32 Burst results for "Oecd"

BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

Squawk Pod

13:12 min | 2 weeks ago

BlackRocks Larry Fink; Johnson & Johnsons Vaccine Study

"Johnson and Johnson is temporarily paused. It's cove nineteen vaccine clinical trials due to an unexplained illness in a study participant the development first reported by stat news notes that the study is not under a clinical hold that's the more serious hold and it's not immediately apparent whether the volunteer received the actual treatment. Or a placebo. That would be key difference J. J. says adverse events. Events like illnesses aren't expected part of clinical studies but if they do find out, yeah, it was the placebo. Well then. It goes without saying. Apparently. It's not always immediately available for that but I read through that a lot because it it seems to me like you'd be able to figure out pretty quickly it to shutting down your entire thing if this was somebody who got the placebo. That's why it's called the blind, a double blind study or whatever you want people knowing who? Didn't. I guess somebody knows I hope so or else you get. Jeez. Yeah. Wow maybe. Striking, about this, this is now the second one of these that we've had AstraZeneca's you know put a hold of briefly internationally on their efforts but by the way that effort I believe is not ongoing right now in the United States. So if for example, there was a hold on the Astra Zeneca project in the United States and they separate hold now on the Johnson and Johnson one minute. It's not this is not a whole. Holistic. Pause. Right. A pause, but there was a I the point I was trying to make was there was a pause if you WANNA use the word pause and hold I know there now there's a distinction between the two, but there was also a pause on the Astra Zeneca program in the United States if they're also pause on the Johnson and Johnson Program in the United. States then you're then you're now down to Pfizer and Madonna as the most promising. The only other two that are even ongoing when you think about the time line for when these things become available, it could become more challenged. I I would. I would wait until. You know. That's not like you to find the negative part of it, but I mean I. Came back. It's not I hadn't realized I. Don't know if you want. I not. Not a spinal thing like the other one I understand that. Thousands of people in all these trials and you're talking about two cases that you don't even know we're going to result in Holt. So it made push it out to ask what if the dates maybe bad possibly, what possible what have you imagined that would have you imagined that the Astra Zeneca program would be running everywhere else in the in the world except the United States right now I I haven't thought realized that tried to mad and haven't tried Ed Needs is this means it's going to be the Astra Zeneca program to become available here at the United States in any kind of similar time. That's the point. For more on the news from Johnson and Johnson. Let's bring in Dr Zeke Emanuel. He of course, the former White House health policy advisor under President Obama he's now vice provost of global initiatives at the university, of Pennsylvania, and he's currently an informal adviser to the Joe Biden campaign and the Covid nineteen and Vaccine Recommendations. By the way he just co authored a research letter for the Journal of the American Medical Association comparing us, covert fatalities to those of some larger OECD countries to talk about that in just a moment. But Dr Manual let's start with this news from J. and J. Does this concern you? Well, any time? There's a serious adverse event it has to concern you but I think as. J. F. O. explained. You know you have to let the process evolve you have to actually examine carefully what the? Situation is the adverse event is related to the vaccine or placebo. Related to something else a pre existing condition, and so those are exactly the kind of questions at. Researchers will look at and try to uncover in the next few hours. And then we'll find out more. If it's in the you know arm with of the vaccine it does raise serious questions because you only have a few thousand people in the study like this one adverse event is serious especially when you're considering a vaccine that you're going to roll out to tens, hundreds of millions of people maybe even billions of people. So you know. That's the that's the ultimate concern, and this is actually standard process. For every research study you get a serious adverse event, you investigate it, it happens all the time. It's just the world's not always watching. So closely to see what the developers are excited worth pointing out that the the CFO of Johnson and Johnson also pointed out, they don't know any of these answers because they have turned it all over to independent investigators, and that is what kind of beefs up the credibility issues around those. The CFO himself has no idea even though this was thirty six hours ago whether this was in a placebo patients someone who actually received the vaccine will continue. That they've been carefully collaborating with the NIH on this trial and you know that I also think should give the American public. Some reassurance at this is going to be done thoroughly and to the highest scientific standards might detrimental. Let's talk about that paper that you wrote. You found that the United States did have higher death rates from Cova. I think the big question is was that something that was taking place very early on in the pandemic and that has improved since then and what have you found? Tell us a little bit about your study. So what we did is to take the United States mortality from it. Compare it to eighteen. Countries a high income countries like Japan and Australia Canada and Jeremy and also the countries that were hit very hard at the start Italy Spain, France and other. European countries. And we looked at the whole period and compared to most countries We actually the United States has done poorly even if you include the early phase but if you exclude the early phase March and April when every many countries were overwhelmed especially places like Italy and Spain. And you exclude them and then look say may after countries have experienced, got their arms around how to manage this of virus. I turns out the United States at extraordinarily bad even compared to places like Italy a we had from. May Tenth. To today roughly ninety thousand more deaths and we should have had we followed Italy scores ninety thousand Americans who died needlessly. As I have pointed out before Italy didn't have anything special or different in terms of Treatment Vaccines Diagnostics compared to the United States, what they have is better public health. Implementation of the public health measures, and that actually is a could could have saved tens of thousands of lives in the United States. and. We can see that when we compare our experience to those of other countries. What are you talking about in terms of reactions? You mean people wearing masks, you mean contact tracing do you mean testing that's put out? How much this you think falls on the healthcare system. As a fault and how much of it rely falls on public policy reaction to it. How much falls on just citizens following the rules well. It's all of it, but it's mainly the public health response in public policy. It really is implementing those public health measures, countrywide with fidelity. And then slowly reopening. So you do have to have social distancing you do have to have a trying not to go indoors. You do have to have having crowds less than twenty. You do have to have wearing face masks doing hand hygiene and focusing your testing and contact tracing capacity first of all, building it up, which we never did successfully in this country, and then focusing it on hot spots because we know this virus breaks out. A super spreading events it's not the usual person to person to person you know eighty to ninety percent of people will not pass this to anyone. Ten percent to twenty percent of people 'cause eighty percent of the infection. So you have to be able to identify them and quickly suppressed that we never built up that capacity the federal government under president trump punted it to the states and then states did very different. Things had Florida right now as rapidly opened up restaurants and many other things and a lot of us are expecting super spreading situations in Florida. We've seen. Places that kind of ignored? This up and down the Midwest saying Oh it's not here. Now having very high rates of cases we've had thirty one states that are going up and not down which is a very worrisome situation going into the fall and we're going to move inside. It's going to much easier to pass this virus along. And a lot of us are seriously worried about the consequences hazy I'm trying to do whether that was apples to apple. So when in May in the United. States. We got we got a later start right in Europe and by May they're already seeing. Progress over in Europe did you adjust I'm not sure whether you adjusted for that because we were right at the height. Close to it in May still and and they were on the downside in. Europe is. Standardized that in a way or wrong on that or or because we were going to have a lot more. A lot more deaths in in May than they would because they they were they got it a lot earlier there. Then I have a follow up question to. That is a super sophisticated question and you're one hundred percent, right we started a week or two later than European countries like Italy France But if you make that adjustment, it makes a slight difference not. Difference Yeah. So it's not it's not. Our peak was in May and their peak was in the end of March early April. In fact, our peak was earlier in April. and. By, by May tenth, we should have gotten our arms around and then also in our paper, we look at June seven and subsequently, and even if you look at June seven, we have tens of thousands of more debts that other countries like again the Netherlands France Spain. Italy. So we've done poorly, and by the way our data collection goes through mid September. So we've done poorly even with the August blip because of the. Spring summer vacations in many European countries where we know people like Silvio Berlusconi in Italy partied and ignored all the recommendations and got cove it So we have done badly even after even if you include the fact that we got this about a week or two later compared to other countries that was a very good question typically on the high level statisticians or clinical researchers ask that kind of. I don't with. Feeling so good about myself. All of a sudden the problems we've had here the number of cases the number of that's a number of hospitalizations was not inevitable. It was a result of bad public health measures being implemented or not implemented as the case may be and you can see this repeatedly states seeming seeming to learn nothing like Florida rushing to open up restaurants bars when we should be slowly slowly be opening. Detrimental very quickly. It I guess we do have time for one more question how how much of an impact do you think a Americans healthiness versus other countries have how do we rate just in terms of underlying co morbidity is that might be there well, it's a mixed bag for one thing our population skews younger than most European countries, they have a much older population more people over sixty five. And we know that older people tend to die from this disease unfortunately we have more co morbidity in terms of diabetes in terms of obesity, but they have more Komo British in terms of lung problems because they have higher smoking rates in the United States Net Nan. It probably comes out in the wash but we're going to have to do some more. Rigorous Studies of the CO morbidity situation and the age distribution of the population. But I don't think it's GonNa be tens of thousands of deaths. It might be a few thousand maybe even ten thousand but the overwhelming response effect that about half of our deaths or unnecessary that's not gonNA come out because of small differences in co morbidity between our countries and their country. Zeke thank you very much for your time. It's really great talking to you. Thank you very sophisticated questions this morning.

United States Johnson Astrazeneca Italy Europe J. J. Florida Dr Zeke Emanuel Obesity President Trump NIH Journal Of The American Medica Midwest CFO Holt Pfizer Apple Silvio Berlusconi Italy France
"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

01:45 min | 4 months ago

"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

"A condition of appearing that needs to be city in in the representative. Completely agree we've got exactly. The same policy heard injured bugs. We will not speak on a panel unless. There isn't you know women. Represented in there because it's not just a token woman, it's because there are numerous. Capable knowledgeable women in this space issue for some reason they're not. They're not you know. Being invited sufficiently, we WANNA change as much as possible, but coming back to your point diversity across so many different aspects you know. Nasty diversity cultural diversity in time of know black lives matter is is in the spotlight. It is something that we're constantly reminded that we need to be made aware of so. I'm afraid that we could talk about this also hours. But. We're rapidly running out of time. I'm going to thank you so much. Carolina juicing us to the OCD to the OCD global blockchain. Policy, center and all the great work that you're doing in informing policy makers and the opportunity blockchain can have. This wraps up this box podcast. We hope we've enjoyed this episode for those of you are listening to us from the gym. Give me that extra mile an extra. Push Up. Keep going, and if you like what you heard this week, please don't forget US grind to leave us a review and. Carolina absolutely loved having you on. The show will be delighted to reinvent you back on the show and to see how your center has evolved in. Some of the ladies recommendations you're giving to regulators and policymakers, so thank you again once again, Kelly. Such, thank you related. Appreciate it and we love to come back in the future..

Carolina OCD US representative Kelly
"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:01 min | 4 months ago

"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

"We still seeing people make that this is something. Okay, it's true it's it's real. This is real thing, but it still somewhere in the future, so helping people understand this is. Is something which is very much happening now. No, it hasn't reached its its full potential. No, we don't know all of the use cases, but it is. There are some use cases that we've already seen happening now. which having implications for policy policymakers so trying I think always brandt back to the concrete, and that's why the coast who develops is very much, shopped around real use cases who trying to describe the concepts of a blockchain. Examples were already seeing their lives today great, so is there any specific areas that are member? States are presently the most interested with regards to to blockchain. Is it you know the governance aspect is the taxation aspect. Is it sometimes you know just reacting like your previous? Then last year we had we know. The. French minister, and Lemaire reacting to libra. You know you know I. What is what is in general? Areas of interest is in mainly around the crypto space. Yeah, it's a good question I. It's actually quite varied to be fair. Look. We think of that I work falling into four categories, so finance supply chains. Government and public goods something that we will blockchain comeback to describe is in a moment finance finances something really quite broad, and it's I work on financial consumer protection in the crypto acids by asset tokenism. But it's also the it's also the tax work that we do its work that we do on sustainable infrastructure, and of course as you probably know, the the also houses the FATF's in. They have some excellent workout I'm looking at bars. Virtual assets as well as digital ID and and I think when I say finance, it sounds like something quite quite narrow that it in fact, it's. It's got a breadth to it that people might not necessarily think about it at first instance. Then on on supply chains as the two aspects of the more traditional track and trace of goods, which I think is really become to the full as as when people talk about will in a kind of post curved about preparing out. To. Make more into the future I think people really see a used case. FULFULL DOT in that space recognizing that perhaps we don't have a good understanding of our supply chains, and as much control and information and transparency as we thought we had. The other side supply chains is the more qualitative aspects. We've done some work here on looking at due-diligence in supply chain, so using the technology and I think this is certainly a more difficult space, but I think will evolve as we see. The growth of the Internet of things with You know what what is happening in your I using? Child Labour slave labor. What are the working conditions? And not just house a good move from from point eight to two point bay. So that's something I think quite quite interesting on the supply chain science will..

FATF blockchain Lemaire brandt
"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

"And. It was about a a couple of years ago. Now in two thousand, seventeen, CD begun, a project could going digital, which looked at digitalization grossly across the policy spectrum. And Really after that project was underway for eighteen months, when are members decided that going forward? They really wanted to focus very mentioned on onto technologies, one of those out official intelligence, and you've seen recently the creation theory, CD's observatory on a on and the other part of course was the was book chain, and that led to the establishment of the end of twenty eighteen of on global boats incumbency center. Really I mean although we've been doing work in this area for about six years I would say it's really in the last three years. That's that's accelerated probably hopefully familiar with with some of the were doubt in this space, but you can see this early a breadth and depth. In the last three years that the walls of aprevious indeed indeed boost whole range of white papers, which are working to put some links on the blog post associated to this podcast. I'm sure that since you know the going digital project in two thousand eighteen. That the conversation around blockchain from a policy. Makers and regulators standpoint most of the vault at the beginning. For example when we launched the podcast in early two thousand eighteen insurance base at that time. People would say okay. You work in blockchain that means working crypto that means you're part of the dark web, which means you must be either a terrorist or paedophile along those lines..

blockchain official
"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:54 min | 4 months ago

"oecd" Discussed on Insureblocks

"In this week's podcast, we will discuss the CDs Global Blockchain Policy Center and I'm extremely pleased to welcome Carole Malcolm head of the always CDs global. Global Boxing Policy, center, Caroline. Many thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a quick introduction on yourself? I related. It's guide for here. I, really appreciate the. Invitation and I know you've had some great guests on on lately, so it's good to be wrong. Some thanks very ranch as on Caroline Malcolm. I hit the. Global Policies into at the OAC Day. Hopefully we will have a chance today to give you a little bit of background about that, but just about me personally semi I might tell from the axiom strain, but been living in France and became French infect for about ten years now. During which time I've been in the area, CD my background is as a tax lawyer and taxes how I actually got into blockchain. Perfect profile video of. You is. We actually had. One of you at compatriots from Australia from Perth, actually. Dr Jehmu Greene. From C. R. Ledger so. Great Get it so as you're probably familiar. We always have it first question here. Initial blogs, which is, can you please explain to our listeners blockchain? And how does it work because what we found is that everyone has a slightly different definition. That.

Blockchain Policy Center Caroline Malcolm Carole Malcolm Dr Jehmu Greene Boxing OAC C. R. Ledger Perth France Australia
Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:10 min | 4 months ago

Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. During. This podcast saw discussed with Mr. Randy ostrow, president and CEO Pro-meta and Ohio based nonprofit healthcare system. Efforts to create a congressionally mandated National Health Care Reform Commission. Miss Joe Stra. Welcome to the program. Missed oestrus bio is of course posted on the podcast website. On background. The current public health emergency brings into stark relief, US healthcare's ineffectiveness. I've noted previously with four point, two five percent of the world's population us currently accounts for twenty six percent of worldwide Kobe, nineteen infections and deaths. Black American Cova deaths and hospitalizations are respectively two point five and four times greater than American whites. Concerning our response to date harbor widely cited global health professor. A she's jaw was quoted yesterday stating we may end up being the worst of any country in the world in terms of our response. Despite outspending all other always OECD countries to to one currently at four trillion annually, the effects of the pandemic is having should not altogether unexpected. In, the first major attempt to rank performance in two thousand, the World Health, organization listed US healthcare thirty seven, the world immediately after the Czech Republic and Jamaica. More recently twenty seventeen Commonwealth Fund ranked US healthcare's performance last among eleven, comparatively wealthy countries. With a current projected toll over two hundred thousand by October one. The question begged is what will federal policymakers learn from this experience more specifically. What will they do to reform? How healthcare is defined delivered and financed. With me again to discuss efforts to create a congressionally mandated national health care reform. Commission is chromatic. CEO Randy Oestra. For purposes of full disclosure I've been working with Primerica in advocating before the Congress on this issue. So to begin Randall, let me ask you if you could provide a brief overview of pro-meta. Sure. Was a traditional integrated delivery system regional and an integrated system. We had hospitals. and. Doctors had an insurance company and then so we were several billion dollars in revenue primarily. Ohio sawfish Michigan and then about ten years ago. through. A variety of of interactions became very focused on of the hunger in the health issues, good as security that really less in spending a decade Fox's on the social determinants of health and a lot of experience. A lot of stories could tell as we talked to organizations around the country that have that were forever covering. We were probably the first houses than they ever talk to them. They said you know. What are you doing here? And then the next special as we're in the of bed and really it's been quite a journey of. Over two years ago while we purchase largest for profit, senior companies in the United States cold hr matter. And so today we would call ourselves the health and wellbeing company We're around. You know just in broad terms of seven billion dollars innovation we, we work in twenty eight states, and really the whole idea is about that. How do you integrate? Things, we do clinically with the things that immediately drafts from a social economic standpoint. You ready records some of that code, and then hot that translate into healthy aging, and all the things that go with it, some of the inequities in healthcare from the inequities treatments, and so we set back from an looking for model in healthcare in realize that we're ought to relieve wrong, pat. We Really Kinda Organization. Try to embark. Do APP, and that's his house voting folks. Okay thank you. Let's go specific to of a national commission, so let me begin with the substantive question, and that is in your experience. What would you say are the three or so overriding structural problems or challenges? Confronting Health Care Delivery and financing today. Yeah I think it's actually a a US question while. You know the American healthcare mile was a mess. I. Think you know that's real clear and I think when you look at the statistics have to go too far whether it's you know the back that we're headed toward ninety percent of the gross domestic. Product by twenty twenty five the statistic. Thank you get already cited from the OECD. Ranked in the world

United States World Health National Health Care Reform Co Oecd Ohio President And Ceo David Intra Cosso Mr. Randy Ostrow Joe Stra Ceo Randy Oestra Commonwealth Fund Primerica Kobe Randall Professor Congress
OECD sees deepest peace-time slump in a century

Rush Limbaugh

00:15 sec | 5 months ago

OECD sees deepest peace-time slump in a century

"And a warning on the financial hit from corona virus shut down the L. E. C. D. club of rich countries saying the world is facing its biggest economic downturn in peace time for centuries also full casting a bounce back next year but only if the outbreak

L. E. C. D. Club
Global GDP could plummet by 7% due to pandemic, OECD warns

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Global GDP could plummet by 7% due to pandemic, OECD warns

"To be worried about a second wave of the virus as it the first way wasn't bad enough the organization for economic cooperation says a second wave of covert nineteen could decrease global economic growth by more than seven percent this year the organization says lockdowns and travel restrictions have caused a steep decline in business activity around the world even without a second wave the World Bank projects of five percent contraction in global economic growth

World Bank
The European Commissions approach to blockchain

Insureblocks

08:24 min | 5 months ago

The European Commissions approach to blockchain

"Hello and welcome to inch blocks urine. Decadent podcast to blockchain ans- mark contracts. I'm will eat. Scuff your host for this week's podcast. We be discussing the European Commission approach to blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have Peters Zilkha this head of unit digitalization Blockchain Digital Single Market Directorate at the European Commission Peteris. You've got a lot of titles. Many thank you many. Thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a brief introduction on yourself? I'm glad to I mean I'm a lawyer by background. I have the JD degree from University of Southern California before they had a political science degree. And though I've never really practiced their California state bar for almost thirty years now and since Two Thousand and five Florence. My Country Latvia joined the European Union. I've been ahead of unit in the European Commission and digital innovation. Blockchain is what I've been working on and you could say to US sometimes perhaps over used term but It's a little bit my passion. I've been interested in walk chain and tech since about two thousand and twelve so perhaps not at the very beginning but at least relatively early for the public service this is also why I'm The original co chair of the Fintech Task Force. I have my second Co-chair coming from the financial services side. And then I'm from digital single market and I mean in both these areas I'm working in legislation and policy in funding infrastructure and research and managing it as well as working with with stakeholders and international cooperation. So it's an interesting bunch of things to work on. I'm glad to be doing it well. As you sitting the key term as passion because you're effectively getting the job of three other men so very impressive So Peter is As it is customary here at Inter blocks. Could you please explain our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work? Well glad to try. This is one of these things. It's a little bit of a communications challenge and exercise. But I mean I would say that. It's simply a growing list of records of blocks In a ledger that are linked utilizing cryptography and generally managed by peer to peer network adhering to a protocol for communication between the nodes and then validation of the new blocks that perhaps gets already a little little technical some listeners. But I would say. It's a way of validating transactions and data in an immutable in permanent way. So that you can be sure that they haven't been tampered with and that you don't have double spending of a value and that you can transfer data along with that value. That's the way that we see it and I think it's also important because some people are I think most of all sometimes negative that they say Blockchain is something that's bad because let's say uses a lot of energy if they take the original crew for work and everything that doesn't do that is is not blockchain. I mean we take a very wide view. I mean distributed Ledger Technologies Hash graphs tangle on these types of blockchain inspire technologies is is blockchain for us. I mean we're not trying to freeze history in two thousand and nine. When the BITCOIN paper was Was published or at some other point. It's developing technology and I would say what is really important is the element of decentralization which is not black and white. It is a gradient going from something which may not exist of completely centralized to something which also may not exist of being completely decentralized but actually allowing a degree of decentralization That a single database or even some federated databases. Don't don't allow so. This is where I think it gets exciting and where it makes it possible for a diverse group of actors to work together while preserving their autonomy. Excellent really loved that. I'm element of your definition of. It's a gradient of decentralisation incidents that's a spot on now could you introduce to us all the different bodies within the European Commission you have the digital innovation in Boston you need. And other bodies within your commission that are here to research enable and further development of blockchain in the EEG perhaps give us an overview where we'll do some deep dive in in some of the sure. I mean starting with with my unit. We're kind of the policy leaders on blockchain as a technology. But we're not. We're not the programmers as I said. I'm a I'm a lawyer and a political. Scientists have other colleagues are engineers but were more economists lawyers people looking at digital policy and in my unit we have the e U Blockchain Observatory in Forum which is a think tank working for us that has a whole set of reports and videos and regular workshops which used to be physical in at least right. Now they're virtually cited We also have the European blockchain partnership that my unit runs. This is twenty nine. Different countries twenty-seven all twenty seven e. You member states and Norway and Liechtenstein. Who are building a European blockchain services infrastructure together. I mean actually building an infrastructure. This piloting this is not testing. We're putting public services on the blockchain justified. We had quite a filtering to see which cases were justified to utilize the blockchain. And this is also something you could call a regulatory sandbox because while the countries and us are working together we obviously have to look at European Union legislation. We have to look at national legislation. Most likely you don't find anything. We're blockchain is prohibited. But you certainly don't find many cases where it specifically allowed though. You're getting some legislation in France in multi in other countries. It's specifically see a root for blockchain Roxanne legally And then we also collaborate with the International Association of Trusted blockchain applications as stakeholders organization I myself I'm in the OECD Policy Expert Advisory Board on Blockchain so we collaborate with OCD with the United Nations and others and In Not Buzz. International position of trusted blockchain applications a global governmental advisory board but also in the OECD activities. In the other activities. We probably would participate in the spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. This year I spoke myself in the IMF Fintech roundtable last year. Also you have the collaboration in the Fintech Task Force as I said from our side digital single market I gave a basic description on the other side. You have the financial markets colleagues the call as coming from research in Salon with the financial markets colleagues. Were collaborating on the digital assets possible legislation we just closed the public consultation on digital assets. Hearing what the stakeholders with the community has to say and in another context of the Digital Services Act which is a updating of ECOMMERCE along with addressing the platforms. We are seeing how perhaps smart contract so we have to do something to ensure that there is not any fragmentation of different requirements smart contracts across the digital single market and the twenty-seven member states. Something that we want to want to avoid

Blockchain European Commission Blockchain Digital Single Mark Fintech Task Force European Union European Commission Peteris U Blockchain Observatory International Association Of T International Monetary Fund Peters Zilkha University Of Southern Califor Inter Blocks California Latvia Oecd United States
The AI Priorities of the United States - with Lynne Parker

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:52 min | 6 months ago

The AI Priorities of the United States - with Lynne Parker

"This is Dan Fidel and you're listening to AI and business podcast as most of your aware our work here to merge artificial intelligence research is primarily with large private sector clients onto that is in financial services. You hear US talk about insurance and banking a lot because those happened to be the industries that hire us for our AI. Opportunity landscape work but one of the more fun. Parts of the job is being able to bring to bear knowledge about the Roi in various sectors to the public sector into intergovernmental organizations. We've been honored to speak at the United Nations about deep fakes to speak about the future of a cybersecurity and surveillance at Interpol and for this particular event for this interview this week at the OECD's headquarters in Paris for their opening of their CD A. I. Policy Observatory which is a fascinating. Project will cover in more depth in future interviews our guest this week our honored guest this week. I should say a proper government. Role is Lyn Parker. Lyn Parker is a PhD from MIT in Computer Science. Who teaches at the University of Tennessee and she is the deputy chief technology officer of the United States of America. No INSIGNIFICANT ROLE. Lindh sat down to talk about what the United States is doing about. Ai At a national level. There's a lot of interesting work if you go to a Ai Dot Gov you can actually learn more about what? The United States is doing with artificial intelligence but Lynn soda boils down. What are the national priorities here? What are the directions? Were moving in. What's the progress we've made as a nation And what does that mean for? The future of artificial intelligence in the investments there in a fascinating interview and it was excellent to be able to sit down with Lynn. And really get the details in. This interview is made all the more relevant by the fact that the private

Deputy Chief Technology Office United States AI Dan Fidel United Nations Interpol Lindh Lynn Oecd I. Policy Observatory Paris University Of Tennessee America
We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:21 min | 8 months ago

We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

"I'm going to be breaking down why we're changing the name. What's been new with us here at emerge and what's coming up to give you a little bit of a preview of where we're headed wanted to be able to serve do justice to our longtime listeners and give a sense of where we're going and how their feedback has played into Where we're design a focus. Things moving forward so I'll be quick here over the course of the last two to three years. We've seen a lot of growth in the show we went from somewhat middling downloads with Ai. Not being nearly as popular to over the course of the last three years growing upwards of sixty thousand downloads in a given month which for a business show is quite a lot. We don't really attract engineers attract kind of techies. We attract functional business leaders. And it's tough to actually get that critical mass so we're really grateful to have the listeners. We have but we're changing things up a bit. Who served decided so in terms of what you're GONNA learn in this little short session here with me. I'm going to be covering three main topics I serve. Why the Name Change? What's new? What's coming up etc? What's new at emerge so in other words? Serve what we've recently focused on as well as where we're headed in the future. And then lastly we kind of wrap up with getting a little bit of your feedback at the end if you'd like to send some along to me We happened here from our folks where longtime listeners. So we'll talk first about the name change of the program so the show for years now has been called. Ai Industry that's been intended to be a broad name. For sort of any given industry could be banking. It could be manufacturing. It could be whatever the case may be but we find that the term a industry has connotations that time more to heavy industry time more heavy equipment etc now we have plenty of listeners from financial services that's our main sector banking insurance investing wealth management. The these are the folks that listened to a lot but the connotation would be a look at the show from the outside is that we're GONNA be talking every episode about oil and gas and about trucking and about manufacturing because industry often implies those kind of terms so really. The show is a in business. This is a program for business leaders who do not know how to Code but they need to marshal artificial intelligence to leverage artificial intelligence to drive results in the bottom line. They're not here to learn. Coding they're not here. Learn theory the her to learn about the real precedence of USA and how they can leverage that in their own businesses meant so a in business. We just felt as a more apt name for the show. Some of our listeners agreed and so we decided. Okay we're going to actually do the name change so this is now the AI in business podcast in terms of the actual focus. We're going to keep things the way they've always been in other words. We're going to appeal to business leaders. That could be. Vp's executives managers could even be consultants that are working within the enterprise or mid sized companies. Folks who are leaders of digital transformation leaders of change who need to marshal ai to make a difference in their business so when we talk about topics that's going to mean it's going to be use cases diving into different individual sectors. It's going to be best practices for adopting a I for finding R. Y. OF AI. And it's going to be real stories of actually leveraging the technology within a company and figuring out what's hard what's easy. What are the trends that matter? So if you're interested in use cases discovering basically what's possible and what's working with a across businesses in addition to the best practices for making it work. This is going to be the show tune into. That's been our value prop for a while and I think we're GONNA be doing a better job of at this year's we bring on a really strong cadre of guests in Twenty Twenty. I'm very excited about our guest lineup. In the next two to three months we've got some big names in the in the hopper as well which. I'm sure you'll be hearing about once. There live on the program rather than doing month long themes for I am business. We're going to be doing shorter. Individual episodes about different topics keeping things. Different keeping the variety up. So if we have a bunch of episodes within let's say banking fraud or compliance and we do a lot in financial services here instead of having them all in a row for a month. We'll kind of sprinkle them intermittently amongst other sectors looking at other best practices other trends are other aspects of AI. So we want every week to be a little different a little interesting a different kind of guests different kind of topic. Sue people really get a good S- play of what's happening with artificial intelligence across sectors and how they can leverage themselves so that's another change will be doing moving forward. I think people really liked the variety. That's been the feedback we've gotten and so we're GONNA be doing it better than ever and in fact I think for some of this year we're going to be doing two episodes a week because some of you had asked for that as well in terms of what's new here at emerge so little quick update on what's happened recently and then where we're headed here just as a company just updating you our loyal listeners last year was pretty exciting year for us so a couple of big things happen there. We've increasingly become more involved with the large intergovernmental organizations last year. We presented our research on deep fakes. Some of you familiar with fakes. Basically taking somebody's face making them say or do something that they never did using artificial intelligence to programmatic generate. Someone's face moving or someone's voice. We presented our research on deep fakes at the headquarters of the United Nations last year presented some of their counterterrorism events as well and presented our research on a in the life sciences sector for the OECD down in Mexico City. In addition to presenting an Interpol World Interpol world is the largest police in law enforcement. Serve event for the international community. It's run by Interpol which is the intergovernmental policing organization. We presented our works on deep fakes. They are as well. In addition to that we've continued to focus on our research work with enterprise so last year was year of really seeing kick up. A lot of that work has been with big banks with multibillion dollar insurance companies with players and financial services but some of it has been in other sectors in professional services in life sciences and other sectors as well the commonality is working with businesses. Who essentially are aiming to make better fruitful use of artificial intelligence in their company and they need to know the current precedence of. Roi Within the field. And that's essentially where our research comes in so this year were served doubling down on what we've been called upon not only speaking at presentations but for our client work in the past. Let's say eighteen months and really focusing their so. We've titled Our what was previously called our AI capability map research. We've we've titled our AI. Opportunity Landscape Research. We've improved the process. We've broadened out what we look at and really the focus is three things so when you think to yourself what has emerged do ultimately what we do is three things we help. Companies develop or validate a winning strategy. We help companies pick the right high. Roi Projects of finding low hanging fruit. That's going to be a win. And we help. Companies pick the right vendor for their particular needs. This is essentially where our work comes in and some of you have already seen the video. You can actually go to E. M. E. R. J. DOT COM Slash A. O. L. That's a opportunity landscape so emerged. Dot Com slash. Ai Aol you can watch a two minute video on what? Our research process is with this sort of updated process. Actually looks like in terms of the research deliverable you can see that emerged. Dot Com slash. Aol But the basic gist here is. We're taking really what our strengths are in. Our strengths are mapping the vendor use cases of AI within a given sector of the total vendor use case could be companies in Europe and the United States etc and looking at their various capabilities. And then doing the same thing with the enterprise. Let's say we're talking about insurance looking at Geiko looking at all state looking at the global top. Fifty insurance providers. Asa and mapping where they're a investments are mapping they're known use cases these level of traction of their various use cases and being able to use both of those sets of data that is to say the startup landscape and the enterprise landscape to find. Where is the evidence of our? Why where are the ease of deployment in terms of AI? Applications with our own proprietary scores? Here it emerged. That's exactly what we do. We look across both landscapes. Look at all the vendor providers. All the enterprise folks and get a sense of where is their current adoption now. Where's the evidence opportunity for us to drive our whereas at Roi already happening by really layering data on those key questions of where the Roi is? We can present a visual map to clients and essentially allow them to make smarter decisions. Moving forward advise them in recommend where to go. What COMPANIES TO PICK? What initiatives are going to be quick winds on informing that strategy moving forward? And so. That's the crux of our work against the bulk of last year's work that's why we were called upon by the bigger organizations and that's why we did our work in the private sector this year. Were only doubling down there so many of you already read the content at emerge dot com. Because you wanNA understand what's possible and what's working the Iowa services essentially the very high level version of that it's the version of that that allows companies to truly inform their strategy to back their suppositions with data and to be able to move forward with data back confidence when it comes to where they're investing their dollars and how they're going to compete in the market when it comes to leveraging artificial intelligence

AI United States Interpol Twenty Twenty VP United Nations Fraud Iowa Oecd Mexico City Europe E. M. E. R. AOL Geiko Professional Services
Global growth plunging into downturn over coronavirus, OECD says

AM Tampa Bay

00:20 sec | 8 months ago

Global growth plunging into downturn over coronavirus, OECD says

"Wanted more gloomy news pertaining to the coronavirus the Paris based organization for economic cooperation and development said global economic growth will fall to levels not seen in more than a decade as the outbreak hits of demand and supply the group also warned of possible global contraction this quarter it cut its full year growth forecast to just two point four percent from two

Paris
Jobs and Skills of the Future

Automated

11:54 min | 9 months ago

Jobs and Skills of the Future

"To get into today's core idea. I WANNA start off by referring to a two thousand fourteen questionnaire by the Pew Research Center so here. Some two thousand experts in the field of technology both those building the actual technologies and businesses as well as those who report on. It responded to questions about the impact of automation technologies so this was actually quite a high level questionnaire and some of the experts for the chief scientists of say for example SALESFORCE DOT com. There's also the vice president of Google. Even the principal researcher for Microsoft. So I wanted to refer to this questionnaire as I think it really highlights the goal of these last two episodes and the podcast as a whole so we can start off with The first group so forty eight percent of all the experts envisioned a future in which robots and digital agents have displaced significant numbers of both blue and white collar workers with many expressing concern that this will lead to vast increases in income inequality masses of people who are effectively unemployable and breakdowns in the social order. But on the other side of this the other half some fifty two percent expect that technology will not displace more jobs than it creates by at least twenty twenty five to be sure. This group anticipates that many jobs currently performed by humans will be substantially taken over by robots or digital agents by twenty twenty five but they have faith that human ingenuity will create new jobs industries and ways to make living just as has been doing since the dawn of the industrial revolution. But does this second group of experts have any lakes stand on so we know that through history jobs and the skills required for those jobs have been changing drastically due to the technological advancements bringing about large changes so you can think about the large changes that we as a species have gone through from hunter gatherers to use an agriculture to the first industrial revolution electrification computerization and the start of the Internet as well as today's fourth industrial revolution. So each of these epochs or eras are I think easily visualized having massively different jobs and tasks and of course the different skills attached to them but have these shifts created more or less jobs. I think that the answer is quite apparent but The net impact of new technologies on employment can really be seen as strongly positive and this is shown in a two thousand eleven. Study by Mackenzie's Paris office and they found that Looking at one of the main technologies that was Believed to destroy Significant amount of jobs the Internet had destroyed five hundred thousand jobs in France alone in the previous fifteen years but at the same time had created one point two million other jobs. This is a net addition of some seven hundred thousand or two point. Four jobs created for every single job destroyed so furthermore one third of new jobs created in United States. In the past twenty five years were types that did not exist or barely existed and these were in areas including It development hardware manufacturing APP creation and IT systems management so think that the argument is quite similar anywhere. You look and is really based on historical fact as mentioned during this podcast if you follow this historical perspective the future has new and emerging technologies constantly creating new jobs that humans will need to do. But what is predicted about how? Tomorrow's jobs and skills and how they look like so. There are dozens if not hundreds of reports out there looking at trends and predicting what these changes will be so I specifically looked at a number of reports ranging from two thousand fourteen till eight two thousand nineteen made by some of the big hitters like the McKinsey Global Institute the World Economic Forum the European Commission the Pew Research Center and others as always links will be in the show notes. If any of you want to look more into depth in these issues I will attempt to point out. The main issues presented with a focus on two ideas. What are going to be. The main new jobs of the future and to what specific skills will be required to perform them so new jobs related to the development maintenance and upgrading of AI. Or artificial intelligence as well as big data infrastructures are among those expected to grow. Significantly so digital technology can also enable new forms of entrepreneurial activity workers in small businesses and self employed occupations can benefit from higher income. Earning opportunities and this leads to a potential. New Category of knowledge enabled jobs becoming possible as machines imbed intelligence and knowledge that less skilled workers can then access with little training. So I've used this podcast even a number of times to illustrate a similar point for example I am putting together a monthly newsletter that I hope to have ready in a few weeks rather than having to design every single part of it online tools with prebuilt templates make the process significantly faster and allows someone without any design experience to produce something with a good level of quality or at least I hope granted this is a very simplistic example without any embedded intelligence but I hope it helps to illustrate the standing on the shoulder of giants picture. This future scenario is trying to push so one of the central themes that runs through many of these future. Job Scenarios is how much emotional intelligence and human to human interaction is in the changing environment so as the routine and Monday jobs are more and more done by automated systems. This will open up the opportunity to have more human interaction than we do today or at least this is what it's forecasted to be so cognizance feature of work reports have actually been quite interesting in this regard as they build this idea into a future scenario. Where over forty new jobs are imagined up to around twenty thirty so you can look at the show notes for links to the two reports. That will list all the jobs but some of the more interesting ones. I'll list right here. So the first one is something called an augmented reality journey. Builder and this future job is envisioned to collaborate with engineers to create the essential elements for customers to move through any sort of augmented reality experience. The second one here is the genetic diversity officer and they are envisioned to construct and encourage adherence to a company wide genetic equity policy that includes an kind of forces genetic diversity The third one is something called a data detective and they will uncover meaningful business answers and recommendations by investigating data through sensors devices and biometric monitors as well as other things that are used in organizations one of the last ones is smart home design manager and they will help customers design and integrate technologies into their smart homes of course. But then again with this increased digital connectivity there is also the increased hacking and security threats and thus positions around this are bound to increase in number as well as in type so one possible Position for seeing that I thought was quite interesting. Something called a juvenile cybercrime rehabilitation counselor and their jobs will be to help the convicted cybercriminals to redirect their online talents towards ethical behavior for the betterment of society. So I think it'll be really interesting to see whether any or all of these envisioned positions will be created over the next ten years. I'm pretty sure that very few people were able to guess the new kind of positions and jobs that are created through the internet or through Ai. So I'm happy to see that cognizant was able to creatively come up with some potential jobs of the future but this leads us to the next point regarding skills if we assume that new jobs are continually created but also significantly change. Do we currently have the skills needed to take on these new shifting roles so the OECD two thousand nineteen future of work report estimated that thirty two percent of all jobs will change significantly in the future though it was quite unspecified as a half that timeframe extends to McKinsey estimates that globally. Three hundred and seventy five million workers may need to switch occupations by twenty thirty but many adults do not seem to have the right skills for these changes. And they say that six out of ten adults lack basic. Ict skills or even have no computer experience which was quite shocking for me to hear. This is compounded with the fact that out of all jobs that are done in the OECD. Highly skilled jobs have increased by twenty five percent over the last twenty years. And this is further compounded by fact that the jobs that are most exposed to automation appear to be those that require relatively low levels of formal education those that do not involve relatively complex social interaction and those that involve routine manual tasks so the World Economic Forum actually highlighted a list of the top ten skills needed in twenty twenty as compared to twenty fifteen. So list will be fully available on the website but all Name a couple the more interesting ones here so these actually fit quite well in what was talked about above so A number one. There's complex problem solving followed by critical thinking and third being creativity. Then four five and six. I'll have to deal with interaction with people so you have people management followed by coordinating with others and the six one being emotional intelligence so I think this is kind of interesting especially in taken. In contrast to the top ten skills that were listed in two thousand fifteen although a number of them are still the same. There are some like active listening or quality control. Which don't even make it into twenty twenty at all and this is just an a five year period of time. Which I think is quite astonishing as you would need to be constantly learning in order to keep up with ever changing New Skills that are needed and I think this is a good segue into one of the last point of this podcast episode in that in all of these Studies and reports that went over for this episode. One of the main central ideas that is pushed forward is that a constant lifelong attempt at learning new skills. new ways of dealing with people is perhaps the most important thing as we go forward into this new and constantly shifting future so to sum up those jobs growing the most by twenty thirty appear to be those that require higher education intensive use of social and interactive skills and at least a basic knowledge of

Pew Research Center Google Microsoft Vice President Principal Researcher Mckinsey United States Paris Oecd Mckinsey Global Institute Mackenzie France Twenty Twenty Self Employed Officer Design Manager European Commission
Zuckerberg Accepts That Facebook May Have to Pay More Taxes

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Zuckerberg Accepts That Facebook May Have to Pay More Taxes

"International reforms that would require a Silicon Valley tech giants to pay more in taxes to being embraced by Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg he's meeting members of your pain union's executive commission in Brussels I could tell the conference he's backing plans with digital tax reform on a global scale proposed by the organization for economic cooperation and development soccer Berg will tell the conference that he's glad that the OECD is looking at tax reform which Facebook also wants the OECD plans would require a digital and internet companies including social media platforms to pay more tax in countries where they have significant consumer facing activities and generate

Mark Zuckerberg Brussels Berg Oecd Facebook CEO Executive
Zuckerberg accepts that Facebook may have to pay more tax

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Zuckerberg accepts that Facebook may have to pay more tax

"Facebook's mark Zuckerberg accepts the social media giant may have to pay more tax Facebook C. E. O. is expected to tell the Munich security conference on Saturday he's backing plans the digital tax reform on a global scale proposed by the organization for economic cooperation and development according to an excerpt of his speech provided in advance circle but will say I understand that this frustration about how tech companies attacks in your up the OECD plan would require digital an internet companies including social media platforms to pay more tax in countries where they have significant consumer facing activities and generate profits Charles the live as well London

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Facebook C. E. O. Charles London Munich Oecd
Mnuchin warns UK over digital tax plan

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:25 min | 10 months ago

Mnuchin warns UK over digital tax plan

"The macro economic quote. Oh the day today comes to us. Courtesy of Treasury Secretary Very Steven Mnuchin by the World Economic Forum in Davos at which Mnuchin was on a panel where the conversation turned to European plans for a special tax on big Internet companies. Most of which the Internet companies are of course. American here is the Treasury Secretary. I think we've been pretty clear that we think that the digital taxes discriminatory discriminatory in nature. And you know if if People WanNa just arbitrarily put taxes on on our digital companies we'll consider arbitrarily putting taxes on car companies. There is a lot in that sixteen. Spare seconds of audio. So we're going to take it apart a little bit here for a bit. I the basics with molly would use of course the host of marketplace came on. Hey Guy or it's a hippie with a very quick primer on the idea of a digital tax explain yeah you have a lot of companies in Europe saying that there are these companies whose product is primarily digital right. It depends on data from their citizens and they're making a lot of money in these countries and they're saying look. We should get a piece of this revenue Pi. It's business being conducted here. It's taking away from and local businesses so France kind of kicked it off with this. Three percent digital tax and several other company countries are prepared to follow suit and the US mission said just does not like it why the US does not like they. You heard him say it is discriminatory hit it. It really does the tax on companies that make more than about eight hundred fifty million dollars in annual revenue globally and in the example of France. Do Twenty five million alien euro worth of digital sales in that country. So if you do that math. That's about three companies. Google facebook Amazon. And they're saying this is a target on American American companies and it's taxing these companies over and over and over on the same revenue an important factor. We should say that the president said maybe a couple of weeks ago if anybody's going to tax these companies America's is gonNA taxis company so there's also that Where does this go? Do you think right well. Not a way sure. Despite by the the state of the discourse and the conversation about it You know Francis said it's going to move ahead with this tax Italy Turkey Austria. Spain Belgium are are all considering digital taxes and the fact is that this is a real issue that does have to get solved this question of kind of how you deal with companies. He's of this. Is that fundamentally don't have boundaries so there's talk of a global tax structure may be being worked out within the OECD that it would be a major shift in global tax policy but without a doubt the conversations far from over Indo forget despite what the president said a lot of these big tech companies also. So don't pay their taxes in the United States right Interesting that this country by country in Europe and it's not under the umbrella. Yeah exactly and I think that's what what makes it so tricky now. France has said that were there to be an E. U. Wide Agreement on taxation. They would be willing to go along with that. That's a hard thing to work out. And it wouldn't an address any of the other countries that might come along and say that they also wanted digital tax. Molly would she does the marketplace tech talking digital tech stuff. Molly thanks lawn

France Molly United States Spain Belgium Europe Davos Steven Mnuchin President Trump Oecd Francis Google Amazon Facebook Austria Indo America Italy
Powell says there’s no rulebook for trade war, pledges to act as appropriate to sustain economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Powell says there’s no rulebook for trade war, pledges to act as appropriate to sustain economy

"Interestingly early enough. This was a week when what the Federal Reserve did was less relevant than what chair Jay Powell said there were other things said about this and the global economy. Let me this week and so now we are going to say some things we being genus like the New York Times Gaye. Davidson is at the Wall Street Journal everybody I Juno. Let me start with you and chair. Powell al and I want your reaction to this thought the idea that does seem to be gaining strength out there that the more Jay Powell talks the less clear. The Federal Reserves Intentions about this economy discuss. I think that might've been a little bit what he was going for this week so yeah. I kind of think think I was talking to a bunch of investors about this yesterday and today and I think that the consensus is that he didn't do that that of a drop this week so basically eh pal hasn't kind of tough job right now because they're setting policy based on trade policy which is highly uncertain and you just never know what's going to happen with it in so. I think what the the Fed wanted to communicate this week which just that they don't know what happens next. They haven't decided for sure. They think it could be a rate cut. They don't know when that's going to come and they don't WanNa guarantee that it is going to materialize in so I think Powell went out trying to convince the markets that they really don't know and I think he was pretty successful at doing that. Wow Kate Davis. It's in what do you make of that and also this growing idea it's coming from the head of the ECB and it's coming from the OECD store yesterday on on how people are beginning to say look fiscal fiscal policy makers that is politicians. You GotTa do something because bankers can't do it all central bankers yeah. I think I think that gene is absolutely right. I thought one of Jay pals responses was was kind of funny. He was sort of asked. When do you know whether you're at the point where you need to cut rates further when you you've cut them enough when he sort of said we'll we'll. you know when we've done enough. We'll stop I mean he he really didn't give I think it was intentionally vague but yes on the on on the Fiscal Policy Front Powell joins a long line of Fed Chairman and women who have argued that fiscal policy makers need to do more if they want to see more economic growth that the Fed can only do so much to sort of support. GDP their goals are maximum employment in stable inflation. Shen in generally that leads to you know pretty good economic growth if things start to go self though in the Fed doesn't have some sort of magic magic tool that they've just been holding onto that we don't know about that's GONNA juice. Everything fiscal policy makers need to be thinking about the effects of their policy and so specifically right now. We're talking about trade. That's weighing on things Gina. Let me ask you this about a report that came out from the New York. Fed they basically said Oh look consumers. Are we're still strong. Businesses aren't doing much the question has to be how long does that endure an and I know I asked this a lot but holy cow show but I mean it's the fundamental question about this business cycle because the consumer is seventy percent of the American economy and they haven't cracked yet and that's why we have seen and such you know really persistently solid growth here. and I think the big question is how long can that process. Because what we've seen is some hints around the edges edges that consumers are getting a little bit spooked by the trade war you know the University of Michigan survey looked weak last month and the preliminary September numbers showed a little bit of a bounce back but it wasn't the bounceback you would have hoped for so I think the real question is you know those surveys tend to correlate pretty poorly overspending but if you would see it bleed over into actual activity of any kind of problem on your hands Kate about trade and consumers the president said today at one of those joint press conferences. He does with visiting heads of state. This was the Australian Prime Minister Head of government. I suppose somebody will correct me. I'm sure he said you know. I don't think I need to China trade deal before the election. If you do the regression analysis regression regression analysis and take the politics out of that do you by who I don't know I think that I think that we all know a lot. Let's let's say that there's not some agreement when Chinese officials come in early October. That's sort of the next big development. They're gonNA come to Washington. If there's no progress made then can you know as of now the US is still scheduled to raise tariffs on October fifteenth on a bunch of consumer goods. We already have tariffs on three hundred sixty billion dollars of of imports from China so excuse me not not consumer goods on the fifteenth by December Fifteenth. There's another round that would sweep in a bunch of consumer goods. I mean at that point. We'll be we'll be we have having tariffs on almost everything from China and it's hard to imagine you just talked about the effect on consumers. It's kind of hard to imagine that you know being sustainable sustainable through an election year so I I have to think that at some point the administration except some kind of deal okay so gina. I wanted to do one last thing with you. You've got this is. GonNa Ridiculous. You're going to have forty five seconds to do it. This thing that's been happening. in the what's called the overnight repo market right these banks lending to on on the new one another. Sh- super short term in order to to make their books workout. We did an interview on it on Wednesday. It's incredibly weedy but the reason I'm asking is that the New York doc Fed said today. It's GONNA keep making these emergency overnight monies available until the tenth of October. Are you stressed about this or is it normal ish. It's not normal so I think it's important to recognize that but it's not a reason for outside stress so basically what happened is the. Fed has been drinking. Its balance sheet for a long time which we've talked about and they got to a point where at very unusual moments when a lot of cash comes out of this market really quickly and there's a liquidity crunch bank serves us to step in to fix that but now bank reserves are scarce enough because of the Fed's balance sheet shrinking that they're not doing that and so the Fed finds itself having a couple of options. It can keep doing these as emergency operations. Would you WanNa do it can basically offer an option to banks where they can switch treasuries for reserves which it's talked about but it's not there yet and they would take watt implement or it can keep growing. It's start growing balance sheet again just a little bit and so it's really going to be a debate over. Which of those sort of your least worst option look. The least worst is how we're GONNA leave this holy cow Gina Smile he dons and Kate Davidson in the Wall Street Journal. Thanks you too.

Federal Reserve Jay Powell Gina Smile China Wall Street Journal FED Kate Davidson Federal Reserves Intentions Fed Chairman New York New York Times Kate Davis ECB Gaye Oecd United States Washington University Of Michigan Shen
OECD GLOBAL GDP GROWTH FORECAST SLASHED AS TRADE WAR, GEOPOLITICAL UNCERTAINTY WEIGH

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:54 min | 1 year ago

OECD GLOBAL GDP GROWTH FORECAST SLASHED AS TRADE WAR, GEOPOLITICAL UNCERTAINTY WEIGH

"In Los Angeles uncon- resolve Thursday today yeah I do believe the nineteenth of September is always to have you along. Everybody the watch word of this program so far this week have been monetary policy interest interest rates and how the Federal Reserve uses them to manage this economy. We did an explainer on Tuesday. The feds economic policy tool kit set the music featuring figuratively chair Jay Powell on guitar. You should check it out marketplace dot org. There was the interest rate decision yesterday featuring chair Jay Powell actually talking about the way the Fed does what it does today. It's the E. C. D. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and is downgrade of its global growth forecast this morning to its lowest level since two thousand nine. Let that sink in for a second. There is the trade war yes but also there is this quote from the OECD's chief economist do not rely on monetary policy to do the job alone. The head of the European Central Bank says the same thing Jay Powell says a version of it because fundamentally central banks for all their power cannot do it all marketplace's. Mitchell Hartman explains what's going on here to try and spark some economic growth central banks from the US to Europe to China have been pulling out every tool in their toolbox of monetary policy. That's manipulating the money supply and interest rates which are now negative in some places and still says Karen Petro at federal financial analytics central banks are wrestling with the fact that they have done everything thing they could more than they ever thought they should and growth is at best in Nemec threat of recession is very real so they're kind of punting to the politicians Titians and saying now you need to use your tools fiscal policy to stimulate growth which generally means cutting taxes and boosting spending bending but not just any kind of spending says Jacob Kirkegaard at the Peterson Institute to invest more money building new real estate high hi speed Internet Education Research and development this kind of spending stimulates productivity and future economic growth here in the the US. We've already Donna version of fiscal stimulus. The massive 2017 tax cuts Douglas Holtz Aken at the American Action Forum says that's led to soaring debt and deficits. He says we should be investing in things like roads and bridges but bitter partisanship is left Congress in a state of fiscal paralysis Alexis. The poster child for this is the absolute agreement that we need an infrastructure program absolutely no ability to get it done in addition to more growth friendly fiscal policy policy central bankers and the OECD also want less confrontational more growth friendly trade policy to help recharge the global economy. I'm hi Mitchell Hartman for marketplace.

Federal Reserve Jay Powell Oecd Mitchell Hartman European Central Bank Douglas Holtz Aken Los Angeles E. C. D. The Organization For United States Jacob Kirkegaard Congress Chief Economist Europe Peterson Institute American Action Forum Karen Petro
U.S. to slap tariffs on steel, aluminum from EU

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

01:48 min | 2 years ago

U.S. to slap tariffs on steel, aluminum from EU

"To dismiss it saying allegations are unsupported the head of the organization of american states expects increasingly tougher sanctions on venezuela's president nicolas maduro after challenged his government with crimes against humanity yesterday secretary general luis migros expects at least one country to sponsor the report and trigger a formal investigation by the international criminal court and former slovenian prime minister john is john's is leading the polls ahead of a snap election on sunday his slovenian democratic party sits on twenty five percent in a campaign dominated by fears of an influx of refugees from a comedian and may and mayan sonic is the closest rival nine to sweep out of political elite that's held sway since the fall of the iron curtain global news twenty four hours a day on airline it takes on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred and twenty countries i'm sandra kilhof this is bloomberg marcus sandra let's turn to one of our themes of the morning that's trade this as the eu is bracing for trade offensive from washington after reports the trump administration is poised to impose tariffs on steel and aluminium the president slapped duties on the metals back in march granted a reprieve to the eu and some other countries until the end of may let's get the latest now on this trade story we're going to go live to paris where bloomberg's counting canal is standing by forest catalin there's been some last minute diplomacy on these tariffs at the oecd meeting tell us about it yeah last minute diplomacy but we didn't see a really any progress here the the eu trae chief cecilia malmstrom met we've the us trade secretary wilbur ross and with the trade representative robert lighthizer bitchy you didn't even do briefing afterwards she didn't talk to the.

Secretary Robert Lighthizer Wilbur Ross Oecd Sandra Kilhof John Prime Minister Luis Migros Nicolas Maduro Representative Venezuela United States Cecilia Malmstrom Bloomberg Paris President Trump Washington EU Twitter
"oecd" Discussed on Albuquerque 1000 AM

Albuquerque 1000 AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on Albuquerque 1000 AM

"You know if you can't hold down a job and you don't have health insurance then and then the therapy to work then you're kind of like in a catch twenty two you know who you first mentioned oecd so it described jimmy win what are you obsessing over because there's an obsessed obsession over something and then the c is compulsive meaning i abcess i hate coop obsessing and so there's something compulsively that you do but it's not just something that doesn't matter it affects you that's the deep part oecd obsessive compulsive dis order a disorder means it impairs your normal functioning so what what was the obsession or is the obsession over how i have a lot of obsessions and they've changed over the years i'm like i said i was first diagnosed at fourteen but um you know i if i have to say i i mean currently my main obsessions are dealing with checking things um you know like i i have to check the box you know of the helms several times even long no they're already off um after make sure you know i have to check my car door lock several times you know i have to um you know if i set like for example i don't know um a laptop or something that i think is valuable sown or something on a table um i have to check it several times and make sure that it's not too close to the edge that way it well that way it won't fall off and break or something and um you know i have i have other um other uh i don't know like i guess those are more of the the compulsions but i'm really the oecd is just so watered down if you really want me to get down to the root of it june um i was uh molested when i was um three or four years old and um for a long time it was just like the steep dark secret i knew what had happened to me everybody else my family new well you just didn't know who did it and we didn't know exactly what happened and i don't remember what happened but i know that that's where the oecd stems from it all comes from sphere um does yes ranked okay sue who there you.

health insurance helms oecd jimmy four years
"oecd" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Net positive depending on two things out as long as the economy grows and there's enough business dynamism we'll be net positive on jobs okay so net positive but you are talking in this report about i dunno colossal transition for workers around the world in the us and beyond have you ever seen anything like the transition that we're about to see yellow accident two for the united states one is from agriculture manufacturing and then ink and then manufacturing to what is now lodged a services sector driven economy if you think about it today only nine percent of the us workforce works in manufacturing wasn't the case seventy years ago fifty years ago but it's clearly something that needs a lot of public policy focus i mean this is not something that government can nibble around the edges on it it's a it's a big deal while it's a really big deal and i think this warfare everybody to be honest it's on just the government but just to stay with the government for example we we one of the things we didn't localities in a how much do governments have looked at oecd countries how much they been spending as a percentage of gdp on worker training as well as worker dislocations support and quite frankly the report cod doesn't look great across the advice oecd advanced economy countries and the us is that the road to the low end of that so we have not been spending very much and we've actually been decreasing the mantra spend four those kinds of workers supports so that's the if you like the report card for the government the private sector doesn't come off likely either because we you know the on the amount of private sector on the job training is also being declining so i think one of the things we're going to have to think about is how do we encourage the economic systems both the private sector and the government to reemphasize investment in human capital uh i mean we have all kinds of incentives to encourage companies and others to invest in r d.

united states oecd seventy years nine percent fifty years
"oecd" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The second one but oecd absolutely um uh you know there's certain parts of the brain that are your shifts there's that allow us to move from one state to the next and a lot of people who have ocd they can't shift gears by the the idle in the brain this too fast part of the brain call the big tanguay and it's just it's just constantly on the fast idle and dumb most people have uh having to have to figure out ways to reduce their stress levels and so they become over focus in so we now know that when people can find the present moment and we teach them how to do this going they can fall into the present moment and become conscious of whether attention and their energy is going if they keep practicing that an keep settling the body down into the present moment every time they settle the body back down into the present they're telling the body it's no law a mind at their the mine and every time they do that there's a liberalisation of energy the body releases a little energy and the begins three wax more into the present moment and the brain becomes will but more coherence and then the programme kicks in and then they noticed that there's an impulse again and then they several their body back down into the present moment may shift their attention from a narrow focus you know focusing on matters to an open focused focusing on nothing space and energy the active opening their focus in connecting to that field begins to create more coherence in their brain in overtime their brain starts get more balanced so we've we've got some great measurements with anxiety and depression than cycles mood disorders in oecd because it's an act of finding the press a memorial in the present moment.

anxiety time people oecd ocd depression little
"oecd" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I am answering champs and we're talking about compulsions this hour the sensation is analogous to being held at gunpoint you have to do whatever it takes to make that feeling go away so you do even smith has had oecd as long as he can remember when he was little he says it manifested in pretty traditional wang's i had what's called magical thinking so i was afraid let's say if i didn't tapped my toothbrush twotimes at each hand a train would crash in europe or people would die or something bad what happened the people that i love actually had one where i had to stare at a girls boobs for thirteen seconds without getting caught in it would always come up like when i was in synagogue and if i did make it to thirteen and have to do it again and but i also had not get caught in retrospect that might not have been oecd at all that just have been becoming a man but is even got older his oecd got worse in high school he became an extreme hypochondriac terrified of getting sick he carried a thermometer with him at all times he took his temperature sixty seventy times a day he went through years of therapy it was hospitalized at one point misdiagnosed a psychotic before he in his parents finally found a treatment that worked thanks in part to the oecd institute or ocd i in boston so the right treatment for oecd is what's called cdt erp the era piece called exposure response prevention what it is is the person that has those ed is exposed to their greatest fear was you start very very small and you slowly work a to your biggest fears through a series of events miho cd had shifted from fear illness to i was afraid i was going to hit my head in cause of bleed like a brain lead by will rat my hands in the elastic of my underwear bomb to protect myself.

smith oecd oecd institute boston europe thirteen seconds
"oecd" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"No look i'm a i'm a guy at betty finding out the emi man logical guy i don't know what you you don't know for her like it could be a reflection of a light could be but from from always see it from my perspective you look like a kind of it is bad enough redgreen triangularshaped what are the it was maybe the size of a football field george i looked at orange jorge serrano that was an alien george yes or no that was a spaceship yes or no yes or no i do not know i do not know in your hour live man i would i would not i was i was not alone when it and when i tell you order but who has no one was a face value we all know we don't know george of of what do you believe do you mean the size of a football field george do you believe it was a spaceship the eight could be an illusion they could be i have no idea eyes yes had and have here oh afterwards saying fears a crash there is offering uh george i was reading that you steps away from your sport because of the oecd and i wonder what was the worst part of oecd for your when it was at its worst what it look like well i didn't i you know i i never been diagnosed with oecd i i'm saying that i have make a joke about i would add thing demo the proper name would be up special you know what i want something i really upset about it um look it up that's what i would say you know like uh what i want something i i think about it content you my head i would have been like this one i wanted kiddo as i wanna do i want the same you know i was at a golden lion i was focusing on it like crazy on so that that's a good day way could be a bad thing when you're like stress phone and like fighting because fighting it felt like a gain feed here get well meaning underlying on looks like and make you make you nervous because we care wellbeing here and what you love most in hate most about fighting george like what what brings you the most joy and what brings you the moment pain.

jorge serrano george oecd betty football
"oecd" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"By the way these are numbers the organisation for economic cooperation and development the oecd widelyaccepted numbers and their from two thousand eight which is the last time he did a really comprehensive analysis on this so this study joe look at all forms of taxes i want to be clear on this liberals take the cotton out of your ears because they always have some counterargument that they'll make up at a thin air cover all forms of taxes on income including social insurance taxes and state and local taxes joe so this study looked at all forms of taxation if found out that the top 10 percent of earners in the us paid more than 45 percent of all taxes on income the top ten percent paid forty five percent of all taxes on income the top ten percent of arms now member of the liberal argument means the liberal argument is always alluded to the fact that the rich don't pay enough which is garbage which is nonsense now in the places they love sweden be in one of whom in sweden joe the top 10 percent of earners paid less than twenty seven per se got as advocates out there who gadgets advocates an it let me so yeah get jays advocacy are so let's just be clear on this so liberals are argument here is that the in the united states the rich people are getting a free pass okay but when you factor in all forms of taxes joe in the us the top 10 percent those evil rich people pay 45 percent you got that 45 a great deal of the numbers around forty location sweden liberal utopia they talk about all the time fake democratic socialist country which is not as there's not you democrat joseph stay in sweden the top 10 percent pay 27 so is twenty seven less than 45 hailing me.

united states sweden oecd joe joseph 10 percent ten percent 45 percent forty five percent
"oecd" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The oecd countries there are groups like yours that give us exactly the opposite argument some my job is to try to keep going in terms of trying to address the urgency of the development challenge their told you about while tackling difficult issues one of the things that we did over the past couple of years is we brought discriminate shen against the lgbt community into the language of the safeguards now there are ninety countries in the world maybe maybe fewer now in which homosexuality is illegal according to their national laws so how do you get anti discrimination against the lgbt community into the safeguards when justified half your countries think that homosexuality should be illegal we did it and we did it because i forced the question but that's the nature of multilateralism you have you have still just tremendous complaints from the low income a middle income countries and then you have your you you you have a groups like yours who are holding us accountable so this is my life this is my life managing managing the complexity and i i wake up every day feeling that not only are we doing the right thing most of the time but that the task is ever more urgent let let me just put it bluntly if we do not as a world bank crew dramatically increase the amount of private capital that we can we can bring in and and be in the middle of it we need to be the reason we need to be in the middle of it is because the private capital the owners of private capital don't have safeguards going into these countries and and and our client countries are expecting us to play the role of honest broker making sure that development outcomes are prioritised first and foremost and then we bring in the capital based on their priorities i that that is my most urgent task right now and i and i can tell you this as as many criticisms as you may maker of of the world bank group if we don't do that if we don't do that the path form the final common pathway for many many countries is going to be fragility conflict violence extremism eventually migration that's what is happening in the world today and we have to live with the imperfection of.

oecd
"oecd" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Let's let's talk about the anxiety one of the things you share openly is joe your battles with oecd mum you wanna talk about a anxiety and oecd at the at the same time yeah you're like they're they're linked to khin yeah when do you remember that uh presenting itself room i think it was a third grade than it it started just with like um really enjoying sort of a setting up toys nicely on a shelf at at it's funny it's like all things where eu are all sort of a addictions or whatever that the first time you do it it's the best feeling in the world so high that will never come back yeah yeah yeah to that degree of how the rest of your life you're chasing this oecd a high of like remember when it was so good but we can't ever you know you're chasing a but leg so i remember that scratching image as a kid that felt pleasurable and the with the bloom i guess like high school it started a more junior high school was like a really enjoying making lists and a crossing out things on malysz but to the point that the crossing out had to be precise vavi get like a ruler and when i was crossing out the thing that was its oto cd thing i was making it out like let's get another level of there is like a square next to it i put a perfect acts to the square like there something really satisfied him and i know that still rears its head to some extent with my inbox in my email in like.

joe oecd
"oecd" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Just a complete really anna i don't know was deployed but uh well yeah when he says are gonna fucked me up licking fucked up your husband and daughter owes like whoa do that'll work yeah but they have acting all of the actors i thought just uh we're just top nods i mean i knew mixed on seed out would be great because he's next monsita of course that like i just thought everybody brought or eight game the actor who plays federico he's amazing he um some of it was the physicality reminded me a lot actually in some ways of michael rodgers' performance and beyond the black rainbow the just as sort of quiet intensity i just you he was magnetic i mean everybody's grading a smell bed have have especially this characters right magnetic as well so it's like a perfect pairing i love the references your you're pulling out other oecd got could give a horta ralph he ably beyond the black rainbow the who flew who great your crew movie geeks uh but i i have to say with one seat out i think that left monologue that he has where he explains his backstory is is the most beautifully performed moment in the movie and one of the highlights i think of his career which is just epic already uh it's it's really well written but it it's it's beautifully performed uh i mean if you look at that moment just the simplicity of how he plays that.

federico michael rodgers oecd
"oecd" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"Oh that's where i gave in to the eating disorder and i was following its logic i wasn't actually doing the compassionate thing that i know to be true or that part of me really wants ray and so the more you practice with that the maori practice disconnecting from that disordered side or challenging at or just stepping away from it noticing it the easier gets to sidestep it right the easier gets to not do the thing that it's telling you to do and i'm not intimately familiar with oecd and i'm not a therapist emma dietician and coach so i you know i'm not trained in all the mental health intricacies of oecd or other mental health conditions but i can say that from the people i've worked with who've had some success recovering from oecd it seems to be a similar type of thing right i mean medication is also huge part of managing oecd so finding the right psychiatrists and psychotherapist as uber important too but cognitively behaviorally some of the things that work are sort of separating out what is my true logical mind saying and what is the oecd logic saying so you might explore that end apply at your relationship with food right and say like where does this thought seemed to be coming from you know if i have x y z thought about behaviors i should be doing with food quote unquote what part of my mind as coming from is coming from the compassionate nonjudgmental part of me or is that coming from the oecd logic right and then the other piece is if you have a mental health condition that is affecting our appetite save you have to take medication for that's increasing our appetite as many psychotropic medications do or decreasing wrapped tight as many of them do as well or depression has got you either really low appetite or eating a lot for comfort right or anxiety or many other conditions can have an effect on your appetite certainly because we have this brain gut connection riot there's a really strong link between our emotions and how we feel and how.

depression ray oecd
"oecd" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"Because with many mental health conditions there will be sort of a separate voice i mean we talk about this a lot with eating disorder recovery right there's an eating disorder voice that's really separate from kind of who you really are and the sort of non judgmental inner caretaker voice that might be there to or might be really silenced by the eating disorder the eating disorder usually is a very critical voice sort of a nagging voice domineering voice many people will identify that it sounds similar to someone in their past ray like at the voice of a critical parent or critical someone else in in your life or in the world so with oecd it's kind of similar raid the oecd voice might have the flavor of criticism or strictness right not flexibility not not logic and i'm sure that you know in your work that you've done on oecd you sort of understand that there is true logic and then oecd logic right like true logic says you can't predict the future and the way washer hands or go about some sort of routine in your home isn't going to determine the outcome of your day right and you sort of can logically know that but then the oecd part of you really believes in that logic really believes that you can control the future based on rituals you do or whatever other behaviors are sort of part of your compulsions right so i think sort of separating those two sides can be a valuable exercise because just as with the diet mentality or the eating disorder verses the inner self or the inner caretaker or the healthy self whatever you want to call it you know those two sides riot the the disorder part and the more nonjudgmental compassionate part being able to see the difference and say like i'm gonna choose not to listen to the disordered part today right or oh i gave in to the disorder part there but i'm not under any illusions that that was coming from the compassionate part right like you can sort of see maybe after the fact with a little distance and reflection.

oecd
"oecd" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I wanted to i could try to um you know volunteer or provide medical services to the military and it's not that i'm considering because i just in my father served in the military my grandfather it was a military man you know i don't want to think it stops you know with my generation euro serving in the military has been something i believe most of our generations i i think every single generation we had in our family served in the military and so to be the first generation and our family to not just bugs me now in terms of wind talked about women being in the military women being on the frontlines i do think that we need to us on one end wherever one serve whoever wants to die for our country i eat we do all we can for that you don't say no to people want to help you fight for our country on the other hand if they're ours specific places where it could be an issue and a certain individuals whether they're female male transgender uh you know could possibly puts certain trump's at risk for example if they put somebody like me on a navy seal team eyewitness news seal team up i don't think it'll but i don't think they would be able to keep their focus because i i'm like super sexy cell half of left big bucks so let's talk about this when we get back what 877buydell seventy oecd a.

oecd
"oecd" Discussed on FT Hard Currency

FT Hard Currency

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"oecd" Discussed on FT Hard Currency

"An and what goes around comes around a presumably very soon will be asking whether mariodraghi starts warning about this this year a level getting into the 112 terry while74 for central bankers i would say it's often the pace of moves rather than the absolute levels which can worry them more now right now i would say the pace is not too worrying i do see actually say that the level shouldn't be too worrying after because if you look away for value should be we look for instance at simple purchasing power parity model ppp models we look for instance at the oecd sustem it from fair value on a ppp model for your dollar his 125 so the euro right now is undervalued the dollar is overvalued now not all models of course put it at 125 and but many do put at higher levels them where we are today said from that point of view that the euro is still relatively soft but certainly if we saw a lot of all eternity central banks won't welcome that john as a general rule and if we did see a another shop spike in the value of of the euro perhaps would begin to okaylet's look at what's happening in emerging markets there is a lot of risk aversion it fails out there onthursdaythere is his brazilian banking scandal which which is an helping mattis march but perhaps to explain this we probably need to look at what what's going on with the the reflation trade and whether we have been worrying not enough about data coming out of china and the us.

central banks john china us oecd okaylet onthursdaythere mattis