36 Burst results for "Ocean"

Fresh "Ocean" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:32 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Ocean" from All Things Considered

"From his food truck. Today we just ran out of pulled pork. I got more cooking right now, so we'll have more again tonight. We've got brisket and ribs right now. He stocked up on ribs and brisket before the storm, the one thing he didn't have today, though, was bread. His home and businesses were flooded and he thinks recovery is going to be a long process. It took us 19 days with Irma. This is a hundred times worse. I can't even say months. Wouldn't surprise me. Well, we also began to get word today of fatalities during the storm. What do we know so far on that front? Well, Ford officials said they need to wait for medical examiners to rule before they can confirm which deaths are really storm related. So right now, although there's just one confirmed storm related death, we know of at least 20 others that are awaiting confirmation. And that number is only likely to grow. Right. That is Ampere's Greg Allen in Fort Myers, Florida. Thank you so much, Greg. Welcome. After a hurricane Ian ravaged Florida, it's remnant spiraled out into the Atlantic Ocean, and then regained hurricane strength. Earlier this afternoon, Ian made landfall in South Carolina. It may have landed as a less powerful category one storm, but national hurricane center official still warned of life threatening storm surge along the coast, as well as severe flooding throughout the Carolinas, and of course strong winds. Amanda Bryan lives in the coastal city of Myrtle Beach, that's a little over 30 miles north of where the center of the storm passed, Amanda welcome. Hi, how are you? I'm well. Thank you for talking to us today. Yes, thank you. Amanda, what did you see and hear as the worst came through this afternoon? The worst came through around an hour ago were actually in the middle of getting the backside of the storm now. So our power is kind of flickering on and off as we speak and the winds have definitely picked up, we rode down to the beach earlier where we frequent on the golf cart and the dunes are completely the dunes are completely covered you said and I know you said your power is flickering. How's

Hurricane Ian Irma Greg Allen Amanda Bryan Florida Fort Myers Ford National Hurricane Center Atlantic Ocean Greg Amanda Carolinas South Carolina IAN Myrtle Beach Golf
The Damage Done by Hurricane Ian, Striking Charleston Next

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 23 hrs ago

The Damage Done by Hurricane Ian, Striking Charleston Next

"Now you know the death toll must be significant I don't know The extent of it but when you look at the damage that's been done and you know everybody didn't leave and some people were hunkering down when you're talking about wins like this you're talking about a massive tornado It's pretty much what you're talking about And so much of Fort Myers is gone Along the waterfront They have a whole downtown area that's been built up over the years beautiful area and it's 90% gone Because of a 150 155 mile an hour winds at slammed into it And you think about people in older homes you think about people that have trailer homes other types of homes those people you think about the pets even The dogs and the cats and so forth you just think about all the devastation because that's what this is It's devastation This storm is tracking to Charleston South Carolina Which is a beautiful town And it's tracking as a hurricane category one It went out to the ocean and it's heading back It's cutting across Sort of towards Savannah to some extent but it looks like it's taking aim right now at Charleston Now we're on the radio and Charleston we're on the radio all over the country So you need to heed warnings from local officials You must

Fort Myers Charleston South Carolina Savannah
Joe Bastardi: Will Hurricane Ian Make Landfall Again?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 1 d ago

Joe Bastardi: Will Hurricane Ian Make Landfall Again?

"First off this is going to make landfall again correct Ian and when it goes out and exits the Florida land mass there and gets back out into the ocean is it possible that they could become a hurricane again I should have said likely of course it's possible is it likely to become a hurricane again and where do you see it going Georgia South Carolina Well to refresh what we've said at weather belt we said from back on Tuesday this was coming back out with hit as a hurricane again that would be a double hit and what happens is that I'm in the private sector and as outstanding as the forecasters are in the government and they are we have to try to hit these forecasts and try to be ahead We have to give people information So if you follow me on Twitter you follow me on weather Bill you know what I've been saying So the national hurricane center remember on Tuesday was keeping it in line and just killing it over southern Georgia We said that we go out and just coming out Now that sounds real pompous you know my dad used to say if you have to tell someone you're good at something you can't be that good at it Day and age This day and age we have to have to make sure that people understand that whether it's a story part of the problem with the climate change situations people don't understand that the weather is a story not a snapshot because someone could use a snapshot like this And say what they say So as far as this storm goes when I looked at the 11 o'clock hurricane center forecast it looks exactly like ours from a couple of days ago and I think that they are right on top of this now We look for a landfall Someplace between Charleston and Myrtle Beach

Hurricane Georgia IAN South Carolina National Hurricane Center Florida Twitter Charleston Myrtle Beach
Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 1 d ago

Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

"You're running as the Republican in the tenth congressional district in Virginia which is right outside of Washington but it also stretches a bit Tell everybody a little bit about your background From Vietnam in 1975 and then we escaped there within days of the fall Saigon Came over here and my father couldn't find work over here So we had to move to Africa So I grew up I spent 7 years in Africa And while we're over there my parents we spent 7 years over there I was going to French schools and my parents realized at the age of 12 that this kid probably needs to learn English also So we moved back here My mom brought myself in my sport sisters back here while my dad remained over there for 15 years by himself working and seeing him every 6 months but I want to I grabbed on to that American Dream and I want to Thomas Jefferson high school for science and technology I was the first class to graduate from there I went to the United States naval academy I got my master's in physics from naval postgraduate school and I was a fellow at MIT and at Harvard But I paid everything back with services country I served 25 years in special operations I thought in Iraq Afghanistan Somalia I was in Pakistan during the earthquake relief I was in the Balkans I dove the ocean depth I recovered John F. Kennedy Jr. but then that's been required last October because just watching Kabul fall and seeing mothers hand babies to marines Just broke my heart I mean that's exactly what happened in Vietnam And so I decided to run for Congress Wow And how old are you I'm 51 sir 51 well you've led a full life at the age of 51 And a very patriotic

Africa Thomas Jefferson High School F Vietnam Virginia Washington United States Naval Academy Naval Postgraduate School John F. Kennedy Jr. MIT Harvard Somalia Balkans Afghanistan Iraq Pakistan Kabul Congress
Hurricane Ian gets nasty quickly, turbocharged by warm water

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

Hurricane Ian gets nasty quickly, turbocharged by warm water

"Experts say hurricanes are being turbocharged by warmer at lytic waters I Norman hall Hurricane Ian grew to major status rapidly in experts say that's due to oceans partly heated up by climate change There have been 30 other Atlantic tropical storms since 2017 that became much more powerful and less than a day Colorado state university researcher Philip klotzbach says and also developed with rapid intensification which is a storm that intensifies by at least 35 mph in a 24 hour period A new yet to be published study in a peer reviewed journal shows that as hurricanes near the coast a danger point where people storms are intensifying more quickly than ever before I Norman hall

Norman Hall Hurricane Ian Philip Klotzbach Colorado State University Atlantic
Ian strengthens into a hurricane, heads toward Cuba, Florida

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 4 d ago

Ian strengthens into a hurricane, heads toward Cuba, Florida

"Hurricane Ian nears Cuba on a path to strike Florida as a category four as early as Wednesday as residents scramble to prepare with supply selling out Forecasters expect a 140 mph winds ten inches of rain and ocean surges of up to ten feet across the Tampa saint Pete area however the exact track is still being pinpointed as Ian moves through the gulf and governor Ronda Santos says floridians need to prepare Floridians up and down the Gulf Coast should feel the impacts of this as up to 36 hours before actual landfall due to the size of the hurricane At ace hardware and Titusville which is on the other side of the state owner Bill pasture max says out of an abundance of caution he ordered extra hurricane supplies and they've been flying out the store We found generators on gas cans We sell chainsaws we sell them tarps we're selling water weather radios Meanwhile parts of the state are under evacuation orders I'm Julie Walker

Hurricane Ian Ronda Santos Cuba Bill Pasture Max Tampa Florida IAN Gulf Coast Titusville Julie Walker
Some 230 whales beached in Tasmania; rescue efforts underway

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Some 230 whales beached in Tasmania; rescue efforts underway

"About 230 whales have been stranded on Tasmania's West Coast just days after 14 sperm whales were found beached on an island off the southeastern coast The department of natural resources and environment Tasmania says the pod which is stranded on ocean beach appears to be pilot whales and at least half a presumed to be still alive a resident told the Australian broadcasting corporation the whales were visible near the entrance to a harbor and described the stranding as a massive event a local official has urged people to stay clear a team from the marine conservation program is assembling will rescue gear and moving in

Department Of Natural Resource Tasmania West Coast Ocean Beach Marine Conservation Program
Gov. Ron DeSantis: Where's the Outrage Against Joe Biden?

Mark Levin

01:29 min | Last week

Gov. Ron DeSantis: Where's the Outrage Against Joe Biden?

"America's governor Ron DeSantis at a press conference today cut 7 go Biden is flying these people all over the fruited plane in the middle of the night I didn't hear a PEEP out of those people okay I didn't hear a peek I haven't heard a PEEP about all the people that have been told by Biden You can just come in and they're going they're being abused by the cartels they're drowning in the Rio Grande You had 50 that died in some shed in Texas I heard no outrage about any of that I haven't heard outrage about all the fence and all that's come across the border that's killing Americans and record numbers I don't hear I don't hear outrage about the criminal aliens that have gotten through and have then victimized people not only in Florida but all throughout the country How to hear any outrage about that The only thing I hear them getting upset about is you have 50 that end up in Martha's Vineyard Then they get really upset Now the media are lining an airport near Rehoboth beach Because word has it that Ron DeSantis may be Abbott or sending illegal ailments to Rehoboth beach This is something as you know publicly I've been urging I've been urging Why shouldn't they enjoy the same ocean the same bike paths The same ice cream cones as the zombie president

Ron Desantis Biden Rio Grande America Rehoboth Beach Texas Florida Vineyard Martha Abbott
Storm battering western Alaska causes widespread flooding

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Storm battering western Alaska causes widespread flooding

"A historic storm sweeps through western Alaska bringing damaging winds and causing widespread flooding Becca loose lives about a half a mile from the coastline and was still able to see the waves crash onto shore flooding Main Street in gnome She says homes and cabins were swept away With all the preparation in the world the ocean is so powerful and it caused so much damage Governor Mike dunleavy says a thousand miles of Alaska's coastline was hit by the storm the remnants of a Pacific typhoon We're trying to assess exactly what has occurred Now he says the concern is the remnants of the storm and surging water plus getting the cleanup done before the freeze starts next month We are going to move as quickly as we can to provide relief to provide recovery I'm Julie Walker

Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy Becca Julie Walker
Erick Stakelbeck Shares His Thoughts on the Iran Nuclear Deal

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Erick Stakelbeck Shares His Thoughts on the Iran Nuclear Deal

"To us about the Iran nuclear deal because I mean, most people know that it was a nightmare that Obama, I mean, I have to say, if you don't know what to think and you're just looking at the optics as they say, it looks like the radical left in America is anti semitic, is anti Israel, at least anti Israel, and they seem to almost want to help the enemies of Israel. Maybe I'm wrong, but when I look at it, that's what it looks like to me. When you make a deal like president Obama made and you give a 150 $1 billion, it's astonishing. I can't even believe that's true. But it's like, you know, Trump said this is the worst deal in history. And he, to his amazing credit, undid that deal, ended it. And here we are now, two years into Biden and he is talking to the mullahs talking to he wants to put this back on saying, how can this be? I mean, what am I missing? Why would somebody want to go back to that? What do they think they're doing? Eric, there is no rhyme or reason to it. The only thing I can think of is that they want to take this off the list of problems. We don't want the Iran menace looming over us constantly. And if we just give them what we want, then they'll go away and they'll play nice. This echoes obviously Neville Chamberlain, Chamberlain, days of appeasement in the run up to World War II, the rise of Hitler. We have a gathering storm and clearly the leadership not only in the United States, but the west wants no parts of it. They just want it to go away, but it's not going to go away. And I have a hard time Eric figuring out what exactly the United States gets out of this Iran nuclear deal. As you mentioned, hundreds of billions of dollars into the hands of the world's number one state sponsor of terrorism, which by the way, has blood on its hands, American blood on its hands, not only that, Eric, when we talk about this deal, Iran's ballistic missile program, which is the largest in the entire Middle East, it's not even on the table. It's not even mentioned in that deal. And lastly, Iran's sponsorship for terror, Hamas, Hezbollah, around the region, also not even mentioned. By the way, last thing Eric, when we talk about those Iranian ballistic missiles, Iran right now is developing intercontinental or at least trying to develop intercontinental ballistic missiles ICBMs for short. They do exactly what their name says. They're designed to travel across continents across oceans. Those ICBMs are not for Israel, they're not even for Europe, therefore us, therefore

Iran Israel Eric United States Donald Trump President Obama Biden Neville Chamberlain Barack Obama Chamberlain Hitler Middle East Hezbollah Hamas Europe
The Power of the Flotilla

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

The Power of the Flotilla

"Want to underscore that because right now the United States Navy has about 280 surface combatants at sea. This comes from page three 88 a victory at sea. The sheer size of the American naval armada surrounding Okinawa was a retelling of the story of the Pacific war, as 1200 landing vessels commenced their Easter Sunday, April 1 assault on the central beaches of Okinawa, they were screened by 200 destroyers 18 battleships and over 40 carriers. You know, that's bigger than the entire U.S. Navy today. It is doctor Kennedy. Yes. Now, the defenders of what's going on in our size and power of E today would say, well, a nuclear powered aircraft carrier of the GL four class of the retiring Nimitz class is so much more powerful than those carriers surrounding Okinawa in 1944. But we had so many more of them out there. And so one of the questions about present power is a possible vulnerability of the limited number of warships, including limited number of aircraft carriers, which we have across stress across the globe today for our commitments from the Houston Mediterranean through the Indian Ocean to the far Pacific. Not to mention, giving an eye enlisted children.

Okinawa United States Navy Kennedy Mediterranean Houston Indian Ocean Pacific
Secretary Robert Wilkie Discusses China, Russia and Taiwan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Secretary Robert Wilkie Discusses China, Russia and Taiwan

"Let's talk about China. How does the lack of a definitive success in the last 6 and a half months? Factor into Beijing's calculus on Taiwan and everything else. I think G has to take a middle road with Russia. I think you'll continue buying their energy, but I can't see him right now. Coming to the military rescue of an incompetent and inept. Kremlin. I don't think he wants to throw all of his weapons into that meat grinder. I think he has to take another look at Taiwan. Because he wasn't counting on the western resolve that greeted. Putin. And it's quite a different thing if their British submarines and their French submarines in the Pacific and the Australians are building a nuclear capability and the Indians are moving farther and farther out into the ocean. Because they've seen what happens if you let a tyrant loose. And they have to live with. The Chinese in their backyard and talk about the Indians the Australians, Singapore. Japan, Korea, Philippines.

Taiwan Beijing Kremlin China Russia Putin Pacific Singapore Japan Korea Philippines
Rev. Martin Dunne: Taking Action Without Compromising Christianity

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Rev. Martin Dunne: Taking Action Without Compromising Christianity

"With me I need to keep my focus on God and encourage everybody else to do the same thing The father Marty I listened that really sage advice And I listened to you with rap detention and church this weekend And if here's what I took out of it and tell me if I'm wrong that because I am angry I'm filled with rage I'm not gonna lie to you I have to go to confession and say I lied then I want to do that But I am trying hard to manage it I really am I'm doing my best sometimes it spills out But I think what you're saying is our rights are in danger action is required vote run for office knock on doors donate to campaigns do whatever you need to do Get involved the do matters But I think what you're saying is don't let the rage encompass you so much that you lose the forest for the trees Am I reading this Like I just opened up the show today saying exactly that that I'm long on the and I'm a financial guy I'm long on the United States We're surrounded by two big oceans We have the world's greatest military We have an entrepreneurial people so eager to work that people flood into the country breaking the law to come here sometimes We don't have any enemies to our north or south Canada or Mexico We're floating on a sea of natural resources I just don't want people to forget that It's not all lost You know there's a future here If we stay grounded and don't get lost in this kind of sea of rage I'm always out there floating in You have to now on the head And let me give you a spoiler alert for next week

Marty South Canada United States Mexico
Dead fish in San Francisco Bay Area blamed on toxic red tide

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Dead fish in San Francisco Bay Area blamed on toxic red tide

"A toxic red tide is blamed for dead fish in the San Francisco Bay Area I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest An unprecedented red tide in the San Francisco Bay Area is killing thousands of fish and other marine life whose carcasses are washing ashore creating a foul odor that experts say could get worse during this weekend's expected heat wave Crews have begun to remove dead crabs bat rays striped bass and other fish that began piling up on the rocky shores of Oakland's Lake merit over the weekend The fish die off at Lake Merritt and its spots throughout the Bay Area may be due to a harmful algae bloom that has been spreading across the base since late July most algae blooms end after a week or so officials say a year's long drought has prevented stagnant water from flowing into the ocean and unseasonably warm and sunny weather may be helping the algae spread reports of dead fish started coming in last week I'm Lisa dwyer

Lisa Dwyer San Francisco Bay Area Lake Merit Lake Merritt Oakland Bay Area
The Things You Are Paying for at Colleges

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:00 min | Last month

The Things You Are Paying for at Colleges

"Should we have to pay for the gender studies majors and the goat yoga people? Is that a thing? It's a thing. Google it. It's a thing. There are some schools that are actually advertising infinity pools. You say, what is an infinity pool? Those are rooftop pools that make it look like you're going to swim over the edge. Which is a little bit. These are you would expect that at some sort of a high end posture resort, not the local university or college. But this is what they're doing. They're squandering our tax money. Who needs to go on a vacation when you can just go to college? Yes. Just do the actual campus that is. No, exactly. I mean, when you look at all the buildings going up, we're paying for all of that stuff. That's true. Michigan technical Michigan technological university. They have a campus on campus, ski resort. A 112 acres of ski friendly terrain. Pomona college. They have an annual ski beach day. They actually have buses that take the college kids to the beach and a mountain resort for fun in the snow and the ocean. Oh, that sounds like a lovely day. Boston University looks some of these schools are private, I get it. Boston University, 26 story glass dorm, a condo with private bathrooms, walk in closets, and you get your own complimentary flat screen TV. Pretty snazzy. The university of Missouri. You guys have a lazy river that runs through campus. There's also a sauna and Whirlpool, hot tubs, and an on campus beach club. There's also a racquetball court and various other full courts where endless games. This is unbelievable stuff here. The university of Wisconsin in Madison. The student union has a bowling alley, art gallery climbing wall, billiard hall,

University Or College Michigan Technical Michigan Te Ski Beach Boston University Pomona College Google University Of Missouri Whirlpool University Of Wisconsin Madison Bowling Billiard Hall
AP's global religion team explores sacred rivers around the world, what they mean to those whose faith is tied to the waterways, and the existential challenges ahead.

AP News Radio

02:50 min | Last month

AP's global religion team explores sacred rivers around the world, what they mean to those whose faith is tied to the waterways, and the existential challenges ahead.

"In this week's religion roundup a stream of faith runs through the world's sacred rivers The global religion team at The Associated Press explored sacred rivers around the world and the existential challenges they face AP explored 6 rivers that cross the Middle East the Pacific Northwest New Zealand Nepal Nigeria and Chile Among them is the Jordan River familiar to Christians and Jews from biblical stories AP's Jesse guardar ski and adherence along the banks of the Jordan describe the role the river plays today The Jordan River is revered by Christians as the site of the baptism of Jesus Because in my religion they use it many times throughout the years So it's good to actually real well you also from the souls Many modern day visitors immerse themselves in the sacred waters in a show of faith We can just simply imagine John's baptizing the believers here waiting for the arrival of Jesus Christ But the lower Jordan River has suffered from decades of water diversions for agriculture and domestic use Today the river's annual water flow is down to just a tiny fraction of its historic levels The Jordan joins other sacred world rivers and facing severe challenges in the Pacific Northwest the Columbia river winds its way from British Columbia through the states of Washington and Oregon The river and the bounty it provides feature prominently in Native American ceremonies at rituals Patricia whitefoot from the yakama nation says the waters are a reminder that humans weren't the first ones here We're taught that the animals and the fish and the birds the mountains the water They were all here And so what we do is really a gift a gift to all of us Today dams climate change and population growth threatened this way of life On the ocean river in Nigeria illegal gold mining along the river has made its waters increasingly toxic However some like activist Anthony and deja vu are hopeful that the sacred river can return to a safe condition I'm optimistic and I believe that it is possible the government just needs to have that political will to save the iconic river AP journalists depart says the people she encountered on the project were grateful that the religious role of their rivers was no longer being overlooked They were thrilled that someone actually wanted to talk about their religion because that has always been pushed to the back door in the middle of legislation politics fishing rights all those issues have taken the front seat over the years over the decades but when it came to religion hasn't really seen the light of day You can find more about AP's 6 part sacred rivers project at AP news dot com I'm Walter ratliff

Jordan River Jesse Guardar AP Pacific Northwest Nigeria Jordan Patricia Whitefoot Nepal Chile Middle East Ocean River New Zealand Columbia River British Columbia Oregon John Washington Anthony Walter Ratliff
The Miracle of a Newborn Salmon With Dr. Stephen Iacoboni

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | Last month

The Miracle of a Newborn Salmon With Dr. Stephen Iacoboni

"To the author of a book called telos, the scientific basis for life of purpose, Steven jacopo, the oncologist, scientist who wrote that book. You were just talking before the break about the miracle. I don't know how else people can view it of you say a three inch long salmon fry. In other words, we're talking about a newborn salmon. That travels how far? 8000 miles, 8000 miles in the ocean. 18, there's no navigation. Thousand miles seems somehow to know where to go, it's mind bending. They do know where they're going. And the book we were talking about is called animal algorithms. Somebody Eric castle, is that it from the discovery institute that astonishing, but it gets to your point. Science says, oh, that's just instinct. That's just anything, well, what's instinct? What do you mean? It has a brain, the size of a grain of sand and how does it navigate a human being would have trouble pulling this off and our brain is vast. So logically, you'd say it seems to have been designed to do this. It seems to have been designed by someone for this purpose. Exactly. So the first chapter, there's several examples like that. Just to get the reader comfortable with the fact that I'm going to talk about down to earth things that they can relate to. And then I say, I reveal to them you may think that science has explained this. They have not. They do not have the slightest idea how this happens. They are misleading you. And so I said, but what we do know is what Aristotle knew, 2400 years ago, which was everything is purpose driven. Everything in life is purpose driven. The only creatures who sometimes do things that aren't purpose driven are domesticated animals and humans. But

Steven Jacopo Eric Castle Discovery Institute
The Gas Price Increase Is All About Biden's Climate Change Plan

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:55 min | Last month

The Gas Price Increase Is All About Biden's Climate Change Plan

"Joe Biden and team they're out there bragging about what amounts to a somewhat minimal decrease in the price of gas over the course of the last 60 days or so. When I say somewhat minimal, I mean, compared to the rise in gas prices that we have seen thus far, gas is now decreased in price from somewhere around the $5 per gallon mark to somewhere closer to the $4 per gallon mark that is still way too high for the vast majority of Americans. And Joe Biden has suggested that this was all due to supply chain issues. It was all due to Vladimir Putin. But the reality is that the high gas prices that we have seen under Joe Biden are not a coincidence. In fact, if you look at the gas prices under Joe Biden, what you see is a consistent increase, month over month, pretty much the entire time up until the recent decrease in gas prices. And this is not any sort of wonder. The American action forum put out a chart showing exactly what gas prices have done under Joe Biden when Joe Biden took office. The gas prices were two 25 a gallon. So when you're talking about, oh wow, they've gone down a lot. Well, now that at $4 account, that's still almost twice as high as they were when Joe Biden took office. And he took a bunch of measures, almost immediately, that exacerbated the price of oil, that made it much, much higher. And to understand what exactly he did and why he did, you have to understand that this was all part of the plan. So one of the big things that the left has said for years and years and years and years is that carbon based fossil fuels are the worst thing in the world. They are just terrible. They're ruining everything. They're leaning to climate change and climate change is going to devastate the planet. It's going to lead to hundreds of millions of people dead. Billions of people displace it's going to be an absolute Al Gore like hellscape in which the polar bears are drowning in the oceans and all the rest of it. Now, all the predictions Al Gore made so far have been wrong. All of the talk about how the Arctic ice would just be gone, all the ice in Greenland would be melted. All of that is just untrue. The notion that tens and hundreds of thousands of people have been affected by predominantly climate change, that's not the reality.

Joe Biden American Action Forum Vladimir Putin Al Gore Greenland
Study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

Study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases

"Hi Mike Gracia reporting a new study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases A new study says more than half of the known infectious diseases in people including malaria cholera and anthrax have worsened due to climate hazards such as flooding heat waves and drought In Monday's journal nature climate change researchers said they found 218 of the known 375 human infectious diseases seemed to be made worse by one of ten types of extreme weather connected to climate change The study says warming oceans and heat waves can taint seafood and other things we eat Droughts can bring bats carrying viral infections to people Downpours and flooding sick and people through disease carrying mosquitos rats and deer Additionally the study found 223 of 286 unique non infectious sicknesses such as asthma and allergies seemed to be worsened by climate hazards I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Human Infectious Diseases Cholera Anthrax Malaria Asthma
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


02:17 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Like you haven't really seen that person you didn't have that physical was this person in one space and this connection is a bit like faded out. You have been listening to Corona under the ocean, a podcast series produced by TBA 21 academy, and the Art.

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


02:18 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"That we are already right in the middle of it..

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


03:51 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Too good to vote for Biden or something. Biden, a radical no, is a lot of what he does. Yes, absolutely. But is there a question here? Because the effect that what may appear in a small way to me, the effects that will happen to me between Biden and Trump, even as a woman, I'm older, even as a queer, I'm not trans. I mean, happy to be trans, but usually he's not going to come after me as trans and the effects on me are going to be pretty pretty, much lower than the effects on black Americans. I mean, this is like not a question. If you're too good to vote for Biden because you say it makes no difference, that's because you're privileged enough not to feel the difference. Our black activists and our black leaders in the U.S. but also the art indigenous leaders. They're rightfully saying in our families, yeah, but we go outside and we don't get the privilege of being invisible. We become hyper visible and hyper visible as that which can be killed without being murdered and once again we're facing that today in incarcerated without committing crimes. You know, so the crime of incarceration without a crime. At least two good two cool for Biden. And again, I didn't. I mean, really. But at least he says he's a placeholder. I gotta give him credit. He's like, I'm just a placeholder. I think he's trying to hold the place for moderate.

Biden Trump U.S.
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


06:59 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Come out of my mouth with the same sound. That was born first and foremost in what we call the Americas now. And the massive enslavement of west Africans. So, okay, wait minute. This fourth axiom that we either presuppose or we don't say can the colonial and racial what we, I'm going to qualify the insect. But let me actually let me back up and say, that fourth axiom is a very different little creature from the first three. The fourth axiom is irreducibly historic, irreducibly political. And irreducibly relational. It's not saying what existence is or the conditions of knowledge are. It's saying out of this thing that was a series of intensities and eventful nesses in an ongoing way. There emerged contemporary western understandings of epistemology and ontology in philosophy and in critical theory. In crucial way, it says, look, if you're going to make an ontological claim, like axiom one, you can't make it the way in which philosophy has made those claims. If you're going to make an epistemological argument, you can't make it the way Kant made those claims because in internal to the question of being, whether heideggerian, looking back into Aristotle or Kant trying to say, look, before we ask what ontology is, we have to ask the conditions of knowledge, like how do we know the world? That is already infected by these histories of colonialism and sadistic racism. So here we have four axiom, but one of them begins in a very different way. One of them begins in the black Atlantic and in the ongoing dispossession and refusal to be dispossessed world to First Nations, Native Americans and indigenous people. And in those literatures, in those critical theories, you have to begin by refusing the philosophical and epistemological ways of moving genealogies of thought and disciplines of knowledge. And so we can think of the civil wars. And you have to begin again, but not begin again by abstracting first and then getting to history. And that's what I'm trying to show those outside of critical indigenous studies and critical race studies who are engaging in saying, you know, we're engaging, but nevertheless, keep on starting and ending with a abstraction in the abstraction is existence is entangled. It's an abstraction. It's a claim about being outside of history outside of the history that constituted a social form and a politics. So we're going to start with vaccine one or we're going to start with axiom four. And I am in the lines with those. I think I would say, you know, Sylvia winter, Denise de Silva, back in Cedric Robinson, cesare, gliese, Hartman, et cetera, who begin in the concrete nature of the historical entanglements that arose out of the sadism of colonialism and the black Atlantic. Sometimes I go further and say, I don't care whether existence is entangled or not. Like if someone says, what's your stand on the entanglement of existence? I say, my stand is that existence was entangled out of these colonial and racial sadism in a particular way that continues to frame the powers of people to affect that entanglement. As for philosophical claim, I grew up in philosophy. I was St. John's kid. I was steeped in the ideology. And I will say, I don't care in an abstraction. I just don't. I want to make one other point. And then I'm going to get to the oceans. Though I got into the ocean, but I'm going to come to the oceans, and I've gotten to the black Atlantic. You have Christina sharp who's in a more contemporary thinking about black artists and black art is rereading, rethinking that long conversation of and say there, both say theirs. And so we're already in the oceans. You know, I've talked about why I think Lisa is so crucial here. And the way he begins poetics of relation in that open boat. But I want to move from the black Atlantic and say something about how my reading, the rhetorical configuration of these axioms. And the rhetorical way in which I'm trying to get certain folks see there's certain incoherence of starting with an ontology on the one hand, on one end, and then saying in axiom four, that ontology and epistemology are themselves already the effect of this. It's not like you can clean them up. So one of the things that I've been thinking about and in conversation with critical indigenous studies is how does my tendency to say bluntly, I don't care about axiom one as an abstract claim. I mean, honestly, if you really ask me, I will say, I like that one better than object ontologies by far. But how does that square with the emergence of the interest in and the politics of indigenous what many people call indigenous ontologies are multi spectacular or animism, et cetera and including the emergence, which is very interesting to me in many parts of Europe of a European indigeneity in which you're various spaces in Europe, various scholars, European scholars, are saying, we also had our own indigenous ontologies before we were colonized by various European forces, right? We also.

black Atlantic Kant Sylvia winter Denise de Silva Cedric Robinson gliese Americas Christina sharp cesare Hartman St. John Lisa Europe
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


02:44 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"The ways in which we can express it..

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


07:13 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"For quite some years now, I've been very interested in the history of zoological gardens. Understanding how the display of non human lives alive, how this system of display that allows for a lion to be a few meters away from a penguin and the penguin from being a few meters away from crocodile and so on and so forth. On the one hand, how is the system that has been created constituted and legitimized during colonialism? And that has deep colonial essence to it. Since presenting exotic species and a mini version of the world's nature in a single space, what Foucault would call the heterotopia and creating this fantasy of singleness on universal natural glory in generally a European terrain. But how also the zoo and this apparatus is for accessibility of animals in urban context. Became in itself a system of exhibition that legitimized or reinforced, let's say, the separation between that who sees and that who is being seen, let's say, between subject and object, we dream the exhibited end of visitor that who chooses where to place themselves and then who instead is forced to be in permanent side of exhibition. Imagining the relationship that exists between the zoo and the cinema as two apparatuses to bring the other and also the other being wildlife closer to the human in a modality that assures comfort, entertainment, education, and security. And then understanding how these systems of exhibition are at the end so aligned with also the systems of exhibition of art in the sense that you display your exhibit objects in a similar way to which you display an exhibit animals in the zoo and to a similar way in which you present images in a movie theater. They rely on the frontal relationship, they rely on creating the best possible conditions of accessibility and of vision, while at the same time creating a barrier, creating I've been calling it a membrane that is an element of separation that determines who stands on which side. So I have a visit to goer. I have a museum goer or have a cinema goer. They know where to sit. They know where to stand. They know where they can stand on the other side of the membrane. They also know that what is to be seen lies safely on the other side of the membrane. So there's this sentiment of comfort and security and accessibility. And aquarium does exactly the same thing. Naturalizes the separation between the subject and the object and between the natural and the culture. The botanical garden, the logic is the same is assembling in a single space, the world's species, and allowing them to live together in this completely constructed notion of Paradise. What is Paradise Paradise at the end is a mini sample of the world. All together, like the biosphere in a way. At a certain point, this clash, when I was looking at an early documentary, about a zoo in the United States, and the documentary said, why bother going to the zoo? When you can watch the animals and you can watch nature edited in front of you in the screen. Because nature doesn't tell stories you go as John Berger often says in why look at animals, generally the zoos disappoint. Or an aquarium disappoints because there's not an experience of intensity. There's not a real encounter. And why not experiencing a real encounter, even if mediated by the screen through cinema that is edited that is compressed, that brings to you the highlights, the big moments, the moment in which the shark is attacking a terrible or the moment in which the gray whale is jumping and splashing everyone and so on and so forth. I do think that there is a really interesting relationship between these different mechanisms of exhibition, projection and accessibility to other. In many cases they replicate one another cinema projection could resemble an aquarium, the exhibition of Joan Jonas that the ocean space last year transformed that church in a series of aquariums where you could have access to all these different marine creatures through the projection of videos. Same thing could happen in our laptops. Our laptop can suddenly become the jungle or it can suddenly become an aquarium if we play a video onto it and you have these different creatures. These animals are become digital become electric. They are rarefied thanks to all these screens that we have access to. At the same time, the cinema allows us to see more than we can see, allow us to hear more than we can hear. We invent a technology that expands, not only our sensorial room, our eyes, and our senses. But also our own welts in the sense that what surrounds us. We can have very clear images and sounds and perceptions of light and of perceptions of immersed immersion. Of environments of territories of unveiled that are not biologically ours. If I start telling you about a school of fish or about a perfect fish that lives in the bottom of the ocean close to the sand and then goes to the corals and because you've been exposed to so many layers of visions of the sea of visions of details of the sea of highly sophisticated renderings of these creatures on of these environments through my words through my descriptions, you can be there and you can understand very well what it means to be there..

Paradise Paradise John Berger Joan Jonas United States
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


04:09 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"That the problem and habits us in many ways. When you speak a language that is not your mother's tongue,.

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


06:31 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"But what does it mean to live in the sea within a kind of human society that not only tense but imposes the land is a kind of a living space and what is the orangutans understanding of the ocean and the waters and then also how does this compare with the general or common understanding of the Pacific Ocean and this is what I mean when I say that on every journey that I make with them, I'm being challenged because we are constantly looking at things from a land based perspective. So what does it look like when we see things from sort of sea based perspectives? If we look at discussions of the ownership of territory, all of these discussions have been long dominated by state centered definitions of territorial boundaries with regard to the appropriation, mapping and the ownership of space. Likewise, inquiries into the territorial ownership are also often made from land based perspectives, based upon the understandings of the appropriation of space by land, based peoples. Critical to this is that while equivalent behavior among land based groups is described in terms of land ownership or land, tenure systems, very little or no such recognition has been given to sea based, mobile groups. If we examine the multi layered temporal spatial realities of partition landscapes for nomadic seafaring, people such as the orang suku laut, we would be able to probe into the most fundamental level of our understanding so space, as well as spatial relations. First and foremost, the orange allowed offer us an exploration into another way of conceptualizing the ocean. Rather than perceiving the ocean as merely a boundary, delineates one group of land inhabitants from another, a conceptual shift is called for to see the ocean as important sociocultural spaces through the lenses of the sea nomads. And by doing so, our entire conceptualization of maritime spaces takes on new meanings. And second, if we choose a lens of the orangutan, it really would widen out dialog on the concept of the ownership of space by posing the challenge to look beyond, then base sedentary peoples and land based nomadic peoples or even tenure systems to examine ocean based people's imaginings of sovereignties. Different kinds of questions would be raised pertaining to the diverse yet compelling ways and these are equally compelling ways in which people feel people experience and people think about space and how they form territories. So the challenge in developing a new perspective to understand forms of ownership of maritime territory with regard to the sea nomadic communities inevitably entails this need to rethink commonly held theory of the politics of mapping. When staking claims to the ownership of territory, the emerges, different kinds of imagined spatial ideas which underpin official as well as community mapping. And as much of the politics of mapping theory has so far not adequately encapsulated the intricacies of contemporaneous mapping politics between sea and then base ideologies. So what we need to do is really to look into issues, concerning indigenous narratives, indigenous histories, and geographies, photographic silencing as well as other forms of knowledge with a view towards widening, inquiry into the different means and perhaps less understood ways of communicating these spatial imaginings. From land based perspectives, especially from administrative points of view, not just now that if we look at historically seen these oceanic spaces as kind of like virgin species, like uninhabited, it's a whole expense and history you see different western colonial powers coming in to demarcate whether this belongs to the projects or the British and the Spanish. And right now you have even in the South China seas, all this political negotiations and debates coming around who owns which areas of spaces and how do you pass all other things. But if you notice, throughout all of this, what is the spatial understandings? Of the ocean. And it all boils down into how do they see their relationships with these maritime spaces. But so far we have heard so little about what the maritime peoples themselves see. What about the relationships that they have with these spaces what do they understand of these spaces? Is it really a virgin oceanic space for everyone to sort of cut up? Just like to bring into focus, James Scott, the renowned political scientist where he quite rightly commented that the numerous C nomads of Southeast Asia can enjoy a whole watery zombie that really deserves a place of study here. Why? Because to see is bigger, it's even emptier than the mountains in the forest. And yet, so very little has been done. And that's why I really got into the study of the sea nomads because I.

Pacific Ocean South China James Scott Asia
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


04:30 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"And some animals go back and forth, they'll change one direction and then they'll change back. Others are born male and change to female, like every possible combination and order strategy exists. And it all serves a purpose. That's the thing when you look at their mating strategy when you look at their behavior when you look at their role in the ecosystem, that strategy, the way they reproduce 100% maximizes their chance of successfully having the most offspring. Ultimately, that's what nature is designed to do. You want to not get eaten and you want to leave as many of your genes behind in the next generation as possible. I love telling the lobster tail because people know lobsters and so they're just shocked and also because they're these big armored clawed things and yet they're really kinky and romantic. It's kind of wild. But for me, one of the most fascinating pieces of research was this woman, doctor Sarah mesnick, who studies whales and dolphins, and some of the work that they're doing that's really showing how complex the vaginas of female whales are. They're like mazes. There's traps and folds and flaps and blind alleys and all these things that basically make it like an obstacle course for the sperm to try to find the egg. Evolution doesn't build extra structures just for fun, right? It takes energy and resources. So trying to figure out like, why? What's the purpose of this? And there's still unraveling. They have a couple of theories, you know, here we have a mammal as closely related to us and we're going to find in the ocean and for 90% of the females on earth that we know of vaginas are like a straight tunnel opening to get to the egg and all of a sudden you have these crazy weird vaginas and they're trying to figure out why. We have to do a feminism and ocean thing because it has a lot to do with what's known as cryptic female choice, which is basically ways that females can control or have some control over the fate whose fathering their offspring post sex. So after copulation, often they don't have choice prior, right? Because the males are stronger, bigger, they gang up. Things that their bodies are doing that we can't see that could help filter or somehow change the odds in terms of which male is actually fertilizing their eggs. And there are several different examples of how this is happening. But it's again, it's a really new field. And it completely flips that Victorian science approach that sex is all determined by the males and the males go out there and try to seduce the females or just overpower her and the females are the passive receivers. No. And the ocean is one of the places where we're seeing this.

Sarah mesnick
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:58 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"That's like with the fissures, right? So you have these poor communities that are completely reliant on the rich global north to buy their product. And then when there's a pandemic, that market shuts down and the way they have learned to fish and the type of fishing they do and the type of product they're creating is too expensive for their neighbors to buy. That's a problem. It's not a resilient system. And it's not how it has to be. And again, it's not to say that some of those fish can't go to a luxury market and help create a premium, but we've just swung all the way to one side. As you said, when we started talking, there's a lot of folks who don't recognize or realize how much deep connection we have to the ocean, no matter where we live. An example of that is the oceans move heat on the planet. When the sun hits the planet, it warms the tropics. That's why the tropics are hot. It's where most of the heat goes. Without oceans, that heat would stay there. It's the ocean currents that actually distribute and move the heat around the world so that you can grow crops in Spain. It's the Gulf Stream that carries that warm water current up so that New England can have four seasons. It's so fundamental to the way our lives operate and we forget it all the time. Ocean marine plants, phytoplankton, they create 50% of the oxygen on the planet. It's pretty basic. People who are sitting here on ventilators getting sick when our lungs collapse, we have to remember where does that oxygen come from initially and 50% of it is from the sea. We are so connected. I'm hoping that some of what can come back out of times of crisis is as we recognize what connectivity is as we start to learn that we can have relationships from afar. You know, in a really kind of twisted way, the way that we're all having to learn how to reconnect that we can remember that even if we don't see the ocean, even if we don't live on the coast, we can still be connected to it and we can be connected to it in a healthy way or a harmful way. Things like the plastic challenge that's happening right now in the oceans is a great reminder that if we act in ways that go against what the oceans can handle, that degrade and literally through our garbage out there, it will come back to us. One of the problems with the plastic situation, the crisis right now is that sunlight wave energy, it degrades the plastic right into these tiny little particles. Those particles are then ingested by marine life because it looks like phytoplankton or other tiny marine organisms. We're now finding that those particles, small microplastics can actually be degraded into nano plastics, which is even smaller and that that actually can get into the flesh. And we know that plastic store toxins, they were like little sponges for all sorts of chemical compounds. So now we're starting to pollute fundamentally the most healthy animal protein source that we have on the planet through these plastics. And it comes back, like, are now going to eat it. So it's like you're eating your plastic. It's very clear that no matter where we are, we're connected. It is one planet. And it is an ocean planet. I have a colleague who is at Scripps with me. Her name is Jessica meir. She was just up at the space station. Literally landed like two days ago back on earth. So I've been thinking of for a lot and following her incredible journey up there, but you look at her photos that she sharing from the space station looking down on earth and it's blue. It is mostly mostly blue. We just forget, we get so myopic. I'm hoping that there's opportunity for really rethinking what connection means really rethinking priorities, reevaluating, work life balance, reevaluating health and rethinking our global systems into more local regional systems that are more resilient and can help us all be healthier and support one another as community. And I think the oceans are a core piece of that. If we can take these lessons and apply it to how we manage and interact with our oceans, we're going to find that they come back quite quickly and that they're really is still reason to be realistically optimistic that we can solve some of these challenges. Climate change overfishing pollutants. I'm not trying to say that everything's going to go and become like a Garden of Eden in the sea. We are likely to lose significantly some of the systems that exist and they're not going to be recoverable in certain ways. But the potential for healthy ecosystems that are beautiful and biodiverse and provide resources for us and in turn provide resources and homes and habitat and food for other tens of millions of species is still there. And so that's what I look to is I look to the enormous resiliency of the oceans. I look to the potential that still exists, even though it will.

Gulf Stream Jessica meir New England Spain Scripps Garden of Eden
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"I do think there's opportunity there for us to learn and to shift. I haven't verified, but folks forget about when we think about COVID and its impact on the ocean is some of the tests that are being used right now. Some of those enzymes and reagents, those are things that have come from marine life. Often from deep sea, crazy weird bacteria or marine compounds in animals that are super diverse and different than what we have on land that have been found in the ocean, those compounds a lot of medical materials and medicines come from ocean life. It is a treasure trove medicine that we've barely begun to explore. One example I like to share is horseshoe crabs are really ancient, old, crustacean. They're like a big crab with a big helmet. There are hundreds of millions of years old. You can see them in the fossil record. They have this bright powder blue like sky blue blood. And they have an anti bacterial compound in that blood. That is so sensitive. I can't remember it off the top of my head, but it's like, it can detect to like one 10,000th of a particle of some sort of foreign bacteria. That test made from that blood is used to test any new vaccine, any medical implant that goes into someone's body to make sure it's sterile. It's how we know if something is medical grade sterile is through horseshoe crab blood. It's incredible the resources that the oceans provide us that can help us to battle and heal.

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:22 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"But then from there, I was like, okay, now I'm done, now I need to go study and be a real marine biologist. So I went to do my doctoral work. Did that in the Caribbean did my degree at Scripps out in California, but on my field work was in the Caribbean and we were looking at how changes in fish populations affected reef health. Coral health and the health of all the other animals spent a lot of time underwater, counting corals, identifying corals in sea urchins and algae and fish, and this was in the early 2000s, and the plight of reefs was not yet really in the public news arena. So pour a bleaching and the collapse of coral reef systems that we have today, it had already started then. But again, there was not a lot of coverage of it. To be honest, it was actually a really humbling time in that I was supposed to be a coral reef biologist and I definitely learned more about seaweeds than I did corals because there were just so few girls to see. And so if you fish. It was just so in my face, right? That we had thoroughly demolished these ecosystems. I really became concerned that I'm documenting all these declines. I'm basically documenting all this death and degradation. And nobody knew about it. Nobody was paying attention to it. As a scientist, we can answer certain questions. We can conduct our studies and we can provide information. But it's not our field to apply that information. And so we need other disciplines to be involved and figure out what a solution is going to be. We need to include fishermen. We need to include law and policy folks. We need to include designers and innovators and technologists and engineers and artists who can think creatively about now that we have the information from science. What are we going to do about it? We need social scientists and philosophers and ethicists all of that. I felt very strongly at that time that while I'm a very good scientist, there's a lot of good scientists. What we need is someone who can bridge and who can start to be a voice for the oceans who can take the science and translate it into stories in ways that are going to motivate and engage folks and help to try to stimulate and be a catalyst for those solutions. I move more into the science communication world and at the same time became very interested in approaches that were inclusive of industry, especially fishing. There are different approaches to conservation and management. I think they're all important because we need a diverse set of tools. But to me, you can't just shut down the oceans and tell people not to go make a living anymore. First of all, we need the food. Second of all, these are cultural heritage and there's livelihoods, right? So I became really interested in how can you work with fishers, especially small scale artisanal fishers to try to come up with solutions that are going to restore some balance. For.

Caribbean California
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


04:31 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"My beginning, gosh, it's funny. I get asked this a lot, and I have no memory of not wanting to be in on or under the ocean. I sort of joke with my parents. I was actually born on the island of Bermuda in the Caribbean. And I just say that salt water that coral reef environment tropical reef environment just got into my blood from the first. I grew up on the coast and have just always wanted to be in it, exploring it. From first memory. So there was never sort of that choice of wanting to be a marine biologist. It was just there. Always. But I didn't know exactly what that meant. I wanted to be a marine biologist, but in my mind, at first, that meant being a naturalist. It meant being an explorer. Someone who could go out and spend my days just seeing what the ocean had to reveal to me, you know, how much further I could go, how much deeper I could go. I learned to scuba dive when I was 12. As soon as I was legally allowed to put a tank on my back and get down there, that's what I wanted to do. That sense at first was a very selfish enterprise, right? It was just curiosity and I just wanted to be in this playground. I'd say that that started to shift. Probably when I was about 1112 and did start diving. I was such a nerd. I went to a marine biology summer camp in Florida keys. That's when I first started to learn about the fact that the oceans were in trouble and that they weren't this untouchable pristine place anymore and that we as people were having impacts. And that made a huge impression on me and it started first with sharks actually. They were my first love and I understood that people were afraid of sharks, but the amount of killing that was happening, the amount of slaughter that was going on with shark populations and the numbers dropping. I still remember reading some of those first articles about shark finning and just how brutal it was and just feeling like, oh my God, how can this be happening? I have to do something. That was that first surge of, I guess, activism. You know, feeling like, I can't just explore. I need to study and figure out how I'm going to help fix some of this. I became really interested in sort of human impacts on the marine environment. I left high school early. I graduated in January and actually went down to a shark research station when I was 17 and lived down there and it was amazing and it was the first time I got to do field science and be out on boats and I was tagging sharks and tracking sharks and it was a dream come true. Still some of my fondest memories and the first time I saw a full 24 hour cycle on the water where you can watch the constellations rise and I don't know if you've ever seen this, but when a constellation first is on the horizon, it's huge. So if you imagine the big dipper or Orion, it's massive and then as it goes up it shrinks and looks smaller when it's at the apex and then it sinks and expands back down as the sun begins to rise. It's just this amazing experience to be where there's no light and it's still in quiet and you're on this little boat watching nature and wearing these headphones listening to this little pinging sound that was this shark that we were tracking and taking locations. I don't know what sharks decide I wanted to be a scientist that I wanted to understand and help understand what was happening to marine life and our impacts. When I went to college though I did this history of science degree because my folks actually were pretty influential, my dad sort of said, you know, you're going to be marine biologist. We've known this since you were two. So make sure you study other things so that you can bring that in. You're going to study marine biology for the rest of your life. This is a chance to go a little wider. And it was really good advice. So I did a liberal arts degree and did history of science and really understood learn about where the field comes from. I think there was a question you had later about sort of the role of oceans in the collective consciousness. And so I did a thesis about ocean conservation and.

Bermuda Caribbean Florida
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:00 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Corona under the ocean is a podcast series exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis on ocean research, as well as its effect on the ocean itself. Using the practice of storytelling, the ten chapters present conversations between writer and curator, Sonia Fernández pan, and guests from various disciplines. The series offers a transoceanic perspective emerging from the fields of marine science, post colonial studies, speculative histories and political imagination. The second episode of Corona under the ocean is the result of a conversation with marine biologist and storyteller, Mara J Hart. Its title, we are ocean life, originates from a statement Mara made during the conversation. In an attempt to account for our connection, not only current, but ancestral, with marine environments. Born on an island in the Caribbean, Mara's passion for the ocean began during her childhood in direct contact with water, and with a special predilection for sharks. Interdisciplinarity, fundamental for her when dealing with ocean matters, is crucial for Mara's practice as a marine biologist. The history and popularization of science, the fishing industry, the ongoing search for practical solutions and a great ability for storytelling, are some of the elements present in Mara Hart's research. Founder of ocean Inc and part of the blue ocean institute, her first book was published in 2016. Titled sex in the sea, it focuses on the sexual life of many marine beings, surprising and unusual from a human perspective. The conversation between Mara Hart and Sonya took place in mid April. For Mara and Hawaii, it was a Friday night. Sonia and Berlin was talking on a Saturday morning. The lockdown in many parts of the world was stricter then than it is now, which was beneficial to marine life. Despite the enormous problems that human activity has generated in the ocean, one of the ocean's characteristics is its great resilience and vitalism. This capacity for adaptation and regeneration is precisely one of the factors that drives maraud a seek practical and optimistically realistic solutions when it comes to protecting, preserving, and caring for marine life. The connection of the ocean with COVID-19 also appears from the oceans importance for pharmaceutical research and drug production. In fact, the test to diagnose COVID-19, among other diseases, was developed with the help of an isolated enzyme from a microbe found in the deep sea. The ocean as a resource for human life is not without its problems. One of them, Mara points out, is the perception of fish as a commodity and exchange value. The decrease in industrial fishing during the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to a local and less aggressive understanding of fishing. Perhaps it could also lead to a less extractivist understanding of the environment. Allowing the sea to be expanded and not diminished. Not only do we depend on the ocean on many levels. But all forms of life.

Mara Mara Hart Sonia Fernández Mara J Hart ocean Inc blue ocean institute Caribbean Sonya Sonia Berlin Hawaii COVID
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:48 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"With their environment. I have a friend who's one of the very few navigators of Oceania today and he knows how to navigate using his body when he goes on a canoe he could actually feel the waves he can feel the echoes of islands. Again, this is science is thinking about physics, but if you think about how the surface of the ocean gives off waves, waves are energy, so all islands have a signature. They have an echo. If you are good enough navigator, especially in the Marshall Islands, you can actually feel the wave with your body. You can actually feel it. It's this micro sensations that people feel in their bodies and it used to be that there were many, many more people that could do that. But the fact is not just colonization, but modernity, all of the technology that we enjoy today has detached all people from those kinds of roots. It would be ridiculous if we were to imagine a utopia where all of these islanders in the Pacific know about all their roots and they know all of this stuff and they're all living harmoniously in nature. No, of course not. There's a lot of trouble there. There's trouble.

Oceania Marshall Islands Pacific
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:21 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"This binary. When we talk about the Pacific, we have these regions called Micronesia, melanesia, Polynesia. I don't want to talk too much about that because really culturally that means something, but it doesn't mean too much. It's sort of based on the voyages of captain cook. It's based on different European geographers and their colonial views about the similarities or differences between people. Those are useful terms when we talk about maps, but if we were to look at the settlement of Oceania, one thing that's really important to consider is that the people that have been living there have been living there for thousands and thousands of years. That means that they navigated there themselves. They did not just drift on the ocean currents. It's been proven very, very scientifically that the people that we now call Pacific islanders are some of the most amazing navigators on earth. They managed to get to their islands. In the case of the melanesia area or the area that is in the southwest of the Pacific, tens of thousands of years ago up to maybe 30,000 years ago or so. And then if you look at the people in Micronesia, they also, that's in the they call it remote. I don't like that word, but the distant part of these small islands spread out all throughout the northern part of Oceania or the central part of Oceania. Massive distances, those people, they separated from their ancestors around Papua New Guinea and around Vanuatu and those places in the south, they turned left, and they went north, and they started traveling out something like 3000 years ago and started moving up into those parts of those islands. And they developed extremely amazing technology to do that. They built sales out of pandanus, coconut leaves, they built beautiful double hold outrigger canoes, and they were able to travel at sea for weeks and weeks and weeks, sometimes months. Using preserved food, a good navigator knew about medicine, he or sometimes she knew how to take care of their people. They might have had special magical powers. They did all kinds of amazing things like that. So those original sort of epic, amazing voyages, and they weren't just in one direction. They went back and forth between islands, so they had this strong connection between islands and of course they had wars. Of course they had typhoons and earthquakes and volcanos exploding. They're all kinds of terrible things that people were escaping from. Floods, famine, starvation, they needed to move to other islands, as they settled out throughout the Pacific from west across what we call Oceania to the east towards what we now call Polynesia closer out towards Tahiti or out towards Hawaii or rapa Nui, which is close to South America or we call it Easter Island as well, right? Or down to New Zealand, which is known as ote roa by the indigenous people there, those are much more recent voyages. Those are only like in the last thousand or so years. By the time they got all the way out to the east, these people had connected their roots, they'd connected their families all the way from their origins in Southeast Asia all the way across the Pacific. Genealogically, in terms of family in terms of humanity, they are all related to each other. They're all relatives essentially, and it's a massive family tree that spreads back over something like 30,000 years, if not longer, 40,000 years, going back into Southeast Asia and what we call Taiwan today in East Asia..

Oceania Micronesia Polynesia Pacific melanesia Vanuatu Papua New Guinea earthquakes rapa Nui Tahiti Easter Island South America Hawaii New Zealand Southeast Asia Taiwan East Asia
"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


04:08 min | 2 years ago

"ocean" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Under the ocean is a podcast series exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis on ocean research, as well as its effect on the ocean itself. Using the practice of storytelling, the ten chapters present conversations between writer and curator, Sonia Fernández pan, and guests from various disciplines. The series offers a transoceanic perspective emerging from the fields of marine science, post colonial studies, speculative histories and political imagination. The first episode, ocean is history, emerged from a conversation with professor and curator Greg dvorak, author of the book choral and concrete, remembering kwajalein atoll between Japan, America, and the Marshall Islands. Gregg teaches at waseda university in Tokyo, and researches the post colonial histories of Japan and the USA and Oceania. His work is related to his personal biography, spending part of his childhood on a U.S. Military base in kwajalein atoll in the Marshall Islands. The meeting with Gregg took place in mid April 2020, when the global lockdown was already becoming a new normal. He was in Tokyo and Sonya was in Berlin, able to connect on their screens precisely thanks to the network of underwater cables, with which the Internet also occupies the oceans. Their conversation began by questioning the notion of an island as a metaphor for human isolation, and as a pure surface of land floating on water, not only are the islands of the Pacific materially connected to each other on a geological level, underwater, but they are also connected on a social and cultural level. Thanks to the indigenous communities that have inhabited a common territory known as Oceania since the beginning of colonization. The effects of the different colonizing impulses and their violence on this territory have been devastating throughout the centuries. From Magellan's expedition to the nuclear testing in the 20th century, the local culture had been exoticized, the environment ruined, and the increase in tourism detrimental. In this regard the effects of COVID-19 should be read as one more chapter in the history of western and Asian power, exercised over the Pacific. In fact, what has been presented as an exceptional and unique pandemic is a product of.

kwajalein atoll Sonia Fernández Greg dvorak Marshall Islands Gregg America Tokyo Oceania Japan waseda university Sonya Berlin Pacific Magellan