5 Burst results for "Obsta Tristesse"

"obsta tristesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"obsta tristesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one eight from W. A. M U and NPR. One A with Joshua Johnson is heard Monday through Thursday nights here, beginning at eleven on K Q, E D, or the program is just ahead. Michael state support for. K Q, E D comes from European sleep works store. The bases its design and materials on research factors affecting sleep including comfort and support, humidity levels, and ease of breathing. Details online about their mattresses and bedding at sleepworks dot com. All night long been oriented from far Lynn, claiming d day here and early news. Bulletin is thousands of allied paratroopers were dropping behind enemy lines in France. We know it's going to happen now talked about it, but look at all those ships down there. One of the last surviving veterans of World War Two recalls. D day tomorrow on morning edition from NPR news. Thursday between three and nine on K Q E D public radio. Then at nine Michael Krasny. Of course, we'll have the foreign program at nine around seventy dead. Great whales have washed up on the west coast. So far this year, the most since two thousand four we'll talk with the whale expert about what's going on, and why it's happening and at nine thirty. The San Francisco board of supervisors will close the city's juvenile hall by the end of twenty twenty one four discussed the city's next steps forum with Michael Krasny. Thursday morning beginning at nine. Support for NPR comes from this station. And from Jones day, an integrated partnership collaboratively providing legal services for more than a century forty-three offices. Five continents, serving clients as one firm worldwide. Learn more at Jones day dot com. From the Charles Stewart Motte foundation, supporting efforts to promote a just equitable and sustainable society and its hometown of Flint, Michigan and communities around the world. More at mount dot org. And from the Annie E Casey foundation. This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson, discussing pregnancy loss and the enduring stigma around miscarriage, and what that might mean as it relates to some of the new abortion restriction laws that are being passed across the country with doctors Williams of the Columbia University for Tillis center. Psychoanalyst Joyce McFadden and Dr Jamila parrot with the American Congress of obsta Tristesse gynecologists. We have heard so.

Joshua Johnson NPR Michael Krasny mount dot Jones Annie E Casey foundation Michael state Charles Stewart Motte foundati France San Francisco Lynn Joyce McFadden American Congress obsta Tristesse Michigan Dr Jamila Williams Tillis center Flint
"obsta tristesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:54 min | 2 years ago

"obsta tristesse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Best decision for my family. Hi, this is Sarah from Fairfield county. Connecticut. Next week on April ninth will be the fifth anniversary of the day. We say goodbye to my second son, Harry, we had an abortion at twenty two weeks because we received a fatal diagnosis that my twenty week appointment and no medical intervention was going to work. We feel at the end of the day that it was the best end of life care that we could have offered him. And we felt like we were doing a compassionate. We felt like we were making a compassionate choice for our son. It was the only thing we could have given him. I hope everyone out. There can understand that. Thank you for sharing your personal stories with us. We'll get some more of them in a little bit. Now lawmakers in several states have bills pending to govern the timeline for requesting an abortion. What are these procedures? Really involve what women go through. And how should we be talking about leader abortions culturally and politically joining us in studio is Dr Sarah Horvath, an OBGYN and a member of the American college of obsta Tristesse and gynecologist she's clinically trained as a family planning specialist and abortion care provider. Dr Horvath, welcome to one A. Thank you so much for having me joining us from NPR in New York is an north senior reporter at vox who covers reproductive health and welcome thanks so much for having me as I said, we've got a lot of voicemails about this. And one of them includes a good question that I think is helpful to start our conversation. This is ruby. From indianapolis. I was calling because he had prompted a discussion regarding late term abortion. And that is something that I have not had any experience with. But I do have a question regarding why would that occur? I just need to understand. What would be the instance that would require someone to need or want or requests, a late term abortion, ruby? Thanks for asking the question. Thanks for being willing to ask that question. Dr Horvath would you answer rubies question? What are the circumstances? That might lead a woman to consider a later abortion. Absolutely. I I'd like to just make a quick clarification of terminology. So late term in the medical world has a very specific. Meaning and that actually refers to a pregnancy that has gone a full week passed its due date. So that doesn't really apply in this case. Generally, what we would say is abortions that occur later in pregnancy. Meaning anytime after the first trimester so in medical terms, a late term abortion. It's almost like a a refers to a pregnancy that has tardy that has gone longer than expected. Exactly an abortion wouldn't occur at that time. Time judging what about the circumstances that might lead a woman to consider an abortion later in her pregnancy? Absolutely. So like, you said earlier, this is an incredibly rare occurrence happens about one point three percent of the time of abortions actually occur after twenty one weeks. And in those cases, they are almost always for cases of either a maternal life threat. So woman with an incredibly difficult disease. Say worsening cardiac failure sometimes diseases that are made worse by pregnancy or even things that occur because of the pregnancy. And now her life is in danger. Another subset of those pregnancies occurs in women who have these fetal diagnoses like you heard about earlier in the program. So women who are told that they're pregnancy is is really doomed from the beginning. And that that child is never going to her vibe after the point of birth. There's a term that's gonna come up a lot in this. Conversation that comes up a lot in discussing abortion. And that's the word viability. What do we mean by viability? That's a great question by ability is different in every pregnancy in general when we think of a healthy normally developing pregnancy, we think of diabilities happening around twenty four weeks. And that's what row often is what often happens in less estate makes it different determination. You mean in terms of the legal precedent on a roadway? Exactly. However, every pregnancy truly is different. And so when you have these fetuses that are compromised either due to genetic anomalies or structural or developmental abnormalities, or even sometimes those really bad diseases that can hurt mom can also affect the developing fetus. And now we're talking about fetuses that might be actually later in pregnancy and still not be viable. To just to be clear. We see that a fetus is viable that means that the fetus could be delivered carried to term delivered. And at the baby would stand a good chance of survival after birth by ability refers to the ability to survive after birth even if that birth occurs earlier than term, and what about fetal anomalies, what kinds of anomalies might we be talking about Dr. So we can be talking about things like rare genetic disorders. We can be talking about things like anencephalia, which is where the brain actually does not grow and function. There are lots of different things that fall into the category of fetal anomalies and often these are incredibly rare things once in a lifetime things even for doctors who specialize in high risk pregnancy. So it's very hard to determine the unique circumstances that each woman might actually be facing a want to ask you some more questions doctor about the procedure itself, but in a north let me come to you for a minute. I wonder what your sense is of some of the cultural factors lately that have been bearing on our conversations in in the public sphere about abortions later in pregnancy. Yes. So thanks so much. There's there's been really I think an of surgeon in discussion of this topic really in the last few months, and there's a number of sort of a bigger picture reasons for that. I think one is you know, we're seeing really really an upswing in discussion of abortion were generally, especially as we see some of these cases start to move their way toward the supreme court. And there's the perception that that this court with with Justice Cavanaugh might might be up for overturning Roe v. Wade so everything around this heightened and as we heard from President Trump. There's been this issue in Virginia. In earlier this year. The the governor Virginia made some comments about a Virginia abortion Bill. His comments were a little confusing, and they really did confuse a lot of people, and they they became very public. And it was a little unclear exactly what he was talking about. It's under like he was he was attempting to describe the Bill, but what he said made it sound a little bit like. It did make it sound almost as though he may be was talking about the euthanasia of newborns. No, he clarified later that. He certainly wasn't talking about that. And he certainly wasn't saying that would be okay. Have a clip of that comments a little later on. We'll get to that in just a bit. Sure. But so that is kind of what kicked off this larger discussion. Now, there have been there have been bills and states, and there has been a villain the Senate, you know, in a larger sense, I think these procedures, you know, they do capture a lot of public attention when they come up because they they can be very emotional for the people who have to go through them, especially if it's a very wanted pregnancy, and for people you don't like like, your listener who don't necessarily aren't familiar with the procedure. It can be very confusing. Why why someone would seek this? So I think it's very valuable to have voices like Dr Horvath explaining why this happens you want to get to one of your stories before we have to pause first of all Dr Horvath common. I'm going to read refers to Potter syndrome. Can you briefly tell us what is Potter syndrome show are so Potter syndrome is when a fetus has an abnormality. Which generally is in the kidneys. That would make it not create enough amniotic fluid. And then that creates a seat whole sequence of events in which the fetus is unable to grow appropriately. Including limb development, facial development and most importantly for survival lung development. All right. I do want to get to that comment. I wanna make enough time to read the communist entirety. So we'll get to that. In just a moment when we continue with Dr Sarah, Horvath OBGYN, and a member of the American college of obstetricians and gynecologists and vox senior reporter in north who covers reproductive-health coming up. We'll hear from a woman who made the.

Dr Sarah Horvath Dr Sarah Potter syndrome ruby Virginia reporter Horvath OBGYN Dr Horvath Fairfield county Harry Connecticut indianapolis American college of obsta Tris New York vox supreme court Justice Cavanaugh NPR Wade Senate
"obsta tristesse" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"obsta tristesse" Discussed on EconTalk

"Because that those nurseries have special. Allies care in that's dramatically improve neonatal mortality. We have nothing like that for mothers. And we should be putting together something like that from others. We should have more Perry Nate tala GIS more maternity icy is because those are the women who are dying and they're dying from lack of technology. So one of the things that I find very upsetting is that although we can argue whether. Childbirth has been medical is too much. When it comes to the issue of maternal mortality, the women who are dying are dying because they lack access to that technology in its bizarre. And and very unfortunate to claim that we could reduce maternal mortality if we lowered the C section rate or lowered the intervention rate because those things have are exactly the opposite of what is going on. And that's a phenomenon dad I have referred to as an others have referred to as medical colonialism in that we have been expropriating or activists have been expropriating the tragedies of underserved women to advocate for what privileged women want. So you find something like New York state promoting dulas in response to the maternal mortality situation. Explain what a jewel is ado is is. It comes from the Greek word for slave. And it's basically a woman who helps other women cope with childbirth who supports them through childbirth. Both by giving encouragement and also by you know, cold wash cloth for their bra cheerleading when they're pushing things like that counting for their Llamas breath. Right, right. But the the sad thing the tragic thing is that while dulas are very good, and they can definitely improve the experience childbirth. The women who are dying are not dying from bad experiences dying from heart disease, their dying from kidney disease in it seems perverse to offer these women who are suffering a amenity that privileged women would really enjoy. Let's I agree. Let's let's move to the rural issue. A lot of people believe I know, you do not want to hear your take a lot of people believe that an EPA Daryl puts the baby at some risk. And therefore, it's better to have a quote, natural childbirth. And that that pain relief is is just unnecessary. Well, a necessary for whom. You know, I happen to think as a physician, and as a human being that treating pain is the cornerstone of what any person should do for any other person if somebody wants to be a pain. That's okay. But you know, all pain relief has risks. Why is this the only form of pain relief where anybody talks about the risks? And why is it that those risks are magnified? So for example, the risk of risk of a baby being harmed by epidurals purely theoretical the risk of a baby being harmed by attempted vaginal birth after caesarean is both very real and orders of magnitude greater than any theoretical risk of epidurals. So why are natural childbirth advocates promoting V Bax? But demonizing Abdur all's doesn't make sense if what they're really talking about is the risk. Beck vegetal after caesarean. That's. What are your thoughts on the risk? The risk is is you said it was radically hypothetical or theoretical. I mean, you know, one of the things that I always find very interesting is that. Women obsta Tristesse don't believe any of this stuff because it's nonsense. Women obstetricians have epidurals in droves. They have C-sections at much higher rate than average. They don't believe in their experienced tells them that these things are not bad things. They're just choices and one of the reasons that they've been portrayed as bad. Things is sadly because of the reemergence of midwifery midwives can't give up Durrell's midwives can't do see sections. And so they've demonized them in the UK where midwives can administer nitrous oxide laughing gas for pain relief in labor. They consider that perfectly compatible with a natural childbirth. Even though that's a drug interesting. Let's talk about breastfeeding because that's another area where there's a lot of emotional cultural issues that interface with actual science to the best of our knowledge. Which is of course imperfect. There's a lot of pressure on women USA just your book to breastfeed rather than to administer formula wise items steak..

heart disease kidney disease nitrous oxide Beck EPA New York UK Bax Durrell Daryl USA
"obsta tristesse" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"obsta tristesse" Discussed on Second Opinion

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel obsta Tristesse KCRW fever two hundred years
The Semmelweis Effect

Second Opinion

03:52 min | 2 years ago

The Semmelweis Effect

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion, a growing number of high quality medical research. Studies challenge the status quo by providing evidence that traditional things like surgery, just don't work. It turns out that much of what we offer patients has little benefit. But that's only half the story. The other half is that once these studies come out nothing seems to change we still do the same number of useless surgeries. In part. This is due to what is called the Semel Weiss effect. This is the tendency to reject new evidence or new knowledge because it doesn't fit with what we think are what we've always believed Ignace similize was born two hundred years ago this month. He was an obstetrician like every other obstetrician at the time who lost a huge number of babies to infect. His disease. Now remember this was way before we knew about bacteria or other infectious agents. There was no germ theory of disease at the time. It was common for obstetricians to perform autopsies on all babies who died to try to understand the cause of death. But obsta Tristesse were in high demand, and they would go back and forth from what we call labor and delivery to the morgue. Well, similize observed that when doctors washed their hands with a chlorine solution between patients or between, the autopsy and the patient death rates fell not a little poten- fold at the time. This was a remarkable observation he urged his colleagues to engage in regular hand washing. Similize wise could not explain how hand washing prevented deaths, but he was convinced. It did his hand washing. Suggestions. Were resoundingly rejected by his colleagues. They thought this was the height of nonsense. How could a man's hands possibly transmit disease by something you couldn't even see similize continued his careful handwashing and had the lowest death rates by far in his hospital while he saved hundreds bias blindness and ego cost the lives of thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands because his colleagues failed to listen to similize or even evaluate his observation. It was worse than that. He just couldn't convince them the leaders of medicine grew irritated by his letters and his lectures, which accused the medical profession of being reckless even murderers when the establishment could no longer ignore him. They accused him of being psychologically crazy for considering disease caused by things that were unseen. They. You can find him to a psychiatric hospital where ironically he died of an infection years later bacteria or discovered and found to be the cause of what was in similize time. Call child bid fever doctors hands were the main source of spread but the Semel Weiss effect is very much alive. Today. It helps explain why humans doctors in particular reject new knowledge because it contradicts. What we've always believed. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Ignace Similize Dr Michael Wilks Semel Obsta Tristesse Kcrw Fever Two Hundred Years