35 Burst results for "Octa"

"octa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:14 min | Last month

"octa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Exactly happened and how much damage was done So to put it in context as you know octa is the trusted identity provider for over 15,000 companies So big small governments private companies And so anytime something like this happens it's a big deal And we'll talk about details and what happened But I want to be really clear that we're responsible So third parties this and third party that it's our responsibility to make sure this doesn't happen And the big takeaway there are many takeaways from us but the big takeaway is as we've done before we're going to learn from our mistakes and we're going to be transparent about what we're doing differently in a concrete way How we're going to prevent this from ever happening again So how did it happen So what happened was as you mentioned there's this third party call center And they do inside this call center There's about 40 people that are support agents that work on behalf of octa to provide low level support to our customers And this is seitan the third party Correct Yeah and the hackers broke into this site So they used some vulnerabilities and some actually the competitors software to break into the site And when they were in the site they were able to take screenshots of what the support agents were doing on their computers And that's what they posted on Twitter a couple of weeks ago So how many customers were actually compromised You said initially as many as 366 Yeah and this is really important because through this whole process we're trying to be as transparent and as conservative in our impact analysis as possible So what we did is we said we looked at every possible customer that had any kind of support interaction over the 5 days in question And that is the list of potentially impacted customers Now everyone is very concerned about this And as they should be octave is critical infrastructure for 15,000 companies So everyone assumed the worst And we did as well But the actual technical impact to companies in terms of what they need to do is near zero It's near zero But it's incumbent upon us What do you mean by that technical impact The actually what they need to do as a response to this What disclosures they need to make So essentially they need to change It's actually near zero 330 366 companies how many actually were compromised Do you know yet Potentially impacted 366 So we're drawing that line very conservatively But because of the nature of how our system worked and our product the octa security technology worked well in this case And the way our processes really limit what a support agent can actually do on these systems the impact is near zero So how many of those 366 customers do you believe were impacted It's not exactly clear Because the hacker was essentially looking over the support agent shoulders And looking at what was happening So what we've done is we want to work with our customers to have a detailed analysis of what actually happened So we've shared with all of these 366 companies detailed click by click support logs So we can work in conjunction with them to truly verify that the impact was zero This investigation is open and it won't be closed until we get every customer to agree with our assessment You faced a barrage of criticism including from your own customer about the timeline with this was disclosed Why did you wait almost two months to share this with the public Only after screenshots were shared by presumably elapsed Yeah I've talked to hundreds of customers and this comes up over and over And it's unacceptable And we're accountable for it The facts that when I tell people the facts they start to get a better understanding The facts well we knew something happened in this time period in January What we actually knew was that an account takeover attempt actually failed and we detected it And there was no it wasn't clear the impact We didn't know the extent of the forensics report It certainly didn't contain screenshots So for all intents and purposes the first time we knew about this the severity of it and what the hackers actually got was on March 22nd when they publicly the information Now your initial statement also stated that octa itself was not breached And this was in the middle of a lot of conflicting and confusing information not just for your customers but for the cyber community for journalists like myself how do you regain the trust of the enterprise community after this and for customers perspective customers who are saying why should we use octa Well I think it's very important We are a trusted brand and that trust has been damaged And we do take accountability for all the mistakes we've made And we have made mistakes And one of them as you mentioned is the communication was not as clear as it should have been So we're trying to communicate more openly more transparently more consistently and more ultimately more clearly And I think when customers in conversations like this understand the facts how they unfolded and what we knew when and more importantly as we share how we're going to do better in the future to make sure this doesn't happen again to make sure customer support environments aren't put in an insecure place to make sure that the communication is more timely to make sure that the communication is clear And there's no question about what was breached and wasn't briefed That's what we're committed to doing better next time What's your sense of how the business will be impacted by this Have you lost customers as a result of this Well it's very early So our focus has been on talking to customers and talking to prospects And when I have those conversations and people on the management team have those conversations what's very clear is a lot of these same questions come up which is why I'm so grateful for you allowing me to talk about this today But when we address these concerns and we talk most importantly about how mistakes were made we're taking responsibility and how we have concrete plans to remediate this and make sure it doesn't happen again They're in a much better place at the end of the conversation and than when they started the conversation Now Bloomberg has reported that the alleged mastermind of this group is a 16 year old who lives with his mom in England what do you make of the fact that a teenager may have pulled this off It's interesting but ultimately Emily it doesn't matter because we have to protect customers against everyone Teenagers and adults and nation states and people that have various different motives And it's incumbent upon us to make sure this never happens again And that's including learning from all the mistakes made And more importantly collaborating with the broader cyber community to share open and transparent information about what happens One of the biggest weaknesses in cyber response is people are afraid to share what happened If you look at time after time again even this subcontractor to octa they were hesitant to share what they knew Why Because they're afraid of litigation They're afraid of being sued And they're afraid of reputational damage If you look this hinders our response as a community over and over again And we have to get better at that And we're trying to lead the way We're trying to be a leader be open and transparent And if you look back at the facts we've disclosed they're all consistent We haven't had to change anything And so we're proud of this front footedness and this transparency despite the mistakes we've made Are you worried about or are you facing any or bracing for potential regulatory scrutiny as a result of a what happened or be the timeline with which you disclosed it Well I'm very confident with the facts and how we've behaved in light of those facts But I think bigger question is should there be more regulation to somehow try to get this log jam broken of people disclosing things So I know the SEC is working on things The federal government is working on things And we would welcome that because we think the best thing to happen is to be more openness and.

Twitter Bloomberg Emily England SEC federal government
"octa" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:18 min | Last month

"octa" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Fully focusing on this until lapses itself posted screenshots and announced to the world that they had done this on March 21st. And octa has finally said after a lot of pressure from wired and the press that maybe they were a bit slow in reacting once they got that report on March 17th. But that's kind of all we know so far and we're still waiting to hear more from the two companies. You talked a little bit about the group lapses communicating with the rest of the world. They have a telegram channel. And for people who maybe aren't familiar with telegram and how it works, can you tell us what goes on there and how lapses communicates? Yeah, this is another fun I mean, again, I have to keep reminding myself and everyone. It's not really fun. Really unacceptable criminal behavior. But it's just kind of wacky or whatever. And so it kind of fits with this lapses persona of like the joy ride of their lives or whatever's going on. So yes, they have a telegram channel. Telegram is a communication platform that builds itself as being very secure, but the thing that's really exploded about telegram as you're describing is the channels. And these are open public channels that anyone can join and it's just sort of this grain feed of an entity in this case lapses talking to an audience and then people can comment and kind of participate. This is where they do everything they announced their new compromises, their new victims, they share screenshots, they share links to data troves, they're actively engaging with the public about their criminal activity and leaking data. And it's kind of a wild ride. And if you follow the telegram channel, you get notifications from lapses that all hours of the day and night about what they're up to and what they're thinking and so kind of wild to me as an aside. All right, well that feels like a good place to end it. Let's take a quick break and when we come back, we'll do.

octa
Sam Scott, CTO at OSO, on Authorization as a Service

Software Engineering Daily

01:45 min | 8 months ago

Sam Scott, CTO at OSO, on Authorization as a Service

"Sam. Welcome asia much having me commissioning authorization. There's a wide variety of tools. That are this space and the first one that comes to mind is off zero which was more recently. Acquired by octa tell me about a brief history of authorizations at service absolutely saw its start with you need to ease the disentangle authentication authorization to very similar. Sounding names often lumped together as just off and there's often a very blurry line between those which piece of the puzzle different people are doing and even goes as far as with the name authorization useful indication and things like that. So i think we think about companies like zero. You know quite a lot of the stuff they focused on is primarily the identity piece the authentication piece right so authentication. It's brown identifying who the user is a few are checking some kind of credentials piece of thing authorization often the piece it comes off to. It's like now. I know you are. What can you do and lower the existing services out the like an author. They do stuff and they maybe do a small piece of the authorization. They may be handled things like you know groups all maybe it's like pulling a few attributes out of the idc providers you kind of get some sense of who this person is. They often leave a lot of the authorization to the application code itself. It's like i know who you are. And maybe i know groups. You belong to roll. You have but i'm gonna. I'm gonna the app you decide what to do that information.

Octa SAM Asia IDC
Mike Maples on Value Hacking and Avoiding The Fake Growth Epidemic

Venture Stories

02:11 min | 9 months ago

Mike Maples on Value Hacking and Avoiding The Fake Growth Epidemic

"Is value hacking. How do you sort of conceived this term. And what problem did you set out to solve. We're doing it. Yeah so so Value hacking was intended to Address problem that we saw more and more in the tech industry which we like to call fake growth and so fake growth to me is kind of like the hidden. In plain sight secret that's pervasive in silicon valley it says pervasive in tech and startups as fake news and politics and so we started to think well a lot of companies that we'd worked with some get all the way to the promised land get public like say octa or lift kind of more recently but some start out great and go off the rails and we wanted to understand why it so we did a lot of analysis and thought about it some and interviewed a bunch of founders companies that had worked and not worked and we really honed in on this issue fake growth and to what is baker. What are the most. Common signs at a startup is experiencing fake it. Yeah so fake growth. Basically emphasizes growth optics overgrowth reality so we like to call it grow theater and so you know what are some common examples. You know focusing on funding round sizes and getting publicity around that focusing on. How much pr can you get regardless of your customer. Traction focusing on is my valuation in the last round bigger than my buddies valuation. In the last round that i met at a meet up and even worse it's the board is actually usually complicit in this. It's it's everybody trying to make numbers in a spreadsheet that look good and so board meetings become about okay. I read in some blog. You've gotta grow fifteen percent a month and so are you growing fifteen percent a month and so what we what we learned is that one of the great causes a fake growth. Is that people start trying to grow before they're ready to grow and that the right way to think about it was create a very strong value proposition. that's true and then Grow by syndicating the truth because if value propositions true in theory we should be able to scale it

Silicon Valley Baker
Yellow Flags at Okta

MarketFoolery

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Yellow Flags at Okta

"Shares of octa are falling ten percent this morning. This is the id management software business. They said their loss for the current quarter is going to be bigger than they originally thought. And also the cfo. Michael corey is leaving. And unless i'm misreading this. This is a sudden departure because they have named an interim. Cfo while they look for a permanent successor. Yeah so the quarter was pretty good. Their revenue grew thirty seven percent to two hundred fifty. one million. Their subscription revenue grew thirty eight percent. The remaining performance obligations were fifty two percent. They added six hundred fifty new customers their enterprise customers surpassed two thousand they closed on an acquisition so on a financial metric basis. It was a solid quarter. But i think the stepping down of a cfo after about a year with isn't isn't the best. The best idea people are not happy about it. Yeah i've said before if if the ceo leave suddenly that's one of those where there's smoke there. There's probably fire situations and right after that in terms if i'm rank ordering right after the cfo it's the cfo if the cfo leave. Suddenly it immediately. Invade invites the question. What's going on so nothing really is going on in terms of the business. Maybe it's a clash of personalities. Something like that but you know the guidance plus the cfo suddenly walking out the door. I get why the stock is

Michael Corey
TCL Goes All in on 8K, Reveals New 6-Series

Daily Tech News Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

TCL Goes All in on 8K, Reveals New 6-Series

"Get. Hub added support for physical security keys when using git over s s h lets developers and push fetch and pull requests remotely previously. Allowed passwords personal access tokens or an ssh key to access. Get get over ssh but does plan to remove support for passwords later this year citing their consistent source of account security challenges. Speaking of standards and connectivity the connectivity standards alliance made up of hundreds of device manufacturers including apple amazon google and samsung announced to the open smart home standard project connected home over. Ip or chip has been rebranded. So if you heard about chip it's now called matter devices with matter. Mit our branding to go on sale by late. Two thousand twenty one. I kind of liked chip better but okay. Amazon updated the echo. Show eight now with the same thirteen megapixel sensor as the show ten and also the ability to digitally panin zim to follow users support for a are features and a new octa core process for the same one hundred thirty dollars price. The echo show five was also refreshed now offering a two megapixel front camera for eighty five dollars and the kids edition available for ninety five dollars. Also different rear fabric a two year warranty to see elle's given out pricing information on the x. l. collection of its eighty-five inch. Tv's previously announced its ees. We're talking to robert harron yesterday. All the tv's are coming out now. The four k four series tv is currently on sale for one thousand six hundred dollars and the led. Eighty five are seven forty five with full array local dimming and dolby vision. Hdr support is three thousand dollars shipping in the coming weeks. Tcl also announced. It will launch an eight k. Many led eighty five inch tv later. This year they didn't give exact pricing or availability on that yet

Connectivity Standards Allianc Samsung Amazon Robert Harron Apple Google Elle TCL
Amazon Updates the Echo Show 8 and 5 With Better Cameras

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon Updates the Echo Show 8 and 5 With Better Cameras

"Updated the echo. Show eight now with the same thirteen megapixel sensor as the show ten and also the ability to digitally panin zim to follow users support for a are features and a new octa core process for the same one hundred thirty dollars price. The echo show five was also refreshed now offering a two megapixel front camera for eighty five dollars and the kids edition available for ninety five dollars also different rear fabric a two year warranty

Kuo: Foldable iPhone in 2023!

Techmeme Ride Home

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Kuo: Foldable iPhone in 2023!

"Main chico has a research note out saying that apple is planning to launch a foldable iphone with an eight inch q. hd plus flexible. Oh led display in two thousand twenty. Three quo says apple will ship. Fifteen to twenty million of the foldable iphones. That first year of sales. Cutting macrumors close predicts that foldable smartphones will become a must have for all major smartphone brands. Ed will boost the next super replacement cycle for high end models. And he believes apple is well positioned to be the biggest winner in the device. Trend believes that the upcoming iphone will adopt a silver nanno. Wire touch solution for the device's display. Which will create a quote long term competitive advantage for apple in the device market. This display technology will be needed for future foldable devices that support more than a single. Fold quoting now from quos note. Future foldable devices will require touch technology that supports multiple folds versus only a single fold and current foldable smartphones rollable medium to large size displays and durability when comparing the advantages of the above specifications. The silver nanna wire is similar or superior to stc's why octa and quote quo says that apple is already using silver nano wire for the touch interface of the home pod allowing apple to quote master the technology at a lower cost using small volume production and quote.

Apple Main Chico ED STC
Why Digital Identities Are All About a Secure Customer Experience

IT Visionaries

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Why Digital Identities Are All About a Secure Customer Experience

"Welcome everyone to another episode of it visionaries and today. We have the ceo of four. Doc fran rush on the show. Fran welcome to the show albert. Thanks so much happy to be here all right right out the gate. What exactly is ford truck. It's got a very strong sounding name. Tell us what for drug does so before. Drug is a digital identity platform though for enterprise and large enterprise. So what the heck is that. Yeah yeah we enable our customers to really create really friction lists and easy identity experiences so that as an employeers a consumer. It's really easy to register. Set up a new account be recognized when he come back and get access to what you wanna do and then move on ossets really that whole process of setting up in your identity to get access to services online so this is a this is a space. That is very hot right now. We know that there are competitors that we've had them on the show so i don't or maybe they're not competitors so for for our audience. I'd love to hear a little bit of what's the difference. What's unique about four rock to give you an example we've had we've had guests from octa from off zero different companies here but i know that typically in software a lot of times people say the same things but they don't actually do the same things curious. What's unique about for drug. You'll let me just before jim. Braude into four doc. I want to take a step back. He said the market's really hot. And i want to kind of explain why yeah. The market is really hot. Right now. And i think some of this ties to the digital transformation that companies have been going through over the past fifteen twenty years where instead of doing business in person or over the phone you know. We're doing everything digitally as employees. Everything we do now online especially in this post covid world where every workers are remote workers

Doc Fran Rush Fran Albert Ford Braude JIM
Harry and Meghan, Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Break Their Silence

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Harry and Meghan, Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Break Their Silence

"Harry and duchess meghan and the new headline. Is they break their silence. Why they turned down oprah when she first asked for an interview. They're telling answer tonight. Here's james longman. One celebrated as the future of britain's monarchy tonight prince harry and duchess meghan further widening. The rift between the two families in an upcoming interview with oprah winfrey meghan claims palisades intervened when winfrey octa for an interview months fool than two thousand eighteen wedding. Turn me down nicely and said Perhaps there will be another time when there's the right time what is right about this time. Well so many things. We have the ability to make our own choices in a way that i couldn't have said yes to you then. That wasn't my choice to make joining. The royal family means not sharing opinions that meghan. It seems found that too restricting. it's really liberating to be able to have the right and the privilege in some ways to be able to say yes. This new kit comes just as buckingham palace. Took an unprecedented step opening an investigation into bullying claims against the duchess. It was definitely an intensely difficult a working environment people in tears on a regular basis. Well harry and meghan won't be involved in the investigation. Senior razor expected to be questioned. Megan's office has called the report. A smear campaign critics also asking if the palace is going to investigate the duchess one also look into prince. Andrew is even more serious allegations around his friendship with jeffrey epstein. Andrew has always denied any wrongdoing in another clip. Prince harry acknowledging the challenges of leaving royal life as being unbelievably tough for the two of us. But at least we have each other and james longman with us tonight. From london james buckingham palace obviously was aware of this interview coming weeks and then this week the palace investigation into megan. I'm curious as the press. They're in the uk. Asking about the timing of all this david. It does feel like this. Investigation is in reaction to the oprah interview. A lot of people are also asking why this couple a speaking out now especially with prince philip in the hospital data questions on both

Duchess Meghan James Longman Oprah Winfrey Meghan Winfrey Octa Prince Harry Meghan Harry Oprah Palisades Britain Jeffrey Epstein Buckingham Palace Andrew James Buckingham Palace Megan London UK David Prince Philip
We Tried the Insta-Famous Hanacure Face Mask

Allure: The Science of Beauty

03:46 min | 1 year ago

We Tried the Insta-Famous Hanacure Face Mask

"Week. We did a little home experiment for you was slightly traumatic but we are dedicated journalists. You're welcome face or something. Jenny what the hell is gonna tell me. Okay trying hannah cure this morning before i start some meetings at work. I'm going gonna open up a package. That's right we did the hanoch your facial it's called an all in one facial in the box says i'm going to get four octa lift solutions and for octo lift am pupils. See you open it up so the ambulance little glass vials in the solutions in these little pods and then i also have a brush and i do not know what octa lift means but we will find out wanting to try this mask for a while. Because i've seen it on social media. I think saw drew barrymore doing it. If you guys don't know this mask is the one that you put it on and it dries and it makes your skin look really really wrinkled. Like a raisin. The desk has a laundry list of supposed benefits like unclogging pours lifting. And firming opened the calf and empowering the little ampule and combining them now and then re seal it a shake vigorously for twenty seconds gel will form right here. We go to reading using the brush apply gel evenly to face. Then you have to pretend you're a mannequin. No laughing or smiling or blinking. Alas instruction says is fish movements to maximize effects. There's a picture of a woman holding fan and fanning her face. So twenty minutes goes trying not to move my face for twenty minutes. And i gotta figure out something to fan my face with these instructions ending bluefields cold and the shrinkage begins. I can feel it. Kinda starting to tighten a little bit. It's almost twenty minutes in. This thing is very tight. Very excited. To her. And set off it loosely. You are very very creepy. Any other thoughts to share. You talk weird no. I can't really move fish. Do you think this is going to make my skin really luminous kind of before. Now you look terrifying. My seven year old is right. I looked terrifying. I just rinse off my face and it was such a relief started feeling really itchy. So then when. I started putting the water on had to rinse for quite a while to get it off so right after i rinsed off the mask i was definitely khloe. Think it part of it was just the glow of being happy that the mask was off my face but my skin was very smooth. It didn't put on makeup right afterward. But i had the impression that it definitely would be a nice mass to do right before you did put on makeup because everything would would go on very nicely. I didn't have the instructions that said to be prepared for redness. I didn't experience any overall. The percents positive. Although it was a lot to go through to get

Drew Barrymore Jenny Hannah Khloe
"octa" Discussed on B2B Marketers on a Mission

B2B Marketers on a Mission

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on B2B Marketers on a Mission

"The other one says that they're all for and You know I'm kind of like inbetween 'cause I feel I feel like it's it's good to a certain extent but I think the personalization still needs to go in there somewhere 'cause. Salesperson you still need to do your homework, right? You find out who these people are. Yeah. I think it's also depends on where lead source comes from his well right. So for for example, if it's like marketing perspective opting took a lead magnet, right? Yeah. Yeah. Of course sequences. Like. That makes sense or I, but it's completely if you are doing the outreach yet change. For example, I'm actually testing out a whole new outreach type right now I mean also a whole new, a whole new one button. I, think it'd be much more scalable as and you'd better. It'll come warmer leads. So for example. Like I'll send you messages before. Anyone that's connection requests connected with thousand my target market Alison video message with a little bit text below it and I'll have at least fifty percent were spot, which is quite good. Made. The other half is now responding. Right. Right. So to me like. Okay like I'm thinking time doing this video messages right? Like I it can't really scares me. You really can't because it's nice to them. Like A filial wasting my time with the other forty percent forty, five percent of the dinar spawned. So how could I readjust it rise I've been tested for about a week and a half now a new a new man, which is the first message sent. Them is more generic right which is a tax met only message is very low key, soft called action. And the message is more so like. It says typed out it's like you know Hey Christian. Thanks so much for connecting. If you couldn't tell based on my profile like my number one goals help BBB Sales Reps. More. You know if you want killer free resources if you want the resources, just let me know anyways how taseer that's it. There's no like OCTA is nothing. And I've been testing it. And I've I've been received faster responses.

OCTA Alison
"octa" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Time. Now, once again to turn is to the skies and check out the celestial fee for October on Sky Watch October is the tenth month of the year that may seem somewhat confusing as OCTA means eight rather than ten. The answer lies in the old Roman calendar, which had just ten months before the addition of January February. And that ten month year is still reflected today with the name September or Septum being Latin. For seven October, octo meaning eight, November November nine and December Desi meeting ten the thirty first last day of October.

OCTA
Bring on the snack cake cereal

The Empty Bowl

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Bring on the snack cake cereal

"Welcome to the Empty Bowl might name is Justin mcelroy and I am a serial enthusiast. My name is Dan Gilbert and I am a serial ethnographer in the sense that I know the cereal culture in the overall breakfast. Zeitgeist well enough to understand the impact of some of the stories we're about to talk about today. that's. So exciting we have so much going on this first news story Dan. I have to tell you. I'm thrilled over here over on this end. I mean it's huge. It's absolutely. Substantial. So. When you write about serial for five years I have inevitably you end up seeing some of the same things again and again, and one of the easiest things to do when you're reading about serial is to tell the world about the weirdly specific cereals that you've always wanted to see on shelves and for me Besides gingerbread toast crunch I think the second most idea of cereal I've ever had would be a little. OATMEAL, cream pies cereal, and now we must wait no more as Kellogg's has partnered with the snack brand to bring oatmeal cream pie cereal two shelves later this year. What's IT GONNA look like? So so from appearance alone, it doesn't necessarily look like the sort of sandwiched cream, an oatmeal cookie. Snack cake that you're familiar with It looks more like a brown oatmeal ring cereal, which is fine. I'm not really in this for appearances so much as the legacy of the snack taking question. You say, what did you say that the cream pie is your favorite little w product It's up there with cosmic Brownie alum that plastic chocolate on a on a cosmic Brownie I used to get star crunches a lot when I was a kid in my lunch bag but I don't like those so I don't know why I felt the need to tell you that but. You know it the for me. I'd say it's a three way tie between the oatmeal Cream Pie the double decker oatmeal cream pies. Distinct feast and the fudge around, which is essentially just a chocolate oatmeal cream by but overall I, think the oatmeal cream pies and amazing snack product. It's probably my go-to whenever I am Matt a gas station stopped long road trip. So I'm very very excited to see it come serial form. Especially, it's going to be a thin line to walk to get that exact flavor because as I, discovered recently. Raisins are in the battle of the bill cream pie. It's sink. Yes. Yes. Yes. Raisins in the OATMEAL cream. Pie. So that's why like you get that like is what gives it its distinct flavor is that there's raisins mixed into into the batter period into the better so. That will be a tricky flavor to to nail. Think I'm really hoping that mine is not the only mind that you've blown with this revelation right here because I did not know that at all I mean. meanwhile, I was just hoping that this is an actual oath based serial rather than some some sort of corn contraption because I think it'd be really an authentic otherwise but. I think my favorite thing about the story overall is how you just know that someone at Kellogg's saw post team up with hostess to drop the sort of twinkies, etcetera cereals, and immediately thought. Get Little Debbie on the horn. We're not going to stand for this sort of force that cooperation to happen. Yeah, it's funny that you mentioned cosmic brownies actually because when the story first broke before, it became official from Kellogg's themselves There was a youtube video of someone reviewing the little debbie cereal or oatmeal cream pies cereal before anyone knew about it and they were also reviewing cosmic Brownie cereal. It was weird because they had the box for Little Debbie oatmeal cream pies cereal but they didn't have any official box art for the cosmic brownies cereal and the stuff really kinda looked like the cocoa puffs Brownie crunch that rerelease not too long ago. So it's very uncertain. The legitimacy of this cosmic Brownie cereal because after the news officially dropped I reached OCTA Kellogg's my contact there and ask them about this and all I could tell me in the Vegas. Possible terms was that a cosmic brownies Syria was not releasing at this time. The seems like a tacit confirmation that cosmic Brownie Syria was at least considered whether it will actually be released or not or if it was scrapped entirely remains uncertain but the point remains that we're entering a brave new world of snack cakes, cereals and I'm all here for it.

Kellogg Dan Gilbert Octa Kellogg Justin Mcelroy Official Syria Debbie Youtube Matt Vegas
"octa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Dollars LG tribute dynasty and it'll have an obstacle or processor. But that's the only one that we've seen that we've been able to find that meets your requirements at this point now. You'll find a few quad core phones and some more expensive OCTA core phones, but that's all we could find. For OCTA core phones keep in mind with eight cores or less a budget phone, a budget phone, and it probably won't perform very well when you compare it to other devices if they could make it cheap enough to sell for fifty. Dollars but sell it for eight hundred because of how it performs, they'd be selling for eight hundred dollars for sure you may be better off looking for a phone with fewer cores and better overall software and hardware. If you're looking for a better experience kind of makes, me wonder John what you intend to use the phone for if you need eight cores. That's a lot of processing for a phone, and that's probably why there's not a lot of them available on the market. But of course, stay tuned because perhaps other listeners have some additional input and we love it when listeners help listeners eight, hundred, eight, nine, nine into anytime day or night at your convenience help John out or anyone else that we address a question or a concern to rick in Mount Juliet Tennessee listens on WTN. Point seven, I think they are like the superstation or something calling in? We love you rick using the free into tomorrow APP have a windows surface pro four that is less than one years old and Microsoft pushed a update. To the computer and I no longer can use my keyboard own head really need help. Well. Rick unfortunately is not going to help you much, but you're not alone this issue seems to have affected a number of surface users, some report that just updating to the latest version took care of the problem for them. Unfortunately, that's not the case for everyone batch of lucky users were able to use their keyboard again after a simple restart but again. They seem to be just a lucky few and it's probably unrelated to the update itself. Many are having better luck by using a button restart. Now to button restart is a three step process I you hold on the power button for about thirty seconds and then release it. Then you hold down the power and volume up button for fifteen seconds the device. Should restart but makes you keep holding the buttons down until that fifteen seconds are up. Then you wait ten seconds after that, you should be able to turn your surface four back on the process work the keyboard will be back to normal if this didn't fix the problem either then reinstalling drivers may do the trick if you haven't tried that already now. I know that this sounds like what Chris just said probably sounds like the typical, Gobbledygook you get when you call a tech support person in India and they want you to stand with your left leg up and hold your right hand in the air and then pushed that button for ten seconds now unfortunately, the only other option that we've heard may work. is to reset the device. Altogether, you can choose to keep your personal files when you reset the device, but windows will be reinstalled. So we encourage you to make this the last option you try, and of course, before you do anything like this backup anything and everything important that might have already been on the device because you just never know it's always good to have a separate external drive backup preferably even a copy off premise somewhere for things like this. But Rick, let us know what of those suggestions and boy I sure hope one of them will work for you. Let us know it help whether listeners with similar problems but as I said,.

Rick John OCTA LG Mount Juliet Tennessee Microsoft Chris India
"octa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"To sort of typical way that you start the day you know I think some people don't really get this It's I think is a personality type issue but like. For me for example, like on an ideal morning, things are going smoothly for me. There is a sequence of things that I like to do and I feel like one seven chief that like start to my day that I'm ready to take on the rest of the day and It's a kind of a grounding thing for me. You know what I mean. And for some people, they're just like not I get up to take a PISS. Go Two kids. So you know everything just goes to hell after that. Okay. So I cannot. Some. You instinct defense. How might they sucked later on? So let's say. My Day when I'm training. So he's just I wake up I, cannot my. In. I mean a toilet come back to my bed on the maximum study on them then nine drink. Lemon water. I prepare my breakfast and go walk. If I go to the. Same Old Walter I think Rooting, these rations I usually I think every day I have wilted. We've lemon. And Error Sometimes I. Buy. Coming. and. You could call it nice to drink. Morning and me. because. Whenever I do I do outside. So I I I don't leave home without a breakfast and. So I'm working Full London for years in my company but I had never the. Lunch there. I only have my own food. Do you get a chance because it sounds like you're pretty busy guy but do you get a chance to read very much? Would you yet? You knew this question was gonna come didn't you because you've listened to all the shows? Do you have a book that you can recommend or do you have an author that you could recommend for the listeners? Yeah. I'm actually I'm reading a lot but I'm rooting a local. OCTA Curtis had very style. Really notebooks and If I would recommend something closest. I read actually existed book is about tradition. And actually this is a book the all the naysayers intend we or generally. Let the all of the should really is doubtless the renowned Davies and the book is lead belly. and. Summer. If someone like want to discuss this topic. suggests. That before he would like show Sunday something at me like resident cards get. Then read this book I. Have your opinion enough that knowledge it really bothered So that is a tweet belly and it's about the on the topic of a gluten. Intolerance about gluten intolerance now, generally about wreak. Diet. You know about that. Of the space of our. Byrom. Doctorate you know it's not some guides. It's medicine the no. Road. Of. The vote that he's. A. Researching likely. I. Also because one of your shows you were asking for. Mogi. Like one less, but I have A. Son Yeah. which movie would you like to recommend not to movies actually I don't know which one I liked most review both..

Davies OCTA Curtis London
"octa" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"octa" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"My fan, it is Valentine The morning 8 26 86654 for my FAM Texan 3143 We got on to this one because Kevin's obsessed with Octa nods. I mean, my kids were obsessed with Dr Nets and, yeah, I guess it's fair to say I am Teo. We just found out yesterday that there's a movie coming to Netflix next month, and I'm genuinely excited about it. I like it because it's educational and it's entertaining. So they like it. But then I get sucked in, and I learned about all the sea creatures and I think it's a fantastic show. Is there a sea creature thing? I'm sorry. That you can talk about now and educate us. Um and No, I wish I may be retained more. But you learned a lot. Yes, exactly. I mean, some of it. Some of it's really some of it's not, You know, Donkey, the gigantic gold fish that lives in the ocean of the Giants like I don't write. How much truth there is. Just read the books, too. Do you read the bedtime stories? So if some and then every single night Molly makes either me or alley make up a couple locked in on stories while she's laying eso Those ones are completely faking. Fabricated. I tell stories about, you know, like the sea turtle that got a splinter and pay, so I had to get his medical bag and get a lot of splinters beneath the ocean. Exactly. That's fantastic. You know the other night for like one of the first times in a long time. I read Colin Ah bedtime story. Yeah, He told us that this night was the funniest thing was sitting there in the bottom bunk of his bunk beds. And you know, here's this kid is 12 and almost tall in his mom and me sit next and read a bedtime story is like was fun, though, And it turned out to be whatever that story wasn't forget. But it was a bedtime story about how Not a hope. It's not prophetic. But it was about how the dad will always be with you. And I grabbed that book from random out of like, 25 different books he had on a bookshelf and just like your dad will always be with you Always be there always be in your heart all this stuff. And I'm like that's so strange. I grab that book out of all these other books that were up there and stuff, you know. Isolate. It was interesting. Hey, Good morning, Alex. How are you today? I'm good. Thanks. How are you? We're doing fantastic. Jules Here's is in her house. Kevin's in his garage, Alex. So what do you go? What's the show for you? That is four kids, but you enjoyed as an adult. Well, I don't want you anymore because my daughter wanted me to make sure that I said no, she's too old to watch it now. But what loved heavy danger and You know we would sit there and all it's on, you know, in the middle of making dinner or breakfast or whatever. And I forget that I was cooking because I get sucked into the right. Right. No, that's a good show. I don't think there's still making anymore, though, because I think the kid is probably older. Now the kid who played Henry right Yeah, it's a brief synopsis. I don't know what the show's about. Well, there's a scientist or the others of Mr Mann or Captain Man they believe is the superhero and his dad when he was a little kid. But the scientist had accidentally exact him. And so now he's indestructible superhero and he needed a psychic, and he owns a little junk store that's like, you know, secret job. That's actually a portal to his man Cave. And then Henry walked into his store and captain Man's okay. You want to be my sidekick? So now he's Henry and he's a teenage boy or 10 year old boy. I'm not sure how old he was in the beginning, but He becomes the sidekick, and he has to keep it secret from his family. So nobody knows except a couple of out by the way she's doing like Hannah Montana situation, but she's doing a great job describing it. If you had asked me, I would have had all those details. Good job on that is good. Doesn't he become like, doesn't get superpowers himself in one episode or something. Yes, I think eventually he gets superpowers too, right? Yeah. Fight off the bad guys, too. It was funny. We love that show so much for a point at our house said I reached out to a friend of ours. Amy Sherman, who does a lot of like press for IRA. And she was going to get Colin and I on the set to watch a filming of the show. It just never happened, though, but we were so stoked and then it just never came through. But darn it. No local Well, Alex. Thanks. Thanks for calling in I say One more thing. There's no Gus. I don't wanna cut you off. Great ahead. No, I wouldn't say I've met you before you came out Univision's better Credit union and did the Veterans Day gas. You pump gas with that into emptied the whole event at the Huntington Beach and I came up with my husband works there and I used to work there. So we came out and helped out that day, and my son came up to you and was very heavy Yankee shirt and picked it up and said Bud's Boo read books to you. No. Okay, So this isn't a nice story about meeting me. I really was feeling that was gonna be one of these nice stories and met you. He's so sweet with a great guy, But I told you you'd thank you suck. Did I say, I think it's for the happiness and know you are just like what you want me to say that. But he was very proud of his being T shirt because my husband and my son of die hard Yankee fans and her dog is even named Yankees. So all right. So what you're saying is we had a positive encounter. We had fun. Doesn't sound like letter, Senator Hey, I met you before you got in a fistfight with my son. No, no, that's not it at all. But he didn't come over and he he was a little shot. He didn't want to do it, but he's got a boo Boo replied to it at a Veterans Day event. So you were the catalyst. Seriously. Go over there and yell at that guy. He's pumping gas for veterans. He's going to put the Yankees shirt on, but the way that is such a great event, I had so much fun doing that It was so much fun to meet everybody down there. We've done it for a few years now and no new vision. Credit. Yoon still does that stuff. And, you know, saying Thank you to veterans at any point is always the right thing to do. So that's like one of my favorite things to be involved in projects like that. That's awesome. Yeah, it was. It was good to see you out there, and I knew you came out and did it again. And you're pumping gas that we didn't go that year, but yeah, it was. It was good to see you there. Now that I got to talk to everybody. Yeah, it was a ton of fun. I mean, the only thing that Ah Stands out as a scarf means that one kid give me the number one side and saying Yankees, Rach, I know, I know, Alex. I know. Hey, listen, have a great weekend till we settle, okay? I roll. Thank you very much. Valentine in the morning.

Alex Yankees Henry Kevin Boo Captain Man Netflix scientist Dr Nets Giants Octa Jules Here Amy Sherman Molly Univision Valentine Huntington Beach Hannah Montana Colin Senator
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 2 years ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Hollywood's Black List

Planet Money

11:33 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood's Black List

"Every year, fifty thousand movie scripts Tele plays other pieces of writer Lee stuff get registered with the Writers Guild of America fifty thousand most of which sucks, but a handful of which will become the movies that change our lives today on the show how a math! Loving movie nerd used a spreadsheet and an anonymous hotmail address to solve one of Hollywood's most fundamental problems, picking winners from a sea of garbage, and he may just have reinvented the power structure of Hollywood along the way. Support for this podcast and the following message come from OCTA A leader in identity driven security as the world shifts to a more remote work approach. Your employees need to securely access all your company data as well as connected thousands of applications, OCTA does just that empowering your employees to work remotely while also working smart, keeping their data, APPS and identity secure from anywhere learn more at O., K., T. A. dot com slash NPR. We're only months away from election day and every week or even every few hours. There's a new twist that could affect who will win the White House to keep up with the latest tune into the NPR. Politics podcast every to find out what happened and what it means for the election. It's two thousand and five Franklin Leonard a junior executive at Leonardo. DiCaprio's production company which sounds glamorous, but arguably he is a glorified script reader. WHO's boss's boss? Is Leonardo DiCaprio. Franklin's job is to help that boss. Find The next great movie for Leo, which means he is constantly reading movie scripts. Every junior executive lives in constant fear of the trade story that breaks about some exciting new script that they didn't know about that. Their bosses like. Like why didn't you know about this? Franklin is supposed to know about everything which is tough because there's this famous old saying in Hollywood. Nobody knows anything as in. It's really hard to know what movies are going to work. So if you do find something any piece of information that can help you gauge. What might work that information? Franklin is learning. That is Hollywood gold one of the things that drilled into your head. Is that information? Information is the most valuable thing. Yeah, and that information is to be protected and kept in house and exploitation of that information is how we in power and leverage like what little information you can manage, and then if it's kind of good, put up a wall as quickly as possible. That's exactly right. Movie scripts are a kind of information like the fundamental piece of information for a movie, and so Franklin's job is go out into the world. World and find undiscovered scripts before anybody else finding those scripts, though amongst the thousands and thousands being written every year it's a bit like walking into like the largest bookstore in the world, and every book has the exact same color. There's no cover art. There's no like publishers weekly. There's no reviews available to you, but your job is to walk into that sort of hyper anonymous bookstore and come out with the best books available That seems impossible. And Franklin says you can see how a problem emerges quickly in Hollywood people deal with this overwhelming amount of information by assuming they should reach for the same shelves of that anonymous bookstores they always do. They assume they should make the same kinds of movies written by the same kinds of people starring the same kinds of people. Yes, we are generally talking about white men people you soon because this has been the case for you thus far that are white writer who went to Dartmouth is better than a black writer who went to? To Clark Atlanta or Spelman, the conventional wisdom that you assume as wisdom is more often than not convention, and that is especially true in Hollywood where the convention has been created by people who are in no way, shape or form representative of the audience and consumer that they are trying to sell to Franklin. decided it was going to be part of his job. Try and find scripts outside of the conventions, well of course, also keeping an eye open for the next conventional blockbuster, which yeah was gonNA mean lots more reading the normal. Look. I've always been bit of a grind. My Competitive Advantage was my capacity to work, and so every weekend I would take home a banker's box full of scripts, but literally twenty five thirty screenplays, and try to read them all every Saturday afternoon. There is Franklin sitting on his couch. It is black sweatpants flipping through page after page after page hoping he's about to read a life changing story imagine if Christmas was every Saturday, but every Saturday. You ran downstairs and opened the box that you're most excited about, and it was socks. Because there is the possibility of getting everything that you ever wanted yeah. But there is the probability that it's. Socks most Saturdays and Sundays go like this Franklin tears into his Christmas scripts seven hours later. Frankland sitting in a pile of socks and the worst thing is when he goes into the office on Monday. His boss says you read anything good. And Franklin has to say no. It was as if he didn't do any work that weekend. Because most scripts are so bad, the Franklin would be in trouble for recommending them, and even if he is lucky enough to find a scripted, he loves he's really got to think about whether. Whether it is the right kind of thing for Leo's company like there was a script going around that year about a guy dealing with his interpersonal trauma by buying and dating a sex doll. It's easy to imagine reading that in saying Oh this is a really well observed human story, but imagine going into your boss's office and saying you should read this and when they ask you what it's about saying. This is what it's about Leonardo DiCaprio. I think you should play this role where you date of a doll like that's. That's a tough sell for the most confident among us. Franklin's breaking point came late one night. Do you remember his? He was in the office. It was dark outside, and he was supposed to go on vacation, and he just kept thinking about how he was inevitably going to end up drowning in bad scripts on vacation, and all of that work would generate nothing of actual value for his job and I remember, looking up and thinking. I. Don't know that this is sustainable and I need to come up with a solution. How is there not a better system for finding good screenplays? If you do the Friends of friends method, you end up with the Friends of friends scripts, and if you try this brute force thing, you're going to ruin your weekends, Andrew Vacation, plus you would need fifty more Franklin's to see all of the script anyway. And that's when it dawns on Franklin. There are more than fifty Franklin's in Hollywood got on. My desktop fired up my calendar and went through and looked at every single person who had a job similar to mine. Who I had had breakfast lunch, dinner or drinks with. If you had eavesdropped on those breakfasts and drinks, Franklin says you would have heard the junior executives ask each other this same question. Have you read anything good lately? Yes, these junior. Our competitors and yes, information is power and companies would probably not be jazzed about them sharing that information, but you know these are low level producers. They're doing each other favors, and it's all off the record anyway. Who is going to know about this and so Franklin figures? Let's see if anyone's read anything good lately. He opens up an email and he BBC's about seventy. Five of his fellow junior exacts, and so know hey. Similar of your ten favorite scripts in exchange I will send you the combined. Responses back. Did you say who you were like? I am a I am a mysterious junior executive. Say anything else, I do not believe that I did. I created an anonymous hotmail address. I believe it was blacklist. Two thousand five at Hotmail DOT com, he called it the blacklist partly to honor the blacklisted writers during the McCarthy era, and partly because he always hated the idea that the word black gets used to mean bad, so this blacklist was going to mean great screenplays. People would respond, but surprisingly responses started coming back. Maybe these other junior executives felt as stuck as Franklin. Maybe it was just this information bargain was was a good deal. I sure transcripts I get a whole list back there around ninety responses and every time somebody mentioned the same script Franklin treated that like a vote for that script, and he starts logging all of this into spreadsheet. Twenty five people voted for things. We lost in the fire by Allan Loeb Twenty. Four people mentioned Juno by cody. Fifteen votes Larson the real girl by Nancy Oliver Fourteen votes, Lars and the real girl that is the script about the guy and the sex. If, you were a junior executive. Thinking this is good, but is this good? I'm not important enough to risk bringing this to my boss. The blacklist was a way of saying you were right. It was good and here is a number. Instead of just your instincts fourteen votes, only living boy in New, York, by Allan, Loeb Charlie Wilson's war by earned Sorkin, Fan Burke and by the way a big deal in two thousand five. This wasn't just about finding undiscovered writers. It was any script that was great and not made. In a script called peacock by riders named Michael Lender and Ryan Roy the top ten of the very first blacklist thubten of the very first blacklist. Point the blacklist was just a spreadsheet that only Franklin could see, and he's about to send it back to all those other junior executives who contributed and he looks at it for a moment all of this normally off the record insider Hollywood Intel now written in a single place. He takes a deep breath. And he hit send. And then he packs up and heads off for vacation in Mexico and about a weekend vacation I went to the hotel of business center to check my email on like the public computer. And this lists have been forwarded back to me several dozen times. and everyone's like Oh my word of this team. Come from a lot of descriptions of sister. Good. Where where did this come from? What's your? What's your thought? It was terrifying. My thought is is that my career in Hollywood has a clock on it and the doomsday clock has just sped up. This anonymous list of the best unmade screenplays was blowing up. It had gone way beyond the small circle. It was initially sent to it even ended up covered the industry press, and so Franklin kept his down. He stayed anonymous and one day. He gets this call from an agent. Saying that his client has written this amazing script. It's perfect for Leo. It's like the usual call, except then the agent says hey. Don't tell anybody, but I have it on good authority that this ripped is going to be the number one script on next year's blacklist. I immediately thought to myself. That's interesting because I made the blacklist and I'm not making another one because I. DON'T WANNA get run out of town on rails. But I'm fascinated that you think that the speculative notion of your client scripting on the list is a sales tool for you. That must mean that this list that I created has

Franklin Hollywood Executive Franklin Leonard Leonardo Dicaprio LEO Writer Octa White House Writers Guild Of America Allan Loeb Leonardo NPR LEE BBC Andrew Vacation
"octa" Discussed on Pittsburgh's Paranormal Chasing Prophecy Radio Show

Pittsburgh's Paranormal Chasing Prophecy Radio Show

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on Pittsburgh's Paranormal Chasing Prophecy Radio Show

"I don't really know Ellen and when I don't know something on on on. Very honest about it. I really don't know I have done a lot of reading. and some of them are there's some theories that they're the Gen. which are kind of shadowy figures. believe from the Middle Eastern culture they really don't like humans too much or they're they kind of play their tricksters This particular one that I had, this is a different house than the OCTA plows him. It was a very tall, very tall, probably six foot shape of a woman dark dark that not only I saw but people who were guests in my home who I did not disclose that to They saw the same thing. She also emitted some kind of odor and and I would see it out of the corner of my eye would see you know just kind of like a shout out of the corner of my eye, and then I saw her full on. And? I. Told Her to get out and and she did. So. I have no idea why that happened but I had many strange things happen I don't usually talk about them. Because, you wrote the minded here. Very Peculiar but I've also in that same house I saw ferry. Appear to me and I kind of mischievous. Form. wasn't millennial malevolent at all and then I actually saw the previous owner of the house which I had never met. The woman was deceased. And I she came to through clairvoyance very strongly. I described her to a neighbor who had lived there for many many years much longer than I had, and she says, that sounds like the person who owned the House before. That's exactly the way you described her how she looked. And I said well, is she still alive? She said Oh no, she passed. A couple years ago? So I'm well acquainted. It was almost like a photograph that I saw with the owner you know clairvoyance. and sometimes images are that strong. It really depends how much you've developed clairvoyance. but there are times I even when I'm doing readings that it comes to me strongly. What was the odor? You. Heard. saw.

Middle Eastern OCTA Ellen
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 2 years ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
"octa" Discussed on Come to the Table

Come to the Table

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on Come to the Table

"In around the opportunity to have your maker mistake of you will suffer the consequences as you alluded to see. But then do they grow from it? At least that's GonNa live impression that I get. Can you kind of speak to your experiences around inmates? In in those people in those experts I talk for a long time. But maybe you're gonNA give a little bit of time on on that subject. What would you say about it? I think the questionnaires. What do I think about the prison system in a more? The people like the people that are there in prison. The people that have gone you will at a system itself. It's more the people that I would be curious about what you think about. Okay well beings that I came up as a runaway on the street I can relate to why a lot of people OCTA and why the female population has expanded in the prison system and why the children are now part of the prison system and this may sound a little corny but when you come to prison that's one eight one to pick up a Bible. That's what they wanted. Join the religious church services and go on and when I move around and I speak to them they have never heard of Jesus they never heard of Jehovah Day only heard of pain agony. I gotta get it for the next person. Get it or I'm going to get out this mess the best way. I know how I'm gonNA blame somebody else and sometimes even love has been. I'll take the fall for you. And those people had taken reform and was promised commissary money on books commissary calmest areas when they put money annuals. And you can buy underwear socks food. It doesn't it doesn't happen. Everybody that I had met in the bottom line is that they need it to be meted. They need it to be one and there was no one there but the sewer of society if you will and they bring you in for their reasons but at least you belong.

OCTA
No prayer, no justice with Pete Greig

Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

09:53 min | 2 years ago

No prayer, no justice with Pete Greig

"Hello and welcome to the together. Podcast conversation about faith justice how to change the world. I'm Don and today I'm joined remotely by Cat and Chris how you guys doing. Yeah so we're trying to recall this remotely so it might have to kind of feel the Z. Meeting where we will interrupt each other and everybody. Everybody says no Yuko common phrase in the English dictionary they have to offer. You have to get really solid. Should be appointed leader. You just how everyone wants to do every single cigars how how you doing. What's your. What's your view like right in this moment? So we're working from home and do you have a good little south there. Yeah I've gone inflatable. Jesus next to me Nice context or just I just I just put him in there to just keep me company so I feel like I've got some workers. Excuse this yeah. I'm still your coworker by not having been actually in my little music station where normally record at home so nice very home for me. Yeah this is. This must be familiar for you. Sat there if you just start in some freestyle staff just because you're in the zone and that's absolutely fine. I think that's go- keyboard as well. Let's go for it. How prepared as everybody knows. He's listening to this where we're in lockdown currently just heading into week four of lockdown guys. What would your one top tip be for for anybody in this situation? Either to keep them saying. Keep them entertained to keep that routine. What would your tip be if you were to give someone a tip if you were to travel back in time for weeks and say to someone that this is coming. This is my one bit for device. Fear what would that be stuck up on toilet row? You'd be that person to left so we go brave shops fine now. There's loads of them there as well. They're just make the mice of light the outdoors. What's the outdoors magical place that I guess? Your question is what their advice would be before lockdown or during OCTA down town. Yeah I think I think definitely like utilizing your one one more day because I did miss a couple. That was a time. I Wen- went out on Saturday and then didn't go out again until the following Saturday and that felt ways. That is extremely down is mine would be to start your car. You never know. It's just GonNa say it once a day but don't shouldn't you like run it for a while as well because he just started and turn off at actually die for a little bit because obviously needed to get supplies say that part is important but in terms of like an actual like like psychological spiritual thing for you to help you life. I'd say give yourself a grace is retained great for now. Of course I think is really important. Everyone tries to get routine. But if you don't not one day by the end of the world was talking to my cousin. Struggle moves like putting on weight. Meanwhile disguise like he's skinny but yeah. I think yeah a little bit more than you normally do like fine. Don't worry I like Chris. I really needed to hear that because I've been struggling to get up in the morning. I think my my two bits of advice. I one is similar to what you were just saying. But I don't know about you guys when you wake up. Naveh shower wherever you come to get dressed. The temptation to put on the jogging bottoms is strong. My advice would a always reach for the jeans or or you could go smarter and just go. Trousers like full-on save by. I think I think just getting wearing clothes that you would wear out does helps me get ready in the right frame of mind. So that's that's one kind of half joke but also have serious. I think the one that someone shared as many words use everyday call someone. You haven't spoken to in three months and so there's quite good now jumping on zoom cores in house party and that kind of thing and talking to the people that we would see every day and that's important But really this also provides us the opportunity to get back in touch with people. We haven't spoken to for a while checking them say. Hey so that might be a fan core even dropping a text or anything and so. That's been quite good because it's been my mind okay. Who who should I do? Should I take a call today? And then you kind of build up. Some momentum happened in that for over a week now and then you start up conversations with people you haven't spoken to you for a while so definitely worth worth trying that one out. That's really grow their start off. That's so they go guys. There's some advice fee listening out there in lockdown but that was just waffle. Because I know you've been waiting for the the pivotal moment in the cast. Is CATS QUESTIONS SECA? Everybody who's WHO's waiting for. This was going to say out of their misery. They're awaiting such excitement. Put them out of their excitement cat. What is today's cats questions? Well I feel like Chris missed out on one last week. It actually has come from last week's question. Technically the question that Donald Smith came about the the sources in the fridge or in the coverage so then I saw the the the popular COMBI Ketchup on May. What do you guys think about that fully behind the I o back that until the day I die so it was the question. Would I combine the two off with story number? Yeah what do you think about the Combi of catch up on the massive financially okay? We'll see this is not going to wear. That was two thousand. I thank the Combo wrong. Okay Chrissie pretend that you hate all. I'll say that I like it and that makes better listening. But now I think particularly so my if I have potato wedges than I'm a massive fan I don't necessarily mix the two sources so have catch up on one side in a catch-up area and Mayor Mayor area but over time I will kind of dip in water and dip in the other and so there is a bit of cross contamination by the I have to mix it all in now we now we get into the French. What are you playing around you? Just get it in that and a mix up percent homemade burger sous why I normally would like my first chip will be will be the one that is blessed to be the mixer and Mitch over. My first chip is usually the one where the my slavers were Say I've got a lockdown special question question if if you could only have one streaming platform from now. What would it be Youtube? Oh Art and eat meat. I didn't even think about Youtube. I was thinking was thinking more. You're paid for services. Bedtime occurs tightly. Yeah if we're talking like free as definitely Youtube paid services I think is between spotify and Net flix. Yeah nobody listen to as much music since I've been stuck in the house. So maybe I think for me. I'm between net flicks and Disney plus because on the partic- plus we're going through the marvel films in order of release guy say currently on Captain America. So I think if I lost that now the devastation equally with net flicks. I need to find out what happens to carol by skin. So three episodes four episodes of targeting with about three episodes left so yeah I think I think it would be between those two if I had to probably Disney plus just until I finish marble. Wild is big so huge. Yeah plus frozen to say what is the deal with Thai King on Comey actually of unique? Because everyone everyone has been telling me to watch it and then so we sat down and watched the trailer yesterday. And it just looks. Renders is marred. It's it's something that you couldn't possibly Ri- I'm only four episodes in but the twists and the complexity and the characters kind of characters. They're real people. Surprisingly people popping up from nowhere and then seventy just becoming major characters in this in this real life story.

Chris Disney Youtube Yuko DON Octa Donald Smith WEN Comey Chrissie Spotify Captain America Mitch
Why Front's Series C matters

Equity

09:11 min | 2 years ago

Why Front's Series C matters

"I'm Alex Wilhelm and once again I have have denny Crichton with me Danny how are you doing. I'm doing awesome. That is that's enthusiasm. You are back in New York. I'm in Providence and I have to say I've I've had enough of this shit. I want some summer but the good news is despite the terrible weather and the time of the year. There is a gazillion things to get to. So I'm going to skip the usual faffing about and jump bright in. I'm going to start the show with front which I need you to explain to me why this particular funding round was such a big deal. Right you'RE GONNA kick off the entire show that so start with why. Hi the Health Care Front. Raise fifty nine million dollars in series C and Here's here's the deal. They didn't have a lead. They had no investors. There no lead V. V. C. WE KNOW Vision Fund. No no sequoia. Although Sequeira did the series B. on they actually lead with a couple of really prominent be to be CEO and founder so lasting Cassia and founder Mike Cannon Brookes octa CEO and Co founder Frederick Harassed Multiplex Co founder and CEO. Ryan Smith Zoom CEO. Eric Yuen. What's interesting here here is is? We're getting to these late. Stage growth rounds at a time when there's more growth money than ever and basically said now we're good we're just gonNA take from really prominent angels. Who all of that exited you know? Kind of startups and. So what's interesting here is twofold one is one the dynamic. VC industry which we can talk about more but to actually kind of the strategy here of front is a B. Two B. Product Arctic. Selling to other kind of B2B startups and so by taking this money from other kind of B. Two B. Sales centered Start founders and see IOS. They're really kind of like buying. I'm from their own customers so to speak right synchronicity. That's connecting the two together. So the fifty nine million dollar round had no lead. VC there was no like Kleiner liner coming in here right in the big check. I'm curious do you think that the disease that previously invested got pro rata in this round or do think it was all just money from these I guess executives turned angels. I think they've got Harada me. I don't think it was in the press. Release that they did but I am sure they did. I'm also not entirely clear that these folks took the entire round. I mean there could have been nate. Twenty or twenty five million dollars slug from around that was announced yama funding from a farm that was announced But nonetheless like the fact that it was positioned this way If you imagine in ten years ago this sort of round first of all wouldn't exist but this ground where we would said Oh a bunch of angels came in late stage. It'd be like well. This company must be doing terribly wrong Novi. ABC was willing to lead the round. Things have changed so much. That founder can literally say God. We got a couple of individuals around at the party. At the craps table they put in fifty nine million bucks. We're going wow unbelievable. They said no to everyone. It's amazing change in time. It is but also I'm kind of embarrassed by the number of people I know on this list. Like I know Frederick a little bit I know Ryan a little but I know Eric a little bit. I think I've met J. I mean I think I need to change industry industries because the the same eight people keep coming up. That's embarrassing to me. I need any new friends. Let's talk about what the company does front is be messaging kind of calms thing. It looks like email works for teams. I'm assuming this is kind of product aimed at customer support customer success kind of groups. Yes affront fronts. Innovation was really for a lot of top companies they have an email like support at techcrunch dot com or press at at Google Dot Com. Which is actually how we reach out to right? And so when that goes into Press Google Dot com on that actually gets centered and moved around the the thousands of people who are in Google Google to figure out how to respond to it. So if he's coming from an ad tech crunch email address like from us he goes to our tech crunch contact if it goes to APEC Asia. Pacific it'll go to someone who's live overnight overnight overseas and so basically thousands of people are accessing the same email inbox and so. Have you ever tried to do your own inbox with g million. No it's basically impossible with one goddamn person on the box. Now you had an hundreds of people all of whom are interacting with the same emails etc and suddenly. It's just a complete mess front. Took that and said Hey. What have we built in box from? Scratch zooming that. There are thousands of people or hundreds of people reading the same tickets reading the same emails. And how can we respond to it. Really really effectively. Huge problem tons of companies have it. They've been super successful. It's only a couple years old and what's interesting is actually the the founders are French It actually has a large Parisian office one founder Laurent Had A decade and enterprise. And then WHO's also female be to be founder of rare breed unfortunately in the industry who CEO up and she. She kind of came out of her master's disagree in two thousand twelve and dived into this and front. So it's a five year. Old Company raised one hundred thirty eight almost one hundred forty million bucks. An insane amount of money ended the speed was raise capitals crazy because their series of ten million was back in May of two thousand sixteen. Then Bam sixty six million early eighteen and then two years later fifty nine million so really. It's pretty frontloaded or backloaded. I'm sorry to kind of where we are in time now. I'm curious to see how much more capital they'll need to scale this to IPO. It's already kind of there. But certainly a lot of star power a lot of customers on this new investment and. I'm kind of curious that this is a trend that will see a flex from companies. That were so hot. We don't even need venture capital all the real stars of our industry the money in It's certainly a new way to approach it absolutely. I think one of the key lessons here at least for me was a company that really figured out product market fit super early on You know if you look at it was founded Five years ago it took two years to build out so uncork. Capital is sort of a firm that argues it focuses on product market fit. They raised three point. One million seed in October two thousand fourteen and then once they sort of got this product market fit. And it's sort of obvious today but looking back in time the idea that there d the SASS product to fix this team oriented email. inbox was sort of not a concept of. Now it's just scaling right it's all sales scaling And so we're seeing the rounds. Get faster and faster. Because they're repeated you you know the sales are repeating assuming the growth is repeating internally. The numbers look great. It's sort of classic SAS business I expect us to see as one hundred millionaire our club as you call it hopefully in the next year or two that there hasn't been announcement around the revenues but I expect it to constitute here about their W. two and a half year over year now has a pretty quickly quickly there probably. I Dunno just guessing. You're twenty thirty million era or somewhere in there and they'll be largest soon enough. Let's talk about the couple world through a different Lens. Though you have been looking at Tau really large funds cutting smaller and smaller Jackson. We're talking about funds at have billions in assets under management writing five seven million dollar checks which seems to make no oh sense. According to the old model of larger funds larger textile works otherwise. They can't really disburse the capital. But that's changing and I want you to tell you why because to fascinating fascinating kind of like nuance about today's venture capital market. Absolutely free front is a great example of this right. So here's a fifty nine million dollar check that no growth stage investor mister. WHO has a billion dollars ready to deploy was able to invest it and so we're seeing once again The largest funds billions of dollars. We had we talked about last week. Show I think we had twenty-one fundraisers that were over five hundred million last year. It was ninety one somewhere in that category so a ton of money deployed and so the idea that you would do early. Stage investments is nuts. Because you can't deploy million dollars a thousand times a year and so the challenges is like. Why are people doing this when I started asking if he sees the answer was well once the the cap tables in the series B and D are out there? They're locked it in a sequeira already in the a benchmarks already in the a founders fund the and they have the capital to deploy in the B A C D E F g all the way through the Sesame Street Alphabet All the way through and so by the time you get to the D. you have no access or in the case of front. No one had access suicide. Basically you have to lock in earlier in earlier and so even if you're the Softbank Vision Fund you WanNa throw four hundred million dollars in series d you have to be in the seed or the series. He's A to start to lock in that Barada to start locking in those early ownership rights. It just gives you more ball control later on because other people are going to kind of knock you out of the way to get around in place and so there's sort of this paradox. Where we're seeing? You know the the largest latest stage funds doing the smallest early stage rows and so that that was a really interesting dynamic that we haven't seen before yeah and the one thing to keep in mind that when I was learning about the BBC World you know maybe a decade ago. Now I was always told that if you couldn't find a new lead investor for the proximate round the next one. It was a very bad signal because it would imply that no one else in the market one to lead your Siri seafood areas to be and having Europe preceding investors. That were leads lead. Your next around was a very bad thing. Now it's entirely flipped on its head because capital is sufficiently unscarred so ample so much flowing around the people want to stay in a company. Preempt preempt that next round they want to lead be and then the as much of the capital to work as they can on a winner to ensure that they can return enough capital to make their large fund contractive enough to raise a second one. So it's a facet of there. Being too much money in the market is certainly a change. Compared to how things used to work it's actually an inversion but it just goes to show how in twenty twenty the way the world works certainly is at least in my experience new. I'm maybe it was like this back in the late. Ninety something but certainly it feels like a new chapter and I presume zoom. Welcome back to what used to be normal when there's less capital around but I don't see that happening for the next eighteen twenty four thirty six months so this this is the way it's going to be Danny presented for the next while.

Founder CEO Eric Yuen Danny Ryan Smith Founder And Ceo Health Care Front Google New York Providence Alex Wilhelm Vision Fund Denny Crichton Sequeira Harada Novi
"octa" Discussed on The Practical Wanderlust Podcast

The Practical Wanderlust Podcast

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on The Practical Wanderlust Podcast

"Hey man what's up. I'm like always right. I know how you think you're always right but like I am though. I don't like sitting talking about today. We're talking about MONTJEU P to your favorite podcast. High really a Jeremy where the accident prone travelers behind tactical wander less. We're here to dish out. Travel tips tips tricks. USEFUL TRIVIA USELESS TRIVIA mildly entertaining anecdotes and everything else. You need to avoid making all of our terrible terrible terrible terrible the stakes and we make a lot of mistakes. The last time we left off having just completed a thirty four hour journey across two hundred and eighty eighty nine miles. Can't be right. No Dude two hundred and eighty nine miles. That's an average of eight and a half miles per hour while we were biking really fast. Speed walking sessions though. Yeah no it was. It was quite an ordeal but we finally ended up in voyeurs and I was excited. I wanted to hike to the stunning OCTA waterfall. Paul also.

MONTJEU P OCTA Jeremy Paul
"octa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"octa" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The spring of eighty five or the winter of eighty five an octa poco so the last time was was so is the in the eighties Paul time during the eighties now yes there could have been the last time was often the air was up in the air coming back from Arizona so were you alive back then geo I yeah five eighty nine I was there was room for a grid green eighty five I'll never forget the restaurant greasewood flats we would fly through restaurateurs on on when I was with the growing pains and I was with the Pomeroy's that I'll never forget it and it never played mentally on you that it's happened before like after it did happen to you when you had to use a public bathroom the next time where you had the feeling in public you didn't think I always will be needed in the past but very recently my body has one will that happen again I it almost happened to me going to LA well you told me yeah yeah just now for the Superbowl commercial right yeah almost happened but it didn't you shut it down now I was able to like I don't move around get up and walk around a little bit and everything kind of settle down a little bit tacos amazing so the last time that you went in a public place which is a airplane bathroom which was not a hotel room of course I can write all that I mean that's where I was when I was seven years old yeah thirty years ago yeah three decades yeah tacos Mexican meat yeah gotcha it's a great I mean you know why is it so hard to understand it because all of us my god I mean I know it's a natural human function I get it but I just as all of us have been really bad spots like really bad spots with that I got a I you know now I buy get myself into a bad spot after this conversation I'll be very angry you guys follow you I don't think that our discussion is going to spur on one of the not a good wow why I would be disappointed that causes a street for the eighty is prepping for a colonoscopy evidently now I'm not but if anybody has ever been taka poco they know what I'm talking about the used to be at a store down there called I could show yeah and it was like everything was labeled as everything was like it was like all heavy cotton stuff like jackets and shirts and shorts and all that kind of stuff and that about the middle back man I would not I would not want to go into that after I was nobody has since exactly the boomer Georgia Otto yeah course yeah do you know where they are counting the money and doing the you know what they're doing to the drug deals behind the stall with the bathroom yes and then you have to go through that sold about them of what it looks like that's what that's what the bathroom looked like they were I was tacos Mexican meet big bowel movements are right okay you guys are great and shave off or are always got some Fauria sportsmen and they'll come right I thought I just had some for you know you something else all right all right it's a new year and it's a great time for business owners.

"octa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Octa Liederman, and my uncle suffered from radical surgery for prostate cancer doctor Lieberman believes men want high success rates to avoid radical and robotic surgery and maintain sexual and urinary control like me for prostate cancer screening and treatment called to onto choices free booklet DVD to call Dr Liederman, two one two choices to onto choices for your appointment and to see great data. It changed my life. Most insurances Medicare Medicaid accepted. Thirteen eighty four Broadway at thirty eighth, call Dr Liederman to onto choices. Glad I did many people with cancer come to Dr Liederman when surgery didn't help and toxic chemo stopped working many come in pain. Many people with cancer come to Dr Liederman when their caregiver has no more care to offer Dr Liederman, bringing innovative cancer care for decades when the next cancer drug is not as promised when surgery was the failed pass. We. May be able to offer you new cancer treatment options. We treat new and recurrent cancers small or large most anywhere in the body, even if prior chemo, radiation, or surgery didn't work call, Dr Liederman two and two choices to and future for a free booklet DVD thirty eighth and Broadway. Most insurances, Medicare, Medicaid accepted Harvard train triple board, certified doctor Liederman, two and two choices to one two choices for innovative cancer treatment. This is to meet Dr Liederman in-person, call two and two choices to.

"octa" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Spelling, bee champions. Got to be honest with you guys. There's no way there should be eight champions. Right and less. It's different age groups weight classes things of that nature. Right. Eight champions, really? I was very happy when I mean, yes, there was a chance that we could be often champs octa champs. Can you spell that they ran out of words that was what we ran out of words? How do you run out of words again start making up words? Flip. None ukulele. Do how do you spell it? I don't know. I was hoping you could tell me and then just tell them how you're out, right? Flip a coin do something. Do something octa champs. No could you imagine? So last night, the NBA finals kicked off in Toronto, the different form, basketball or the square ball. And it's like a three second shot clock and, you know, they've got, you know, this just different but Toronto, well, could you imagine at the end of the thing that says, you know, we're going to give everybody who participated in the playoffs trophies? Right. We ran out of basketball, so we can't play anymore. You guys are both champs doesn't work that way. It's silly. If you had different age groups, I'm fine with that. If you had, like ten and under twelve and under fourteen hundred sixteen hundred. Okay. That's totally different. Nope. Nope, there's no way there should be eight champions. I that's just my, my doing. This is the everybody gets a trophy BS. We, you could have gone on to Google and found some words, right? You could have done it. You should have been prepared three two three five three twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow. Is your Twitter. You could tweet at us love hearing from you. Happy friday. Hey, I'm working with an amazing organization kids. I want you guys understand this called wounded Paul people going what. Explain to me. What wounded pause? So what they do is they go to kill shelters. Right. And they go, and they find dogs, that would be, essentially, you know, put to sleep within hours. They rescue them. They train them to be service dogs, and then they get them to people who need it veterans. First responders and their families twenty Veterans Day, commit suicide. And this is a great way to help save Paul and, and save a hero. It is awesome. What they do. Now what they're looking for is a car that you don't use a truck and RV even a boat something in storage, not using it, and you're like I'm never going to use this thing. And I was going to sell it, but I'm not getting a lot..

basketball Paul Toronto octa Twitter NBA Google Chadbensonshow three second
Oculus Quest taunts some customers after arriving more than two weeks early

The Vergecast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

Oculus Quest taunts some customers after arriving more than two weeks early

"Oculus finally announced the octa this quest which we've been hearing about forever, and he wrote a great review of it. She says it's a little compromised, which is true. I actually got to try one a couple of weeks ago outside of like the Facebook world as an a conference in somebody had one and the allied me like play with it on the sly. It's great like this is the ga-. This is the next I'm going to buy for sure it's self contained VR like it does the thing you you put it on. You don't need any wires cables or a gaming PC. You it has inside out tracking cameras. And the does this really cool thing where to create the space around you that you can operate in it lights up the front cameras. You can see the world. And then you just paint lines on the ground in VR to be like, this is the space that you should put the interface in which is awesome. And then it just works. Let's have been worked. I was at a busy conference, and it was like complicated and it. Figured out the inside out tracking in that space. So it was like pretty cool, and it works is it getting rid of that cable is like a big deal. I know I don't pods all the time. But it is true. Getting rid of heavy cables attached to your head is a notable improvement in the user experience of things I own a Oculus go, and it's not just the cable. I mean in because they're also launching the the rift is s. Yeah. So that also has inside out tracking. But like my problems always been I typically have a small room. And so you've got to set up the cameras and then stand far enough back from the cameras, and so your room has to have a perfect layout.

Oculus GA Facebook
Ikea Debuts First City Store: You Take Home Nothing

Business Wars Daily

04:20 min | 3 years ago

Ikea Debuts First City Store: You Take Home Nothing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. Happy Friday, everyone there's big money to be made in thinking small or so it seems for my KIA's latest announcement the huge Swedish home goods and furniture company is opening a miniscule Manhattan store designed for New Yorkers who live in tiny spaces. It's a truism of city life the tiny your apartment, it seems the more stuff you need to keep it organized. And so I ki- is newest urban stores really a showroom. Call the planning studio it gives city dwellers interior design ideas intended to make their cramped quarters seem spacious that's exactly opposite of the retail strategy. I ki- has so carefully cultivated for decades. You know, the company with the gargantuan suburban warehouse where you can find just about anything you can eat, and you can lug virtually all of it home yourself from couches to dining room sets to entire kitchens of. Of course, you got to have a car or truck that strategy doesn't work on the subway new. I key marketing so carefully notes in the new store at the new Manhattan location. In fact, you can't take anything home yourself, not even small, vases and lamps that look like you could tuck under your arm. All you can do is look dream plan and order, I will deliver your things to you. The new store opened on tax day just in time for all those tax refunds in Manhattan's upper east side, it's the first of about thirty plant city centre locations, the company reportedly made the decision to make the store showroom by talking to city dwellers about how they actually shop. It's a necessary pivot for the decades old company. I key is profits are down as customers decide that online shopping may just be more convenient than schlepping through KIA's mammoth stores this plan should help Kia reinvigorated self by appealing to millennials consumers. Herb. Urbanites are naturally less likely than their suburban counterparts to own cars. But car ownership is down across the board for millennials no matter where they live. And so I ki- is delivery. Only stores are clearly designed to attract an entirely new set of customers. One caveat. However delivery is expected to cost at least thirty nine dollars and possibly fifty nine dollars or higher with customers of online furniture sites. Like Wayfair accustomed to free shipping Kia could be in for a shock. If customers balk one thing that will remain the same as I keep pivots to the city shoppers will still have to assemble all that furniture themselves. Armed only with Allen wrenches and presumably some good beer. From one this business wars daily this week's episodes were written edited and produced by lane Appleton grant, Emma Cortlandt is our editor producer, our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by or non Lopez for wondering, I'm David Brown. We'll see next week. This episode of business worse. Daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist Marc injuries in. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

KIA Manhattan David Brown PO Marc Injuries Allen Lane Appleton Emma Cortlandt Marshall Louis Lopez Executive Producer Editor Producer Thirty Nine Dollars Fifty Nine Dollars
Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

Business Wars Daily

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, April twenty fifth. Hey, alexa. I'd like to buy a motorcycle. And no, I haven't done that. But the day may soon come when we'll all be shopping on our speakers while so far only a small number of some five or six percent of actually bought anything by calling out. Hey, Alexa, or, hey. Google market watchers predict the audio shopping industry will be worth forty billion dollars by twenty twenty two. That's in part because of the explosion of on demand. Audio from our homes to our cars to our mobile devices. We're listening to more and more podcasts and other kinds of streaming media. You could say Audio's having its day for big brands, especially those that don't have a physical product that. You can actually see this means it's time to think about designing logos for the ear. Take a listen. That was the new sound of MasterCard the gigantic payment processor released earlier this year it used what else an audio press. Release to explain why corporate leaders felt it was so important to create a sonic identity. One reason to be ready when the smart speaker shopping revolution takes hold the sound. You heard is just one iteration of a ninety second music anthem MasterCard is localizing the theme all over the world. And also producing sounds and even vibrations that occur when you use your smartphone to shop with MasterCard. The company hopes that like a visual logo, it's sonic logo will create instant recall its way finding for the twenty-first audio storytelling century, or as we put it. It's the process of distilling a multi million dollar brand into a few seconds of sound MasterCard generated a lot of buzz with at sonic logo launch. But it's actual. Really late to the party its fiercest rival visa on its own sonic logo and associated mobile. Sounds and sessions early last year in the absence of old cash. Register clinks customers want to hear something that signifies a successful transaction the company says intervals sonic logo split-second. Tune that plays after you've successfully parted with your purchase cash. And then there's this as smart speaker use grows audio shopping becomes second nature. There's nothing to look at while you shop the obvious problem for brands on a smart speaker visual logo has no place but the audio logo certainly does musicians. Take notice is a whole new market out. There waiting for. You is just that. You're tunes could be awfully short. From wondering this is business wars daily. We'd love to know more about you. And we'd be so grateful if you could answer just a few questions visit wondering dot com slash survey. And thanks so much. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zero to PO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Mastercard Alexa David Brown PO Marc Andreessen Google Twenty Twenty Forty Billion Dollars Million Dollar Ninety Second Twenty Fifth Six Percent
"octa" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KOMO

"Experienced casper for yourself. You'll understand why casper mattress owners have such an optimistic outlook on life. PC? Casper is all about delivering a great night's sleep. So you wake up feeling good ready to take on whatever the day. Throws your way stepped in a puddle extra parachutes in your bag flat tire. It's a gorgeous data octa work favorite taco stands closed. No problem pizzas. Right. Next door. The great night's sleep comes from the casper mattresses four layers of pressure relieving phone it's softer under your shoulders and firmer under your hips for healthy alignment and extra support plus the breathable foams are designed to keep you cool while you sleep casper ships directly to your door in a compact box. And every mattress comes with a one hundred nights risk free guarantee with bedding bed frames and even dog beds. Casper has everything you need to create the perfect sleep environment. So good, casper dot com now and enjoy free shipping and returns on all mattresses. That's casper dot com. Additional fees may apply for Lasca in Hawaii. Terms and conditions apply. No an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive. Gotta take these off, right? What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. Traumatic.

Casper Lasca Hawaii
"octa" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Know, a little bit of. Installation possibly on the windows. But you know, without actually looking at it. You don't know. I don't know if the company that you had install them was that was that somebody else. Someone else. Okay. Yeah. I mean, you could address it that way. But yeah, there's a lot of information online regarding condensation, and when and where it can and can't happen. I mean, it was getting to the point where we got really cold. Like we had we had ice build up and then huddles forming and then ruining awarded wooded. Based on the inside share. We were constantly shopping up the windows getting rid of the moisture, so there wouldn't windows. Correct. That were replaced. Yeah. They were replaced wooden ones were replaced. Okay. Okay. They're replaced with vinyl materials. Okay. There's a lot of information online with condensation, but there's a myriad of reasons as to why it could actually physically happen. There may not be anything wrong with the windows per se. If the windows could produce humidity, and if the windows could produce moisture would be selling them in the desert all day long. So it's the circumstances around the windows that are causing it for sure. Yeah. And just to piggyback on the a lot of times, it'll be the your older windows, the air infiltration, the windows are just breathing crazy. And then so you seal it up with an efficient window. Let's say a dual paned window. And now you start their infiltrations. So the air isn't moving in and out the hitting the colder glass and common saving Benjamin. Due triple pane windows help with that as far as keeping the glass, a little bit warmer the inside pane of glass. So you don't get that that patient very much show triple pane window is the way to go nowadays when it comes to window replacements. Triple pane is gonna inside edge. Temperature glasses gonna be about fourteen degrees warmer than compared to a new double pane product. So big difference with the triple pains. So what would you do get the installers back in that's a possibility? But the other thing is you get a high Gromit or a high grammar is actually something that tells you the exact level of humidity. That's within that house and room to room could be slightly different. Got the cigarette can be back for one four seven nine nine one six twenty accurate mortgage, talk and text line fix it show. WTMJ? I'm Brett octa.

Brett octa fourteen degrees
"octa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:13 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Idea we had come across during the course of octa Matic in. This is the single hardest thing about developing an internet business was just the the business leaders and the accepting money. Yeah. It's it's it seemed like a really important problem. And we thought there should be something really easy folks from developers instant setup to that people started to starting accepting money. But on the other hand what we know. Right. We're the we're these two college students. Yes. So maybe the financial system had it all figured out. And we were these these impetuous youngsters at with the wrong ideas. So let me understand try to understand what that would take us back to two thousand nine. I mean, I remember using Amazon, and you know, buying stuff from Amazon and for me as a customer, it was seemed fairly friction less. You know, I just hit click to to buy it would be delivered a couple of days later. That's exactly is. And I think that's part of why it didn't get solved is that as a customer, everything seemed fine. Yeah. And then you talk to anyone who had to run business, and in particular, an internet business, and they would talk your ear off Hopley about it. I mean, the kind of the stories they would tell you oftentimes they will tell you is the single hardest thing about getting their business off the ground because the providers that at the time was often through banks. They were the gatekeepers. They were the people that said, yes, you can have an online business or or. No, you can't and so much more important step in that regard. I mean, it's funny when we go to investors early on for stripe. They would say, you know, it seems pretty solid two thousand nine like, I think we have this internet payments thing down, and they will do some asking around. And that's when they got us. Right. So you so if you were starting internet business in two thousand nine when when this idea came to you what you want to accept payments. Let's say you had a business selling, oh, I don't know. The homemade peanut butter that you would ship to people. It was hard. It would have been really hard to set up a way to accept payments through your site. And it's hard to imagine that it could have been the case. And Kyrie there must be some reasonable answer to this. Some some, you know, easy to use piece of software, and we just weren't finding it. But we came to realize is that because it was financial that sort of technology companies were very hesitant to go unaddressed. Why why would they be hesitant because you feel with partnerships with financial institutions regulation and risk controls and making sure that things are done compliantly, and it becomes then very complicated. Figure out how to offer that service internationally. And so the fact that you had to kind of spend these multiple sectors and deal with all these different constraints with figure out a better way to do payments technology companies, startups, tended and still tend I mean for understandable reasons to kind of shy away from from problems. You have to solve a lot of hard problems in multiple domain. Yeah. And then coupled to that was the fact that in pave Alexander did. Yeah. And I think for a while back in the early days of pay pal people thought that was going to solve this. So you guys had a couple hundred thousand bucks from the sale of automatic. And obviously, you had the coding chops in the technology chops, but you did not have any money. How were you able to to get money to to fuel the ambitions of this company? One of the things that Silicon Valley does. Well, is it probably has the patron. I now travel to a decent number of other places in stripe has offices around the world and Dublin London Singapore in places like this. But I think Silicon Valley is probably the best place in terms of the risk tolerance of the investments capital. That's available. If we could get people convinced of the opportunity, and if we could show people that initial early customer traction. And how much it resonated with the target, Marcus? They were actually willing to take a bass. Despite the fact, I mean when you look back on it. There was a vast amount of uncertainty in every other aspect of the execution between Patrick might be able to get visas for the United States to work here. Would we be able to hire two part with a long-term financial partnership structure and things like that? Look like, the people are willing to look past all of those things. Yeah. She the opportunity. What would I I wonder is when you mean, you had an advantage when you when you started meeting with investors, I'm assuming because you had already started and sold a business and a lot of investors love that they love to see that experience. But did they ask you where you asked tough questions by potential investors? Like, for example. You know, you guys are really young. How are you going to manage people or you don't have any connections or involvement in the financial industry? Our back. Did you get questions? Like that. Surprisingly now, I think people are used to that in Silicon Valley. I mean by the time people become famous because because the thing they worked on succeeded. They tend to be older, but I think the mental image. We have of people who do successful things is like ten to twenty years, maybe even more older than the ages at which they tend to have actually done, right, and VC's and investors and just people in general in Silicon Valley, I think are unusually.

Silicon Valley Amazon Hopley Dublin London Singapore United States Alexander Marcus Patrick twenty years
"octa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

09:36 min | 3 years ago

"octa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"January seventeenth from six to eight PM. What a nice gift for people can't argue with that. What a nice gift to people had spent any time here in the in the greater Boston area. They're not gonna be able to be with us much longer. If you want to sneak in a phone call, I know a couple of callers to put you on hold during the course of the news if you want to sneak in a call before they leave six one seven two five four ten thirty is the number six one seven two five four ten thirty or eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty s a toll free number eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty and you hinted at this earlier, Brian and everybody asked you as you were putting this book together. What were your favorite ads, and perhaps what were the things you discovered? A maybe rediscovered about Boston and its cultural life in that period that you were able to focus on only because you were doing this specific book. Wow. That's a tough one. My favorite ads went here for. Let's see. Well. So there are there ones that I love because I was there. So there's this one the tedious mob. Local hip hop group performed at Tower Records November in nineteen Eighty-eight. Oh, my I was there. And it was this right? When I came back to town for the second time, it's a very homespun flyer. It's not very doesn't have a high production value. But so so that was important to like, I I I remember that show is in the same way that there are other shows in here that I I remember. But so that was that's one that I love just looking through here. Some of the ones let's see that. I I wasn't even here's a great Skippy whites at everyone knows and Skippy yet, again, we were talking about places that are still around Skippy has one store left. He's over an Eggleston, but he's still going strong. If you go down there. I don't think he's opened Sunday. As but pretty much any day. Skip you'll be there, and he'd be happy to talk to you about music for hours and hours. And so I personally am thankful that he's still here in the same way that David is is a resource for me. If I have a question about something Skippy is absolutely encyclopedic. When it comes to gospel music, and Rb and see this is why it's fun talking guys because we get to go off on tangents, and you mentioned skip white. It's a wonderful thing to push a couple of buttons and get recordings from anywhere in the world. But you lose that a music same expression. I use early in a different context. I think he lose that sense of adventure at an exploration would people would be pouring through record stores looking for that odd recording that unique album that was tucked away in a corner and in doing that talking to people like the Skippy whites of the world as opposed to now someone will download a piece of music, and in in you, you, you you you don't you don't know nothing. About the the group of the performer anything else. So then you you've played thirty seconds of the song. And you like it now. But but in the process, I think something was lost one of the great things though. That's emblematic of the ad that Brian has for Skippy. Whites is the caricature of Skippy and the slogan, which is just helmet. And if you can home. Tell you. What record? It is your humming. That's not a joke either. He will do it must now pay isn't that isn't that? What what you've got so many sound hound. And so many other things can do almost it's not the same. I again, I've told this story before and it's something lost that the ads help us to remember for people of a certain age. Guess we're in Paris, my wife, and I are in Paris number of years ago. Prepaid Spotify or on the Champs Elysee. At at the end of the street is the octa Triomphe. So I should be beyond all sensation. Now. I feel nothing. I there's no thirst there is no hunger. We're on the this is it this is why you go to Europe. This is why Aren Paris good grief or on the shops at Lisa Triomphe and everything that's on the Champs Elysee, and we're walking along it and my wife my poor long. Suffering wife. David who is wonderful woman, a wonderful woman as an IRA high tolerance threshold, not particularly into music, she enjoys it. Because she'll go along with me. And all those years, I covered so much comedy. At the herald, she'd go to these comedy shows, and it was like, she was observing something at the Louvre was very very funny. She just yet. So we're walking along, and and I guess I twitched or something and she just knew and she looked at me. And she said go ahead. There was a virgin records. On the Shaam sale. He's an and I had to go up there before we went any further. She wouldn't get a cappuccino or something again and Paul and I ended up getting heaven helped me it seemed like a good idea at the time. The Japanese import album of Betsy Bogart, and I still don't know how he pronounces apathy. A piece live in Japan, which I wasn't able to get at home. But here was recording imported from Japan that I got. That's lost. Now, you just go on. So there it is Tump Trump, and there's a convenience to it. I'm not saying I get mad. The always the best way these kids. That's not what I'm saying. But you lose that. And when you see the ads for Skippy. Weizer cheapo records, these things it conjures up that age where man if you wanted your music he had to do a little work. It just didn't drop out of the sky and you lap. And maybe that one if some ways that wasn't such a bad thing. Well, but also you can get at stores like that and Skippy still to this day. I mean, you know, he prides himself on customer service, and he loves it. When someone says, hey, you know, I'm I'm looking for this one gospel record, and it kind of sounds like this or or or you know, who I love Mahalia Jackson. But I don't really know that much else about gospel. Like what else would you recommend? And so he can kind of guide shepherd you through this process if you're trying to get into a new genre. Or that's really what those play bookstores, obviously. The same way. Like, oh, if you like that author, then you'd really love this book, and it can kind of lead you down this this whole wormhole. And in only the best way where you just end up discovering something that you'd never know. And you can't you as much as Pandora and all these places kind of have these algorithms that do that. There's no replacement for a human being who has this vast knowledge who and David's, you know, the same way and in a lot of ways with with all kinds of things not just music. But so that's what who I surround myself with and have these resources that yet again, like, I don't do lectures. And I don't pretend to be all knowing about any of this stuff because this is all the journey for me too. I mean, I know a good amount, but I don't know anywhere near a quarter of all this stuff about about that other people. No. Or the other thing too is I have a lot of different. Kind of archival historical tentacles. So different parts of Boston. I can kind of pick and choose. So if if I if I have a hip hop question, I can go to this one resource. And if I have a theater question, I can go to another resource, and that's important too. Because then I can be almost like a middleman, I'm in a way. So, but that's what Brian's creating in the Boston public library event next Thursday, for example, is it becomes a multimedia event. And you know, it embraces a lot of different content. A lot of different Boston cultural reference points. It's film. It's slides. It's commentary. You know, it's it's a back and forth dialogue with people who were in attendance. And you know, you want to know what stimulus is creating a response from people. Sometimes the matter of triggering a remembrance of I was there. I did that. Sometimes God, I'm sorry. I missed that. I wish I had been there. Tell me more about it. Yeah. So the the event again Thursday at the Boston public library from sixty eight. You're also going to be a resource if people are there questions comments and they're wondering. No. Better than Google is going to be to ask you guys in in just making sure I'm taking care of all this business before we let you guys go you had mentioned, for example, going to the Bieber archives. And as you call it mount Bieber, I think David you had said when you've been on the times past and moving it all into that one one spot that you have now it was eleven tractor from twelve and a half tractors. Well, twelve twelve and a half tractor trailers. No self-aggrandizing. We don't want. We we we we don't want fake news. So we wanted accurate a twelve and a half tractor trailers. I I believe you told me it was an excess of six hundred thousand items. We're heading reality. Instead. Told me that I knew the number was antiquated. But well, so we it's it's it's giving us giving you an idea of the the reverence material that both of the both of these gentlemen were drawing from and I I've enjoying myself so much Indra would do for one break. Right. Haven't taken a break yet. Why don't we take our last break in? This segment will contain the conversation here to nineteen. It's weekend. Live with dean Johnson, touch and a couple of minutes..

Boston David Brian Champs Elysee Paris Japan Europe octa Triomphe Louvre Mahalia Jackson Eggleston Aren Paris Bieber Betsy Bogart Tump Trump Lisa Triomphe Shaam dean Johnson IRA