anything more than supplementing with fish oil. Get this. I even stumbled across a couple of supplements where P. R. M. stood for pre resolving. Instead of crow resolving mediators and the marketing material explains that pre resolving mediators are the precursors that the body needs to make pro resolving mediators in other words plain old fish oil. As for the actual crow resolving mediators, there's actually very little research of any kind to speak of remember it's only been a few years since we discovered them since then a few studies have looked at the effects of individual cell types in petri dishes but look what happens to a cell in a petri dish and what happens to cells, tissues, and organs, and a living organism is a very different thing. There are also some rodent studies that at least look at the effects of PRM's in Vivo, but these are simply looking for mechanisms of action. They don't compare the relative effectiveness of PRM's to other anti inflammatory agents such as fish oil. Now, I expect that more research will follow, but it'll be a while before we get to the level of research that would test the safety and effectiveness of Pierra supplements. Symptoms or on risk factors in human beings. In the meantime I don't think there's any reason to shell out more for fish oil with PRM's. But that also begs and interesting question and that is should healthcare providers even be selling supplements. Now many healthcare practitioners recommend nutritional supplements to their patients into their clients, and some of them also sell these products. Often, this is seen as a convenience to the. Instead of having to hunt for specific product or research the differences between various brands you can simply walk out the door with your practitioners preferred brand in your hand and sometimes healthcare practitioners have access to brands and products that are not readily available through direct to consumer channels. However, it does introduce thorny issue. We WanNa Trust that are practitioners advice and recommendations are based solely on our needs. But when part of their income stream comes from supplements or other products that they sell, it does introduce a conflict of interest. A more expensive product usually brings in more revenue and so does a more aggressive supplementation regime. I think it's hard for even the most ethical and well intentioned practitioner to be one hundred percent objective in this scenario. A busy practitioner may not have time to thoroughly research and follow the science behind various nutrients. So they rely pretty heavily on the information provided by the sales representative who's going to present their product in the best possible light, exaggerating the positive effects and the positive cash flow and minimizing any gaps in the research or information about alternatives. Sometimes it's not even the practitioner who's choosing these products but an office manager who may not have any training in nutrition, but whose job it is to run a profitable or at least a solvent practice. Now, if all of the sounds kinda familiar, it's because it's very similar to the model by which pharmaceuticals are sold to healthcare professionals most physician education on the effectiveness of drugs and medical devices is provided by the companies that sell them, and as a result, the drugs most frequently prescribed are not necessarily the most effective or the most cost effective choices, and the same is true for nutritional supplements that are sold by healthcare practitioners even the really well meaning ones.

Wanna Trust Pierra Sales Representative P. R. M. Office Manager
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 1 year ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Retail Bankruptcy Filings Keep Coming

Bloomberg Businessweek

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Retail Bankruptcy Filings Keep Coming

"These interviews as news is happening and crossing the Bloomberg terminal kind of fast and furiously. And that was true for the retail industry, Brooks brothers, and so the tabla filing bankruptcy bed Bath and beyond announcing plans to cut about 20% of its stores, So it's been very tough on the retail front just this week alone. Alan Ehlinger is someone who has worked with in the retail industry for some 40 years. He is co founder, senior managing partner of the investment bank MMG Advisors, and he says this time is unlike any other. As a firm. We've been working remotely, um, office closed on March 12th on and on in our office manager. Nobody's been back. We've managed to be in touch with every one of our clients. Right now We're handling three bankruptcies. In a matter of fact, we're missing three bankruptcies. So our world continues, but just continued remotely. I'm quite busy. I might have. Yeah, and so so busy. It sounds like on sort of bankruptcy restructuring side. But presumably and you know, this is what I hear. And I'm sure Carol here is from Investors that we know. I mean, these are the times when maybe there's some values to be had from a partnering up perspective from an acquisition perspective. What are you seeing, or is it too early to tell? But it's very It's a really good question. What we're seeing what we're experiencing. Or in an enormous amount of inbound phone calls. From opportunistic buyers. People who know that there's going to be bargains out there and they're just they've got a lot of dry powder. These are both both strategic as well as private equity. Who are sitting there sitting on the sidelines right now, just waiting to pounce on the right opportunities. I just wantto do a commercial banker this morning and the word that they used was the other shoe hasn't dropped yet. What was I saying? What? While there are a lot of bankruptcies in process at the moment, There are a lot of companies who really haven't um Acknowledge the fact that they're gonna have to make some pretty hard decision in the next couple of months. The PPP money has enabled companies to last a little longer. People wanted to see company owners who want to see what would happen when retail. We opened it. It would be a positive impact on this or not, but you know, we're living through a period of time at the moment where for the first time ever Both the supply side and the demand side have been impacted simultaneously. We've never seen him like that before. Part of which On top of which, when this happened, it happened suddenly. All of a sudden doors were locked and people could not shop in stores and consequent cash flow just dried up. We've never experienced that. You know, in the past when companies Skating, I use the word are skating on thin ice. And they're considering bankruptcy. You planet plant up sometimes weeks, sometimes months in advance, and you're able to come up with a plan of volume and because you kind of know what you're What you're proud of your sales were in the similar dates and you could come up with the financial plan all that fall apart. Because there's been there's been no traffic. So you don't know Del. Filed for Chapter 11 in March, I think was March 11th right? They couldn't. They couldn't even run and going out of business sale because the startled look They're just now reopening, so would be different. We've never experienced anything like this. We also experienced the volume of bankruptcy each that were that were living through right now. And I gotta tell you, I think it's just beginning. No, we're going to see a lot more bankruptcy his time that during the balance of this year, maybe early next year. I will also tell you that we're over stored the country. Yeah, we're over in wine also over inventoried as a country. So the fact that Retail organizations as an example, are using I'm using the term the cover of Cove. It They're using their using this period of time to clean up their balance sheets to get out of unproductive leases. You look like companies like J. C Penny or who had More stores across America. And, you know, a lot of those stores are unproductive. They're in C A D malls. So you know, they don't those air, not money making stores. This gives him an opportunity to clean up their balance sheet. Get up, get out of unproductive leases. And because it's under the under the cover of Kobe, they won't have the stigma. Once they come out of it, they were able to rebuild their

Co Founder Bloomberg Brooks Brothers Office Manager Alan Ehlinger Tabla Mmg Advisors Carol Kobe J. C Penny Managing Partner America
"office manager" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Several years ago, Julie Sanchez was working as an English teacher while living in Shanghai China. The job was fun and interesting, but had one big downside. It wasn't great for making the social connections. She craved as an ex pat in the city. In an effort to meet people who weren't her students, she signed up for a soap making workshop. Little did she know she ended up loving it. Eventually Julia returned home to the US settling into a new job as an office manager for a nonprofit. That job paid the bills so that she could go about enjoying the rest of her life. But even that became difficult when her life turned into a soap opera. Well actually, it wasn't quite that past. She just had a failed relationship. Hey, it happens. And that experience helped to reassess everything else. You see being back. Home was tougher, Julie. Before China, she lived in both Belgium and Japan and visit many other countries in between. She decided to combine her nomadic history with her love of soap making. Specifically, she wanted to create fragrance soaps inspired by sense from around the world. She's been one hundred and fifty dollars on soap, molds, mold, poor basis and fragrant oils. Then she caught to creating. The techniques Julie learned back in. China quickly came back to her. It didn't take long to produce her first successful bar. She called it Amsterdam. It was made using hempseed oil something. The city is famous for. But even then she wasn't doing your hobby as business. It was just a passion project. Remain that way for another year while she experimented with different sense. Eventually though Julia was making so many soaps that only seemed rational to try and sell some after all. How many showers can one person take a day? and Mid Twentieth Eighteen. She summoned the courage to open your own store, calling it the adventurous Soco. Julie got on her soapbox and started telling everyone. She could about her products. She made instagram and facebook accounts posting images of her soaps to get the word out. And it worked less than two weeks later. She made her first sale from an instagram follower. Although the sound the APP made when the sale came through wasn't loud. cha-ching the excitement of receiving it kept her up all night. The exuberant feeling that sale inspired in dirt, it roll this way into the end of the year and Julie ended up having lucrative Christmas. By the time January one arrived. She already earned three thousand dollars, selling her soaps off from a tiny initial investment, and while holding her day job. Next she worked to. Improve product line. She designed imprinted her own labels, and even had professional photos taken for free by using a little hack. She would send pre soap samples to aspiring photographers looking to enhance their portfolios in return they'd send. A professional product shot back to her. She joined soap, making and travel related facebook groups and shared her products. They're on top of that. She used advertising platform to send shoppers to her listings. A method she says is responsible for the lion share of sales. She expects sales to double in her second full year of business, while some businesses are all washed up to well. You probably know why that big thing of two thousand twenty. The point is Julie's doing better than ever with more people at home. More people are online shopping and her sales have increased. Why isn't generating enough income for her to leave her day job? She's had her best months yet since the craziness started. To be clear, this increase isn't just due to luck. The whole time Julie has been expanding her range of soaps and even introducing new product lights in the form of lip, bombs, perfume, oils and more. All inspired by sense from around the world..

Amsterdam Julia Julie Sanchez Shanghai China facebook Little Mid Twentieth Eighteen US office manager Soco Belgium Japan
Senate report raises ‘significant concerns’ about FAA oversight in Hawaii in wake of chopper crashes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Senate report raises ‘significant concerns’ about FAA oversight in Hawaii in wake of chopper crashes

"The FAA once again in the cross hairs for apparently being too cozy with companies it regulates and a key Senate committee wants it investigated this time the issue surrounds the Hawaii field office manager he's accused of having a tight relationship with the helicopter company involved in three crashes over two years one of them killed three people last April well now Senate committee is asking the transportation department inspector general to investigate the committee says its own probe isn't finished yet but it already raises significant concerns about FAA oversight in

FAA Office Manager Senate Hawaii Field
"office manager" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"office manager" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The office manager and and budget didn't have any authority to withhold the funds to Ukraine because the act permits it only this is the empowerment act only under certain circumstances those circumstances according to the general accounting office were not met managing money research the well what will withholding the funds because of doing so is necessary to ensure the day weren't span and in a manner that could conflict with the president's foreign policy but the general accounting office he described the holding wasn't him permissible policy deferral and that goes directly to article one of the impeachment period you cannot withhold funds appropriated by Congress to suit your own political purposes to to Jane your own political meetings and and lamp harness and clearly that's what they were doing there's no question about it no question about he said I wouldn't he's one of the opportunities he's under indictment I write all will look he's under that so what so what you mean people who are under indictment can't tell the truth he's out there on Anderson Cooper and and Rachel Maddow always with the New York times he's telling these people everything he knows and he's producing documents and what is Donald Trump say war war war I don't know him I never met the man I don't know I'm I'm not I've never heard of him I don't know anything about it but he said that eight times you know one partner said every time he says that I'll release another picture any re still video of him with Donald Trump and others Tom now being at Mar a Lago.

office manager Ukraine president Congress Jane Anderson Cooper Rachel Maddow New York times Donald Trump partner Tom Lago general accounting
Jason Fried on Treating Workers Like Adults

Distributed, with Matt Mullenweg

08:24 min | 1 year ago

Jason Fried on Treating Workers Like Adults

"Jason. I am so glad expected. Likewise basecamp formerly known as thirty seven signals has been so many ways and inspiration for automatic over the years and I'm sure countless ever distributed companies. So thank you for that I of course and I would say likewise I mean you guys are even more distributed than us so oh I feel like we're year the ideal situation where we're getting there because we're we still have about fifteen people in Chicago and we have an office there were maybe are you getting rid of so. We're GONNA be following your footsteps so we we had zero office but then with the acquisition of Tumbler. We've now got a space in New York again. So we've got the direction Right it's funny how we keep trading. Yeah we're not sure we're GONNA do but our lease ends in August so we're thinking about moving on as as in moving on to nothing and then trying to do that for a while and see what happens in if that works out. We'll do that if not will We can always go back to getting off again but we'll see just for our listeners. Who might not be as familiar with base camp? What you kinda publicly share about the scale of the company customers number of employees that sort of thing? Well we've about fifty-six people who work at base camp and we have close to one hundred thousand paying customers all in across all of our different products Although basecamp is the primary product but we have basecamp way of high-rise. We have a few others but basically it's base camp in all three generations. We have classic base camp tune based Cam three. This is a specific as we'll be but we generate tens of millions and annual revenues annual prophets. And we've been around for twenty years to Sir Twenty th year in business and we've been profitable since the start kind of a big thing for us is to always be profitable so that's that's Kinda only KPI. We don't really use those terms but that's the only one we have. Which is let's make sure we make more money than we spend every year in in other than that whatever happens happens? How do you think about investing more or not? We don't have a investment shortfall. Kind of thing. It's not like if we only had an extra. I'm just making up rough numbers here. Next million bucks we would do I do x or y like we. We have everything that we need to do. And we don't want more people because we want to keep the company's small we possibly can so we we have a bit of A. It's on a dilemma really. But it kind of is in a sense because I feel like we're doing everything we could do and having more wouldn't help us In fact I think in in some ways it would probably hurt us. We'd be a little bit slower. We be probably doing too much work at the same time which I think can often dilute what you're really trying ado. We might take on more stuff than we really want to. We might just find work invent worked. Keep people busy. There's always of course more work to do but we kind of believe in doing it at a certain pace and I think having more people or fewer people would at this point would can mess up that pace when you say a smallest possible. Do you mean by customers or by colleagues and employees. I mean employees. I mean The number of people who work here. We've always wanted to stay at fifty or less but we're about fifty six right now and that feels like a really good place to be so. We're very comfortable with that. The thing is is that we could have considerably more people but again we're just not really. Maybe maybe we're just not good at it. I mean I'll just take the blame for that like I. I'm not probably good at running a much larger company than this and I don't think David is either. I don't think we want to. I think it also keeps Edward honest in terms of the experiments ruling to do which I didn't some places more and more and more experiments is a good thing. I think a few or thing but I think too many people people get stuck doing things that never ship over and over and over and over and over and I think that can be a bit demoralizing. So we think we've got kind of good enough feeling here right now at least but then again we're the largest we've ever been and I'm sure when we were thirty people. We said You know thirties enough. So you know we're here fifty six at feels like enough right now. We'll see how it shakes. A louder probably has to do with with the success of this other product. WE'RE GONNA launch next year because the one part of a company that that does have to continue to grow is customer service so product development doesn't have to grow. We have enough people there but as we have more and more and more customers of course we have to make sure we support them at the highest level. So that's that's one place where growth does continue. You need to happen even if we don't want it to offer automatic that's been pretty larch it's been appointed half of our company was a customer service just because we wanted to maintain a certain level there and as the customers went up. You just got kind of goes literally one of those things yes. Of course you want to invest in making the product easier documentations self help and everything like that. But at some unlevel he wanted a person talking to a person. You need some more of them. You know you WANNA do documentation and make things easier to everything. But I've also I've been sort of changed my mind and a little bit on on it. I think earlier on when we just had fewer people we are really focused on. You know like on the self help side of things and you know making ensure documentation was really good and answer great online and people could find their own answers and we WANNA make sure that's true too but actually see customer service interactions as a competitive advantage manage. Most companies are pretty terrible at it and the larger the company is it seems like the worst they get try to email. You know Google get help and say forget it or Amazon sometimes times but not always that great although quite good sometimes also it's one of these things are the larger you get the more customers you have just the hardest to maintain that level standard. Have you tried to live chat for customer support yet. Yeah we do that sometimes and it sort of depends on availability and then we also use twitter as well for that those those things all work out really well as well it just depends we wanna meet people essentially where they are with the exception of we don't have a published phone number but if you want us to call you we will live. Chat was a big step function for us. Just both young terms of agent and customer happiness. Because you cannot resolve things on the spot actually know we do support rotation where everyone the company goes into us. Customer service at least one week here is actually coming up and I think a couple of weeks. You're journeyman. Yeah so if you contact us and I think it's the third week of December you might get me. We do the same thing we call it. Everyone on support One day every like roughly six weeks or eight weeks or however like the the company you know the the number of people are you know as we rotate through. So we'll each do support for a few days a year throughout the year. It's great. I'm glad you guys do that too. I think it's one of the most valuable things you can do for reasons come rotary hearing from customers and understand the language. They're using syncing their frustrations or their happiness or their whatever it might be the and then also just having a lot of respect for customer service as a as a job in as a career in a lot of places. Customer Service is sort of treated as a almost as a part time. Job as a stepping-stone somewhere else but I think it can be a wonderful career and it's just really nice to see the people who've dedicated their time here in this my only experience of course to work in customer service for five six seven eight plus years and really see the work that they do and support it is and and it's our it's our doors are frontline. It's really important experienced. What is your company breakdown right now in terms of roles in the fiftyish? I'll give you some rough numbers because some people are sort of multiple things so he can't. It's like if I give you the counselors might not add up to fifty six so we have about Currently a belief sixteen people on customers support and that also includes. I believe. You've this might make it seventeen or still sixteen. The team lead so all of our managers or team leads are are working managers and that they do the work too so sixteen ish On customer service we have seven ish on technical operations all the server work that kind of stuff all the level infrastructure work then we have four people people on what we call the SIP team which is security infrastructure and performance. We have about seven fulltime designers. We have around fifteen. Gene developers actually fewer than that because some of them are now on SIP on the team around that number. We have two people who do our podcast work. We have One data analyst. We have an office manager slash keeper. We have a head of people ops than we have David who's CTO Oh and museum CEO. We have a head of strategy and ahead of marketing.

David Chicago New York Jason. Twitter Google Office Manager Product Development Analyst Edward Amazon CTO CEO
"office manager" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"I help you yes I would like to speak with the office manager I heard my name is Rebecca how may I help you Rebecca yeah you're the person they told me who handles complaints yes that's me yes that is you and I have a complaint okay let me just put you on a brief hold and I'll be right back what's your name my name is Casey Ryback okay KC one second okay I got a pen and paper so could you spell your name for me can't think your last name R. Y. B. A. C. K. okay and what is the nature of your call well the nature of my complaint is I'm I'm happy with my lay sick procedure okay I'm sorry to hear that eight eight can you be more specific yes it's ruining my life oh okay I don't understand it running your life meaning you're having blurred vision or you know actually it's quite the opposite it's perfect I don't understand what you mean what do you mean perfect well after my lay sick procedure I went back home and the first person I saw was my wife and news to me it didn't look like my wife I'm not sure I'm following what you're saying she looked a lot different than what I'm used to okay you mean clearer yes extremely clear I have been a good vision since we met and now I can see her perfectly I am not following okay because of your company and the lace of procedure you're going to ruin my marriage I can actually see what my wife looks like now and it's horrible I'm not sure how we can help you with that case here I mean if your vision Hey I'll give you an example for the last decade I thought my wife looked exactly like the actress Nicole Kidman you know who that is yes yes she is but after lay sick my wife looks more like carrot top and I found that out the hard way would you want to be married to carrot top I don't think so are your writing I'm sorry but I've never had a complaint like that before and I I'm not sure how we can help you with you've got to do something about this I have no idea I mean maybe we can set up an appointment we can see the doctor I can talk I think I think that you need to on laser my eyes for delays or or whatever it is and I need a full refund it really doesn't work that way what we do here is we're in the business of correcting people well yeah you're in the business a merit just you're in the business of ruining marriages articulate back it sounds like your your vision has improved yes it has unfortunately and I brought my wife with me to the consultations somebody could have pulled me aside and said Hey just so you know when your vision gets better you're gonna be extremely disappointed only would have appreciated that honesty that have been rated number how you that your wife looks one way I mean that I'm sure people noticed me didn't take one look at her if you got good vision and you can see the resemblance the carrot top I feel really uncomfortable Mister right back you're uncomfortable let me ask you a question are you married I'm sorry that's none of your business okay well let's say you were married to somebody you thought was a very it like a like a John Stamos type character and then you got your eyes done and you come home and it's another John who's not as attractive as the stables one give me a John that you don't find attractive I don't know any John you don't know any unattractive Johns right has nothing to do with what my job entails you know the kind of complaint that you're making and nothing to do with your there has to be done in the world that you don't find attractive and if you thought you were with the John stay most looking guy and you came home you saw Audley John you'd be all set it is getting really uncomfortable for me and I don't like that you're asking me about whether a Mehreen and what John is attractive this is completely out of line and inappropriate and I'm going to end the call what if you thought you were married to John Stamos and you came home and it looked like a mash up of your co workers grace and Brian good what what are you talking about well I'm talking about the fact that your coworkers grace and Brian set you up for a prank phone call what do you mean I mean that this is actually Jubal from broken jewel in the morning doing a phone tap on you and your coworkers Grayson Brian say you up you really had me going I want to play a joke on you because I guess you deal with all kinds of weird complaints yes I DO but never anybody that has perfect vision if you found out your Medicare top you'd be upset I promise click here bad looking no John.

office manager Rebecca one second
Scary Stories From The Eek-conomy

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:44 min | 2 years ago

Scary Stories From The Eek-conomy

"We are exploring some of our darkest economic fears and our slightly worried about aliens from outer space in Nineteen fifty four in December nineteen fifty four there are a whole bunch of people in Chicago the Planet Clarion so this group called the seekers and they got a ton of media attention is looks like you know looks like Iran is in fact what they did was doubt that we people convince themselves of something the facts proved them you see right now in a political discourse is is a lot of people. I'm really afraid that the cognitive distances kicking in and we've splintered US oh that's poetic next up jared Europe some of the big important economies Germany in particular seems to be slowing down and markets will take care of themselves yeah there stoically very worried about over-heating about inflation Connie's is a way to really entrench these downturns or slow growth it's a prevention is happening exactly not only do you need an ounce of prevention space aliens too big economic fears because if you and I bought our own economic fears in fact this shirt and it's a picture of an inverted yield curve people make you healed off recessions to come right but also upside down words saying because the inverted yield curve does have a good track record of because it has such a strong track record it is a monster to me it is something that makes me worried with black pants and kind of green ish jacket I don't okay spirits is a term invented by the economist John Maynard Keynes to explain the role of emotions Jim shop because they're always like a billion costume places in New York that go into like any empty and you know this is New York Halloween subway in New York is always kind of a spectacle right everybody nobody was dressed up in the opposite I thought like what is going on so two years ago we spent almost ninety dollars per household on Halloween the sheer it's about spend extra money on a costume and then of course if people are pulling back on their Halloween spending maybe means they're the National Retail Federation reported that fewer people are celebrating Halloween at all dressed up and I found the Devin Miller you know our office manager like the sweetest the things in fact so I thought I would like bring him into into the studio and ask him like into work dressed up and then you like became discouraged and like just took off the costume that and then what happens okay so this morning I dressed up as a lumberjack my normal routine given the place ready for the day but it just I don't know I just wasn't feeling can't muster halloween spirit like that's a bad sign like I feel like Devon's always modesto all week like Jack Lynch and ready to go devon will you be our indicator lean close is our indicator for this Halloween. I think it's I think it speaks in

New York Devin Miller John Maynard Keynes Chicago Jared Europe National Retail Federation Devon Iran Office Manager Jack Lynch Germany Connie JIM Modesto Ninety Dollars Two Years
Thailand's new visa troubles

Correspondents Report

05:54 min | 2 years ago

Thailand's new visa troubles

"Now unless you're an expat living in Thailand or a regular business traveler to that country perhaps you've probably never heard of the TM thirty visa tobacco tobacco in recent months though it's been causing outrage among the Southeast Asian nations one million strong expert community it stems from a forty year old law that has never have been enforced until now with Thai chilies determined to crack down on international criminals hiding out in the country South East Asia correspondent Catherine. This has the story I finally landed my dream job. I was now a foreign correspondent but little did I know just how long it would take to get my visa or all that I was flying into the middle of visa crackdown controversy facing foreigners the topic of conversation tonight as you can see is Thailand's controversial immigration Russian laws and the consequences will come back to that but first we need to go through a little history it all comes down to a low written almost forty a US ago after the fall of the Kamei Rouge regime in Cambodia in nineteen seventy nine. There was a major influx of refugees across the border. People people were also coming in via boat from Vietnam so as a security measure tile authorities put reporting requirements in place to monitor the movement amount of foreigners but as with much in Southeast Asia it was never publicly enforced until now under the system all non immigrant visa holders that is any expat living in the country is now required along with their landlord to report win they leave their home province and upon their overturn within twenty four hours every single time so for example if you live in Bangkok and traveled to poo kit for the Kent you're required to report and of course the system used to enforce it doesn't work so smoothly as you can imagine being a foreign foreign correspondent. I travel a lot for this job like many other experts so Wanda standardly it's causing furor among the Expat community immunity and has become such a hot topic of discussion over drinks at Thailand's foreign correspondent club. The board invited immigration officials to explain blind why it was needed. Dominic folder chaired the discussion. This law is from forty years ago from the Cold War period and the bureaucracy that is being applied to administer it is from the same era. How can you justify this. They they onerous for seizure this procedure that causes a lot of difficulty an inconvenience to people. I can absolutely understand that skip your heart Tom doing that but understand us. You're going to know that you start that hot. We've tried to make things easy. System is erratic non-functioning so basically a system has been launched which people like this are expected to deal with the does not work is is that a good way of doing things is about telling your wife that you're already at home. Trust me is went back and forward like these four hours with the immigration officials giving away little to satisfy the frustrations expressed by the crowd and insisting the changes are needed to catch foreign criminals both just going back to this idea of why why this suddenly became because nobody has noticed a particular deterioration and in the security situation in Thailand. It's not apparent on the outside surface things. It's been changing in the country Thailand in all over the world. The the criminal amid is getting stronger. The requirements are so onerous landlords some apartment complexes are erecting signs saying no oy foreigners while others jokingly say the new tourism slogan in Thailand is travel less. A group of experts have launched a petition against it and perhaps even more concerning is the impact on investment with some investors weighing up whether it's just too hard to do business here. Luckily Luckily I have a local office manager. Who's able to help me out with the paperwork but this was just one of the many steps required of me as I madly sought about getting Ching my visa. We started the process even before left Australia bought. It still took three months to gain approval. When I got an interview with the immigration in department fairly soon after my arrival I thought it would sail through but no it dragged on and on and because of the time it took I had to travel in and out of the country a few times to renew my tourist visa and then my husband and I were required to travel to the Thai Embassy in another country to register for a journalist visa. We thought we could go in and out in one day but as we eagerly lined up in a long line of other expensive tie embassy input on pen. We were told it would take three days to process. That's only gave us a three-month visa from there. We had to apply to extend it for for a year. I had started to wonder if I can get my visa before my year-long posting was over then a week later back in Bangkok and after hours of waiting in the immigration office we had good news. We finally gained approval a few days later. I found out I was being posted to our Washington Washington bureau so the process dance all over again. Let's hope this time it doesn't take quite so long. Catherine this with final report out of Bangkok.

Thailand Bangkok Catherine Kamei Rouge Southeast Asia United States Cambodia Thai Embassy Wanda Standardly Vietnam Washington Washington Dominic Office Manager TOM Kent Australia Twenty Four Hours Three Months Forty Years
"office manager" Discussed on Dentist Money

Dentist Money

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on Dentist Money

"So if you start with one person or you have five people, you're going to have the same. We're gonna have the same duties, right? So let's first define what those duties are. So the way I broken down, as you ever -ception est, right? That's the greeter. Phones, the person the first impression for the patients you have the treatment coordinator, the scheduler the financial coordinator. And then the office manager or somebody running the show. Right. So I have those broken up. So if I'm calling on insurances, calling on claims, you know, I'm the financial coordinator, if I'm sitting with the patient and trying to get them to accept the treatment and talking about their out of pocket. I'm the treatment coordinator fun, trying to fill the schedule or key people in the scheduling the scheduler. The reason I say that, that's important is because we have to, like, I shouldn't be answering the phone like a financial coordinator, I should be answering the phone a receptionist to different types of personalities. Right. So sometimes in the front we have to do it all now as we grow. It's like okay, now we have two people in the front who's good at what or what role do you like? So what I normally do as I grew. My practice is if I had one person is okay, what do you love about your job? I love greeting patients. I love the phones. I love those great. You're going to do this. What don't you love? I hate the financial part. I don't like the great. We're going to find. Somebody who's good at that. And so that's how I would say we grow the team and let's go find some news really good with numbers or detail. Right. And as you grow now, a lotta offices have two three or four people, you can't have two or three or four people doing everything each person should have their own responsibility. So if I have five people, I'm gonna have a financial coordinator,.

coordinator office manager
Graphic Design Startup Canva Hits $2.5 Billion Valuation

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Graphic Design Startup Canva Hits $2.5 Billion Valuation

"Business wards daily is brought to you by Dell. Don't miss out on Dell small business month celebration. Get up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors, call eight seven seven by Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven b u y de l l for tech advice and one on one partnership. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Tuesday may twenty eight. These days, practically every entrepreneur marketer, and even office manager needs to be a graphic designer as well. Instagram's wild growth alone has created an explosion of demand for visual, content and the skills to build it, our insatiable craving for all things visual has been a boon to Melanie Perkins. The Australian co-founder of Canada Canada is a web based design platform intended to feel intuitive for the average user if you haven't heard of canvas, yet, you probably will soon Perkins. Thirty two years old started the company from her mother's living room back in twenty twelve sensing a need in the market for an easier. More cohesive way for non designers to produce things like high school. Yearbooks, six years later that homegrown company has more than fifteen million users, designing everything from logos to social media posts, too. Resignations is just been valued at two and a half billion dollars. Double its previous valuation in mid may famed venture capitalist. Mary meeker chose Canada as the first investment from her new fund called bond can be received seventy million dollars in that round from meeker and partner investors the investment at that sky high valuation was notable. But arguably, it was even more notable coming from meeker who grew her fortune by helping to spot growth companies. We all know today companies like Dell Google Amazon, EBay and into it just a name few that she chose Canada as her first investment says a lot about the growing design space and about Canada itself can book is a broad platform encompassing design tools photography, and presentation software, it competes across the spectrum with several bigger names from adobe to shudder stock to Google, but one enormous company in particular should now sit up and take notice. We're talking about, you Microsoft. Perkins loves to gleefully chat, about the dreaded death by PowerPoint is a way to point out that Campbell offers competitive presumably, sexier presentation tools with the new funding Campbell plans to go after big customers, those enterprise businesses for whom PowerPoint has been standard for far too long. If you believe Perkins it remains to be seen whether this little Australian company can compete at the level of a Microsoft, but if it could outgrow Perkins mothers living room, this fast, all bets are off. I'm wondering this is business worse daily. If you like our show gives a five star rating in a review on apple podcasts, would you. We sure appreciate it. I'm David Brown will be back with you tomorrow. Business worse. Daily is brought to you by Dell. The clock is ticking on Dell small business month celebration. Enjoy up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors, plus a free external hard drive with select computer purchases before it's too late. Call eight seven seven by Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven. B. U. Y. D E L L for tech advice and one on one partnership, eight seven seven by Dow.

Dell Melanie Perkins Canada Canada Mary Meeker Intel David Brown Technology Advisor Microsoft Instagram Co-Founder Office Manager Google Campbell Apple Canada Adobe B. U. Y. D E
"office manager" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"And this is all why was doing like, Twitter and vine stuff. So they sort of knew me as the guy who is doing stuff online on the internet. What nine like peeing for productions where I got to know like the guys for the new from vine. Yeah, they started. Well, I don't think they knew me before. But they saw that. I was doing that stuff. While also an intern at the company. Okay. This guy comedy. So eventually, I just like Rosenstein who was producing all the comedy stuff was like, okay. Well, he likes comedy. Well, if you wanna work these comedy things go for like he had a meltdown where I met you and like just a peeing on their different comedy productions and whatnot. And just getting in there. And then when I left I went to be office manager at the ADHD, if you know them they weren't animation studio that does not exist anymore. It was like they made next and Lucas broS and like from like short animation series, and I was doing that for a while just like moving computers and figuring out what angle to put TV's at. How did you get the first internship, though? I just reached out to a million people. It really was just like a shotgun approach of being like, okay, what's on entertainment careers dot net. And then sending them resume and being like, here's all of the things that I have done before. And I went to film school, and I'm capable of doing this. And I have a car, and I think they were just like, yeah, he works. I just got. Well, you weren't making any money. No. Were you working job or your parents helping? I my parents were helping. Yeah. Because I was I'm not saying that to embarrass you. I'm totally. She's an important. Yeah. It's not put my boot straps up in. Now, just got John dude everybody that saying they put their bootstrap. There's somebody. There's usually there might be. Somebody to the side. That's like, yeah. If you can't eat we'll help right? And it's always like there's like you're not the most layer privilege where it's like, your parents pay for everything. But it's like if you go down if you steps there's something where it's like a lot of people don't have that. And for me, it was not that deep. It was I was still in college. My parents were taken care of me, right? Or I was living off of just saved money. I have that part of the story is usually skipped over I like, including it. So so you they Vining they were like thing, and then the ADHD, and then the thing, and then I left ADHD because someone who was an assistant at read our went onto work at funny or die. And which is kinda like we're putting together a digital team. I know you like did all those cool vine stuff all that. Cool. Vine stuff with tiny men. You didn't want to be known as the vine guy and twice vine open the door for you. It keeps becoming a thing where.

ADHD Rosenstein Twitter Lucas broS intern Vining office manager John
"office manager" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on AP News

"He while also a medical mind was a brilliant pedophile. The seventy one year old Bartow was sentenced to at least seventy nine years in prison for the sexual assault with thirty one children. Most patients nineteen people gave victim impact statement. Johnny Varta found me his nurses found me the office manager failed me in the state medical board failed me so many people saying quiet for so long led to the sexual assault of so many children the state medical board throughout a case in two thousand against Bartolo. Allowing him to keep practicing medicine demonstration held on the steps of the California capital on the one year anniversary of the police shooting death of Stefan Clark, Sacramento. Attorney Benjamin Crump who represents Clark's family says there's an effort underway to change state law to foresaw police shooting deaths to be considered by a grand jury. We want that to be changed to compare the district attorney to submit the circus. Stances of all involved. Police shoe is to a grand jury bark was shot and killed by police who were called to his grandparents neighborhood on reports as someone trying to break into cars along the street that night officers say they fear for their lives thinking he was holding a gun in his hand. It was a cell phone three. People are dead five others wounded in an attack on a passenger trolley and the Netherlands three of them are in critical condition. Police have a suspect in custody. Prosecutors say it's too soon to say if it's a terror attack Mozambique's President says upwards of a thousand people have been killed by a typhoon that hit four days ago in the massive flooding that followed the storm the Red Cross estimates. That ninety percent of a port city of a half million people side there badly damaged or destroyed. There is widespread flooding and storm damage in two other southeast African nations. This is AP radio news. The Pentagon has sent a list of hundreds of military construction projects to congress some of which could be cut to fund President Trump's border wall. AP's? Jackie Quinn reports the projects on the list. Total nearly thirteen billion dollars. President Trump says he wants three point six billion for the wall is a twenty page list of projects across the US. And around the world worth about thirteen billion dollars that might be slashed to make way for the border wall. House Democrats say when their colleagues see military plans being scaled back in their communities. It might push them to vote to override President Trump's veto of the measure that would negate his emergency declaration, one example, North Carolina home to GOP Senator.

President Trump Johnny Varta assault President Bartolo Bartow Stefan Clark AP Benjamin Crump Mozambique Jackie Quinn Attorney US Red Cross California Netherlands North Carolina office manager
"office manager" Discussed on Dentist Money

Dentist Money

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on Dentist Money

"Have you hit those points where you personally, I don't I think the way the way that maybe I would encourage people to think about this. And maybe this is the way I shift, maybe the I don't know how you frame it up in your own mind either. But would be an intriguing thing to think how you really think about that. I think there are paths that you go down that are requiring certain parts certain skills that you don't have. Okay. And that becomes evident like, oh, yeah. But there's never a point where you should stop you that you have to stop growing because you can find someone else to help you with it. Well, even like, let's just take the case of someone who this is probably the most relevant case, you've got a dentist who's tried to grow. But it's just not working. They're not getting an associate to burn through a couple. They're not glowing new patients. They're not have to satellite locations, but there's no profit. Yeah. They're just not able to bring in. An office manager like the problem isn't necessarily that you can't do grow. The problem is you're were hitting some they're some attributes about your personality that are probably not optimal for. The bringing on an associate or denting talent or holding some people to some goals or building came in capital or there's something about it. And I think what's more important isn't like, I think people well, sometimes hit a I think there are definitely people that. Should pivot a little bit and make a shift in who they think they are or what they think they should be or, but I don't think that that you should ever stop growing. I don't think you should ever stop improving your income improving your career improving growing revenue your grow. If you're an owner growing collections and continued expand. I just think there's a continual. Awareness that you have to develop of what things you're not as good at as someone else might be. And and and those are really hard things to learn like, I just feel like I'm still learning that extra myself, you know, and there's things I think I might be good up. But then I'm I wake up the next day. And I'm like, I've always thought I was good at that. But I don't think I really am. I what I think why did I ever think that was something that I was doing well, and I wanna to go rock climbing. There's too much like obsolete thinking this way where it's like I fail or succeed or I'm like meant to be an own amazing at it, or I'm not I'm meant to be a seven practice, you know, ten location or not location or I can't grow to a second one. So I can't really isn't about that. I mean, you can use your opportunity as an entrepreneur as a dentist to bring all kinds of talent into your business. You can share ownership you can borrow to expand. You can use the money..

office manager
"office manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"I think salary to programs. It's a six year degree that. I'll get into more years. All right. So two more years from now what happens give me the dream scenario. Two more years. Now, what happens in two more years I've been in healthcare ever since I was seventeen so hopefully, I can take on sort of an office manager type position, okay? In healthcare. Yes, sir. Because you have this degree. And if you don't really like sales right now is just it's not really your thing. And you're scared to death. If I don't hit my goal. I'm going to get fired and my wife and kids are gonna starve so. Correct. Number one. They're not gonna starve so you need to relax your fear a little bit. I appreciate your heart. I think your heart's in the right place. Okay. A love it that you care so much, and you're worried about this. But three is you're not gonna starve your talent to twenty year old. I'd like to see you move out of the sales role. And I'd like to see you get in a position where you are in healthcare, and you are in the business side of things. And again, you know, the space better than I do. But what I mean is I'd like to see you working for somebody in some role some support role that is doing what you eventually want to do. I wanna see you working for that man or woman interstate what I'm saying because that is valuable experience for you. To work for somebody who's doing what you wanna do. You're watching how they do things you're learning from them. You're taking notes and keeping this part to yourself. How I would do this differently. It's not there to be a spirit of criticism. But it is a spirit of owning going. Okay. I understand why they did it this way. I think maybe I'd do it this way. And I'd like to see you get out of a sales role in to a support role. How much money do you make? That's the problem. So right now, I'm bringing about one thirty five. Whoa. Okay. Yeah. Now, I just did sit everything I needed to say. Because you're not, you know, why I'm laughing because you're not gonna move into that role. I'm talking about and make anywhere close to one thirty five. Like forty five fifty thousand dollars position. I know twice started laughing. So now, my vice is different. You know, what my vice is now Ashton put your big boy pants on. Put your big boy pants on. You. Gotta get over this fear. You gotta start doing great. You're not giving them your full effort. You said it yourself. You're not smashing things you probably see sales as role that you can learn and get better at you can be trained you can become better. And what you need to do, sir is realized that this sales role that's paying you. Really good money is setting you up beautifully to step in two years from Allen to the space. You won't be in. It's good money. And it is temporary. So you can handle it. Stop worrying about. What happened to you last time? Here's here's how we avoid that issue. Kill crush at work hard. When you start to go on making really good money. See here's your problem Ashton. You're.

Ashton office manager Allen forty five fifty thousand doll twenty year two years six year
"office manager" Discussed on Nobody Told Me That! with Teresa Duncan

Nobody Told Me That! with Teresa Duncan

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on Nobody Told Me That! with Teresa Duncan

"So how, how many times do you hear about the rogue office manager like myself is just screwing everything. Well, I also hear about the road hygienist or assistance. Well, you know, in the scheduling we did three most column elsewhere in the back of the front. And that's always the first we talk about. It's so funny because every time that I bring that up though, so many heads, nod or people leaning over kind nudged each other like me. You know, it's like, I think it's really fascinating that again, I think it goes back to people take ownership of that schedule. It's my schedule. This is my patient, you know in there's nothing wrong with that, but it certainly, yeah, it caused a lot of friction in the practice and I've, I've seen firsthand. You know, you have to. I was obviously the cause of that, you know, for some of them side, like to apologize to those Genesis in that I screwed over during those years except for those two in, you know who you are, do not. Petty. I'm so sorry because I haven't had enough coffee, throw it out there. Just just, you know, manifests the university, they know who they are. So. If they're listening to this, I'm so sorry. Don't listen to me anymore. People who don't like you are listening to your podcasts. That's when you know you have a darn. I have to listen to your voice just to get that information. There was one other thing that I used to hear that would just went, try me up a lot. I think this is across the board when we would hire a new person that come in and we're training them if they said, well, that's not how we did it in our office. That's not that one time I'll let you go. But if you say that more than twice in the first hour I'm done, I'm just I'm just done because you should be coming in wanting to know how we do it in this office. Not how you're used to doing it. You know, when you change jobs, that's the expectation. You come with the blank slate. You can't walk into a job in expect them to cater to what you're used to. It used to drive me insane. Oh, talk about looking through the windshield instead of the rear view mirror..

office manager
Richard Nongard- Being an Active Viral Leader

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

08:14 min | 3 years ago

Richard Nongard- Being an Active Viral Leader

Richard Engineer John Deere Australia British Airways Innov Peter Drucker Steve O'brien Chief Executive Officer Office Manager Consultant Stephen Stephanie Nuys Doug Amazon Lincoln Programmer Brian Forty Years
"office manager" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on LadyGang

"So then lo and behold one night as i'm leaving the box office manager i mean that sounds fancy away those who that it was hank from around the corner and guy here's also making five dollars said that um and asia left a card at the box office and of course who what agent comes to skid row to see a play on not having high hopes right turns out it was this really kind of big deal agent at a mediumsize sag accredited agency who saw me in this crazy kabuki makeup singing poorly and just i don't know he just liked it he said he had been brought there on a some crazy blind date and he was having a ho chi are of unfair brought there on a date forced to go there and he was so pleased to have met me and um so i went in and i met with every one of his agency and vetted it and he became my first really great agent and he was instrumental in building my career but you know damn that's how it works right like you don't get your first grade agent because you went to the right party in you schmooze the right person and it doesn't work like that and that's part of what i try to explain in the book is the difference between what you hear it's like and what it's really like yeah i wanna get to a couple of stories from the book but first we need to talk about steve corrales glow up this year he got so hot what happens we always knew he was that you did of i did not hawkins are they have he's now yeah was he was because of the fischler as of note as many of these like got the round glasses and he's got like kind of like cute he must have gotten a stylised i dunno do you think he's ha i always thought he was hot all and it was like a talent crush you know what i mean like someone sweat now is likely as of late attractive ya silver fox hot yoga he's.

office manager hank steve corrales hawkins five dollars
"office manager" Discussed on First and Last

First and Last

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"office manager" Discussed on First and Last

"A lot of times you'll try to compare it to their workplace where it's like oh if you were an accountant for example and you add something on your personal life but you weren't charge and there were there was nothing than your business should have no recourse but we gotta stop comparing professional athletes with being an office manager or any other sort of typical job part of your job as an athlete unfortunately or fortunately will comes to the territory being a public figure and making all that money because a big part of the reason why you make those millions of dollars is because you are representing a huge brand in a very public way these guys have tons of followers on social media they have the ability to speak directly to fans now so part of what comes of that is a behavior restriction that maybe doesn't exist for everyone and i'm i'm sorry but i i agree with that i think that's okay i think that if you're going to make that kind of money on the basis of being out in the public space then you will be held to a higher code of conduct and sometimes that supersedes what the law says you did and i'm okay with it i will carry the giver more the nfl's found itself although that idea and i want a whole andrei idea and make sure we take that forward because you said it and we often hear it is be places where we decide that provi fled ex are different from the normal workplace always seem selective it's an a place where the fame comes to benefit guys in certain ways so you're expected to take on certain ills but the minute we point out the areas that were you'll be nfl or the professional sports workplace is different.

accountant office manager social media nfl provi professional sports