24 Burst results for "Occupational Health"

Lets unmask the confusion about masks

The Big Story

05:25 min | 4 months ago

Lets unmask the confusion about masks

"I'm fought macedo. Sitting in for jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Jennifer mcdonald is a doctor physical medicine and rehabilitation in ottawa. And is one of the five hundred signatories on a letter calling federal and provincial governments to seriously address the aerosol transmission of covid nineteen. Hi dr mcdonald. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me so. I'm really curious about how this letter came about. Can you tell us a little more. Would its goals are and what the purpose was of writing and sending it to all the governments sure so it came about actually for me on my end. I was actually on maternity leave. And was reading up on the science of covid nineteen transmission and notice that there was quite a bit of controversy even between a leading experts and wanted to see more interdisciplinary collaboration. So as a rehabilitation doctor we are experts in interdisciplinary collaboration. And i thought while i am by no means an expert in nineteen i could bring my expertise in that collaborative approach to bring these disciplines and hopefully come to some sort of consensus on the science of transition. So that's how we got writing this letter and bringing these people together. We have doctors. Relevant scientists occupational health and safety experts as well as engineers as a part of the team. We're sort of like a loose coalition all with interest in promoting this route of transmission which is air assault or airborne transmission. So that was the goal of the is to ask our country as a whole as well as each province to better acknowledged the importance of aerosol transmission as well as to implement appropriate measures to combat it so clearly. This wasn't happening because you had to write about it. I i noted in the in the letter that you you mentioned or all signatories mentioned that international scientists came together to i bring up this issue. In july of twenty twenty and yet nothing has been done in canada since and the public's understanding of transmission seems to have become murkier and honestly more confusing. So i'm wondering if you can explain how the virus is transmitted is it. Airborne is transmitted through aerosols. And and what's the difference really Yes and i think that's kind of the heart of the issue is that term airborne and it's very contentious amongst some experts in public health as well as infection prevention and control. They reserve that term for diseases that have ironclad proof that they transmit through the air at very far distances in after a long period of time so an example is musil's that We have proof that it can be transmitted between faraway rooms and if a person left that room in that someone else came in an hour later they would get infected so basically the they're not wanting to use that term to describe covid nineteen since we know that in the majority of cases people are getting transmitted at close contact so when they are With somebody close to them so in terms of how covid nineteen can be transmitted. There's sort of three modes that we hear about in. That's full night's droplets and airborne or aerosol transmission so in terms of how someone can get infected by code nineteen truffaut mites. That would be if an example of that would be you. Wipe your eyes. You have copa. Nineteen and then you shake someone's hand and then that person wipes their ira reps their nose and they get infected So that's off. We focused on hand hygiene now. Interestingly full might trent full night's transmission is not found to be the main mechanism. And that's actually recognized by most of the big public health bodies that yes it's likely important but it's not the main issue so then we get to droplets and aerosols so you can think of a large droplet at transmission as a large saliva canon ball or spitball coming at you and basically that's protected from the person off when they're coughing or sneezing and would land on your eye or on your mouth and therefore Make entry into your body. And infect those cells in the nose or mouth or is in the upper respiratory tract and the thought is over time. It might migrate down into down into the lungs causing more dangerous viral pneumonia. What has been ignored in medicine. I must as dr. I was not taught about this. Possibility is the idea of aerosols being important at close ranges well so a good example is to think of smoke and if someone smoking and you're standing next to them and they breathe a big plume of smoke directly in your face while you're gonna inhale quite a bit of that smoke in it's coined probably to make you cough and turn your head away. So imagine aerosol says smoke and they're going to be most concentrated when you're close together so eric. Short range aerosol transmission or airborne transmission at close contact with. Someone is still an important vote of transmission. It's not really being discussed. And so basically the difference between airborne and air assault is more semantics. Actually i think it's actually easier if we use the term airborne to describe it 'cause the public that makes sense to

Macedo Jordan Heath Rawlings Jennifer Mcdonald Dr Mcdonald Musil Ottawa Canada Trent Pneumonia Eric
Amazon offers to help U.S. with vaccine in letter to President Biden

WBZ Afternoon News

00:17 sec | 5 months ago

Amazon offers to help U.S. with vaccine in letter to President Biden

"Amazon is offering to help accelerate the distribution of covert 19 vaccines in a letter to President Biden today, of course, Dave Clark, the incoming CEO of Amazon's retail units, as the company has a contract with an occupational health provider to administer vaccines at its facilities.

President Biden Amazon Dave Clark
"occupational health" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:57 min | 8 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic Q&A. I'm Deedee Steven as positive cases of covid-19 continue to spike across much of the country the role of contact tracing to prevent further spread becomes even more important when it comes to contact tracing quarantining and isolation timing is critical to prevent further exposures and spread disease joining us to discuss is Mayo Clinic preventive Medicine Specialists. Dr. Lora Brewer. Dr. Brewer is medical director of Occupational Health Services at Mayo Clinic. Welcome to the program with dr. Could you describe contact tracing and what role it plays in preventing further spread of the virus? Yes, I'd be happy to so contact tracing is essential the process of identifying those who may have been exposed to someone with covid-19 doing a risk assessment of that exposure and facilitating quarantine if we do identify that wage, Risk of developing covet and that quarantine make sure that that person stays home does not intern expose others. Should they develop covid-19 that 14 days so early on in this pandemic your team in Occupational Health developed digital tools to conduct contact tracing. Can you explain for our audience how this works our staff really made at the information much more quickly and we needed to be able to assess them as quickly as possible so that we could help them quarantine. So we developed digital tools including a digit off contact list. So we integrated our Occupational Health database to pull in information from our HR database for our employees so that we could send a contact log to a supervisor and they could go through and actually pick the names of their employees send it back to us, and we would have their phone numbers at our fingertips to be able to start reaching out and calling them immediately dead. We also developed a second tool which was an exposed employee assessment form. So when the supervisor submits that contact log every one of those employees who is potentially exposed to get some email in their workplace inbox to ask them certain questions about potential exposure and by doing that we're able to notify anywhere from 1 to 50 people all in a few seconds that they may have been exposed and then we go through and we do the we do the digital assessment and we've created some processes to facilitate the work of multiple different teams with that. We outlined our processes and a paper on Mayo Clinic proceedings so that it can be shared with others if they're interested in looking at that how has a compact racing evolved over these past few months and and does this this current search and Kobe cases that were seeing impact how contact missing works.

Mayo Clinic Dr. Lora Brewer Mayo Clinic preventive Medicin supervisor Occupational Health Services Deedee Steven intern Kobe medical director
"occupational health" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:04 min | 8 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Guidance on shielding in August of this year, which means shielding has now been paused so that means in practice you can go to work and if you cannot work from home as long as there's business is what they call covert safe now and it's important to note that this guidance is advisory. So what I would suggest, you know, the first step really is you should just first of all have a discussion wage Employer and agree your plan for returning to work. Now where you work is a question mark you know, so as I've said with the previous series, you know under the equality act which applies in England Scotland and Wales and the disability Discrimination Act which applies in Northern Ireland. Your employer has a legal obligation to make what we call reasonable adjustments to help you assemble with cancer to stay home work and that could be a variety of different things including helping you to work from home. So I suppose what to say to people if people are not feeling safe have that discussion with the employer employer particular with your line manager as your first point of contact and discuss the situation discuss what they're doing in the business what measures they're taking to make the workplace code would safe and if you're still not fitting that that's a safe environment for you, then I'd suggest, you know, you talk to your employer about alternative working Arrangements if that's possible. This is all in an Ideal World with a reasonable employer wage. And a job that you can drive to and get out of the car and get you know and get straight into the office. What about for those people who are contacting that Millions support line because they're they're genuinely worried about returning home after furlough. They might not be in such an accommodating place of work or a practically easy place of work to get to having to use public transport, for example, so what page first of all is actually really try to understand the risk and my first suggestion would be if you're speak to your clinical team. Now if somebody is going thru cancer treatment and and hopefully they'll be able to talk to their Consultants or their nurse specialist if they have access to one and the clinical team should be able to advise you on your health risk based on your condition and you are treatments and everybody's going to be different and this is something that's important to understand just because you have cancer doesn't necessarily mean that you're all automatically at higher risk. It depends on your type of cancer where you are in your tree log. Journey so it's important really first of all, I think to you know, find out the right information. So you understand the health risk for you. If you don't have access to your consultant or a nurse specialist also, you could find your g p and thought you to be about your condition and what you know things you need to be concerned about because again, not everybody will be in the same position. So it's really important to try and for yourself find out what the risks are for you then I would suggest that the next step then would be to go and talk to your workplace. Now. Your first point of contact is always your line manager there there the person that you know are responsible for you. And so you should talk to them about, you know, the information you get from your your clinicians your GP about the risks that you face and then talk to them in detail about you know, what measures they're taking in order to protect you as a worker in that business now, they have a duty and an obligation to provide, you know a safe environment for you as an employee. And so they need to take that very month. Seriously now, you know, there are also other people that you could talk to in the business as well now depends very much on the size of the business and the type of the business but there will be some businesses that would have health and safety officers that you can speak to they'll be others where you have access to what we call Occupational Health which are you know health services that are attached to a business and you could ask for a referral to your Occupational Health practitioner and they should be able to then advise you and the headline manager about what sort of adjustments would need to take place in order to help you to get back into the workplace. So there are some steps that you can take I'm not saying that everything I say here is going to absolutely help every single person out there with their own scenario, but I'm hopeful that it will help people to know what steps to take in order to be able to take control of the situation for themselves so that they understand the risks and what they can do as an employee to support themselves. I guess that you know birth. Taking back control thing is is is comes back again and again and again when we talk about cancer diagnosis and and arming yourself, I guess with the facts as well. That was there's really interesting thing that you said about, you know, making sure that you are in, you know in possession of your risk level and so it's not kind of something that's a bit amorphous for your employee. It's actually you know, here we are. This is it and it makes life a lot easier. If you go as informed as you possibly can to that conversation, it seems yeah, absolutely, you know, the more you know about what you need to protect your health the better position you'll be in to be able to have a conversation with your employer and hopefully your employer will be reasonable and we'll try and support you every you know, every worker has a value and and nobody wants to you know lose people unnecessarily and I'm sure there are lots of lots of efforts that are being made by employers. You mentioned reasonable adjustments. Can you just sort of pick that apart a little bit about what else that might look like a part-time job? Social distancing in an office space and hand sanitizer everywhere. What else might you be able to have a conversation about? Yeah. Well again just to State again. There's the equality act in in that applies in England Scotland Wales and disability Discrimination Act in Northern Ireland and those pieces of legislation say that your employer must make reasonable adjustments when would work place or work practices puts you at a substantial disadvantage because you have cancer and now and that is compared to other colleagues who do not have cancer. So what this means practices that your employer needs to think, you know creatively and you can think as an employee creatively about what sort of changes could be made to allow you to stay at work. Now the context of coronavirus these can be you know, flexible working arrangements. So for example, you know, let's think about if you were traveling to a job, but you didn't want to travel at rush hour because there will be more people. On and increases your risk then a flexible working arrangement might mean travelling later in the morning or coming back late earlier in the evening or later in the evening. Whatever works for you in order to be able to walk to do your job. There's also very good scheme. They're out there called access to work. It's a government scheme and they can pay for certain types of adjustments and it's called government jobs. Best kept secret in many ways because it's a it's a scheme there that the employer and and use an employee can look into to see if it can cover things like travel you might be able to wage claim for maybe first class train travel for example, or pay for taxis to and from work. If you're feeling that that will protect you and give you more security and that is a reasonable adjustment to suck you to stay in your employment changing work patterns shift patterns providing access to things like software and equipment from home so that you'd be able to do your job from home giving you the song. The computer is everything else that you might need in order to be able or even Wi-Fi access to Wi-Fi. So I suppose the important thing is to remember that anything could be considered an adjustment anything that allows you to keep a job could be considered but it must be reasonable what's reasonable for one employer might not be reasonable for another employer. It kind of depends on you know, how big is your business? You know, the finances the sort of adjustment that you're actually asking for so it's it's it's very like it's very specific to that kind of situation that you're in. So again, you know your relationship as an employee if you have cash with your line manager is so important but knowing your rights I think gives you again the confidence to know what you can approach and what you could talk to your employer about and that's hugely important choice. Absolutely, I guess as well the reality of coronavirus and the pandemic is that not everybody will be having as positive and experience in the workplace. We would hope and if people do end up having money worries, they are there other places that they can turn to what should they be doing initially now McMillan has a range of really great services that can support people with cancer. We have a wonderful team of financial guides and they can explain lots of options available and things that need to think about and things that you need to do so they can cover things like your budgeting and you're planning mortgages what to do with mortgages. Maybe you need to take a mortgage break for a while. They can support you about what song versation so you need to have with your building Society or your bank. They provide you information on your pension. For example, if you want to take early retirement Insurance options issues around Financial products is overdrafts. And also if you have debt and how you would manage your death in the unfortunate outcome that you lose your job. We have a team of fantastic welfare advisors who offer home Ice on benefits and other types of support that you might be able to Avail on such as you know council tax breaks as well. And then we've a team a small team of energy advisers who can talk to you about you know, how did you pay your gas or electricity or water bills, you know, and they're really really great team as well to to call and all of these services are available on the Mac Miller and support line, which is a free confidential find that anybody can call. I think there is some tangible Rising tension as well about the the job retention scheme finishing the end of October at people might be terribly worried about a thousand C's at this time. Oh, absolutely. So well the job retention scheme as as you said or the further scheme it's as it's known ends on the 31st of October 2020 now to end for a low employers should give stuff notice in writing if they're going to end the first game and there's no minimum notice. For furlough but employers they should talk to staff about The plant stand for as early as possible and they need to encourage staff to raise any concerns. They have about or problems around returning to work. So that's that's hugely important. Is there anything replacing it that's planned? Yes. So there's a new scheme called the job support scheme. Now, this is a is a scheme. It's designed to protect what they call viable wage jobs in businesses. There are businesses who are facing a lower demand over the winter months because of covet and it's there to help keep their employees attached to the workforce. Now the scheme is on the 1st of November and it runs for six months so over the winter. So what happens in that scenario is that the company will continue to pay the employee for the time worked but the cost of the arrows not worked. So there's not that they're not working. They will be split three ways between the employer between the government and the employee so the government will wage. Up to I think it's about a third but to a certain cap and the employee would obviously pay a bit too through wage and reduction but the whole point is trying to enable the employee to keep their job. Now the scheme isn't as generous as the previous job pretentious game, but you know your employer may be may try to take advantage of that, you know, if they're facing difficult because of covert over the the next six months. It's a really really difficult time isn't it? And I think in you know where so much is in certain and there is so much with worry and concern on top of a cancer diagnosis having such clear.

cancer Northern Ireland consultant England Scotland Occupational Health Wales England Scotland Wales Mac Miller McMillan
"occupational health" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now he's close to qualification, said Rufus, You're talking about yourself. I said, Oh yes, Mary. I am she said. Well, it shouldn't be a problem, she said. What was the mental problem? I said, Well, they gave me a diagnosis. Schizophrenia. Oh, dear, she said. Let's just think he marry. Think of your book. You know it is delusion and I said to her look. I had some problems when I was 18. I haven't taken medication since the age of 19. I really want to train as a psychologist. I don't have to keep this secret anymore, she said. Rufus relation of light. Well, Mary, I'm not sure I would have got to where I am today for hand of light. One of my more sanctimonious moments. She said. Well, I want to support you. We want to support you, but we're gonna have to take this further. So they spoke to the Occupational Health Department and the Occupational Health Department said. Well, what do you think? Do you think he's worth standing by? And they said Yes, we do. And they said, Well, we'll have to talk to his GP. So I wrote to My GP and my GP wrote a report saying that at the age of 18, I had a nervous breakdown related to family related stress. It had psychotic features. It'll? That sounds good. That sounds a lot better in schizophrenia. I wish they had told me that at the time. What they told me at the time was to have to take medication for the rest of my life. I had this lifelong illness and I need to lower my expectations of what I could achieve. Was a bit rebellious. I didn't believe him. I got through. I had a clean slate. I could now be open. Mary on the team supported me. And qualified and I got a job in east London. And I wanted to be honest. I didn't know how to bring that part of me in. I'd hoped in psychology I could bring in is a form of wisdom. But there never seemed the place for it. Personal experience just didn't seem to fit in there. A year later, there was a conference. Hands. They really wanted to hear stories of people coming through. It's what scene is severe mental illness, and so I wrote and applied to give a talk and they took a risk. They never heard of me, and I got to give a talk about My journey. And how I worked as a professional. I wanted to bring the two things together. How what experienced in psychiatry heavy drugs. No talking. A bit of doom and gloom. A bit of occupational therapy. How that influenced me and what I had found helpful on DH. How I would work Two people before I gave the talk is really important to look like I was saying. So I wore my best shirt. I did a few press ups before hand. A bit of yoga. Look serene and And There was AH woman next to me, Sandra. She's like the fairy godmother of the hearing Voices movement. The hearing voices movement is like a network of self help. Groups of people hear voices. She was next to me and told her it was my first ever talk. She's really nice. And as I was giving my talk 150 people there. And I was talking about people who helped me and inspired me. And one of the people I was talking about was my mother. My mother had a brain hemorrhage when I was 11. And Together with my dad and family and friends. She done lots of excited I'd seen her. Make a real strong come come back from her brain hemorrhage. I was talking about how it inspired me. And I paused. Sandra said. You're doing really well. Something inside broke on DH. I just started to cry. Which was a disaster. I wanted to prepare, sorted. That's how we're trained in clinical psychology to appear like a sanity consultant. And not only was I crying There were sobs. I couldn't speak. And I looked to the audience to my friend for support. And to my horror. She was crying too. So I thought I'm gonna have to leave the stage. And I just said Offhand, really. Someone help me out. And a guy stood up at the back and start clapping and then everybody started clapping. And I could breathe. And the sub's subsided. I could carry on. I finished my speech, and I felt like I brought these two parts of my life together the professional and the personal and I felt like a spiritually come home. It was valued. Finally And.

Mary Rufus Sandra Occupational Health Department London consultant
"occupational health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mary. I am she said. Well, it shouldn't be a problem, she said. What was the mental health problem? I said, Well, they gave me a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Oh, dear, she said. Let's just think he marry. Think of your book. No, it's his delusion. Home and I said to her No. I had some problems when I was 18. I haven't taken medication since the age of 19. Really wantto train is a psychologist. I don't have to keep this secret anymore, she said. Rufus, you really shouldn't have light. Possible, Mary, I'm not sure I got where I am today for hand of light. One of my more sanctimonious moments. She said. Well, I want to support you. We want to support you, but we're gonna have to take this further. So they spoke to the Occupational Health Department and the Occupational Health Department said. Well, what do you think? Do you think he's worth standing by? And they said Yes, we do. And they said, Well, we'll have to talk to his GP. So I wrote to My GP and my GP wrote a report saying that at the age of 18, I had a nervous breakdown related to family related stress. It had psychotic features. Ethel. That sounds good. That sounds a lot better in schizophrenia. I wish they had told me that at the time. What they told me at the time was I have to take medication for the rest of my life. I had this lifelong illness and that I need to lower my expectations of what I could achieve. I was a bit rebellious. I didn't believe him. I got through. I had a clean slate. I could now be open. Mary on the team supported me. And qualified and I got a job in east London. And I wanted to be honest. I didn't know how to bring that part of me. And I'd hoped in psychology I could bring in as a former wisdom, but they never seemed the place for it. Personal experience just didn't seem to fit in there. A year later, there was a conference. And they really wanted to hear stories of people coming through. It's what's seen in severe mental illness. And so I wrote on DH applied to give a talk and they took a risk. They've never heard of me, and I got to give a talk about My journey. And how I worked as a professional. I wanted to bring the two things together. How what experienced in psychiatry heavy drugs. No talking. A bit of doom and gloom. A bit of occupational therapy. How that influenced me and what I've had found helpful on DH. How I would work two people before I get to talk. It was really important to look like I was saying So I wore my best shirt. I did a few press ups before hand. A bit of yoga. Look serene and And There was AH woman next to me, Sandra Atia. She's like the fairy godmother of the hearing Voices Movement. Hearing voices movement is like a network of self help. Groups of people hear voices. She was next to me on DH told her. It was my first ever talk, and she's really nice. And as I was giving my talk 150 people there. And I was talking about people who helped me and inspired me. And one of the people I was talking about was my mother. My mother had a brain hemorrhage when I was 11. And Together with my dad and family and friends. She done lots of exercises. I'd seen her. Make a real strong come come back from her brain hemorrhage. I was talking about how it inspired me. And I paused. Sandra Asher said. You're doing really well. And something inside broke and I just started to cry. Which was a disaster. I wanted to prepare, sorted. That's how we're trained in clinical psychology to appear like a sanity consultant. Um and not only was I crying There was subs. I couldn't speak and I looked to the audience to my friend for support. And to my horror. She was crying, too. So I thought I'm gonna have to leave the stage and I just said Offhand, really. Someone help me out. And a guy stood up in the back and started clapping. And everybody started clapping. And I could breathe. And the sub's subsided. I could carry on. I finished my speech, and I felt like I brought these two parts of my life together the professional and the personal and and I felt like I spiritually come home. It was valued. Finally.

Sandra Atia Mary Ethel Rufus Occupational Health Department London Sandra Asher consultant
State fines beef plant $957 after huge coronavirus outbreak

Democracy Now! Audio

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

State fines beef plant $957 after huge coronavirus outbreak

"The Trump Administration has find The Operators of a beef slaughterhouse plant just $957 off after they failed to protect workers from Contracting coronavirus on-the-job 338 of the plants 850 workers got sick during a major outbreak at the Iowa premium beef place. In April this week the occupational health and safety administration ordered a $1,914 fine against the company for record-keeping violations. Then agreed to cut that fine and 1/2 off negotiations with Executives. The Associated Press reports for other meat plants in Iowa with major outbreaks received no fines at all, despite hundreds of covid-19 has and nine deaths down at the plants at

Trump Administration Iowa The Associated Press
"occupational health" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:57 min | 10 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"During the height of the outbreak, authorities are proposing a fine of $28,000 against the home. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration said the violations were serious and added They were notified after a healthcare. Employeesunion filed complaints lawsuit trying to force in New York City into reopening Door dining is still moving forward despite indoor dining being given the okay for later this month, Assemblywoman Nicole Malia Takis says the city is being discriminated against 25% capacity is still treating us differently than the other municipalities in this state. Every other municipality is operating at 50% capacity. We want to be treated the same. We meet the metrics like everybody else. Indoor dining resume September 30th a 25% capacity in New York City restaurant owners are struggling and say that percentage won't be enough to keep many in business. This Saturday night Live will be back in the studio for its 46th season. Liz Warner reports the show and its cast will be back Broadcasting in person from Studio eight H at 30 Rock on October 3rd following several months hiatus due to the pandemic. SNL is last Live episode was March the seventh, and they aired several virtual episodes during the lock down in April and May. Returning cast members host and musical guest for the upcoming season have yet to be announced. Liz Warner, New York and Cowboys quarterback Dak Scott is being called a true leader by Jerry Jones family for admitting he suffers from depression, Dallas Cowboys executive Vice President Charlotte Jones Anderson posted on social media, Prescott showed the ultimate act of strength by being vulnerable and expressing his true self, Prescott said earlier this week, he dealt with depression at the start of the Corona virus pandemic. I went into counseling. Scott's brother also committed suicide in April. Lisa Taylor, NBC news radio. Thank you Santa Fe for voting us among the best consignment home Interior stores in the Santa Fe reporter. We couldn't have done it without you. Nearly 40 years, we have served our community of Santa Face First Consignment Gallery..

New York City Liz Warner Santa Face First Consignment G Santa Fe Assemblywoman Nicole Malia Tak Prescott Occupational Health and Safety Dak Scott depression SNL Dallas Cowboys Charlotte Jones Anderson NBC Jerry Jones executive Vice President Cowboys Lisa Taylor reporter
Advancing Life Quality with Objective Research and Action with Jenna LeComte - Hinely

Outcomes Rocket

06:41 min | 10 months ago

Advancing Life Quality with Objective Research and Action with Jenna LeComte - Hinely

"Welcome back to the PODCAST. Privilege of hosting Dr on account timely she's the CEO of Hark Inc. Heart stands for health assessment and research for communities. She obtained her PhD at Portland State University in the field of applied psychology with an expertise in occupational health psychology, and she strives to keep workers happy healthy and productive. The idea of data and evaluation is something that we all tend to cringe when we hear. But today we're going to dive into why it's actually good and how it. Could really appropriately help the health of communities when we think about the topics of a social determinants of health and how he each WanNa Tackle B.'s whether you be a provider organization a Public Health Organization or just an entrepreneur trying to add value to the ecosystem. Today's conversations really gonNA dive into how we can take a look at data on evaluations as a positive thing Dr Lee count timely has served on the board of many nonprofits including John Senior Center. Health and HIV aging research project among others her passion for. The healthcare ecosystem and giving I really inspiring and I think you'll enjoy today's conversation. So Jenna privilege to have you with us today. Thank you for having me. So what are I missing your intro that maybe you want to share with the listeners? Pretty, comprehensive. So Hark is a nonprofit in addition to sort of serving on their boards of nonprofits. They also route one and that I think that they kadhamy that seeing it from both sides has been really important. So we're really a nonprofit that there's other nonprofits and other health and Human Services Agencies, which is a very rewarding thing to do love that. Now that's key. So what is it? That got you interested in in healthcare ecosystem to begin with? Well, I'd say we are more focused on health not health care health care is only a small piece of your overall health. The county health rankings models shows that clinical care only counts for about twenty percent of ultimate health. Outcomes the length of your life and the quality of your life. The rest is all about those social and economic factors, the physical environment, your health behaviors. So I typically think of myself as in the health sector, not the healthcare because it's so much broader, but it's a good distinction. Yeah. Yeah and I got into through research I started doing research when I was nineteen and I, just loved it. It's so fun to find the systematic way to find answers to your questions, but I always wanted to do meaningful research. So not which candy flavored do you like best but research that actually helps people. So I started off studying doing research in gender discrimination and from. There I got into occupational health psychology. So that's the how to keep workers happy healthy and productive. So that's what I studied in Grad School and my thesis and my dissertation were both on the topic of work life balance and its impact on your physical and mental health, and so after that, I was looking for a job and I found the job director of research at initially I was director of research for about three years and I became CEO about four years ago, and it was really exciting to me like I could not have crafted a better job because it's so fun to do. We have so many different clients and to do research one day on. A fall prevention programs for seniors and the next day on a literacy program for kids. It's so diverse that we really get this wonderful full circle picture of what is health and our community I love that and I could hear the passion in your voice when you when you talk about the different topics and I'm glad that at the beginning of our discussion and you prefaced it with, Hey, you know health health is big thing. It's not just the point of care that we're so used to focusing on and so as you've conducted the work that you do what's been an inside or an outcome that you've helped your your customers achieve that's different. Hard is really Where data geeks all of us and we're really designed to be that sort of outsourced, the many small nonprofits want to be evidence based, but they can't afford to have a researcher on staff fulltime. So that's where we come in to customize on. So that's how we have the this diversity of clients and honestly I'm not doing anything that changes lives. My clients are using the data that we give them to change lives, which is magical and so happy to be a part of. that. Is Sort of a negative connotation but I, it's it's accurate. In a positive way. Yeah. Yeah. So one of the things we do actually what was launched for us, we do this huge community health survey of the Coachella Valley in Southern, California and we provide that data back to the community at no charge so he can use it and I think what's most Encouraging and exciting is how some people have used it to change lives, and one of my favorite examples is desert. AIDS project is a federally Qualified Health Center, an FQHC here in the desert, and this really illustrates that we do this survey, every three years, and the first time. There was no questions about HIV and delegates projects. Said I think we need to. Add One. So at the next survey, we added a question whether an adult had ever been tested for HIV just ever in your entire life and we found out that almost seventy percent of adults in our region had never been tested for HIV, and they didn't know their status and that's terrifying given that we have an HIV prevalence that's twice the national average. So based on that. Desert AIDS project launched get tested Catella Valley, which was this three year public health campaign. It was five million dollars there was so many partners working together to get everybody tested, and for those who tested positive connecting them to care. So they had US do some research on wire people getting tested and wires some others not, and one of the things that we found was super important. We talked to you providers we talked to people who had been tested for HIV and said. Why did you get tested and one of the top to answer was my doctor offered it we talked people who'd never been tested and said, why haven't you been tested and one of the top two answers was my doctor never offered it so it became clear that physician input is really important to a really large component of the campaign focused on provider education rather than patient education I mean, it's always great if your patients are activated engaged in asking for an HIV test. But it's most important that the provider themselves is they're offering HIV test.

HIV Public Health Organization Qualified Health Center CEO Portland State University Director Of Research Hark Inc Hark Catella Valley Dr Lee Jenna Human Services Agencies John Senior Center California Researcher Grad School Southern Fqhc
"occupational health" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We have the author of Loving your Life and also another book by her anxiety warrior, Alka Shoals. My guess She's a psychotherapist from Canada, and she'll talk about what to do about anxiety or panic attacks. Whether you're suffering from phobias or maybe depression, possibly addictions or pain management. We'll talk about that, hopefully, in time allowing so we'll talk everything having to do with mental and emotional health with Elkins Shoals and then later in this hour, Jean Alfieri joins us. He's the author of Blessed to Be Me. Nall of capturing the stories of your life and capturing those memories in a journal and she calls it kind of a pandemic Journalist, he says. It's very important that you not only doctors and nurses and medical professionals but also, um you know, regular everyday Joe Q public record What's going on now, for you know, either as a family legacy, or just look back on to reflect on and the coming months and years, all right? Some news to get to before we get to onto our regular features of the of the programme, which is a fitness file matters of sexual health and the funny bone pharmacy emailing nonstop can harm your health. This was a study or employees who felt they had to respond to e mails immediately, even when they weren't on the clock, And they reported were sleep higher levels of ah burnout and more health related absences from work. This is from the Journal of Occupational Health. It's like Ology. They added that workers who were expected to be available even when they aren't at work, experience and elevated stress response. They measured their cortisol levels and found that out, and, uh, let's see just to conclude this article to the here. C ous faras. Your body's concerned being available to work while off the clock does not register as leisure time, according to the experts, job contracts or two contacts. Scuse me and work availability outside regular business hours are associated with impaired well being. So if you're off the clock stay off the clock. But it's interesting that 52% Here's another survey that found 52% of employed Americans check their work email even when they have a signal. Here, take a sick day or if they're, you know, Okay, are on a day off and not working that day. How do smartphones mess with our brains? Well, there's almost Thing more compelling to humans and social interaction and information, right. The fake Burke and insta Shana's I called them, but it's because you know the reason they're addictive is it activates your brain's reward system? You get that pill coming hit and a cognitive psychologist says it's a focus destroyer as well. One study found. It can take your brain 15 to 25 minutes to get back to where it wass after stopping to check email. Another study found that You spend a lot of time media multitasking, as it's called, tend to have less gray matter and part of the brain involved in thought and emotion. Control in the same characteristics are associated with obsessive compulsive disorder, as well as depression and anxiety disorders, according to neurology, neuroscientists. So what can you do to get back in control? Well, meditation, spending time in nature exercise and most of all, limiting your smartphone use. All right, some nutrition or ah, health trivia for you from factoids that there may not be a value. Well, here's one long is known record. You think you've been constipated, longest known record for constipation, 102 days that that's over three buds. My gosh. Well, the same toilet paper bills. Heaviest organs in your human body are in the human body are your lungs which together way about 42 ounces. Choose if you were locked in a completely sealed room and would die of carbon. You would die rather of carbon dioxide poisoning before your die of oxygen deprivation, And this brings to mind masks and now squaring and the controversy there Because you're covering dioxide levels in the blood do go up. Oxygen levels go down. Uh, most sensitive finger is the forefinger and surgeons perform. Excuse may perform. Better during operations if they're listening to music. All right, let's go to the fitness file.

Jean Alfieri Alka Shoals Elkins Shoals Journal of Occupational Health Nall Canada cortisol Burke
"occupational health" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:51 min | 11 months ago

"occupational health" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We have the author of Loving Your Life and also another book by her anxiety Warrior, and Alka Scholes is my guest. She's a psychotherapist from Canada, and she'll talk about what to do about anxiety or panic attacks. Whether you're suffering from phobias or maybe depression, possibly addictions or pain management. We'll talk about that, hopefully and time allowing, so we'll talk everything. Having to do with mental and emotional health with Elkin Shoals and then later in this hour, Jean Alfieri joins us. He's the author of Blessed To Be Me a Guide a journal of capturing the stories of your life and capturing those memories in a journal, and she calls it kind of a pandemic journals, he says. It's very important that you not only doctors and nurses and medical professionals, but also, um No regular everyday Joe. Q public record What's going on now, for you know, either as a family legacy, or just to look back on to reflect on and the coming months and years. Alright, some news to get to before we get to onto our regular features of the of the programme, which is a fitness file matters of sexual health and the funny bone pharmacy emailing nonstop can harm your health. This was a study. He or employees who felt they had to respond to e mails immediately, even when they weren't on the clock, And they reported were sleep higher levels of ah burnout and more health related absences from work. This is from the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. The added that workers who were expected to be available even when they aren't at work experience an elevated stress response. They measured their cortisol levels and found that out and let's see just This article to the here, C ous faras. Your body's concerned being available to work while off the clock does not register as leisure time, according to the experts, job contracts or two contacts. Excuse me and work availability outside regular business hours are associated with impaired wellbeing. So if Europe o'clock stay off the clock, but it's interesting that 52% Here's another survey that found 52% of employed him. Americans check their work email even when they have a sickness or take a sick day or if there you know you are on a day off and not working that day. How do smartphones mess with our brains? Well, there's almost nothing more compelling to humans and social interaction and information, right? The fake Burke and institution as I call them, But it's because you know, the reason they're addictive is activates your brain's reward system. Get that Phil coming hit and a cognitive psychologist says it's a focus destroyer as well. One study found. It can take your brain 15 to 25 minutes to get back to where it wass after stopping to check email. Another study found that people who spend a lot of time media multitasking, as it's called, tend to have less pre matter and part of the brain involved in thought and emotion. Control on the same characteristics are associated with obsessive compulsive disorder as well. Depression and anxiety disorders, according to neurology, neuroscientists. So what can you do to get back in control? Well, meditation spending time in nature exercise and most of all, limiting your smartphone use alright, some nutrition or of health trivia for yous, factoids that there may not be of value. Well, here's one long its own record. You think you've been constipated, longest known record for constipation, 102 days that that's over three buds. My gosh. Well, the same toilet paper bills. Heaviest organs in your human body are in the human body are your lungs which together way about 42 ounces. If you were locked in a completely sealed room and would die of carbon, you would die rather of carbon. Dioxide poisoning before you die of oxygen deprivation, And this brings to mind masks and now squaring and the controversy there because your carbon dioxide levels in the blood do go up oxygen levels go down. Uh, most sensitive finger is the forefinger and surgeons perform. Excuse me perform better during operations. If they're listening to music, All right, let's go to the fitness file. Running, running at 85%.

Alka Scholes Joe Journal of Occupational Health Jean Alfieri Elkin Shoals cortisol Europe Canada Depression Burke Phil
"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Collins of Maine is now facing her toughest reelection campaign yet are Laura Ross Brow. Them reports. He's running against. Main House Speaker Sarah Gideon who won the Democratic primary this week. The Cook Political Report calls me in one of the closest Senate races. It's also become the most expensive in the state's history. American government Professor Sandy Mazel Colby College thinks he knows wise Senator Collins approval rating is less than forty percent. It used to be in the high sixties. She lost it frankly by keep boats. Boats on important trump initiatives particularly his tax plan the nomination of just Kevin, on and the votes unimpeachable Collins won the last Centrists Republicans voted with President Donald Trump on these three issues most critically confirming Justice Breyer Kavanagh's domination to the Supreme Court. The cons has been the center for twenty four years in Gideon, is still an unknown on the National Political Scene University of Maine political science professor Mark Brewer, necessary gains track record in the main house has been largely liberal, although she won the primary moderate Democratic candidate. I says it would benefit Senator Collins is you can help get more symbols money through the US Senate the senator. Herself is teasing that they're going. Be Able to get that done right, so I think that's going to be something. That's GONNA. Play into this race to the paycheck. Protection Program has been hugely important for a number of not just mainers. Ericans asked the Collins helped write the paycheck protection program. However, breath thinks that Gideon campaign could have the edge if it can convince enough voters, cons has changed during the trump era, and in the absence of federal guidelines this week Virginia's become the first thing to adopt mandatory workplace safety rules to prevent spreading the coronavirus virus. The states, safety and health codes board voted nine to two on Wednesday to adopt emergency temporary standards after Labor groups pushed for stronger policies, according to Kim Bobo with Virginia. Interfaith Center for Public Policy She hails Governor Ralph Northam for creating a blueprint to protect workers when she says the Occupational Health and Safety Administration has failed to the federal government has remake and setting a national Osha standards that. That would have protected everybody across the country, but in Virginia. You know we're led by a doctor. Really understand. This is understand that spread in the workplace can really help spread in the entire society, a coalition of Virginia Business and Industry groups opposed the new regulations saying they're unnecessary. Because many businesses already follow.

Senator Collins Sarah Gideon Senate federal government Virginia Donald Trump Laura Ross Brow Professor Maine National Political Scene Unive Virginia Business Kim Bobo Sandy Mazel Colby College senator Governor Ralph Northam Justice Breyer Kavanagh Supreme Court US Occupational Health and Safety
"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Collins of Maine is now facing her toughest reelection campaign yet are Laura Rus Brow Telam reports. He's running guests main House Speaker Sarah Gideon. Who won the Democratic primary this week? The Cook Political Report calls me in one of the closest Senate races. It's also become the most expensive in the state's history American government Professor Sandy Nasal at Colby College thinks he knows why. Center Collins approval rating is less than forty percent when it used to be in the high sixties. Lost it frankly by key votes on important trump initiatives, particularly his tax plan the nomination of just Cavenaugh am about Pizza Collins when the last centrists Republicans voted with President Donald Trump on these three issues most critically in confirming Justice Breyer. Kavanagh's domination to the Supreme Court. The Con- has been the Senate for twenty four years and Gideon Stone. Unknown on the National Political Scene University of Maine Political science professor. Mark Brewer Necessary Gideon's track record in the main house has been largely liberal although she won. The primary is the most moderate Democratic candidate. I says it would benefit Senator Collins is you can help get more stimulus money through the US Senate. The senator herself as teasing that they're gonNA be able to get that done right so i. think that's going to be something. That's GONNA. Play into this race to the paycheck. Protection Program has been hugely important for a number of not just mainers Americans as icons. Icons helped write the paycheck protection program. However breuer thinks that Gideon camping could have the edge if it can convince enough voters, cons has changed during the trump era, and in the absence of federal guidelines this week. Virginia's become the first thing to adopt mandatory workplace safety rules to prevent spreading the crow virus, the states, safety and health codes board voted nine to. To two on Wednesday to adopt emergency temporary standards after Labor groups pushed for stronger policies according to Kim Bobo with Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy. She Helps Governor Ralph Northam for creating a blueprint to protect workers when she says the Occupational Health and Safety Administration has failed to the federal government has remake and setting a national Osha standards that would have protected everybody. Everybody across the country, but in Virginia. You know we're led by a doctor. Really understands this understand that spread in the workplace can really helped spread in the entire society, a coalition of Virginia Business and Industry groups opposed the new regulations saying they're unnecessary, because many businesses already follow CDC worker safety guidelines, they contend.

Sarah Gideon Senator Collins US Senate National Political Scene Unive Laura Rus Brow Telam Virginia Kim Bobo Donald Trump Gideon Stone Professor Collins Maine Sandy Nasal Occupational Health and Safety Virginia Interfaith Center for federal government senator Virginia Business Justice Breyer
"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Republican senator. Susan Collins of Maine is now facing her toughest reelection campaign. Yet are Laura Rus Brow. Telam reports he's running guests main House Speaker Sarah Gideon won the Democratic primary this week. The Cook Political Report Calls Me and one of the closest Senate races. It's also become the most expensive in the state's history American government Professor Sandy Nasal Colby. College thinks he knows why. Cinder cones approval rating is less than forty percent when it used to be in the high sixties. Frankly by key votes on important trump initiatives, particularly his tax plan, the nomination of just cavenaugh am about unimpeachable collins. When the last centrist Republicans voted with president trump on these three issues most critically in confirming justice breath Kavanagh's domination to the Supreme Court. The cons has been the Senate for twenty four years, and Gideon is still unknown on the national. Political Scene University of Maine Political Science Professor Mark Brewer necessary. Gideon's track record in the main house has been largely liberal although she won the primary moderate Democratic candidate. I says it would benefit Senator Collins is you can help get more stimulus money through the US Senate the Senate herself is teasing that they're going to get that done right so i. think that's going to be something. That's GONNA. Play into this race to the paycheck. Protection Program has been hugely important for a number of not just mainers. Americans as helped right the paycheck protection program. However, Breuer thinks Gideon campaign could have the edge if it can convince voters, cons has changed during the trump era, and in the absence of federal guidelines this week. Virginia's become the first State to adopt mandatory workplace safety rules to prevent spreading the krona virus. The states, safety and health codes board voted nine to two on Wednesday to adopt emergency temporary standards. After labor groups pushed for stronger policies, according to Kim Bobo with Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy. She Helps Governor Ralph Northam for creating a blueprint to protect workers when she says the Occupational Health and Safety Administration has failed to the federal government has reneged and setting a national Osha standards that. That would have protected everybody across the country, but in Virginia. You know we're led by a doctor. Really understands this is understand that spread in the workplace can really help spread in the entire society, a coalition of Virginia Business and Industry groups opposed the new regulations saying they're unnecessary, because many businesses already follow CDC worker safety guidelines, they contend the new requirements could be costly for struggling businesses. I'm Diane Bernard. Companies could face penalties of up to one hundred thirty thousand dollars if they're found.

Sarah Gideon Senate Senator Collins Professor Sandy Nasal Colby Political Scene University of Laura Rus Brow Virginia senator Kim Bobo Maine Virginia Business Virginia Interfaith Center for Professor Mark Brewer Supreme Court Diane Bernard Occupational Health and Safety CDC Telam federal government
"occupational health" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"occupational health" Discussed on WTOP

"Right now in Washington as we head back to 90 this afternoon, it's 11 11. A developing story we're following this morning A man was killed in an accident on a construction site in southeast D. C. D c. Firefighters say about an hour ago, a large piece of machinery weighing several £1000. Fell on a construction worker while he was working on site at New Jersey Avenue, South East New York M Street in the Navy yard neighborhood. Other construction workers quickly use nearby devices to pull the machine off the worker. And firefighters assisted in making sure the machine was safely secured so it wouldn't fall again. A man died at the scene. The Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration are investigating. We'll have more on this story throughout the day. We've heard a lot of of younger people fueling a spike in cases of covert 19 throughout the South and west. Well, now there is evidence that is also the case around here. Loudon County is reporting a sharp rise specifically in teenagers with cases of Corona virus. Health officials say About 100 teens have tested positive and despite traces back to a beach trip to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Loudon County Health director also tells our news partners and NBC for beachgoers brought the virus back with him and more cases could still develop. Meantime, three Rehoboth Beach lifeguards have tested positive for covert 19. The Delaware Beach towns Police chief says the three likely have little contact with the public as they spend most of their time on the lifeguard stand. All three are said to be asymptomatic, and they're staying at home until they're cleared to return to work. Tomorrow. Virginia enters Phase three of its reopening, However, everyone still is being encouraged to practice physical distancing and to take health related precaution. Feelings were face covering. Inside businesses is a class one misdemeanor for anyone 10 and older in Virginia, where everyone is being urged to continue taking precautions that helped the state get to phase three. Loudon County Health director Dr David Good friend recommends stained six feet apart from other staying home when you're sick and washing hands frequently. The safest place right now is still your home, he says, adding that people who are most vulnerable, such as older adults and people with underlying health conditions should remain extra cautious while out in public. Christy came. W T O P knows Allowed homeowners who were affected financially during the pandemic. Governor Ralph Northam says the rent and mortgage relief program consists of $50 million in federal aid. That money is intended to help people facing eviction or foreclosure. By covering their payments. Homeowners do have to meet certain criteria to qualify. A woman is suing Ah Baltimore restaurant after they told her she couldn't eat there because her nine year old son's clothing violated their dress code. Marcia Grant tell CBS this morning she's taking legal action because she feels her son was targeted after the manager of Ouzo Bay failed to explain to her why a white child who was dressed In a similar manner at the restaurant was allowed to eat there, and her son Dallas, who was black, could not issue was never an issue of policy. I don't care what the kidsheads aware whatever Wass policy, Wass Is Lana. They were instituting it across the board. I wouldn't have any issue with it..

Loudon County Virginia director Occupational Health and Safety Rehoboth Beach Myrtle Beach Marcia Grant Washington Governor Ralph Northam New York Department of Consumer and Reg Delaware Beach asymptomatic Wass Ah Baltimore Ouzo Bay Dr David Good South Carolina
An employment lawyer explains what we need to know as workplaces open

The Big Story

05:36 min | 1 year ago

An employment lawyer explains what we need to know as workplaces open

"Wednesay Scott is an employment lawyer based in Toronto. She's a partner at Roland Linzie Jordan. We wanted to talk to you today because almost every conversation. I have with anyone with the job at this point involves what's going to happen when we go back to work and I was hoping you could just answer some of the questions. We've been hearing. Yes I'm happy to so first of all I guess you probably been getting some of these questions too. So what what are the common ones or the maybe the most common one That you get yes. So I mean for my my clients who are fortunate enough to still be employed foreign away without exception. The number one question that I've been asked is do. I have to go back to the physical workplace and of course. The answer varies depending on your individual circumstances. That's the top question for sure. What kind of options do people who asked that question? Have if they're worried about going back to their workspace. You mentioned it varied how does it vary? And what kinds of questions should they be putting to their employer? I guess I guess it depends on why you're worried okay. So if you're worried because of a specific concern with your workplace so for instance you're aware of the fact that the is not taking the public health recommendations seriously and has in for instance modify the workplace isn't staggering. Schedules is of offering any additional training or policies on how to protect employees from in nineteen. That's that's a real real problem. And so if that's a specific concern than there are absolutely options for you In terms of refusing to to perform work and to go back to the workplace. If you're somebody that needs accommodation either for individual health reasons or for your family situation that could be another reason why you might be able to make some adjustments to your usual work routine if my employer is telling me to come back in but I feel that I can continue to do my job from home. And let's just say for a moment. There are no explicit safety concerns. I just you know it's. It's an incredibly frightening time and I'm scared and I want to wait a few weeks and see if things spike or not what can I do? Yeah if it's a great question so in Ontario and perhaps other provinces if you can do your job from home your employer should allow that so most of us here on -Tario will remember the government regulation closing various non essential businesses so in that regulation. There's actually a provision that says that any business that remains open shall operate so it's mandatory shall operate the business in compliance with the advice recommendations and instructions of Public Health Officials. So at this time the public health officials are advising and recommending that employees work remotely where feasible in order to limit the spread of Kovic nineteen so for now employers are obligated to follow that advice. Is there any sort of general level of safety that an employer is expected to provide by mean? You mentioned a couple of examples. But what about Just sort of in general terms in the workplace like. What's that judged on? Yeah we'll employers have a duty to protect the health and safety of their workers that was true before the pandemic and all the more so now so in the context of the pandemic they're required to implement measures to ensure that their workers aren't exposed to cove in nineteen while they're working And it's a really really big deal if they fail right on for obviously for moral reasons but also for legal reasons. They could face fines and penalties and in serious cases even criminal prosecutions under occupational health and safety legislation. So it's a high bar. They have to eat and there are a number of ways that they can do that. I'm thinking of some examples That have come up in conversation with a couple of people And I'm I'm sure that there'd be many offices especially that this would apply to Are they expected to create six feet of space between me and my co workers or are they expected to give me a mask and gloves to wear in the office? If I don't feel safe without them. Yeah so the. The provincial health authorities are telling employers that they need to do everything they can to make the workplace safe. And so yes the that's gonNA mean once sometimes called engineering controls which is a fancy way of saying addressing the physical structure of the work place. So if that means erecting barriers we see flexi glass in some in some modified workplaces on. It could mean designating whole as as one way. So you don't have employees passing each other. It could mean at creating walls or staggering Cubicles for instance so that yes you can facilitate that physical space requirement so this the physical workplace and then there's also all of the policies and procedures that need to be implemented whether it's staggering employee schedule so that we don't have know full capacity in an office at one time There's really a whole host of measures that employers can and should be doing as far as the p. p. e. component that personal protective equipment. The provinces are telling us that really. Pba should only be used when employers have done everything else they can do to make the workplace safe so some of the other measures that I spoke about When employer can't totally eliminate a hazard then yes they can consider the use of p masks and gloves and eye protection up and employers. Can't just sort of hand those things out and assume that they have Discharged their health and safety obligation

Public Health Officials Roland Linzie Jordan Wednesay Scott Partner Toronto PBA Ontario Kovic
"occupational health" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"occupational health" Discussed on The Current

"Right there is certainly You know a lot of talk around one inspection that was done by the Department of Occupational Health and safety the Friday before the culture and I understand occurred is that an inspector he facetime inspection of a plant of thousands and thousands of square feet. Workers weren't interviewed You know it's very curious. And t-that a health and safety officer Relies on facetime inspection to conclude that the plant is safe when he himself Would set foot in the plant. We asked the Labor and Immigration Minister and the Agriculture Minister for interviews both declined but the Labor ministers office said that there was a union rep at that video inspection done and it was done to your point in order to minimize exposure to the virus that they didn't want to expose further people to the virus. Who you do via facetime. You're saying that that wasn't sufficient. Well you know to suggest that there was a union representative. There is not true We have individuals in the pants. Who Volunteer They're they're involved in the union. Their Union supporters Colt shop stewards. But these aren't individuals with health and safety or professional labor relations training so they grabbed one of these people perhaps another employee and sort of took them along for the ride As it were the points That they did this To ensure that wasn't spread of infection or that was proper. Social distancing underscores our very point No-one should be in the plant. And that's an admission on their part that no one should be. There are questions as to whether the virus spread at the plant itself or whether it's spread in the communities or the houses of those who work there have listened to Craig snodgrass. He is the mayor of high river. Alberta cargill would have closed day one. I do not think our situation in high river changed because primarily. The spread is taking place at home. It's taken place and in these large groups that are congregating and living conditions etc so then it spreads outside and into our you workers that are in our grocery stores in our healthcare facilities or long-term care centers Thomas Essay. What do you make of it? Well you know I would call that a call that Nonsense a plant this size with this number of workers and you know all roads lead back because I plant so I've heard for example. Some officials say well people were carpooling. You know three or four car and that was you know those. Those tight spaces led to this cargill outbreaking. But if it wasn't if it wasn't for the plan being open they wouldn't have been carpooling and going to the plant so all roads lead back to the plant in terms of social proximity In in living conditions Yes there are at times for six people living in the same place and but that's all tied up with employment at the plant. They came to work at that plant. And you know. These people aren't well off with paycheck to paycheck struggling to pay rent so it's not surprising that they live together. Many of them are new immigrants and temporary foreign workers as well. Yep many but so the reason they're living together it is because of employment at the plant and it is it is the plant that is at the epicenter of this. There are no gatherings going on that large without much. Proximity there you know. It's a petri dish in the middle of town and all roads lead back to the plant. Thomas Essay. Good to speak with you about this. Thank you pleasure. Thomas has as the president of the United Food and commercial workers. Union local 401 that union represents workers at the cargo plant in high river. Also represents workers at another plant in southern Alberta J. B. S. has a plant in Brooks Alberta has ninety six cases of covert nineteen linked to the facility. But the plant is still open when asked about plans to close it. Alberta Premium Jason Kenney had this to say I can say that Alberta Health Services Occupational Health and safety the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Alberta Agriculture together with the plants have all worked very closely on plans to deal with meat packing facilities these these constitute an essential part of the food security of Canadians. In fact Just one of those plants represents forty percent of The beef consumption in all of western Canada and so Obviously food security constitutes an essential service and so the direction has clearly been from the government to take every necessary Health and safety precaution and Should there be advice for public health officials that there should be a suspension we would we will obviously perceived that but There has been very strong interagency cooperation with the companies the unions to ensure as much as possible to save to people in those plants. That's Auto Premier Jason Kenney Dr Jia who is one of Calgary's medical officers of Health Dr Good Morning to you morning when did Alberta Health services learn about the first case of covert nineteen at that cardinal plant in high river? We limit the first case on April third in the first lap confirmed case You know on the fourth. We had a request Inspection by cargill which was conducted on the seventh the employees of the plant. And you just heard one say that. There was no official announcement about an outbreak until there were thirteen cases of the plant. Why was that? I think the the official announcement was made On the seven or around the time that we heard about roughly ten cases. Initially it was hard to determine if they're all plant associated or you know part of the within the town of river another facilities. I do think one of the things that we can do better in the future. You know I. I do knowledge that I think you know mistakes were made where we could have identified some of these interventions earlier. Somebody faces earlier and I think one thing that you know. We're learning about it. Oh boy to health services Many people are around the world. Just know how quickly coded can spread around in class one of the things. We heard though from that employees that the people who are working on the floors there are working shoulder to shoulder. There's not the opportunity for physical or social distancing in a plant like that where three to four thousand animals are being slaughtered a day and as the union says this is all about efficiency. Alberta has faced criticism for not closing the plant sooner. The Union called for the jobs plan to be closed as well. Why weren't these blinds closed earlier? Yeah so I mean. I think we did the inspection on the seven. You know. I'll go to health. Services made a number of recommendations for control measures And you know some of those control measures including You know physical separation possible and would not physical barriers. Were actually erected between workers and workers were provided Peaky including masks and face shields so about point know we did feel that the the risk of transmission on the on the platform itself is quite low and I think that is demonstrated by some of the epidemiologic numbers where we do see a reduction. In the number of cases amongst flat workers you know op control measures. We'll put in place. You know that being said you know what I think. Some of the things that we you know getting recognized the time but now recognize those. Dan You know how many of these workers living these large household settings and truly the biggest risk of transmission now is the within household transition piece so to a. and that's where we'll see ongoing for his vision and that's why we're planning to do things like that set up isolation hotels for for people so they don't They have cooler. They don't to their families. That's why we're engaging newcomer organizations like Calgary Catholic Society to ensure that you know we can communicate with the workers and linguistically and culturally appropriate way. You know I I think moving forward. There's a Lotta things that Y. We will be doing better. It'd be better for any future plant. I guess if you go back to the plant itself though We heard from that employees. Who said that? There wasn't physical distancing that he wasn't able to get a fait shield shield. And you mentioned the inspection is is is facetime inspection appropriate video inspector appropriate when you're trying to learn what's actually happening on the ground in a massive plan like that Yeah well the the video inspection was done by you. Know Await U. S. and I can't comment on. You know what they do or don't you? I will say that we didn't go there in person. You know on the seven and then I went there again in person on the seventeenth and you know at that point. In time I went to the plant floor. You know saw that there were barriers and people did have those things. I don't think that I really thank the worker for sharing his story. I I don't think I can't say there. Were definitely there when he was there But you know it does go to show that there's a lot for us to do still and a walker us to learn. Is it possible to keep these plants open? In an era of physical distancing. I think yes Depends on the plastic self. I wouldn't say we should shut down all the plants everywhere. I think we have to be really digilent- about our case detection. I think we have to be really vigilant about. Maybe adopting some of those control measures proactively. And you know I. I think the biggest lesson from plant was just around. You know understanding you know not just the plant's operations but the you know the holistic picture no including carpooling piece which Tried to you know. Get the initially asked. People not to Carpool not recognize. That was a difficult thing to do for people. You know given sort of their socioeconomic situation And so I think if we recognize that picture and you know we understand where the transmission is happening and what we can do to support people both in the plant and outside of the plant. Then I don't think they'll have to close but I think you know Berta across North America. We are learning to be very very cautious about These particular settings given the risk of transmission of cold Ed's part of this is also about protecting the nations food supply. Something like ninety. Five percent of beef in Canada goes through three processing plants. Two of them now have cove it outbreaks. How do you strike that? Balance between ensuring that employees are protected but also that. The food supplies protected. Well I guess fortunately for me is somebody. Who's a public health condition? You know my focus and my priority is on the health and wellbeing of the population including the population of the workers. So you know I think if I do believe there's a threat to the health and safety workers that can be ameliorated than we take action and the you know the play obviously is a very important thing but it's not my primary consideration. I appreciate speaking with you about this. This is an important issue not just in Alberta but right across the country.

Alberta Union facetime cargill Canada Department of Occupational Hea Labor and Immigration Minister Alberta Health Services Occupa Alberta Health representative Canadian Food Inspection Agenc officer Labor ministers office official Jason Kenney Dr Jia Brooks Alberta Craig snodgrass
The Afterburn Effect

20 Minute Fitness

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The Afterburn Effect

"The often burn effect. It's also known as excess post exercise oxygen consumption or epoch. For Shaw as mentioned it's basically referring to the increased quantity of calories burned off you exercise so once you exercise your body needs to perform a number of tasks to help it recover and this includes the replenishment of oxygen stolis replenishment off. Atp stores removal of or that lactic acid and repairing your muscles and all of these processes require oxygen so oxygen consumption. Roy Solved you exercise. It costs energy and say additional calories are burned above the resting rate. And there's something known as the oxygen debt that occurs after intense exercise which is usual body requiring more oxygen than the body can take him properly through breathing so basically physical activity as you know increases the muscles demand for oxygen on this oxidises cobs and fights producing the energy required for movement. The demand of the human body for oxygen increases proportionately with the intensity of your workouts. I DIDN'T OR TO PAY OFF THAT OPTION. I mentioned and restore the balance in your body. The body needs a few more hours recovery. And in that time it can seems more than ten leads is an extra oxygen thus burning more calories post workout looking at this in depth a study called the effects of exercise intensity on on the excess post exercise oxygen consumption found the also bud effects climaxes in the first hour following exercise and declines thereafter and it can lost anywhere from ten to seventy two hours. E-p-o-c-h dependence Bailey on a few factors that includes the todd exile doing was upbeat Will weightlifting it depends on your workout. Intensity you'll workout duration your gender at the level experience you have when it comes to exercising and studies have shown that one of the main factors influencing the accelerated burning all calories off the workouts is the intensity of that activity will increase in the exercise intensity the magnitude and duration of epoch increase is a study was conducted by scientists at the National Institute of Occupational Health in Norway and they had a number of subjects cycle at different intensities. So one at or a group of Twenty Nine Percents Group at Fifty Percents Alec Group at Seventy Five percents of you to Max. Paul Eighty minutes on the result shed. The greatest epoch was seen in the five percent group lasting for around ten and a half hours and resulting in an additional one. Hundred fifty calories burned. However if your goal is to preserve muscle on your strength if you're consistently by out eighty minute cardio workouts. This might be counter-productive. It'll be expending lots of energy journey actual work out in the burning more after she wants to eat. Sloth nor to preserve gained muscle mass. So you may actually doing hit. Workouts and researchers have also looked at hits when it comes to e-p-o-c-h subjects were signs one or two groups. I did thirty minutes of running one. Great run continuously at seventy percent there to mucks on the other did sprints intervals for the hit type workout pushing themselves to a hundred and five percents view. It's you Max for one minute followed by human. It's arrest on the epoch of the interval grouped hit group was about sixty nine carries on the continuous group was about Hoffa's amounts so sixty nine calories of additional energy expenditure from hit so this will allow you to benefit from the benefactor out over training without pound the away. Eighty minute runs or cycles days week. Nyc With Cardio workouts. The puck of weightlifting depends on numerous factors but research sharing that weightlifting survive affect is fairly long anywhere from fifteen to thirty eight hours and the metabolic boost. It gives. You is on our bridge around nine to eleven percent. So it's put it in context if someone's Bam all basic rate is two thousand five hundred calories. They may but an additional two hundred fifty calories over the course of the post workout recovery periods workouts. That might help. Significantly to increase levels include planet metric exercises. Which would cut before to these. Your books jobs you'll burpee your Swat jumps any explosive body movement sprint intervals as we've heard to hit workouts strength training certificates high-intensity on users things swimming as it's an effective low impactful body workout unfortunately for more experienced athletes. The city you are the more efficient your body becomes getting you back to your resting metabolism and the lesser of an epoch influence. You may feel so honey. Trade athletes may not read the same after burn effect. That's auto a weight. Individuals do so final thoughts on the altar benefit it can be a great auction tool for exalted. Someone saying Baba workout plan each training session host to in house the fat but the reality is the calories burn jury exercise all the most important factor in fat loss on furthermore the types of workouts. You need to do by and large amounts calories through e r really unfeasible if he wants to mould eighty minute sessions if you want more than one hundred and fifty calories from epoch. At eight percent of the total calories burned would be from training itself

Paul Eighty Shaw National Institute Of Occupati Alec Group ROY NYC Hoffa Bailey Norway Todd
"occupational health" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"occupational health" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Com. Coming up thrill five it's tax day. You get screwed like me. We'll talk about it. We've got governor Doug Ducey in studio at five fifteen MAC and Gaydos, explosive joins us every month. We're gonna talk about if he sides with the president on bossing migrants sanctuary cities that came out last week. The president said this is what I wanna do. Is do see onboard. Because we know we have people here that are bus to Phoenix. Can we stop that and tell them well, you gotta go somewhere else. And if that happens that help Arizona right governor Ducey five fifteen in studio, if you are a person that works with the public. I'm sorry. If you sorry restaurant airline person, if you have to work with people people can be real jerk. So if you have to you have to be nice and the customer's always, right, and you have to do this. And you have to do that. Do you drink more? Are you part of a growing on people who actually drink more to deal with it? Because of new a new study in the journal of occupational health psychology. Says that they found a link between fake smiles and increase instances of drinking after work. All right. So so so who has to put on a smile at all times. Maybe a flight attendant, maybe have a concierge or somebody at the front desk of hotel restaurant business restaurant business. Anybody who deals with public? You run a store? Yeah. If so if you put a fake smile on your drinking at night. All right. So are you is that because you're tired of being a phony or because you're just doing your job? Right. You're supposed to be welcoming. You wanna part of the business? You know, you don't wanna have this look on your face get out. I mean, that's bad for business. They they said that it's more about having control. It's it's trying to control negative emotions at work. So faking suppressing motions with customers. These people are less able to control their call in take after work as I guess a way to compensate, I don't know if I get this. I mean, I know that if you're a flight attendant there times when you don't have to fake smile you. Gotta get mad because somebody's doing something stupid. Right. There was a story last week on the Phoenix tarmac at sky harbor. Some guy was was sprain. Passengers with some bottle of who knows what this liquid and then he was he was touching their face. And then when they landed he opened the door jumped out jumped out, okay? Why you smile that smile at that? So I mean, you can't smile at your work every single minute of every single day because it's not it's not how life goes. Yeah. It's called surface acting when you have to exhaust. Oh, absolutely. It is. I don't know. How I mean you we've never worked at a restaurant. I don't know how especially waiters waitresses staff. Just people you're never going to satisfy and how you don't. 'cause I would always take it personally or I'd be like what is wrong with you. That's to your now. It's not painting, whatever just eight in the difference between you and the news people is that you're getting out your your frustrations verbally. I just I probably right, right. They're not blowing their top they right or not allowed to keeping it all in. Right. See I would just think that that would drive you crazy. But I don't know why would send you home to drink. The link they say between four smiling and or forced smiles and drinking especially strong in implies who are impulsive. And who want to work in jobs where they only have one time in counters with customers clerks ring up you at the mall. People who you just are bum barred by people all day, and maybe they're just not nice. I don't know. How people do it. I would not want to job like that ever work in a restaurant there. Becky Lynn you ever have to smile. I never worked at daughter, Dan. Yeah. She knows how that goes. So she fake smile. I'm sure she did at times get people that complain about everything or try to pull one over, and, you know, they're lion while I'm not saying that you came in. And drank what happened? But did she come home? And was she like exhausted from kind of faking you know that everything was perfect at her job. I he would put it to that. But anybody that works at a restaurant is gonna come home exhau-? Yeah. Your daughter fakes fundraiser. We went to me. Absolutely hell she was had Lutely ended. She liked you, exactly. Putting up with me? Coming up next. Hey, let's take some phone calls on today is tax day. We want to know if you got a tax refund. How much was it? What are you going to spend the money on? Also wanna know if you owe how much do you owe? And how apprised were you two seven seven five eight two seven start tomorrow morning with the latest breaking news..

Phoenix Doug Ducey Lutely president Dan journal of occupational health Arizona Becky Lynn
"occupational health" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"occupational health" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"You work as a server bartender somewhere. We're supposed to be happy and friendly to your customers. You might develop a fake smile. Go with what you do that fix mile. You know like that. You're always smiling study finds the customer service workers who force a happy behavior on the job are more likely to over drink after work. How they study these things why I don't know. Researchers at Penn State and the university of buffalo reached this conclusion after serving interviews with the fifteen hundred plus American workers much they suppress emotions on the job how much autonomy. They're given. How impulsive they are. And how many they knocked back when they're done. They said faking and suppressing emotions with customers was related to drinking beyond the stress of the job or negative feelings early studies show that service workers tend to drink more which this research confirms, but the data goes deeper the relationship between surface acting and drinking after work was stronger for people who are impulsive or lack personal control over behavior at work. Or the people who tend to get off work when other bars are open that'd be wanna go somewhere after work. And that's all it's available to do. I don't know if you're postive or constantly told how to do your job it's harder to reign in your emotions all day. It was published in the journal of occupational health psychology. I'm just passing it along even harder for impulsive people who work in jobs with. Customer encounters. It's used to be just be a way to pay your bills when you're in college or something or beyond depending on how long you want to stick with it. Maybe the ideas is don't be friendly to people be yourself. Be yourself the matter. How like you are. All right. What are we have? We got six thirty nine traffic, weather sports. I a Bloomberg update. Good day for the markets yesterday and details coming up just ahead. Seven hundred. Online at seven hundred wwl w dot com.

journal of occupational health Bloomberg Penn State university of buffalo
Feds Find Kentucky Fails To Meet Standards For Worker Safety

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:36 min | 2 years ago

Feds Find Kentucky Fails To Meet Standards For Worker Safety

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything Kentucky's worker safety agency has a whole lot of problems. That's according to a recent audit by the federal occupational safety and health administration or OSHA from the Kentucky center for investigative reporting. Eleanor clemen off details fatal flaws in Kentucky's worker safety program. On what would have been her forty third wedding anniversary. These hubs stands in the front yard of camp. Pious the farm handed down through her husband's family for generations. She watches as the very same dump truck that killed her husband rolls down her country lane in December twenty sixteen pious. Gene, Hobbs was raking gravel with the meat county public works crew. When dump truck number two to five backed over him, the driver, then accelerated forward hitting him a second time Hobbs was crushed to death. Hey, let's hear that one no backup beeper no backup people more than a year later when Lisa hob sees that same truck number two to five reverse. She here's how nothing has changed on the day of her husband's death, both I witness and a state trooper said the trucks backup beeper was not audible Hobbs might not have heard the truck coming but Kentucky ocupation safety and health said the beeper wasn't a problem that was after testing it on a quiet street hours later, the same inspector failed to interview the sole eyewitness and overlooked possible worker safety violations at the worksite while the shortcomings are very concerning. Jordan Bearup is a workplace safety expert who ran federal OSHA under President Obama identifying the causes of these incidences also vitally important because otherwise the employer doesn't know how to avoid the next incident. Gene, Hobbes's case is not the exception. In fact, it's the norm. That's according to an annual audit that federal OSHA conducts of all twenty eight state run workers. Safety programs. The most recent audit of Kentucky which covered fiscal year. Twenty seventeen was sharply critical depiction understaffed under resourced agency. That's failing to protect Kentucky's workers federal officials, specifically criticized how the state investigates worker deaths in a statement, the federal department of labor said it's working with Kentucky on a corrective action plan Berube said the feds have the authority to take over state run programs that don't meet federal standards having a state program is a privilege, not a right of the states. And certainly it requires states to address rapidly and seriously any problems that are identified by federal OSHA, it Kentucky labor cabinet declined to comment. But speaking to w k MS public radio in April. Then labor secretary Derek Ramsay explained. How the state approaches companies about possible worker safety violations, we're going to educate we're going to educate we're going to educate and we're going to educate. And then satay without a really strong enforcement unit. These voluntary compliance assistant programs are not gonna be able to do the job. Laura stock is the director of the labor occupational health program at the university of California, Berkeley, she said what's happening Kentucky reflects a national trend. Republican governor Matt Bevins' administration has been strongly pro business and anti regulation when gene Hobbs was run over by a dump truck Kentucky issue, no violations or fines to his employer a state worker safety supervisor wrote in an E mail that Hobbes walk behind quote and apparently completely compliant. Dump truck backup alarms working the supervisor added that Hobbes quote jus- zig when he should've zagged we know that the truth, it's not the truth federal OSHA agreed with gene Hobbes's widow. Lisa in a report the agency found the state failed to interview the eyewitness missed possible worker safety violations and hadn't done enough to test. The dump trucks backup beeper. We're not the only. One. There's a lot out there Kentucky occupational safety and health investigated forty four deaths in a two year period. According to the federal audit, there were serious shortcomings in a vast majority of those investigations for NPR news. I'm Eleanor Clinton off in Louisville.

Kentucky Osha Gene Hobbs Gene Hobbes Lisa Hob Gene Kentucky Center Comcast Eleanor Clemen Department Of Labor NPR Eleanor Clinton Derek Ramsay Louisville Supervisor Jordan Bearup Secretary Matt Bevins
"occupational health" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"occupational health" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Excuses for over working first one we work long hours because our bosses tell us to write oil just is what it is this is the nature of the game we've heard this on the show already adegui call well it's just the nature of the gig well it's the wrong gig another one big reason economic incentive corporate culture technologies ride that just keep so attached to the office so we're reacting to macro forces beyond our control i love hell carmichael writes that the third big reason is our psychology you get some inner drivers such as ambition greed anxiety guilt enjoyment pride shortterm rewards a desire to prove important and over developed since of duty imitates them those to last once i think it's a big driver on the psychology side here's something multiple researchers of actually found that work is less stressful than our home lives for some of you people maybe not me but it's a reality work can be a haven for some people so that's the reason why they spend all the time at the office so does overwork actually do what we think it does does it result in better output morale put aaron read a professor boss universities questions school of business said that managers could not tell the difference between employees who actually worked eighty hours a week those who pretended to i was from a recent study here's another numerous studies by marianna averts in it of the finnish institute of occupational health found that overwork and the resulting stress can lead to all sorts of health problems impair sleep depression heavy drinking diabetes impaired memory and heart disease now those are bad enough for the workers.

carmichael aaron marianna averts professor school of business finnish institute of occupatio eighty hours
"occupational health" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"occupational health" Discussed on KPCC

"Next twenty four seven lecture ruby delivered by a specialist in occupational health and john and human factors engineering in victoria australia and he's the winner of the two thousand ignoble prize in physics for coauthoring the study and analysis of the forces required to drag sheep over various surfaces john calvin nar dr colvin orders topic the forces required to drag sheep over various services first a complete technical description of the subject in twenty four seconds on your marker gets at go greetings folks the title of the speeches rejoice rejoice after searching all night it was there in a lot i might shake what a wonderful side so ruling so bryant but what air kaba that john bucks not lied it is not slide you must drag it from a height remember mm and now clear summary that anyone can understand in seven words on your mark get set go new was wrought eat apples and bitty mont thank you moon your final 247 lecture will be delivered by a researcher at the smithsonian institution's department of invertebrate zoology alicia peres poor hurt topic spun is first a complete technical description of the subject in twenty four seconds on your mark get set go marina sponges ssm either bite the rate at the base of met this owns evolutionary tree they have a key role in marine ecosystems and different levels of resiliency to climate change because of these some reefs have been reportedly switching from portal to sponge nominated i use genomic techniques to reveal these nettie kid behind acclamation to climate change in ripped sponges.

australia researcher smithsonian institution alicia peres dr colvin bryant john bucks climate change nettie twenty four seconds
"occupational health" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"occupational health" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"You do our lab tests and things like that as well yeah urging care offers a whole host of offerings we do epa saada urging care if you know something bumps bruises coughs you feel nothing changes stitches absolutely we have onsite x ray we have digital lab we do walk in preventative services may be schooler camp physicals if you need them you can't get in a broken leg broken leg yet the would they do the casting uh we'll do casting or an air cast typically what you'll do energy cares will treat a pace russian ten will mobilise them and get them ready to transfer down on orthopedic yet um and so we do all those and we also offer employer services we do a lot in the player health world three talk a little bit about that in some of the services that you do offer to employers and the employer health world you know we do a lot with occupational health a lot related to health and safety in the workplace also you know preventitive iverson example that yeah so we'll do a lot will do a preemptive physical will do respiratory fit testing will do drug screens all of the pre employment if somebody happens to get injured on the job they can come to an urgent care embassy in by a physician get x rays will treat their ailments we spent a lot of time with our employers working with our returned to work programme so if somebody gets injured on the job we worked very closely to get them back to work modified duty really helped at employees and the employer and and what kinds of qualifications do the people that are working in your for half the doctors nurses all the above all the above we have boardcertified physicians we have license nurse practitioners physicians assistance medical associates we have license rat texanol are centres license nurses.

epa iverson