35 Burst results for "Octa"

Bring on the snack cake cereal

The Empty Bowl

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Bring on the snack cake cereal

"Welcome to the Empty Bowl might name is Justin mcelroy and I am a serial enthusiast. My name is Dan Gilbert and I am a serial ethnographer in the sense that I know the cereal culture in the overall breakfast. Zeitgeist well enough to understand the impact of some of the stories we're about to talk about today. that's. So exciting we have so much going on this first news story Dan. I have to tell you. I'm thrilled over here over on this end. I mean it's huge. It's absolutely. Substantial. So. When you write about serial for five years I have inevitably you end up seeing some of the same things again and again, and one of the easiest things to do when you're reading about serial is to tell the world about the weirdly specific cereals that you've always wanted to see on shelves and for me Besides gingerbread toast crunch I think the second most idea of cereal I've ever had would be a little. OATMEAL, cream pies cereal, and now we must wait no more as Kellogg's has partnered with the snack brand to bring oatmeal cream pie cereal two shelves later this year. What's IT GONNA look like? So so from appearance alone, it doesn't necessarily look like the sort of sandwiched cream, an oatmeal cookie. Snack cake that you're familiar with It looks more like a brown oatmeal ring cereal, which is fine. I'm not really in this for appearances so much as the legacy of the snack taking question. You say, what did you say that the cream pie is your favorite little w product It's up there with cosmic Brownie alum that plastic chocolate on a on a cosmic Brownie I used to get star crunches a lot when I was a kid in my lunch bag but I don't like those so I don't know why I felt the need to tell you that but. You know it the for me. I'd say it's a three way tie between the oatmeal Cream Pie the double decker oatmeal cream pies. Distinct feast and the fudge around, which is essentially just a chocolate oatmeal cream by but overall I, think the oatmeal cream pies and amazing snack product. It's probably my go-to whenever I am Matt a gas station stopped long road trip. So I'm very very excited to see it come serial form. Especially, it's going to be a thin line to walk to get that exact flavor because as I, discovered recently. Raisins are in the battle of the bill cream pie. It's sink. Yes. Yes. Yes. Raisins in the OATMEAL cream. Pie. So that's why like you get that like is what gives it its distinct flavor is that there's raisins mixed into into the batter period into the better so. That will be a tricky flavor to to nail. Think I'm really hoping that mine is not the only mind that you've blown with this revelation right here because I did not know that at all I mean. meanwhile, I was just hoping that this is an actual oath based serial rather than some some sort of corn contraption because I think it'd be really an authentic otherwise but. I think my favorite thing about the story overall is how you just know that someone at Kellogg's saw post team up with hostess to drop the sort of twinkies, etcetera cereals, and immediately thought. Get Little Debbie on the horn. We're not going to stand for this sort of force that cooperation to happen. Yeah, it's funny that you mentioned cosmic brownies actually because when the story first broke before, it became official from Kellogg's themselves There was a youtube video of someone reviewing the little debbie cereal or oatmeal cream pies cereal before anyone knew about it and they were also reviewing cosmic Brownie cereal. It was weird because they had the box for Little Debbie oatmeal cream pies cereal but they didn't have any official box art for the cosmic brownies cereal and the stuff really kinda looked like the cocoa puffs Brownie crunch that rerelease not too long ago. So it's very uncertain. The legitimacy of this cosmic Brownie cereal because after the news officially dropped I reached OCTA Kellogg's my contact there and ask them about this and all I could tell me in the Vegas. Possible terms was that a cosmic brownies Syria was not releasing at this time. The seems like a tacit confirmation that cosmic Brownie Syria was at least considered whether it will actually be released or not or if it was scrapped entirely remains uncertain but the point remains that we're entering a brave new world of snack cakes, cereals and I'm all here for it.

Kellogg Dan Gilbert Octa Kellogg Justin Mcelroy Official Syria Debbie Youtube Matt Vegas
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 3 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Hollywood's Black List

Planet Money

11:33 min | 3 months ago

Hollywood's Black List

"Every year, fifty thousand movie scripts Tele plays other pieces of writer Lee stuff get registered with the Writers Guild of America fifty thousand most of which sucks, but a handful of which will become the movies that change our lives today on the show how a math! Loving movie nerd used a spreadsheet and an anonymous hotmail address to solve one of Hollywood's most fundamental problems, picking winners from a sea of garbage, and he may just have reinvented the power structure of Hollywood along the way. Support for this podcast and the following message come from OCTA A leader in identity driven security as the world shifts to a more remote work approach. Your employees need to securely access all your company data as well as connected thousands of applications, OCTA does just that empowering your employees to work remotely while also working smart, keeping their data, APPS and identity secure from anywhere learn more at O., K., T. A. dot com slash NPR. We're only months away from election day and every week or even every few hours. There's a new twist that could affect who will win the White House to keep up with the latest tune into the NPR. Politics podcast every to find out what happened and what it means for the election. It's two thousand and five Franklin Leonard a junior executive at Leonardo. DiCaprio's production company which sounds glamorous, but arguably he is a glorified script reader. WHO's boss's boss? Is Leonardo DiCaprio. Franklin's job is to help that boss. Find The next great movie for Leo, which means he is constantly reading movie scripts. Every junior executive lives in constant fear of the trade story that breaks about some exciting new script that they didn't know about that. Their bosses like. Like why didn't you know about this? Franklin is supposed to know about everything which is tough because there's this famous old saying in Hollywood. Nobody knows anything as in. It's really hard to know what movies are going to work. So if you do find something any piece of information that can help you gauge. What might work that information? Franklin is learning. That is Hollywood gold one of the things that drilled into your head. Is that information? Information is the most valuable thing. Yeah, and that information is to be protected and kept in house and exploitation of that information is how we in power and leverage like what little information you can manage, and then if it's kind of good, put up a wall as quickly as possible. That's exactly right. Movie scripts are a kind of information like the fundamental piece of information for a movie, and so Franklin's job is go out into the world. World and find undiscovered scripts before anybody else finding those scripts, though amongst the thousands and thousands being written every year it's a bit like walking into like the largest bookstore in the world, and every book has the exact same color. There's no cover art. There's no like publishers weekly. There's no reviews available to you, but your job is to walk into that sort of hyper anonymous bookstore and come out with the best books available That seems impossible. And Franklin says you can see how a problem emerges quickly in Hollywood people deal with this overwhelming amount of information by assuming they should reach for the same shelves of that anonymous bookstores they always do. They assume they should make the same kinds of movies written by the same kinds of people starring the same kinds of people. Yes, we are generally talking about white men people you soon because this has been the case for you thus far that are white writer who went to Dartmouth is better than a black writer who went to? To Clark Atlanta or Spelman, the conventional wisdom that you assume as wisdom is more often than not convention, and that is especially true in Hollywood where the convention has been created by people who are in no way, shape or form representative of the audience and consumer that they are trying to sell to Franklin. decided it was going to be part of his job. Try and find scripts outside of the conventions, well of course, also keeping an eye open for the next conventional blockbuster, which yeah was gonNA mean lots more reading the normal. Look. I've always been bit of a grind. My Competitive Advantage was my capacity to work, and so every weekend I would take home a banker's box full of scripts, but literally twenty five thirty screenplays, and try to read them all every Saturday afternoon. There is Franklin sitting on his couch. It is black sweatpants flipping through page after page after page hoping he's about to read a life changing story imagine if Christmas was every Saturday, but every Saturday. You ran downstairs and opened the box that you're most excited about, and it was socks. Because there is the possibility of getting everything that you ever wanted yeah. But there is the probability that it's. Socks most Saturdays and Sundays go like this Franklin tears into his Christmas scripts seven hours later. Frankland sitting in a pile of socks and the worst thing is when he goes into the office on Monday. His boss says you read anything good. And Franklin has to say no. It was as if he didn't do any work that weekend. Because most scripts are so bad, the Franklin would be in trouble for recommending them, and even if he is lucky enough to find a scripted, he loves he's really got to think about whether. Whether it is the right kind of thing for Leo's company like there was a script going around that year about a guy dealing with his interpersonal trauma by buying and dating a sex doll. It's easy to imagine reading that in saying Oh this is a really well observed human story, but imagine going into your boss's office and saying you should read this and when they ask you what it's about saying. This is what it's about Leonardo DiCaprio. I think you should play this role where you date of a doll like that's. That's a tough sell for the most confident among us. Franklin's breaking point came late one night. Do you remember his? He was in the office. It was dark outside, and he was supposed to go on vacation, and he just kept thinking about how he was inevitably going to end up drowning in bad scripts on vacation, and all of that work would generate nothing of actual value for his job and I remember, looking up and thinking. I. Don't know that this is sustainable and I need to come up with a solution. How is there not a better system for finding good screenplays? If you do the Friends of friends method, you end up with the Friends of friends scripts, and if you try this brute force thing, you're going to ruin your weekends, Andrew Vacation, plus you would need fifty more Franklin's to see all of the script anyway. And that's when it dawns on Franklin. There are more than fifty Franklin's in Hollywood got on. My desktop fired up my calendar and went through and looked at every single person who had a job similar to mine. Who I had had breakfast lunch, dinner or drinks with. If you had eavesdropped on those breakfasts and drinks, Franklin says you would have heard the junior executives ask each other this same question. Have you read anything good lately? Yes, these junior. Our competitors and yes, information is power and companies would probably not be jazzed about them sharing that information, but you know these are low level producers. They're doing each other favors, and it's all off the record anyway. Who is going to know about this and so Franklin figures? Let's see if anyone's read anything good lately. He opens up an email and he BBC's about seventy. Five of his fellow junior exacts, and so know hey. Similar of your ten favorite scripts in exchange I will send you the combined. Responses back. Did you say who you were like? I am a I am a mysterious junior executive. Say anything else, I do not believe that I did. I created an anonymous hotmail address. I believe it was blacklist. Two thousand five at Hotmail DOT com, he called it the blacklist partly to honor the blacklisted writers during the McCarthy era, and partly because he always hated the idea that the word black gets used to mean bad, so this blacklist was going to mean great screenplays. People would respond, but surprisingly responses started coming back. Maybe these other junior executives felt as stuck as Franklin. Maybe it was just this information bargain was was a good deal. I sure transcripts I get a whole list back there around ninety responses and every time somebody mentioned the same script Franklin treated that like a vote for that script, and he starts logging all of this into spreadsheet. Twenty five people voted for things. We lost in the fire by Allan Loeb Twenty. Four people mentioned Juno by cody. Fifteen votes Larson the real girl by Nancy Oliver Fourteen votes, Lars and the real girl that is the script about the guy and the sex. If, you were a junior executive. Thinking this is good, but is this good? I'm not important enough to risk bringing this to my boss. The blacklist was a way of saying you were right. It was good and here is a number. Instead of just your instincts fourteen votes, only living boy in New, York, by Allan, Loeb Charlie Wilson's war by earned Sorkin, Fan Burke and by the way a big deal in two thousand five. This wasn't just about finding undiscovered writers. It was any script that was great and not made. In a script called peacock by riders named Michael Lender and Ryan Roy the top ten of the very first blacklist thubten of the very first blacklist. Point the blacklist was just a spreadsheet that only Franklin could see, and he's about to send it back to all those other junior executives who contributed and he looks at it for a moment all of this normally off the record insider Hollywood Intel now written in a single place. He takes a deep breath. And he hit send. And then he packs up and heads off for vacation in Mexico and about a weekend vacation I went to the hotel of business center to check my email on like the public computer. And this lists have been forwarded back to me several dozen times. and everyone's like Oh my word of this team. Come from a lot of descriptions of sister. Good. Where where did this come from? What's your? What's your thought? It was terrifying. My thought is is that my career in Hollywood has a clock on it and the doomsday clock has just sped up. This anonymous list of the best unmade screenplays was blowing up. It had gone way beyond the small circle. It was initially sent to it even ended up covered the industry press, and so Franklin kept his down. He stayed anonymous and one day. He gets this call from an agent. Saying that his client has written this amazing script. It's perfect for Leo. It's like the usual call, except then the agent says hey. Don't tell anybody, but I have it on good authority that this ripped is going to be the number one script on next year's blacklist. I immediately thought to myself. That's interesting because I made the blacklist and I'm not making another one because I. DON'T WANNA get run out of town on rails. But I'm fascinated that you think that the speculative notion of your client scripting on the list is a sales tool for you. That must mean that this list that I created has

Franklin Hollywood Executive Franklin Leonard Leonardo Dicaprio LEO Writer Octa White House Writers Guild Of America Allan Loeb Leonardo NPR LEE BBC Andrew Vacation
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 5 months ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
No prayer, no justice with Pete Greig

Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

09:53 min | 6 months ago

No prayer, no justice with Pete Greig

"Hello and welcome to the together. Podcast conversation about faith justice how to change the world. I'm Don and today I'm joined remotely by Cat and Chris how you guys doing. Yeah so we're trying to recall this remotely so it might have to kind of feel the Z. Meeting where we will interrupt each other and everybody. Everybody says no Yuko common phrase in the English dictionary they have to offer. You have to get really solid. Should be appointed leader. You just how everyone wants to do every single cigars how how you doing. What's your. What's your view like right in this moment? So we're working from home and do you have a good little south there. Yeah I've gone inflatable. Jesus next to me Nice context or just I just I just put him in there to just keep me company so I feel like I've got some workers. Excuse this yeah. I'm still your coworker by not having been actually in my little music station where normally record at home so nice very home for me. Yeah this is. This must be familiar for you. Sat there if you just start in some freestyle staff just because you're in the zone and that's absolutely fine. I think that's go- keyboard as well. Let's go for it. How prepared as everybody knows. He's listening to this where we're in lockdown currently just heading into week four of lockdown guys. What would your one top tip be for for anybody in this situation? Either to keep them saying. Keep them entertained to keep that routine. What would your tip be if you were to give someone a tip if you were to travel back in time for weeks and say to someone that this is coming. This is my one bit for device. Fear what would that be stuck up on toilet row? You'd be that person to left so we go brave shops fine now. There's loads of them there as well. They're just make the mice of light the outdoors. What's the outdoors magical place that I guess? Your question is what their advice would be before lockdown or during OCTA down town. Yeah I think I think definitely like utilizing your one one more day because I did miss a couple. That was a time. I Wen- went out on Saturday and then didn't go out again until the following Saturday and that felt ways. That is extremely down is mine would be to start your car. You never know. It's just GonNa say it once a day but don't shouldn't you like run it for a while as well because he just started and turn off at actually die for a little bit because obviously needed to get supplies say that part is important but in terms of like an actual like like psychological spiritual thing for you to help you life. I'd say give yourself a grace is retained great for now. Of course I think is really important. Everyone tries to get routine. But if you don't not one day by the end of the world was talking to my cousin. Struggle moves like putting on weight. Meanwhile disguise like he's skinny but yeah. I think yeah a little bit more than you normally do like fine. Don't worry I like Chris. I really needed to hear that because I've been struggling to get up in the morning. I think my my two bits of advice. I one is similar to what you were just saying. But I don't know about you guys when you wake up. Naveh shower wherever you come to get dressed. The temptation to put on the jogging bottoms is strong. My advice would a always reach for the jeans or or you could go smarter and just go. Trousers like full-on save by. I think I think just getting wearing clothes that you would wear out does helps me get ready in the right frame of mind. So that's that's one kind of half joke but also have serious. I think the one that someone shared as many words use everyday call someone. You haven't spoken to in three months and so there's quite good now jumping on zoom cores in house party and that kind of thing and talking to the people that we would see every day and that's important But really this also provides us the opportunity to get back in touch with people. We haven't spoken to for a while checking them say. Hey so that might be a fan core even dropping a text or anything and so. That's been quite good because it's been my mind okay. Who who should I do? Should I take a call today? And then you kind of build up. Some momentum happened in that for over a week now and then you start up conversations with people you haven't spoken to you for a while so definitely worth worth trying that one out. That's really grow their start off. That's so they go guys. There's some advice fee listening out there in lockdown but that was just waffle. Because I know you've been waiting for the the pivotal moment in the cast. Is CATS QUESTIONS SECA? Everybody who's WHO's waiting for. This was going to say out of their misery. They're awaiting such excitement. Put them out of their excitement cat. What is today's cats questions? Well I feel like Chris missed out on one last week. It actually has come from last week's question. Technically the question that Donald Smith came about the the sources in the fridge or in the coverage so then I saw the the the popular COMBI Ketchup on May. What do you guys think about that fully behind the I o back that until the day I die so it was the question. Would I combine the two off with story number? Yeah what do you think about the Combi of catch up on the massive financially okay? We'll see this is not going to wear. That was two thousand. I thank the Combo wrong. Okay Chrissie pretend that you hate all. I'll say that I like it and that makes better listening. But now I think particularly so my if I have potato wedges than I'm a massive fan I don't necessarily mix the two sources so have catch up on one side in a catch-up area and Mayor Mayor area but over time I will kind of dip in water and dip in the other and so there is a bit of cross contamination by the I have to mix it all in now we now we get into the French. What are you playing around you? Just get it in that and a mix up percent homemade burger sous why I normally would like my first chip will be will be the one that is blessed to be the mixer and Mitch over. My first chip is usually the one where the my slavers were Say I've got a lockdown special question question if if you could only have one streaming platform from now. What would it be Youtube? Oh Art and eat meat. I didn't even think about Youtube. I was thinking was thinking more. You're paid for services. Bedtime occurs tightly. Yeah if we're talking like free as definitely Youtube paid services I think is between spotify and Net flix. Yeah nobody listen to as much music since I've been stuck in the house. So maybe I think for me. I'm between net flicks and Disney plus because on the partic- plus we're going through the marvel films in order of release guy say currently on Captain America. So I think if I lost that now the devastation equally with net flicks. I need to find out what happens to carol by skin. So three episodes four episodes of targeting with about three episodes left so yeah I think I think it would be between those two if I had to probably Disney plus just until I finish marble. Wild is big so huge. Yeah plus frozen to say what is the deal with Thai King on Comey actually of unique? Because everyone everyone has been telling me to watch it and then so we sat down and watched the trailer yesterday. And it just looks. Renders is marred. It's it's something that you couldn't possibly Ri- I'm only four episodes in but the twists and the complexity and the characters kind of characters. They're real people. Surprisingly people popping up from nowhere and then seventy just becoming major characters in this in this real life story.

Chris Disney Youtube Yuko DON Octa Donald Smith WEN Comey Chrissie Spotify Captain America Mitch
"octa" Discussed on How Did This Get Played?

How Did This Get Played?

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"octa" Discussed on How Did This Get Played?

"A week's go around will give it a will say one positive thing about this game and then give it a numerical decimal rating. I'll begin. You mentioned the ambulance levels again plan. I watched it on video but man. The lighting effects are very snazzy in an ambulance levels you're driving the road in the fucking lightest shifting over your and that's like an additional environmental hazard as you're trying to perform the surgery yeah. I thought that was dazzling but that look great. This game is you know. There's another game octo dad which is a similar sort of the. The controls are intentionally difficult. We talked a little bit of category. How that game is. The controls are difficult in that game. But not at anywhere on this level like that. There are a little clunky on that by design but this is more in the the OCTA dad category where it's just like it's intentionally very very hard to get with Matt screen up. We've got a dad who's an octopus basically And maybe wants you to retrieve his slippers from the porch or his sandwich from the kitchen. And but that's another game where it's just like very very hard to control and I get it I understand with the scheme is trying to accomplish. Something they WANNA play like. I'm not going to return to this and so for that reason. I think it's creative but I'm GONNA put the I'm GonNa give this a middling five point five. I heather go ahead The thing I liked the most and I would love Matt to pull. This up was the music. We haven't touched them. I I really liked that that that core song that plays that incorporates a beating heart into it or allow an EKG meter. I I love that music. I don't mind it at all. let's see if we can hear a little piece of it. It's so that the beat has dropped. That's pretty that's pretty fucking.

Matt OCTA
Why Front's Series C matters

Equity

09:11 min | 9 months ago

Why Front's Series C matters

"I'm Alex Wilhelm and once again I have have denny Crichton with me Danny how are you doing. I'm doing awesome. That is that's enthusiasm. You are back in New York. I'm in Providence and I have to say I've I've had enough of this shit. I want some summer but the good news is despite the terrible weather and the time of the year. There is a gazillion things to get to. So I'm going to skip the usual faffing about and jump bright in. I'm going to start the show with front which I need you to explain to me why this particular funding round was such a big deal. Right you'RE GONNA kick off the entire show that so start with why. Hi the Health Care Front. Raise fifty nine million dollars in series C and Here's here's the deal. They didn't have a lead. They had no investors. There no lead V. V. C. WE KNOW Vision Fund. No no sequoia. Although Sequeira did the series B. on they actually lead with a couple of really prominent be to be CEO and founder so lasting Cassia and founder Mike Cannon Brookes octa CEO and Co founder Frederick Harassed Multiplex Co founder and CEO. Ryan Smith Zoom CEO. Eric Yuen. What's interesting here here is is? We're getting to these late. Stage growth rounds at a time when there's more growth money than ever and basically said now we're good we're just gonNA take from really prominent angels. Who all of that exited you know? Kind of startups and. So what's interesting here is twofold one is one the dynamic. VC industry which we can talk about more but to actually kind of the strategy here of front is a B. Two B. Product Arctic. Selling to other kind of B2B startups and so by taking this money from other kind of B. Two B. Sales centered Start founders and see IOS. They're really kind of like buying. I'm from their own customers so to speak right synchronicity. That's connecting the two together. So the fifty nine million dollar round had no lead. VC there was no like Kleiner liner coming in here right in the big check. I'm curious do you think that the disease that previously invested got pro rata in this round or do think it was all just money from these I guess executives turned angels. I think they've got Harada me. I don't think it was in the press. Release that they did but I am sure they did. I'm also not entirely clear that these folks took the entire round. I mean there could have been nate. Twenty or twenty five million dollars slug from around that was announced yama funding from a farm that was announced But nonetheless like the fact that it was positioned this way If you imagine in ten years ago this sort of round first of all wouldn't exist but this ground where we would said Oh a bunch of angels came in late stage. It'd be like well. This company must be doing terribly wrong Novi. ABC was willing to lead the round. Things have changed so much. That founder can literally say God. We got a couple of individuals around at the party. At the craps table they put in fifty nine million bucks. We're going wow unbelievable. They said no to everyone. It's amazing change in time. It is but also I'm kind of embarrassed by the number of people I know on this list. Like I know Frederick a little bit I know Ryan a little but I know Eric a little bit. I think I've met J. I mean I think I need to change industry industries because the the same eight people keep coming up. That's embarrassing to me. I need any new friends. Let's talk about what the company does front is be messaging kind of calms thing. It looks like email works for teams. I'm assuming this is kind of product aimed at customer support customer success kind of groups. Yes affront fronts. Innovation was really for a lot of top companies they have an email like support at techcrunch dot com or press at at Google Dot Com. Which is actually how we reach out to right? And so when that goes into Press Google Dot com on that actually gets centered and moved around the the thousands of people who are in Google Google to figure out how to respond to it. So if he's coming from an ad tech crunch email address like from us he goes to our tech crunch contact if it goes to APEC Asia. Pacific it'll go to someone who's live overnight overnight overseas and so basically thousands of people are accessing the same email inbox and so. Have you ever tried to do your own inbox with g million. No it's basically impossible with one goddamn person on the box. Now you had an hundreds of people all of whom are interacting with the same emails etc and suddenly. It's just a complete mess front. Took that and said Hey. What have we built in box from? Scratch zooming that. There are thousands of people or hundreds of people reading the same tickets reading the same emails. And how can we respond to it. Really really effectively. Huge problem tons of companies have it. They've been super successful. It's only a couple years old and what's interesting is actually the the founders are French It actually has a large Parisian office one founder Laurent Had A decade and enterprise. And then WHO's also female be to be founder of rare breed unfortunately in the industry who CEO up and she. She kind of came out of her master's disagree in two thousand twelve and dived into this and front. So it's a five year. Old Company raised one hundred thirty eight almost one hundred forty million bucks. An insane amount of money ended the speed was raise capitals crazy because their series of ten million was back in May of two thousand sixteen. Then Bam sixty six million early eighteen and then two years later fifty nine million so really. It's pretty frontloaded or backloaded. I'm sorry to kind of where we are in time now. I'm curious to see how much more capital they'll need to scale this to IPO. It's already kind of there. But certainly a lot of star power a lot of customers on this new investment and. I'm kind of curious that this is a trend that will see a flex from companies. That were so hot. We don't even need venture capital all the real stars of our industry the money in It's certainly a new way to approach it absolutely. I think one of the key lessons here at least for me was a company that really figured out product market fit super early on You know if you look at it was founded Five years ago it took two years to build out so uncork. Capital is sort of a firm that argues it focuses on product market fit. They raised three point. One million seed in October two thousand fourteen and then once they sort of got this product market fit. And it's sort of obvious today but looking back in time the idea that there d the SASS product to fix this team oriented email. inbox was sort of not a concept of. Now it's just scaling right it's all sales scaling And so we're seeing the rounds. Get faster and faster. Because they're repeated you you know the sales are repeating assuming the growth is repeating internally. The numbers look great. It's sort of classic SAS business I expect us to see as one hundred millionaire our club as you call it hopefully in the next year or two that there hasn't been announcement around the revenues but I expect it to constitute here about their W. two and a half year over year now has a pretty quickly quickly there probably. I Dunno just guessing. You're twenty thirty million era or somewhere in there and they'll be largest soon enough. Let's talk about the couple world through a different Lens. Though you have been looking at Tau really large funds cutting smaller and smaller Jackson. We're talking about funds at have billions in assets under management writing five seven million dollar checks which seems to make no oh sense. According to the old model of larger funds larger textile works otherwise. They can't really disburse the capital. But that's changing and I want you to tell you why because to fascinating fascinating kind of like nuance about today's venture capital market. Absolutely free front is a great example of this right. So here's a fifty nine million dollar check that no growth stage investor mister. WHO has a billion dollars ready to deploy was able to invest it and so we're seeing once again The largest funds billions of dollars. We had we talked about last week. Show I think we had twenty-one fundraisers that were over five hundred million last year. It was ninety one somewhere in that category so a ton of money deployed and so the idea that you would do early. Stage investments is nuts. Because you can't deploy million dollars a thousand times a year and so the challenges is like. Why are people doing this when I started asking if he sees the answer was well once the the cap tables in the series B and D are out there? They're locked it in a sequeira already in the a benchmarks already in the a founders fund the and they have the capital to deploy in the B A C D E F g all the way through the Sesame Street Alphabet All the way through and so by the time you get to the D. you have no access or in the case of front. No one had access suicide. Basically you have to lock in earlier in earlier and so even if you're the Softbank Vision Fund you WanNa throw four hundred million dollars in series d you have to be in the seed or the series. He's A to start to lock in that Barada to start locking in those early ownership rights. It just gives you more ball control later on because other people are going to kind of knock you out of the way to get around in place and so there's sort of this paradox. Where we're seeing? You know the the largest latest stage funds doing the smallest early stage rows and so that that was a really interesting dynamic that we haven't seen before yeah and the one thing to keep in mind that when I was learning about the BBC World you know maybe a decade ago. Now I was always told that if you couldn't find a new lead investor for the proximate round the next one. It was a very bad signal because it would imply that no one else in the market one to lead your Siri seafood areas to be and having Europe preceding investors. That were leads lead. Your next around was a very bad thing. Now it's entirely flipped on its head because capital is sufficiently unscarred so ample so much flowing around the people want to stay in a company. Preempt preempt that next round they want to lead be and then the as much of the capital to work as they can on a winner to ensure that they can return enough capital to make their large fund contractive enough to raise a second one. So it's a facet of there. Being too much money in the market is certainly a change. Compared to how things used to work it's actually an inversion but it just goes to show how in twenty twenty the way the world works certainly is at least in my experience new. I'm maybe it was like this back in the late. Ninety something but certainly it feels like a new chapter and I presume zoom. Welcome back to what used to be normal when there's less capital around but I don't see that happening for the next eighteen twenty four thirty six months so this this is the way it's going to be Danny presented for the next while.

Founder CEO Eric Yuen Danny Ryan Smith Founder And Ceo Health Care Front Google New York Providence Alex Wilhelm Vision Fund Denny Crichton Sequeira Harada Novi
"octa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:09 min | 10 months ago

"octa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The spring of eighty five or the winter of eighty five an octa poco so the last time was was so is the in the eighties Paul time during the eighties now yes there could have been the last time was often the air was up in the air coming back from Arizona so were you alive back then geo I yeah five eighty nine I was there was room for a grid green eighty five I'll never forget the restaurant greasewood flats we would fly through restaurateurs on on when I was with the growing pains and I was with the Pomeroy's that I'll never forget it and it never played mentally on you that it's happened before like after it did happen to you when you had to use a public bathroom the next time where you had the feeling in public you didn't think I always will be needed in the past but very recently my body has one will that happen again I it almost happened to me going to LA well you told me yeah yeah just now for the Superbowl commercial right yeah almost happened but it didn't you shut it down now I was able to like I don't move around get up and walk around a little bit and everything kind of settle down a little bit tacos amazing so the last time that you went in a public place which is a airplane bathroom which was not a hotel room of course I can write all that I mean that's where I was when I was seven years old yeah thirty years ago yeah three decades yeah tacos Mexican meat yeah gotcha it's a great I mean you know why is it so hard to understand it because all of us my god I mean I know it's a natural human function I get it but I just as all of us have been really bad spots like really bad spots with that I got a I you know now I buy get myself into a bad spot after this conversation I'll be very angry you guys follow you I don't think that our discussion is going to spur on one of the not a good wow why I would be disappointed that causes a street for the eighty is prepping for a colonoscopy evidently now I'm not but if anybody has ever been taka poco they know what I'm talking about the used to be at a store down there called I could show yeah and it was like everything was labeled as everything was like it was like all heavy cotton stuff like jackets and shirts and shorts and all that kind of stuff and that about the middle back man I would not I would not want to go into that after I was nobody has since exactly the boomer Georgia Otto yeah course yeah do you know where they are counting the money and doing the you know what they're doing to the drug deals behind the stall with the bathroom yes and then you have to go through that sold about them of what it looks like that's what that's what the bathroom looked like they were I was tacos Mexican meet big bowel movements are right okay you guys are great and shave off or are always got some Fauria sportsmen and they'll come right I thought I just had some for you know you something else all right all right it's a new year and it's a great time for business owners.

"octa" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:08 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Produce a business at work report every every year where we actually show all of the Trans implications in what people are doing with with application network so yeah big big thing for us one of the trends in the last ten years has been the growth of API company so it's obviously box has an API but the boxes also a rich platform where you're managing files the more recent things that people think of as API products products are things like Twi- Leo or like Stripe how does octa integrate with these different kinds of API's is there anything notably notably different about octopus integration with the API companies relative to the more classic SASS product types. We'll we are an API company in the sense that there is a lot of customers that are using OCTA for the product and service so the traditional workforce workforce is one of our areas the other side is basically using octave API's to power your system so there are some even consumer websites that are using OCTOPI is that you're not even be able to tell that octaves behind the scenes and in authenticating the user but customers can actually use her API's and when we we started having that kind of line of business we basically started getting really good at really indicating API's so for example we can be an an open been ID token provider for example where people can actually secure those is API access management with OCTA in so that's basically more on on the a CTO said that I was talking about where we actually become really authentication for those services and we can give you can of tokens where you could even kind of indicate your own services so now in a world of micro services for example where you even want to authenticate your own API is you could also use Oxen Open Eddie provider in have client ideas and in create kind of authentic gators all built in October. Now that is a very very different thing than what we have been in describing us us basically the workforce or connecting to cloud services. This is more of like what a developer would do you go to for example developer DOT COM and and you're trying to build an indication for API's. It's going to be a very very different experience that you go to to our website in and go to our workforce side which is more of off again this year versus the CTO so yeah I mean the short answer is very very very different world but actors an identity platform we also so think about not only indicating people but also getting services nothing getting APS. I'd like to walk through a you log in with octa in some technical detail. Can you just explain what happens when a user logs into OCTA OCTA give me some of the breakdown of the security key management and the workflow of different services behind the scenes while that is one of the things that I think is part of our value develop W. bring to our customers that we make the complex. Look very very simple so let me there are a number of things that that could be involved in in an actor anticipation. I'M GONNA try to do is one of the most common ones would would may or may not be one of the simple so let's say you want to authenticate to you click. Let's let's say you you get an email and you get a link from sells for record that you wanna that you wanna see so the way it works. Is that UC a salesforce link on email email then you click on it in your browser. It's going to take you to that. SALESFORCE page. salesforce knows that you're trying to access a specific attendant. Then salesforce is configured to use OCTA or cellphones now dad four so we'll know that occupies your entity provider and so then salesforce is basically going to redirect you to Octa with some magic redirection and then your browser is actually going to show an OCTA page and it's going to be your sign on page. There's going to be customized to you so you're we already know the tenant. We're GONNA show you whatever page it's customized to meet whatever your tenant anemic and then he's probably going to be using Password Ryan the most simple simple scenario so you'd have been your username tapping your password dad since those grand French else to Octa they're not there are some policies that are evaluated and then at that point. We evaluate where you're coming from. If you're you're even allowed to the authenticate if you have any GEO location restrictions for example if you have any specific policies around your advice about your around your Ip address anything thing that gets gets evaluated in the policy so let's say you're policy requires a multi factor authentication so then at that point. We're going to return different pages to you you so that you can use one of the multi factor that you have configured and let's say that that factories push notification to your watch and so at that point the page that we send you it just going to be like hey you're going to be receiving push notification accepted and then at that point the backend is GonNa via the APN if you're using or whatever they apple push notification service or the notification service. You're going to get it to watch in your watch. You're going to see the location of their request. You're going to get some information you get in your watch. You say except that except go through different low. Obviously whatever you're watching using for wildfire lt and it's that's that's GonNa talk them out. There is going to make that connection is going to know that okay. I just had a partial session and the verification from the second factor that is going to create create a strongest indication now okay now. We know who you are now. We know who you are and then we're going to send that wasn't gonNA basically create a similar assertion and then we're gonNA that is really a token of you. Will that that we provide for your browser so that you can actually present that to salesforce so that can it gets to your browser. In the form of direct. You're basically to to salesforce salesforce will basically verified that signed by OCTA and they were so usually previous trust that was created when sales were initially configured and then finally cells. I will say okay no who you are. The salvation will have everything that they need to authorize. Is You and then you're. GonNa see the page that you had access to. That's a simple one. I can give you a little bit more complex. One wonderful now this. L. Associates one facet of OCTA. Which is that okay? This is core infrastructure and it needs to be quite fast and there's a lot of integration points. There's a lot of network hops so I'm wondering kind of instrumentation do you you have to be able to understand the trace of all of these different network hops and to be able to to diagnos latency issues that might be occurring along this complicated request path which by the way is just one of. I don't know how many integrations you have but you need. You must have some kind of standard instrumentation infrastructure for being able to detect. What's what's going on in this kind of trace. Can you tell me about that yeah. In this particular scenario I choose not to use multiple multiple identity providers or delegates indication for example averse an observer or some active directors indication there was involved in this flow which happens also for certain certain authentication paths right so you're absolutely right aware monarchic about monitoring and I guess the simplest answer is there is a request I I did that is basically past left and right but there is also a lot of systems that are involved in this and so we also are redone in the way we monitor our service and so we have several approach for ABM sold for log management and so we can actually track all of this and all of the of everything that is happening and we can tell of these requests Chris together but we cannot monitor that at human speed right that would be impossible at this scale that we are and so we also have created a lot awed of alerts and dashboards in curious sticks in analytics around all of these requests that are happening in our system and one thing that is I don't know how how unique it is but it was definitely unique ten years ago. Maybe I don't know if it's still unique now but our testing what's traditional like. Qa team team are testing is basically engineers that are not only kind of like doing the traditional black box testing. They're basically writing tests. In reading synthetic transactions sounds that are constantly having a doctor but in the just monitor what's going on but in addition to that they also create dashboard also create automated alerts they also create these humoristic to identify trends are are changing in that basically how we can monitor and react very quickly hopefully hopefully before customers nor or is there is there is a problem and then once kind of our automated systems alert. We have basically all the traceability of everything that is going on and we have threats halls across everything that I talked about for for example in delegated authentication when we have to negate to another system that is constantly being monitored when we train where even like a few customers are seeing light delays that basically triggers what we call tribal alert and those travel alerts go to allure of architects and engineers that are basically looking to see if there's a problem and if we we are anti that there is something that could potentially cause problems then they engineer calls what we called a flare and then when you call a flare is basically pager duty eh calling a number of again architects engineers and managers just looking to see if there could be any any customer impact after that we escalate to other phases of yellow. Oh and read just to make sure that we can try to take things that are not doing great in the service even before customers start noticing but again. This is something thing that we have evolved over ten years and over. Obviously I'm over simplifying it but yeah you hit the nail on the head. I mean we have to have traceability for everything that is happening because the complexity it is incredible and also this has to happen within seconds ready. Milliseconds looking for a job is painful and if you are in software and you you have the skill set needed to get a job in technology. It can sometimes seem very strange that it.

OCTA OCTA OCTA salesforce CTO developer Stripe DOT COM engineer apple ABM L. Associates Chris ten years
"octa" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Said in your initial description of the product if I get an OCTA account when I sign up for the company if I joined the company as an is an engineer the OCTA account when it gets spun up is going to spin up a user account for the company's box and the companies get hub hub and maybe the company's Stripe Account or Twi- Leo and all these different SAS tools that I might need a log in for four OCTA becomes the sham over that logging experience and that means that you have to build integrations with all of these different. SAS providers and integrations can be a really overwhelming challenge for you know for a company that does have to build a lot of integrations because as I see it that the number of SAS tools that you have to integrate with is just it's growing and growing and growing and you have to maintain tain those integrations over time so how do you systematize the testing and the expansion and the the demands that come from a growing wing surface area of different products that you have to integrate with Yep it stuff. This is a good way to think about the problem so the reality is that when we actually developed OCTA. We probably need to focus on. Maybe like twenty. Maybe fifty products ready had the boxes of the world sales force of the world world in everything was basically build in a monolithic way. If if you will right so we would be developing those applications. They ended up being kind of like a fixed hard headcorn classes in Java will connect to those services eventually. It was very obvious to us that we needed to really take more of like a platform approach and so over the years we basically created a fool on Meta data based.

OCTA Twi- Leo engineer
"octa" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"Together. Let's figure figure out how we can do all these co op programs together where it is octopus box equals this and this is the work together and then how we each bring each each other customers in and use that as really good sort of soft laden's and it was one of the the more successful programs that we run a honestly think ogden box still do a lot together the ogden box that we talked about. I'd be no them because freddie was to be at sales for his great. The the community is very very small as an this is a this is a really important point and i'm glad you brought that up because you have things like best to breed which is is this for those of our listeners who don't know is like you know. Imagine like a mini conglomerate of products that are similar to one another in the sense is that they're selling into the same place but they're not competitive with each other and it's like hey you could go with all of these best of breed products or you could go with you know accompany acts that has a suite of products and you know your positioning like hey yeah we're great but also all of these other ones are great to like that's to that is like a really strong use case for yeah when partner marketing goes greg and if you do this sort of deep level of integration between and everything and the the days of let's pick up the phone. Let's call oracle. Let's buy your entire. Sack aren't necessarily there anymore where you have these scrape best of breed solutions where it is. I'm gonna get actor for this. I'm going to get box for this. I'm going to get salesforce or this. Here's all the pieces but when i put it together look at this incredible. It's sort of an option that i don't have to go with. This is sort of my mightier to. I've got a i too much time to tell my to oracle solution asian something that is beat into us for for decades of having worked here but i just i love the work that we did together and it was the level of live integration and it was the level of cooperation from a marketing side of how we how do we work together. And how do we really build. This partnership and octa was one of my favorite companies to work with joe and i was going to ask front crush on that. Did you like sit side by side with the their marketing team. Did you meet with kim went out lately and we plan events together and i remember we did this whole field marketing series around boxed in october that we all over the country and they were probably twenty different events around the country. You're thirty events around the country that my head of field marketing and the octa ahead of field marketing would get together. They'd plan events together. They'd plan content together and it's everything everything from who is paying for this to who was writing the content who's bringing in the the actual speaker. What is this look like so. It wasn't a <music> a program that the octa person jumped in on it wasn't the octa program box person jumped in on it really was co-developed co belt together you officially salihi were your sales people selling and this was a different kind of partnerships are sales people were in- weren't even selling octa products and they weren't telling so this was like a marcus orchestrating pure our new. Let's save money. Let's go dutch trio. I think there is but there is something there and i think that's where a partner marketing really finds. Its grew room when you can find the partners that worked together so we i also run an ice co marketing team for very strategic co marketing. <hes> we have about thirty partners is that we do co..

octa partner ogden freddie Sack kim joe
Oculus Quest taunts some customers after arriving more than two weeks early

The Vergecast

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Oculus Quest taunts some customers after arriving more than two weeks early

"Oculus finally announced the octa this quest which we've been hearing about forever, and he wrote a great review of it. She says it's a little compromised, which is true. I actually got to try one a couple of weeks ago outside of like the Facebook world as an a conference in somebody had one and the allied me like play with it on the sly. It's great like this is the ga-. This is the next I'm going to buy for sure it's self contained VR like it does the thing you you put it on. You don't need any wires cables or a gaming PC. You it has inside out tracking cameras. And the does this really cool thing where to create the space around you that you can operate in it lights up the front cameras. You can see the world. And then you just paint lines on the ground in VR to be like, this is the space that you should put the interface in which is awesome. And then it just works. Let's have been worked. I was at a busy conference, and it was like complicated and it. Figured out the inside out tracking in that space. So it was like pretty cool, and it works is it getting rid of that cable is like a big deal. I know I don't pods all the time. But it is true. Getting rid of heavy cables attached to your head is a notable improvement in the user experience of things I own a Oculus go, and it's not just the cable. I mean in because they're also launching the the rift is s. Yeah. So that also has inside out tracking. But like my problems always been I typically have a small room. And so you've got to set up the cameras and then stand far enough back from the cameras, and so your room has to have a perfect layout.

Oculus GA Facebook
Ikea Debuts First City Store: You Take Home Nothing

Business Wars Daily

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Ikea Debuts First City Store: You Take Home Nothing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. Happy Friday, everyone there's big money to be made in thinking small or so it seems for my KIA's latest announcement the huge Swedish home goods and furniture company is opening a miniscule Manhattan store designed for New Yorkers who live in tiny spaces. It's a truism of city life the tiny your apartment, it seems the more stuff you need to keep it organized. And so I ki- is newest urban stores really a showroom. Call the planning studio it gives city dwellers interior design ideas intended to make their cramped quarters seem spacious that's exactly opposite of the retail strategy. I ki- has so carefully cultivated for decades. You know, the company with the gargantuan suburban warehouse where you can find just about anything you can eat, and you can lug virtually all of it home yourself from couches to dining room sets to entire kitchens of. Of course, you got to have a car or truck that strategy doesn't work on the subway new. I key marketing so carefully notes in the new store at the new Manhattan location. In fact, you can't take anything home yourself, not even small, vases and lamps that look like you could tuck under your arm. All you can do is look dream plan and order, I will deliver your things to you. The new store opened on tax day just in time for all those tax refunds in Manhattan's upper east side, it's the first of about thirty plant city centre locations, the company reportedly made the decision to make the store showroom by talking to city dwellers about how they actually shop. It's a necessary pivot for the decades old company. I key is profits are down as customers decide that online shopping may just be more convenient than schlepping through KIA's mammoth stores this plan should help Kia reinvigorated self by appealing to millennials consumers. Herb. Urbanites are naturally less likely than their suburban counterparts to own cars. But car ownership is down across the board for millennials no matter where they live. And so I ki- is delivery. Only stores are clearly designed to attract an entirely new set of customers. One caveat. However delivery is expected to cost at least thirty nine dollars and possibly fifty nine dollars or higher with customers of online furniture sites. Like Wayfair accustomed to free shipping Kia could be in for a shock. If customers balk one thing that will remain the same as I keep pivots to the city shoppers will still have to assemble all that furniture themselves. Armed only with Allen wrenches and presumably some good beer. From one this business wars daily this week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton grant, Emma Cortlandt is our editor producer, our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. We'll see next week. This episode of business worse. Daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist Marc injuries in. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

KIA Manhattan David Brown PO Marc Injuries Allen Lane Appleton Emma Cortlandt Marshall Louis Lopez Executive Producer Editor Producer Thirty Nine Dollars Fifty Nine Dollars
Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

Business Wars Daily

04:24 min | 1 year ago

Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, April twenty fifth. Hey, alexa. I'd like to buy a motorcycle. And no, I haven't done that. But the day may soon come when we'll all be shopping on our speakers while so far only a small number of some five or six percent of actually bought anything by calling out. Hey, Alexa, or, hey. Google market watchers predict the audio shopping industry will be worth forty billion dollars by twenty twenty two. That's in part because of the explosion of on demand. Audio from our homes to our cars to our mobile devices. We're listening to more and more podcasts and other kinds of streaming media. You could say Audio's having its day for big brands, especially those that don't have a physical product that. You can actually see this means it's time to think about designing logos for the ear. Take a listen. That was the new sound of MasterCard the gigantic payment processor released earlier this year it used what else an audio press. Release to explain why corporate leaders felt it was so important to create a sonic identity. One reason to be ready when the smart speaker shopping revolution takes hold the sound. You heard is just one iteration of a ninety second music anthem MasterCard is localizing the theme all over the world. And also producing sounds and even vibrations that occur when you use your smartphone to shop with MasterCard. The company hopes that like a visual logo, it's sonic logo will create instant recall its way finding for the twenty-first audio storytelling century, or as we put it. It's the process of distilling a multi million dollar brand into a few seconds of sound MasterCard generated a lot of buzz with at sonic logo launch. But it's actual. Really late to the party its fiercest rival visa on its own sonic logo and associated mobile. Sounds and sessions early last year in the absence of old cash. Register clinks customers want to hear something that signifies a successful transaction the company says intervals sonic logo split-second. Tune that plays after you've successfully parted with your purchase cash. And then there's this as smart speaker use grows audio shopping becomes second nature. There's nothing to look at while you shop the obvious problem for brands on a smart speaker visual logo has no place but the audio logo certainly does musicians. Take notice is a whole new market out. There waiting for. You is just that. You're tunes could be awfully short. From wondering this is business wars daily. We'd love to know more about you. And we'd be so grateful if you could answer just a few questions visit wondering dot com slash survey. And thanks so much. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zero to PO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Mastercard Alexa David Brown PO Marc Andreessen Google Twenty Twenty Forty Billion Dollars Million Dollar Ninety Second Twenty Fifth Six Percent
XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

Business Wars Daily

03:35 min | 1 year ago

XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business daily on this Wednesday, April twenty fourth one reporter Daphne Howland of the industry site, retail dive wrote about the explosion and women's plus size fashion. Something happened that surprised her larger men reached out to or saying they want the same kind of mainstream and high end fashion that plus size women are now finally enjoying about a third of American men are so called big and tall, but such larger sized clothing. Only accounts for ten percent of all menswear sales Forbes reports, but now there is a bit of increased attention to creating good-looking fashion for men who are taller and heavier than the average guy retail dives Jalan reports on a handful of specialty in mainstream companies paying attention, including the clothing box company, stitch fix and men's online retailer Benito's both recently. Attended their men's sizes to be more inclusive stitch fix told retail dive that when it announced an XL offering for men twenty five thousand customers signed up on a waiting list, and blogger called the Kirby fashion Easter lauded bonobos saying that this move is another validation that plus size men belong in mainstream fashion brands. Oh, and if you had noticed there's a walking billboard for fashionable big and tall men, and he's looking for you Shaquille O'Neal who stands seven foot one and weighs about three hundred twenty five pounds has a line of big and tall men's clothing, it JC Penney through Sunday shack is conducting a nationwide search for model his size. He's often called a giant. And there aren't many like him he acknowledges so pennies is working with a modeling agency will Amenas in what they call the biggest and tallest search around looking for shack says big and sexy guys. Like me, maybe the publicity will finally help this miniscule slice to the menswear market grow. A lot bigger. Rum. Wondering this business wars daily, if you find this story fund tweeted, would you word of mouth is how people find thanks so much for listening. I'm David Brown will see tomorrow. This episode of business was daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Shaquille O'neal David Brown Shack Marc Andreessen Daphne Howland Reporter Forbes Jc Penney Benito PO Amenas Three Hundred Twenty Five Poun Ten Percent Seven Foot
Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

Business Wars Daily

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Tuesday, April twenty third, you know, these days, we're no strangers to reporting on the bankruptcies and closures of big old retail chains. Bad news about legacy companies like Sears, k mart PayLess and Circuit City can make it seem like it's impossible for brick and mortar stores to survive much less thrive. Well, in that context today story is pretty surprising. Electronics retailer best buy is doing better than ever. Thanks in part to CEO. Uber's Ulee best buy finance chief Corey berry will become CEO. A rare appointment for a woman in the fortune five hundred ranks at forty four years old berry will also be one of the youngest big company. Ceos Joe Lee will continue working at best buy his executive chairman and advisory role. When Julie took the reins in twenty twelve best buy was suffering looked as if it could be on its deathbed in. Two thousand thirteen it stock was in the dumps selling for about twenty dollars today after five years of steady growth best buy shares or at a record high over seventy dollars some analysts call the company's trajectory one of the greatest turnaround stories in recent business history. So the question is how exactly did show compete with Amazon and turn best buy around when Circuit City could not in twenty twelve best buy was suffering from so-called showrooming syndrome. That is you'd go there to try out a computer or a pair of headphones than to save money you'd buy on Amazon. So Joe Lee change the game. He matched prices to Amazon and improved service ahead of many retailers. He also allowed customers to order online and pick up at best buys thousand stores if best buy could do it why not Circuit City, which closed in two thousand nine that seems to be the rationale for circuit. City leaders who resurrected the business last year, primarily online radio shack to is attempting some operations but best buy strategy, which looks so common sense is hard to mimic, Circuit City and radio. Shacks still seem like has been with most consumers unaware they're actually open last year the motley fool compared the ailing electric spenders to best buy and didn't spare the snark they may be back from the dead the fool wrote. But that doesn't mean they scare anyone especially best buying. From wondering this business words daily, like our daily analysis share our show with a friend or colleague, why don't you cheer appreciated? I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. This of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero. IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now. I'm about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Circuit City Joe Lee Amazon CEO David Brown Marc Andreessen Corey Berry Sears Julie Showrooming Syndrome Executive Chairman PO Forty Four Years Seventy Dollars Twenty Dollars Five Years
Ancient Astronomy of the American Southwest

Astronomy Cast

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Astronomy of the American Southwest

"Welcome to castor weekly facts based journey through the cosmos, where we help you understand not only what we know what how the woman, I'm preserve Cain publisher of universe today. With me as always Dr Pamela, gay, a senior scientists for the planetary Science Institute and the director of cause request Pam how you doing I'm doing. Well, how are you doing Fraser, really good? It's been a nice relaxing week. So far, actually it's been good. Some follow up stories, we you know, the bare sheet Lander crashed and but now bear she too is is is go. The falcon heavy landed. Perfectly accepted didn't the the the core booster fell over in the high seas and broken half and half returned to Poseidon. You didn't know that? No. Yeah. So it landed and then fell over in the high because 'cause the Octo grabber can't grab the core booster of a falcon heavy, and so yeah, it fell over and the top crunched off and and went to the went to Davy Jones locker and they need they need an octa grabber. Massive addition Octo grabber heavy. Yeah. Yeah. And of course, still been just feasting on black hole news. So it's it's been a, but it's a poor chil. But it's been it's been good. It was let's say it was very burnt out on. Space news last week all excited. Let's basins again this week yesterday. And today have been like story after story after story. And what I loved is today. There was a theme of when asteroids invade your solar system, and it was a pleasing theme really pleasing thing. Yeah. Inter people's had no light pollution, and they knew the night skies. Very well. In fact, they depended on them to know when to plant when to harvest today, Pamela, talks about the arc yo astronomical sites of the American southwest, which coincidentally is a place you are going to be traveling to relatively soon. It. It is true next. August I am going to be leading an Astro tore through the American southwest departing from Tucson going to places still being determined, but will include national parks, and observatories and ending it all in Las Vegas. Now, we aren't going to get to visit a lot of the archaeological sites that I'm thinking today. But the reason that I'm leading that tort is because that's the part of the country where I spent my summers growing up. It's where my grandparents are it's where I went to graduate school. Well, it's where I did a summer or a you as an undergrad. And so when I picked the topic for today, it was basically like, okay. The news is heavy. I wanna pick something will bring me joy to read. And I know I just don't I know exactly how this went down. You were like looking at sites that you were going to be going in thinking about it. And then just nerd out and went down a rabbit hole of cool. Historical archaeological sites in the American southwest. Yeah. Now that eight so actually I was playing ticket to ride with keeper of maps and paranoid. You're going. Have no idea what to talk about. I have. No, I am out of a DEA 's. And it was out of me bemoaning how I was like out of ideas, as I faced the weeks world news that I was like what if and it was like archaeology, let's talk about archaeology. Let's talk about things and before the expletive hit the fan. So. Oh, yeah. So, but I mean, the irony, of course, is that the places you're going to be talking about are not places that you're going to be going on your Astra tour. I think that's the point is likely is is that you this is pure Pamela rabbit hole. This is you. Yes, finding something and nerd ING out about it for for our benefit. It's it's true. And this is going to be part of a series. And we are going to talk next week most likely about the modern astronomy being done in the American southwest today. We start with the beginning times. And next week. We're going to talk about how we're learning about the end times.

Dr Pamela Octo Davy Jones Planetary Science Institute Cain Fraser Publisher PAM Director DEA Astro Las Vegas Tucson
Alibaba CEO Lauds 72 Hour Work Week

Business Wars Daily

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Alibaba CEO Lauds 72 Hour Work Week

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this twenty second of April. And yes, it's Monday. If you share the feelings of many working Americans, you might not love Mondays that two day weekend can feel pretty darn short. Well, take a job with Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba and that two day weekend could feel like a luxury recently, China's richest man touched a nerve with workers everywhere by endorsing scheduled. Call nine nine six that cryptic number stands for what alley. Bob is CEO Jack Ma says is the ideal workweek nine AM to nine PM six days a week Ma posted on social media that employees who choose to work such long hours are in his words blessed? He said those who choose to work shorter hours, quote, won't taste the happiness and rewards of hard work. His remarks angered many, including Chinese programmers who routine. Keenly work that schedule often without overtime pay. In March, thousands of Chinese tech workers protested labor conditions on a Microsoft coating site called get hub that get hub thread was named nine nine six point icy you meaning the seventy two hour grind could land you in the intensive care unit or worse media reports of young Chinese workers dying prematurely from overwork are not uncommon. Mas comments, also, drew I r- from families asking who will take care of kids and the elderly in this nine nine six world, like its competitor, Amazon Alibaba is a massive online shopping business. It's expanding internationally as Amazon and the two are often compared to each other Amazon is five times the size of Alibaba. But today, the Chinese company is more profitable last week Amazon announced that it will shutter its domestic operation in China. Following the firestorm of angry responses mop posted again saying forced over. I work is in his words. Inhumane too, many that comment seemed disingenuous he also said perspective Alibaba hires should expect to work twelve hours a day to succeed. We don't lack those who work eight hours comfortably. He said a recent spate of experiments in Sweden new-zealand and America have shown that shorter workweeks, reduce stress, enhance creativity and improve productivity think about that. The next time. You find yourself burning the midnight oil. From wondering this business words daily. Hey, if you like our show, give us a review and a rating Wigan, we promise it's not much work. Thanks a lot David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero to IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist Marc injury. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now. I'm about halfway through up to which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Amazon Alibaba Amazon David Brown Ceo Jack Ma China Microsoft Marc Injury PO Sweden BOB America Two Day Seventy Two Hour Twenty Second
"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

Business Wars Daily

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"Meat" Means Only Animal Products, Say States

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily and it's Tuesday. April sixteenth. Remember big dairies campaign against the use of the term milk by companies that produce nuts avacado 's anything that doesn't have breasts caused quite a stir in the beverage industry. Well, meat producers are following in the dairy industries big footsteps, four states have now made it illegal to misuse, the term, meet Missouri. Was I followed by Mississippi and South Dakota, the Montana legislature recently passed a similar Bill, which is awaiting that governor signature in those states. The legislation says you can now name food meat only if it comes from an animal, not a plant and most certainly not a cell culture. In addition, ten other state, legislatures are considering similar bans the campaign is a legislative attempt to stem, the tide of consumers choosing to go meatless. The industry site food. Dive reports that seventeen percent of Americans are now vegetarians and another sixty percent say they're reducing their meat consumption. A lot of these folks are switching to plant based alternatives and more recently moved into burgers and other meatless meat products created in laboratories to such alternative meat companies have gotten a lot of Presley, impossible foods and beyond burger are both growing meat substitutes. That are said to look taste and smell like beef. And that's pretty scary to ranchers and meatpackers perhaps the timing of the growing number of state bills is no surprise meet grown in Petri dishes is getting so big that Burger King just put impossible burgers from the company impossible foods on the menu. They called the new item and impossible Walker. When one of the world's biggest hamburger chain start serving non meat meat. Ranchers blanche, the veggie brand tofurkey along with others, including the American Civil Liberties union immediately challenged Missouri's labeling law when that state passed it last year a settlement in that case is expected by may first in Montana, the Republican who sponsored the legislation. There says it's only fair that Montana's know where their food is coming from it doesn't ban. So cultured products just says they can't use the term meet to describe them the ways in which the meat industry's responding can be confusing big companies like Tyson, the chicken producer invested impossible foods rival beyond meat. Think of this the same way big donors contribute to Republican and democratic candidates to make sure they benefit from the eventual winner, but smaller states in producers don't have this kind of clout. And so they are fighting instead meat production is a top industry and many smaller rural States, South Dakota. For instance is. The twelfth largest meat and poultry producer in the nation. Meaning a big swath of that population depends on animals for their livelihood as they gear up for a fight. Ranchers slaughterhouse owners and Packers are also looking beyond. The lab the Montana law is also fending off a growing competition of the six legged kind. It also says you can't call an insect ameet how we name our food may or may not have much to do with what we actually choose to eat. That's a dilemma that will play out over the coming months and years in our shopping carts and on our dinner tables. In the meantime, semantics will continue to play out in the courts in an increasingly hot question for all sides. From wondering this business wars daily. If you think we're the real thing. We'd appreciate you. Spreading the word sheer this episode on social media widget. Thanks, I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz. And Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick harassed co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Montana Octa South Dakota David Brown Missouri Producer PO Burger King American Civil Liberties Union Netflix Packers Mississippi Presley Joshua Davis Walker Tyson Ben Horowitz Andrew Jackson Contributing Editor
Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business words daily on this Monday, April fifteenth, there are a whole lot of things happening today. It's tax day patriot's day and the one hundred and twenty second Boston marathon, even for non runners the marathon is an institution viewing it or watching the barrage of ads for footwear, athletic, clothing, and sports drinks can inspire even the most dedicated couch potato to go out for a jog. Well, maybe not the most dedicated couch potato for those of us who rather sit than sprint friendly's, the iconic east coast ice cream chain is offering a celebrate Tori marathon Sunday. So what makes it a marathon Sunday? Try twenty six point two ounces of ice cream. That's one ounce for every mile of the marathon, the six coupe red white and blue patriots Sunday costs almost ten dollars will only be offered today in friendlies Massachusetts stores. Offering marathon theme. Treat is counter intuitive and gives friendly's chance of standing out from the outdoor branding mania surrounding the race. But friendly's has been facing just about as many rivals as any top marathon runner from traditional competitors. Like restaurant chain Bob Evans to a multitude of healthier fast, casual restaurants as a result. What's going on in the friendly's boardroom is well anything but friendly in early April at about the same time that it announced its gigantic Sunday friendlies abruptly closed twenty three restaurants in New England and upstate New York, reportedly without warning employees. I the closure sparked controversy over whether the company had complied with federal law requiring sixty days notice of an eminent layoff friendly's owned by a private equity firm has been on a downward slide for years in the last decade is closed more than three hundred locations leaving it today with one hundred seventy four while every company has its own management. Uh-huh. Friendly's is also struggling with dynamics that are squeezing big food brands everywhere. It's an ice cream and burger place in an era when families are searching out healthier lighter foods, it's been in and out of chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. In the last several years. The company says the closures are intended to help the chain and its latest rebranding effort, but the term challenges friendly's faces could be the eighty year old chains. Heartbreak hill. Romm wondering this is business wars daily take a second away from that. I r s deadline and rate and review our show on your favorite podcast Appalachia. We promise it's a heck of a lot easier than those taxes. Thanks bunch. David brown. See you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Octa David Brown PO Bob Evans Massachusetts Boston Heartbreak Hill Joshua Davis Romm Frederick Carris Netflix New England Mark Andriessen New York Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder Twenty Second
Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Going Bananas: Chiquita Launches New Snapchat Filters

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From one I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. It's friday. And that means it's time for dancing bananas. We like to think receives about business here, but we couldn't help but chuckle over the campaign Chiquita is rolling out to celebrate world banana day, which is next Wednesday April seventeenth the one hundred fifty year old banana producers been moving swiftly into the twenty first century embracing both Snapchat and augmented reality in its efforts to get teens and young adults to eat more of America's most popular fruit through the end of may the blue sticker on Chiquita's bananas. We'll be adorned with one of three Snapchat snap codes for you, Snapchat, novices out there that means if you have Snapchat on your phone, you can scan the sticker in one of three augmented reality scenarios will play out, according to the company one Lynn's will turn you into a dancing banana character on Snapchat. Another transforms your. Face into Chiquita banana and third game. Fide? Snapchat, lens invites you to catch falling bananas to score points. Sure. It's silly. But the campaign which will appear on two hundred million bananas underscores a couple of trends one is that marketings becoming more and more interactive. But more accompany can get you to engage with something. Instead of just looking at it, the more interest in loyalty, you might feel at least that's the idea and snap Chatters share their activities widely meaning campaigns like this have the potential to create huge ripple effects on social media tiny banana, stickers that turns out our huge business that you keep us nap chat campaign rivals Dole's current heroic effort dole began piggybacking off the captain marvel movie release in March stickers on millions of it's bananas depict comic book and real life heroes, including women farmers anti-hunger activists and more through the end of may like Chiquita the does. Promotion, which includes recipes inspired by comic book. Superheroes. Intended to get shoppers to spread the word through social media peo- back these playful promotional campaigns. And there's a lot of steak. Both companies are vying for the growing organic market, and though the sweet fruit is easy to sell. Neither rival wants to let their produce lose the spot of top banana. I'm wondering this is business wars daily. This week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton brand Emma Cortlandt is our editor and producer. Our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. See next week. Business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur is hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to IPO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark, Andrew Jackson, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Chiquita Snapchat Octa David Brown Dole Joshua Davis Frederick Carris Netflix Contributing Editor Patty Mcchord Ben Horowitz Lane Appleton America Executive Producer PO Emma Cortlandt Lynn
FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

Business Wars Daily

04:47 min | 1 year ago

FDA, Activists Pressure Walgreens to Stop Cigarette Sales

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Thursday, April eleven Walgreen cigarette. Sales could go away in a puff of smoke outgoing FDA. Chief Scott Gottlieb has been criticizing the country's biggest pharmacy chain for continuing to sell cigarettes. In February Gottlieb issued harsh criticism to Walgreens over its high volume of illegal sales of cigarettes to minors. Twenty two percent of its stores were found with sold cigarettes to teenagers in most states the legal age to buy tobacco is eighteen. Now. Some activist investors are pressuring Walgreens to stop selling cigarettes altogether saying cigarette sales put their money at risk of lawsuits. So far, Walgreens says no it has no plans to quit CEO Stefan persona says customers demand cigarettes rival CVS ended. It's cigarette. Sales in twenty fourteen attempting to reposition itself as a health and wellness company. CVS says that choice cost the chain about two billion dollars a year in sales. And here's the rub Walgreens just posted its worst quarter in four years, although sales were up they still didn't meet Wall Street's expectations. Last year. Walgreens announced it would cut costs by a billion dollars by the end of twenty twenty one following its flagging second quarter results at tightened the screws, even more. Now, the company is cutting costs by one and a half billion dollars. Walgreens, doesn't say how much money it makes from cigarettes. Although it does say sales have been falling still when it comes to smoking. Walgreens is caught between a rock and hard place on the one hand it may need its existing tobacco sales on the other hand like CVS Walgreens is trying desperately. To become a health centre rather than it retailer, prosciutto the Wall Street Journal last week. He says future success will Bank on its in-house healthcare clinics and lab testing, not it's retail side. Critics have all green cigarette policy point to the obvious conflict between cigarettes and Walgreens efforts to serve chronically ill patients the company which has ten thousand US locations is piloting tobacco-free stores at about eighteen of them to see how customers react a twenty seventeen study showed that when CVS stop selling cigarettes smoking fell by statistically, significant margins. Whether or not Walgreens, stop selling cigarettes, probably won't move the needle on its financial health the strategic problems facing both Walgreens and CVS are far bigger than the cigarette business. But the issue is a huge public health concern last year the surgeon general declared teen e cigarette use epidemic for Walgreens, it's a branding problem. Will consumers close their rise to the conflict between offering healthcare services and selling cigarettes for the ailing pharmacy chain this issue isn't likely to evaporate quickly. From wondering this is business wars daily. We hope our daily episodes light you up tell us. Why don't you tweet us? Your thoughts about this episode at business wars and thanks alive. I'm David Brown. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneurs hard, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Walgreens Octa Chief Scott Gottlieb Ceo Stefan Persona David Brown Wall Street Journal United States PO FDA Joshua Davis Netflix Frederick Carris Patty Mcchord Mark Andriessen Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder
Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

Business Wars Daily

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Sweet Sorrow: Kelloggs Says Ciao to Keebler, Famous Amos

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Wednesday. April tenth brace yourself. This episode could make you hungry for the next. Couple of minutes will be talking chocolate. But cookie business has become one big chess game last week Italian company Ferreiro announced it's buying Keebler and famous Amos cookies from Kellogg. Yes. The Keebler elves are legally any way moving to Italy Ferraro is spending one point three billion dollars to spirit the elves across the pond famous Amos and Kellogg unit that bake some girl scout cookies, we'll go with them Forero known for its new Tele hazelnut spread is quickly becoming one of America's sweetest sweets companies. This is the fourth American cookie or candy brand. It's eaten up since twenty seventeen. Ferreiro bought Nestle's candy division little over a year ago. Those Keebler elves will be joining baby Ruth butterfinger. And many other delicious American trifles. So what's going on Kellogg admits that it was starving? Those poor elves and Amos of resources it was pouring its efforts and money into treats that have sweeter returns on investment from pop tarts to Pringles Kellogg. I started shopping the brands in November it's been trying to figure out how to spur Americans lagging appetites for snacks from big old brand names. In fact, it's been a rough patch for most consumer packaged goods companies. According to NPR, young shoppers, simply aren't brand loyal the way baby boomers were for Kellogg. That means the Keebler name no longer pools. It's weight as American shoppers are increasingly avoiding processed foods Kellogg in its competitors. Are pulling their hair out at least sixteen consumer packaged goods CEO's had left their jobs between twenty sixteen and twenty eighteen the Wall Street Journal reported presumably. They were failing at or exhausted from trying to kick start growth, but if it were just the shift toward healthier food that was hurting cookie sales. Why would Herero be sweetening? It's own desert portfolio apparently will still indulge plenty, especially if the quality is high for railroad specializes in improving tired brands in February and relaunched Nestle's one hundred year old butterfinger candy Barr with more chocolate and no hydrogenated oils. So Ferreiro sees a huge opportunity in our collective sweet tooth as does delay international. Jones. The Oreo Mondays spending more than two billion dollars to buy those yummy. Danish butter cookies dance or rather maker the Kelsen group from Campbell Soup. Campbell's is another legacy food brand that's been struggling to reshuffle. Its portfolio Monday is also buying Australian cookie maker or. Or should we be calling them biscuits? So cookies are not being flattened by celery and carrots, there's still a lot of money to be made in indulgences, but selling them is harder than it's ever been. Which is why cookie chess his getting so aggressive? From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey before you run off to that mid morning snack. Take a second Llosa five star rating on your favorite podcast app for us. That'd be a better gift of box chocolates bags. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur's heart. And it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about his others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today. People like the Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is Patty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcasts.

Kellogg Amos Octa Keebler David Brown Campbell Soup Nestle Ferreiro PO Wall Street Journal Italy Ferraro Joshua Davis CEO Netflix NPR Frederick Carris Jones
"octa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"January seventeenth from six to eight PM. What a nice gift for people can't argue with that. What a nice gift to people had spent any time here in the in the greater Boston area. They're not gonna be able to be with us much longer. If you want to sneak in a phone call, I know a couple of callers to put you on hold during the course of the news if you want to sneak in a call before they leave six one seven two five four ten thirty is the number six one seven two five four ten thirty or eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty s a toll free number eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty and you hinted at this earlier, Brian and everybody asked you as you were putting this book together. What were your favorite ads, and perhaps what were the things you discovered? A maybe rediscovered about Boston and its cultural life in that period that you were able to focus on only because you were doing this specific book. Wow. That's a tough one. My favorite ads went here for. Let's see. Well. So there are there ones that I love because I was there. So there's this one the tedious mob. Local hip hop group performed at Tower Records November in nineteen Eighty-eight. Oh, my I was there. And it was this right? When I came back to town for the second time, it's a very homespun flyer. It's not very doesn't have a high production value. But so so that was important to like, I I I remember that show is in the same way that there are other shows in here that I I remember. But so that was that's one that I love just looking through here. Some of the ones let's see that. I I wasn't even here's a great Skippy whites at everyone knows and Skippy yet, again, we were talking about places that are still around Skippy has one store left. He's over an Eggleston, but he's still going strong. If you go down there. I don't think he's opened Sunday. As but pretty much any day. Skip you'll be there, and he'd be happy to talk to you about music for hours and hours. And so I personally am thankful that he's still here in the same way that David is is a resource for me. If I have a question about something Skippy is absolutely encyclopedic. When it comes to gospel music, and Rb and see this is why it's fun talking guys because we get to go off on tangents, and you mentioned skip white. It's a wonderful thing to push a couple of buttons and get recordings from anywhere in the world. But you lose that a music same expression. I use early in a different context. I think he lose that sense of adventure at an exploration would people would be pouring through record stores looking for that odd recording that unique album that was tucked away in a corner and in doing that talking to people like the Skippy whites of the world as opposed to now someone will download a piece of music, and in in you, you, you you you don't you don't know nothing. About the the group of the performer anything else. So then you you've played thirty seconds of the song. And you like it now. But but in the process, I think something was lost one of the great things though. That's emblematic of the ad that Brian has for Skippy. Whites is the caricature of Skippy and the slogan, which is just helmet. And if you can home. Tell you. What record? It is your humming. That's not a joke either. He will do it must now pay isn't that isn't that? What what you've got so many sound hound. And so many other things can do almost it's not the same. I again, I've told this story before and it's something lost that the ads help us to remember for people of a certain age. Guess we're in Paris, my wife, and I are in Paris number of years ago. Prepaid Spotify or on the Champs Elysee. At at the end of the street is the octa Triomphe. So I should be beyond all sensation. Now. I feel nothing. I there's no thirst there is no hunger. We're on the this is it this is why you go to Europe. This is why Aren Paris good grief or on the shops at Lisa Triomphe and everything that's on the Champs Elysee, and we're walking along it and my wife my poor long. Suffering wife. David who is wonderful woman, a wonderful woman as an IRA high tolerance threshold, not particularly into music, she enjoys it. Because she'll go along with me. And all those years, I covered so much comedy. At the herald, she'd go to these comedy shows, and it was like, she was observing something at the Louvre was very very funny. She just yet. So we're walking along, and and I guess I twitched or something and she just knew and she looked at me. And she said go ahead. There was a virgin records. On the Shaam sale. He's an and I had to go up there before we went any further. She wouldn't get a cappuccino or something again and Paul and I ended up getting heaven helped me it seemed like a good idea at the time. The Japanese import album of Betsy Bogart, and I still don't know how he pronounces apathy. A piece live in Japan, which I wasn't able to get at home. But here was recording imported from Japan that I got. That's lost. Now, you just go on. So there it is Tump Trump, and there's a convenience to it. I'm not saying I get mad. The always the best way these kids. That's not what I'm saying. But you lose that. And when you see the ads for Skippy. Weizer cheapo records, these things it conjures up that age where man if you wanted your music he had to do a little work. It just didn't drop out of the sky and you lap. And maybe that one if some ways that wasn't such a bad thing. Well, but also you can get at stores like that and Skippy still to this day. I mean, you know, he prides himself on customer service, and he loves it. When someone says, hey, you know, I'm I'm looking for this one gospel record, and it kind of sounds like this or or or you know, who I love Mahalia Jackson. But I don't really know that much else about gospel. Like what else would you recommend? And so he can kind of guide shepherd you through this process if you're trying to get into a new genre. Or that's really what those play bookstores, obviously. The same way. Like, oh, if you like that author, then you'd really love this book, and it can kind of lead you down this this whole wormhole. And in only the best way where you just end up discovering something that you'd never know. And you can't you as much as Pandora and all these places kind of have these algorithms that do that. There's no replacement for a human being who has this vast knowledge who and David's, you know, the same way and in a lot of ways with with all kinds of things not just music. But so that's what who I surround myself with and have these resources that yet again, like, I don't do lectures. And I don't pretend to be all knowing about any of this stuff because this is all the journey for me too. I mean, I know a good amount, but I don't know anywhere near a quarter of all this stuff about about that other people. No. Or the other thing too is I have a lot of different. Kind of archival historical tentacles. So different parts of Boston. I can kind of pick and choose. So if if I if I have a hip hop question, I can go to this one resource. And if I have a theater question, I can go to another resource, and that's important too. Because then I can be almost like a middleman, I'm in a way. So, but that's what Brian's creating in the Boston public library event next Thursday, for example, is it becomes a multimedia event. And you know, it embraces a lot of different content. A lot of different Boston cultural reference points. It's film. It's slides. It's commentary. You know, it's it's a back and forth dialogue with people who were in attendance. And you know, you want to know what stimulus is creating a response from people. Sometimes the matter of triggering a remembrance of I was there. I did that. Sometimes God, I'm sorry. I missed that. I wish I had been there. Tell me more about it. Yeah. So the the event again Thursday at the Boston public library from sixty eight. You're also going to be a resource if people are there questions comments and they're wondering. No. Better than Google is going to be to ask you guys in in just making sure I'm taking care of all this business before we let you guys go you had mentioned, for example, going to the Bieber archives. And as you call it mount Bieber, I think David you had said when you've been on the times past and moving it all into that one one spot that you have now it was eleven tractor from twelve and a half tractors. Well, twelve twelve and a half tractor trailers. No self-aggrandizing. We don't want. We we we we don't want fake news. So we wanted accurate a twelve and a half tractor trailers. I I believe you told me it was an excess of six hundred thousand items. We're heading reality. Instead. Told me that I knew the number was antiquated. But well, so we it's it's it's giving us giving you an idea of the the reverence material that both of the both of these gentlemen were drawing from and I I've enjoying myself so much Indra would do for one break. Right. Haven't taken a break yet. Why don't we take our last break in? This segment will contain the conversation here to nineteen. It's weekend. Live with dean Johnson, touch and a couple of minutes..

Boston David Brian Champs Elysee Paris Japan Europe octa Triomphe Louvre Mahalia Jackson Eggleston Aren Paris Bieber Betsy Bogart Tump Trump Lisa Triomphe Shaam dean Johnson IRA
"octa" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on Here & Now

"France is temporarily suspending the tax hike on fuel that sparked those deadly yellow vest protests in Paris and other major cities in the last three weeks. Protesters wear the yellow safety vests that all drivers are required to have to underscore their guests fury. They smashed statues and scrawl graffiti on the octa 'trial in Paris over the weekend. Three people have died. The BBC's who Scofield is in Paris. And you you write that, this is the way French social conflicts have long been resolved the street rises up the government acknowledges them, but wasn't the president mccone against this sort of capitulation. You're absolutely right. And that's why you know, this is more of a story because it's also about the, you know, the future of president macaroni and his his reforms, but he's he's kind of had to face reality that his predescessors of old had to face, and they don't you know, that we're looking into the Sutton of Shadan footed right now saying, well, we did tell you. It wasn't. Gonna be that easy. Saturday's von in Paris was something people have not seen for many many many years which has caused him to reconsider. He's had to sort of college hoops schedule and say, look, I think we need to retreat, and that's what they've done. Well, the prime minister in announcing the suspension of the taxes said people's anger must be heard there has to be proper debate. But mccrone had implemented the taxes mainly the tax on diesel fuel. That's used primarily to offset environmental concerns. Are there people who approve of that? Or I mean, what's the public sentiment? We see the pictures of the cars on fire, and the, you know, these violent protests, but what's the sense of the French people when it's called long Bill on the that initial cools which was as you say the the fuel tax hike, which is coming. It's one of a series of increases which go back many as before micro and the cop and tax which was to be brought in many years. He's he's sort accelerated that process, and it's all part of greening. They. Annemie and so on with which most people including yellow yet investment would would agree. But you know, there's a there's a sort of Haya issue for the people that are protesting, which is their standard of living. The sentence that this is a policy being dictated to them from the kind of comfortably off town. Well, as he don't really need cause. And so they feel that they're having to pay for the the conscience to good conscience of the metropolitan elite. I mean, you know, it's pot. This a whole dialectic between town, and and province is very much part of modern day politics in Europe for lion America too. You know, these people saying hang on to say, you know, you may have you'll conscience, but we've got our livelihoods, and that's what lies behind it. That's the that's what the violence. Well, I mean, the, you know, the doubt that there are some very angry people among the among the yellow vessels of those the question that they have professional revolutionary people far left and far right who have latched onto it and were heading most of. The burning on on Saturday. Plus, I have to say cause I saw myself people kids from the bolia, you know, the ones who brought it in full coming in and just taking advantage of the whole thing. Look what we got just a few seconds here. This is a suspension not a cancellation. So what's the sense of what might happen you? Well, yeah. Indeed. And they're All People's already saying this is not enough. A my feeling is that will probably have another protest on Saturday by hardliners. But the aim of this concession is to speak to the majority of the to the country's a hold to get them to say. Oh, yes. Look, the government has reacted is listening and that should the government hopes. And I think it may be right to remove some of the momentum behind the protest movement as a whole, which means we might have it might have peaked, and we might be on the escalation, we'll see the BBC's Euskal fill in Paris. Thank you. Thank you very much..

Paris government BBC mccrone macaroni Annemie octa president France Scofield prime minister Haya Europe America three weeks
"octa" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on AP News

"From the near capitals octa Triomphe. Show the construction sites shed on wheels. Six. Black smoke rising. Paris deployed some three thousand police to contain the day known demonstrations that included a tense protests at the foot of Shawn's Z. He said that five thousand protesters flooded the capital's famous avenue with a two one thousand protesters in total nationwide. According to police at least twenty people were injured in the day of unrest. I'm Sarah shakily. It took a while. But a dog lost in New York has been found in Florida eighteen months later Sinatra the Brown and white husky was taken in by thirteen year old rose for real who founded wandering around the neighborhood turns out Sinatra once belonged to sixteen year old Zion Willis who died in a gun accident in Brooklyn New York in two thousand fifteen he'll be reunited with his family in Baltimore soon. The Tampa Bay times reports that while the dog has been found. No one knows how it traveled twelve hundred miles from New York to center Florida, which is near Tampa. Hi, I'm making crane AP digital manager and host of the podcast ground game. Look at the top political issues bubbling up around the country ahead of this year's midterm. Elections. It's available on apple podcasts and podcast one. While you're there, be sure to subscribe rate and review it that's the podcast ground game. AP radio news. I'm Tim Maguire. New government report on climate change has been released a piece Maganga reports of findings go against President Trump's stance..

New York octa Triomphe Florida Sinatra Tampa Bay Zion Willis AP Tim Maguire Sarah shakily Tampa President Trump Paris Shawn apple Maganga Baltimore Brooklyn eighteen months thirteen year
"octa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Beneath the octa Triomphe those who fought and died in World War One was serenaded century on by cellist yo-yo Ma. High school children read testimony written by soldiers in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine we got news of the armistice at half past nine this morning. All the streets and the square was ablaze of color. The ceremony was seventy heads of state and government populists. Protectionists progressive internationalists, a reminder that division still exist in Europe and beyond. President Trump and Putin the last to arrive shed a brief greasing on the VIP stand a warm handshake and a quick thumbs up. The news. Seamless? The president Macron this wasn't only about honoring the past but protecting the future. His message peace isn't made alone. But patriotism is the opposite of nationalism nationalism is treason, if we think our interest income, I don't care for others. It's a treatment of our values betrayal. Moral values. As part of the commemorations his guests were invited to a new peace forum to boost multilateral solutions. The only prominent figure to excuse himself. Donald trump. Retired. French general Dominique Tonko said the US needed to play a bigger international role. Probably President Trump sometimes to forget to ball, the internal US election and think that he's the leader of the major part in the world, and we need to have him on board. On the other side of the another international gathering smaller angrier to protest current global leaders costing themselves as benefit peace. What about Mr. macro? I mean, that's the greatest job I've ever had. Unharmed exporter. And. The same time. He promotes peace. Across europe. Sounds and symbols of marks for decades governments and governed reflect on the history the future and the role of individuals in world peace. Well..

President Trump president Europe US yo-yo Ma Dominique Tonko Macron VIP Putin
"octa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KCRW

"The black umbrellas to the octa Triomphe, President Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin joined them there. Separately students read testimonies from soldiers and witnesses of the day. The armistice was signed in one thousand nine hundred eighteen they spoke of joy and relief that day into the European nationalist tragedy that spread worldwide. Emmanuel Macron warned of nationalism today at the time of increasing international tensions. The BBC's Danny everhart election workers in Florida are feeding millions of ballots into scanning machines in a recount of votes in the governor and US Senate races state law requires a recount when margins are less than a half a percent after new ballot tallies were submitted yesterday. Unofficial results showed Republican Rhonda Santa's ahead of democrat Andrew gillum and the governor's race by less than a half percent. And in the Senate race. Ace the GOP's. Rick Scott's lead over Democrat Bill Nelson was less than a quarter of a percent. This is NPR and from KCRW, I'm Cheri Glazer. With this special fire update fire crews have been trying to take advantage of a break in the winds to get a handle on the Wolsey fire. It's burned through eighty three thousand acres and Ventura counties and destroyed more than one hundred seventy homes. It's only five percent contained as of last report. Thousands of people remain evacuated across a wide area from parts of Thousand Oaks to bell canyon to Malibu Scott major had to evacuate quickly. He came back to find that nothing was left. He told CNN what was like to see the remains of what was once his home sick. It's just sickening to see and.

Senate Thousand Oaks Vladimir Putin Donald Trump Emmanuel Macron Rick Scott Cheri Glazer GOP Bill Nelson Danny everhart President Rhonda Santa Andrew gillum CNN Ventura bell canyon BBC NPR Florida
"octa" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"Hello and welcome back to another episode of control octa leat. This episode is a very special live recording that I didn't foils Charing Cross London bookshop with Jodie pickled. The bestselling writer of twenty five novels and counting books of sold over fifteen million copies worldwide and have been translated into almost fifty languages in this episode, we discussed how newest book a spark of light, which has just come out is just come out in America, and has topped the New York Times bestseller list, and is out in the UK imminently. The book centers around women choice and abortion rights in America. It unravels backwards with the first page in the kind of heat of the drama with the characters all held hostage in an abortion center in Mississippi as a novel goes on you start to realize what exactly brought all of the different characters that the abortion center. It is an incredible book, and it has opened up so many conversations. And this is really what this episode is discussing. So a little bit more about Jodi quickly. She is someone who writes fiction, but at the heart of every novel is an important topic. How I booked debut at number one on the New York Times better list was nineteen minutes, which was a novel about the often moth of a school shooting in a small town her book change of heart published in two thousand eight was a second novel today at the top of the charts. I'm one of the books. She is best known for is probably my sister's keeper, which was turned into a film starring Cameron Diaz in ho last book, small great things, she tackles, racism and white supremacy. She doesn't shy away from important topics. And she's also very self aware when it comes to being the author of sad topics in the telegraph recently. She said writing about racism was challenging as a white woman. I wasn't sure. Whether I had the right? To do. So I always do a lot of research, and I did even more with small great things in two thousand sixteen Jody joined the advisory board or Vida women in literary arts. It's a nonprofit feminist organization committed to creating transparency around the lack of gender parity in the literally escape and is all about amplifying marginalized voices, including people of color writers with disabilities and trans and gender. Non conforming individuals. She someone who is an activist. I don't know if she calls us health and activists, but to me, she is someone who really cares about law things and puts her weight behind it. So I hate enjoyed this episode. We talk a lot about her new book spark light. And I think you will agree off to listen to this episode that she is an incredibly inspiring off take you let and very motivating person one last thing at tonight just wanted to say is that we had a bit of a technical hitch in foils, unfortunately, so the audio. Oh, isn't as crisp as it normally as I hope this doesn't put you off and enjoy the nonetheless heritages..

Cameron Diaz New York Times Jodi Charing Cross London America Jodie UK writer Mississippi Jody advisory board nineteen minutes
"octa" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"I think that's it's it's no doubt that people who listen to this show are on top of that translate loves the ex professionals because they're so tuned into customer understanding in ways that frankly, marketers simply are not. What we do is we do interviews with three groups of customers. We interview new customers. We interview longtime customers, and we interview lost customers. Perfect. Before we start those interviews, we document the customer journey all the touch points in inflection points at the brand has with the customer in the interviews we ask what they expected to happen. Yeah. At each of the such, because once I know what you expect, I know what you don't expect. Yes. Difference between what you expect and what you don't expect is where your trigger le'ts on it. Okay. Document those customer expectations at every step of the journey, and then you kind of have a sense of what where this kind of fits in. Right. That's that's kind of the first step. As part of that, we also very much recommend that you convene what we call the triangle of. Awesome. Okay. The triangle of awesome is is, is the middle of it, right? Is sort of see x. professionals if you have that in your company, then you've got marketing sales and service. Because sales and service are the ones that really know what customers want. They're the ones who actually talked to customers. Octa customers market isn't anything about customers. Marketing thinks they understand customers, but they usually don't. And I say that as a marketing professional, it just it just doesn't work like that. So you got to get everybody in your company involved, especially because a talk trigger is an operational choice. It is. So you gotta have everybody singing out of the same hymnal because if all of a sudden marketing does goes in freestyles this and does it alone or even if CX does, hey, guess what guys now we're gonna do this wacky thing if you wanna talk about, you're going to get blown out of the concerts known. Yeah, we notice as Ceac. This is part of our work on a regular basis. Is this underbelly part of it where if you don't engage, you know, it's not vented here by vic- later iota, so so true. So that's the kind of the first step is that sort of research piece then we recommend creating a list of five. Seven doesn't really matter a handful of what we call. All candidate triggers. Okay. Desert things that you could do that, would you think crate conversation that that customers don't expect that that you know where in the customer journey you would initiate or launch them? Got it. Okay. And and the key there I want to reinforce it you said is a handful isn't a, you know, an excel by g with two hundred things on you're gonna present leaders in people's eyes dance, what it revisited map every touch point return blur. Yup. Okay. Out when we do it when we do in our company as as as consultants are internal SLA is we try and come up with a nine really good ones. Okay. We present six to the client. Got it. Okay, good. That's it. No more than that. Yeah, I can't. They can't deal with more than now know exactly. So, so then we've got, let's just say we have six, so then we create and there's a graphics in how To's and all this stuff in the book about how to do this. Exactly. But then we, we, we score. For each of those candidate triggers on a matrix that we created very simple x. axis is presumed talk ability. How how talkable do think this is now? This is this is anecdotal. You're just taking a guest. You got some sense of like this while he's our or this kind of, wow, he's our you stick stab at right. So presume, talk abilities this axis, this way is operational complexity. Okay. So what you're looking for is something that's kind of in the middle of both pretty talkable but also pretty doable. Yeah. Yeah. And then you're like, okay, everybody, cool fat. We really wanna do this every good. Everybody's gonna sign on, then you test it. You have to test it. You take some sort of segment it could be every customer. It could be a particular location. It could be a particular product set. There's a lot of ways to do it depends on the company, but you you, you segment out your customer base. We'll give that section of your customers access to the talk trigger, and then you wait for however long. It is typically valid for your company. Doesn't remember customers. Mitt might.

Octa Mitt vic
"octa" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on Rocket

"And for larger teams, text expanders supports single sign on Halloween and grouping accounts. This includes identity providers like octa one logging and g. suite that reduces the time. It takes to onboard larger numbers of users, which sounds like a hell process, but it doesn't have to be because are making it as easy as it possibly can be. Two guys never good snippet story for me this week. Send you on the spot. Well, for me, it's like so many of the things I write are so freaking routine like running a campaign like that sounds good or thank you and like you can. You can really get very programming with the snippets, like guess is just mix. I wouldn't say mix and match, but there really isn't. It's, it's a, you can get very detailed in how all of these things work. And like if you're curious about how to do something, you can Google. There's a million people have thought of like some of the most creative applications for text expand, or you can imagine. So it's fantastic and they even send you an Email at the end of every week. Is about it. So I, yeah, I, I was gonna say, I love the Email because like every week and like you've saved this much time, you know, with your Texas with your snippets, unlike hell ya have. And it's funny because you know what's really neat about it is that you can have all kinds of scripts in addition to just expansion stuff. So obviously you can expand in plain text which texts, whatever. But you can also use Java script a shell script or apple script to have, you know, to command that that do something, and that's really awesome. Because like for instance, I have a script that I've had for a really long time that will grab all the links from my chrome tabs and then put them in a bark down reference list. And I've done this for years, and it's a way for me to kind of organized by writing something, and I want to be able to quickly reference stuff. I have that list to just look up to. And so I just type in semi colon links and it does it with for chrome and a have a different one for for for safari. And it's really, really great. But I also have some stuff that I've been kind of playing around with like some Java script, things that'll work like more cross platform or or wherever you are, and that's really cool. So yeah, I, I love my my my text expanders snippets, for sure. The idea of building complex sprawling conversations in Texas Bander. So never. Needs his text, expand for his mouth. If you expand or go to text expanders dot com slash podcast now to learn more about text expanders..

Texas Bander octa Texas Google apple
"octa" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"Yes a family structure and this could be a monir women someone could go to a nightclub and they could very hopley on a different neom pretend they've got a different profession octa different type of person maybe they're very conservative in their workplace but they got to burning mom and they dress up like a postapocalyptic character they they they enter into max yeah which is a look that i think is a good look but then a mom the moscow the moscow structure that could be a monitor of women the moscow structure is in a sense you you'd find yourself you couldn't do that you you 'cause you think you are who you are so stupid men yet if you look at elon mosque beside grimes you know you can see this ill muscular is a picture of avondale musk's in and he's very much this guy who believes he is ill musk jared grimes was dressed up as a goth kind of fairy so you could see the that grimes was much more comfortable playing with appearance on maybe the next time the wide she might be wearing something completely different whereas he's probably going to still be in a business it you know but all of this coming brings brings up some interesting but do you wanna talk about that for second before we don't have you know we usually idea my little five minute thing actually maybe we should unpack this as we go oh that's fun i don't know plan when we when i was we were brainstorming ideas for this final episode or the final installment of the sex thing after this will never of course about sex again in our discussions ever ever but the original idea which is not talk about sex at all until the very end and then talk about sex a lot as sort of like a metaphor for yeah i might hop happen the way the rate we're going.

grimes avondale musk moscow elon mosque jared grimes five minute
"octa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Media is controlled directly or indirectly by the president and opposition candidates are rarely seen or even mentioned turkey meanwhile remains under emergency rule introduced 2016 failed coup political scientists jenkins octa warns this power could be earth want decisive card the economic situation is getting worse by the day but thanks to the emergency rule the ruler can do whatever he or she wants already they're extreme doubt about the security of polling stations so in one way or another he will make it last year when nationwide protests over boating fault allegations when a referendum turn turkey from a parliamentary system into an executive presidency so the winner of these upcoming presidential elections will inherit sweeping powers all sides agree that in an election they cannot afford to lose during jones dw istanbul and i'm keith walker in bonn germany you're listening to inside europe and the last few months facebook has been slammed for failing to protect the data of more than fifty million users their data was used to further political projects including brags donald trump's presidential victory and new e u data privacy law requires companies to get explicit consent from users to share data with third parties the general data protection regulation or gdp are goes into effect on may twenty fifth brendan finucane is ceo of the irish company which develops the e cumbersome opt and also advises political organizations on data protection and joins me now.

president keith walker europe facebook brendan finucane ceo jenkins octa executive germany donald trump twenty fifth
"octa" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I'm not sure jalen hurts listen to this program he's probably calling an uber right now to go to the airport let's check in with larry next larry would you would you take him to the airport that guy iota board jalen hurts yeah man you got that right octa moma guy i'll let iran on my jack i have interrupt this for a second because i've spoken to you how long we've been friends man what are you i don't know but larry i guess i'm trying it five years ten years what would you say yeah fifteen fifteen years in those fifteen years we've had some interesting conversations you know where i'm going to i don't know if i've ever heard you this drug originally why he got me gone one i mean usually i can understand every third or fourth ward hey i'm waiting for the un interpreter tell me what in the world you're talking about may draw blame playing taking done the mall and he's got my ducted that wa i don't know you know wanna may not know he knows out push my buttons and get me toasted but but i'm happy they're just for the record can you give us a count beer account by dane around there i mean they've been on there as normal or talboys just normal who knows a normal so math for me eighteen times twelve ounces yeah okay bye now lawn a lot a lot i i'm starving dragging the can but jay it out man i'm i'm i don't my world turned upside down one day a member warm only we figure.

jalen larry iran un jay fifteen fifteen years fifteen years twelve ounces five years ten years one day
"octa" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"So finally i i'm free of that i go back to england then this time i didn't deserve it it snowed in paris and was one of the first times snow had been pair in paris and with the snow at the octa toyota was beautiful just beautiful kids were playing no traffic nothing all traffic had been cut off everybody's running around on foot throwing snowed each other so i go right onto the octa playoff and i build my version of a dolly parton snow woman anatomically correct and devoid of any clothing who says france right where nudity is nothing they blasted me they've bunch of sean d'armes came up and they said we want to see your passport and they saw that previous troublemaker stamping their undesirable for one year bang back to the airport undesirable fly back to london god oh my the french hate me they cannot stand me you're not the only one they hate so don't worry about it i finally went back another type in there a lot but i went back another time with my wife at the time gina and she's just like don't get into any trouble i've wanted to come here my whole life i will kill you if you get in any trouble so i was an angel during that trip while i i will never go back to paris france i would love to go back to the south of france and see other parts of the north up in northern north oh god they love us up their exactly never never again paris why a horrible experience they just treat you battle they treat you just it smells awful verse wheel and he was a cop that's what's so funny about that story.

paris france sean d'armes gina england octa london one year