35 Burst results for "Obesity"

The Quality of Your Sleep Could Be Affecting Your Immune System

The Model Health Show

01:58 min | 4 d ago

The Quality of Your Sleep Could Be Affecting Your Immune System

"Of course our nutrition is a big part of this conversation are sleep qualities. A big part is conversation. There hasn't been asleep mandate but we do know and this is. According to data published in the journal cycle neuro endocrinology that sleep deprivation directly reduces the production in performance of our natural killer. Cells are in cases whenever most dynamic immune system weapons and our natural killer cells are so effective that very early on in this experience with sars. Cov tune this is back in like april. The fda was fast tracking drug to target our natural killer cells because they were found to be so effective are in case sales at killing. Sars cov two infects. His children tend to have a much higher resilience. For example. is there a very robust production. Immobilization of ourselves. We suppress when we're sleep deprived now. There's this term corona som- neha rice one of the ramification. One of the fallout is where we already have a society that sleep-deprived one hundred and fifty million americans are regularly sleep-deprived. The data exists. And then you throw this on top of it. We're suddenly we're living groundhog's day over and over and over again and our regulation of our sleep consistency is just kinda gone out the window but these are all issues that we can change. We can work on. We can improve. The exciting thing is of course. There's a life thou parameter parameter but of course if things we can do with our nutrition for me last night included. I just had my favorite thing before bed. Which is rishi. And it's because published in the journal pharmacology biochemistry and behavior this renou. Medicinal mushroom is able to significantly decrease lee blatancy meaning fall asleep. Faster is proven to increase your overall sleeping time in increase non rim deep sleep and rem sleep. That's pretty remarkable and this is published in the journal this focused on pharmacology

Journal Cycle Neuro Endocrinol Neha Rice FDA Journal Pharmacology Biochemis Lee Blatancy Rishi
Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:00 min | Last week

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

"Today. We look at a condition that comes with a multitude of serious health issues. Obesity and we start with the best ways to figure out our optimal weight based on our height. We seem to become inured to the mortal threat of obesity. Go back medical issue. A half century or so when obesity wasn't just run of the mill. The descriptions are much more grim. Obesity is always tragic and its hazards are terrify but it's not just obesity of four million deaths every year tribute excess by nearly forty percent of the victim are just overweight or obese. According to two famous. Harvard studies weight gain of as little as eleven pounds from early adulthood through middle age increases risk of major chronic diseases such as diabetes cardiovascular disease and cancer the flip side though is that even modest weight loss can major health benefits. What's the optimal bmi The largest is in the united states and around the world found that having a normal body mass index a bmi from twenty to twenty five associate with the longest lifespan. Put all the best available stays with the longest follow up together and that can be narrowed down even further to a bmi of twenty two twenty two. that'd be about between one hundred and twenty four hundred thirty six pounds for someone who stands five foot six but even with a normal bmi the risk of developing chronic diseases such as type two diabetes heart disease and several types of cancer starts to rise towards the upper end even starting as low as a bmi one a bmi five eighteen point five and twenty four point five or both considered within the normal range but a bmi five maybe shared with twice the heart disease risk compared eighteen point for just as there are gradations risk within a normal bmi range their spectrum with an

Obesity Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Harvard Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease United States Heart Disease
Why Weight Loss Is Harder for Some Than Others

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Weight Loss Is Harder for Some Than Others

"You have excess body weight the standard advice to eat less and move more. Of course we all know. This is easier said than done for one thing. It takes a lot of work to change deeply ingrained habits and behavior patterns. It's hard to move more when our workplaces are designed for sitting and our neighborhoods are designed for driving. It's hard to eat less when you're constantly surrounded by hyper palatable food and it's also challenging to eat less when you've learned to use food to cope with stress or soothe your emotions now. These are all issues that a good behavior modification program can help you with. But it's also really hard to eat less when your brain is sending the wrong signals about whether you've had enough to eat hunger which is the urge to eat or seek food and say she ation that feeling that you're full and you don't want more food are both regulated in the hypothalamus. This is the most primitive part of the brain. The hypothalamus responds to hormonal signals. Being sent from different organs all over your body via various chemical messengers and when this system is working as it should our hunger increases when our body needs energy and decreases when it doesn't and the result is a stable body weight but sometimes that system goes awry. Dr gabriel smallers is an endocrinologist specializing in the treatment of obesity. And here's how he explains it and the hypothalamus is receiving all of these different inputs and essentially processing the situation says then say should we eat. Should we not eat. Should we stop eating. Should we seek food etc. We conclude that there's this regulation when the system. Actually the gas tank is full. But yet the signaling at the level. The hypothalamus is indicating an empty tank. If your brain is receiving the wrong signals about whether or not you need food. This is obviously going to make much more difficult for you to eat less.

Dr Gabriel Smallers Obesity
Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

Mind Pump

01:38 min | Last month

Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

"Why fix the obesity epidemic and it is an epidemic. I know that they named it. Officially an epidemic in the late nineties but obesity been for a couple of decades before that was only really in the nineties. It they said okay. This is an epidemic and it's growing it's been growing ever since so why even solve it. Why even look at this issue and say what are the things we can do to fix this problem. Well there's a there's a some big reasons Number one the health risks associated with obesity alone are tremendous it dramatically increases your risk of all cause mortality. So being means that you're much more likely to die of any reason at all but to be more specific. Your risk of type. Two diabetes goes to the roof heart. Disease goes to the roof. Stroke goes through the roof. Gallbladder disease goes through the roof. Osteoarthritis goes up quite a bit cancer. You know some recent studies atribu consi- literally say that you could just by not being obese. You could reduce the risk of like seventy five percent of cancers okay so just being obese increases your risk of cancer sleep apnea is another one. So is it big problems now. A lot of people might say well. That's personal right. If you're obese. Then it's your your own issue. And i i get part of that. But here's the truth. It literally no joke if you look at obesity and you look at all the things that are connected to obesity. It threatens to bankrupt. Modern

Obesity Gallbladder Disease Cancer Sleep Apnea Cancers Diabetes Stroke
Chicago's Cook County opens 25K 1st dose COVID vaccine appointments

WGN Programming

00:46 sec | Last month

Chicago's Cook County opens 25K 1st dose COVID vaccine appointments

"Of of Public Public Health Health opening opening 25001st 25001st dose dose vaccine vaccine appointments appointments today today amid amid rising rising case case number number statewide statewide and and across across the the country. country. WGN's Judy Wang has more the appointments. Available or at four suburban mass vaccination sites. This is the National Guard run site at a former came out start in displays. Cook County is currently in phase one B plus, which expanded eligibility to people down to H. 16, who have chronic health conditions that includes cancer, kidney disease, diabetes and obesity. Essential workers previously classified under phase one. C can also make appointments. Those who work in government, higher education, restaurants and the media eligibility scheduled to open to all people in the state outside of Chicago, ages, 16 and up on April 12th as covert

Public Public Health Health Judy Wang WGN National Guard Cook County Kidney Disease Obesity Diabetes Cancer Chicago
The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

20 Minute Fitness

06:11 min | Last month

The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

"Let's dive a bit deeper into metabolic health in general. I would say the us stephanie. Facing metabolic health. Dem's it's become so so tough that you know. Diabetes is on the rise diabetes type two and obesity is on the rise and aloft. It can be let back to metabolic flexibility or the lack of it. Maybe can talk about more about the concept actually pollick expolit the actually means and why it is important. Yeah being metabolic flexible in in kind of a textbook definition really speaks to the ability to use a variety of different fuel sources that mainly really carbohydrate and fat though although by extension ketone very seamlessly with with little drama little difficulty really not a big change in in performance or perception. My wife is an example of somebody who's very metabolic flexible. She can go kito goes in. She goes out no headache. Lethargy no problems She can eat a fair amount of carbs and doesn't suffer. You know a really crazy blood. Sugar excursion she doesn't get like blood. Sugar crashes unless she really you know if she a ghost for the extra large mexican meal of beans and rice and tortillas and you know and right and then she can feel kinda rough from that like she can overdo it but she needs to really try to do that and in researching some material for my second book wired to eat. We did some side by side. Comparisons where i would eat say fifty grams of carbohydrate from white rice. She would eat the same amount. She's a good thirty or forty pounds lighter than i am but she would still her blood. Sugar would over a two hour period of time. Never really get above about one hundred and fifteen hundred twenty you know. Throughout the course of that whole experience was mind would top off round one. Ninety one ninety five. I would then suffer. Really cloud rafic crash blurred vision cognitive problems. I mean i was. I was kind of a disaster on that. And so this was you know it was cool in that it gave a little bit more concrete explanation for what i'd seen clinically. Which is that. This person seems to run great on carbs. This person doesn't and you know here's there's kind of like an actual yeah and just to be clear. You're not diabetic. North korea pre-diabetic new. But i think if i ate carbs pretty consistently i would get there rather rather rapidly. Yeah or or the minimum. I would suffer a lot of deleterious health effects. Light like a a vision problems and and whatnot. Yeah yeah so. How do you explain now. Like metabolic flexibility. Like how does it cure or is it just something that some people have in some. Don't i not entirely sure. I think that there's multiple factors at play here for sure. Genetics is a piece of this. People who have more of the emily's gene more frequency of the emily's gene seemed to do better with carbohydrates. They seem to digest them better but they also have a more favourable insulin response. It seems to keep the insulin. Or the blood glucose levels within tighter parameters and. Here's an interesting thing that i For me it was kind of this. This pretty deep inside. I don't know if it is for other people but an individual like myself to have good blood glucose levels after he reasonably low carb like probably below fifty grams of total carbs. Day sometimes more. Like if i'm really active or whatnot but it in that situation. Abbott pretty consistent blood glucose response throughout the day. People were very metabolic flexible or very insulin. Sensitive they looked like i look like eating significant amounts of carbs. And that's really the big difference there in the people who eat significant amounts of carbs and don't suffer the blood sugar crashes which then lead into the over over consumption of food writ. Large i think is where we kind of see the distinction between folks Twenty years ago. I was definitely a bit indie. Insulin hypothesis camp. I think over the over the course of time. I've i've come to the conclusion to. Yeah chronically elevated. Insulin levels are definitely a problem but insulin. In and of itself is not the primary driver of of Say type two diabetes and insulin resistance and whatnot you kind of a classic gary tops approach I don't buy into that but at the same time ni- fully on board with say like it fits your macrophages crowd. That will just say so. Long as composition doesn't really matter you just need to keep control of your portions and a free living world free living population. How you keep control of portions is really important. Not that many people have the discipline or the neuroses to do basically like a figure competitors lifestyle like that. That's a big lift for a lot of folks and so finding a way that people can spontaneously match caloric intake and output. I think is kind of where the ticket is. And that's where people kind of find own their their metabolic flexibility optimum belay yet. He asked a really good question. I did a poor job of answering it at you. Know what is metabolic flexibility. What goes into a defining it genetic so definitely a big piece. The gut microbiome appears to be a big piece. The caveat to that is we know it's important. I don't think very many people have any idea what to do to improve that. Like probiotics works for some people pre baddeck fiber work for others and for some people all of those absolute disaster and do nothing. So i think there's a lot of Charlatanism that goes around the gut microbiome. We know absolutely that. It's important. But i think the only thing that we can really hang our hat on is if we do something and has a clinical outcome of improving gut else and improving metabolic flexibility. That's great but we're not really at a great predictive place with that like i. I think there's a lot of goofiness that on the testing and whatnot. There is some lesser known or considered things like iron overload particularly in in men or postmenopausal women excess iron accumulation in the body is a pro oxidant in that pro oxidative status can increase inflammation and increased inflammatory state Degrades insulin sensitivity and by extension the Metabolic flexibility so. There's some big picture things that we know. Feed into metabolic flexibility and again. I think that we have burying degrees of control over those different lever.

Kito Diabetes DEM Stephanie Obesity Headache North Korea Emily Abbott United States
New York Pharmacies Begin Vaccinating for Underlying Conditions

Rush Limbaugh

00:25 sec | Last month

New York Pharmacies Begin Vaccinating for Underlying Conditions

"And Cuomo was giving the OK for pharmacies to vaccinate more people, including teachers and people with underlying condition. The governor says New Yorkers with pre existing conditions or some of the most at risk residents, and therefore they now qualify for shots at pharmacies statewide so long as they provide proof of eligibility. Underlying conditions include cancer, kidney, pulmonary, heart and liver disease, Severe obesity, intellectual and developmental disabilities and

Cuomo Severe Obesity Liver Disease Cancer
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | Last month

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
Accidents And Aging,  Learn How To Avoid Them

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:34 min | Last month

Accidents And Aging, Learn How To Avoid Them

"Back with us. Today is our favourite cool doctor. Dr aleida mucci. You may remember her from last month when we talked about. Frailty today we're talking. Oh all things incontinent. So thanks for joining me today. Thank you very much. It's lovely to see her again. Jerry to hopefully soon we'll be able to travel and now my husband's go to europe so we have a lot of people to meet over in the uk soon so and me. Smile american college of physicians conferences. Which i used to do every yes. Oh yes looking forward to. That sounds terrific so last month we talked on. Frailty what it is how to prevent it or prevent it from getting worse. What's on on topic for incontinence today. How is that tied into aging. Will danny wed do. I stop you can enormous topic and a very interesting run and i think as we get into the conversation i like to get a couple things out there straightaway and the first thing as incontinence and age in on the same thing incontinence at any age is malt known as we get older and if we spot experiencing We shouldn't just say well. would you expect i. May you five ninety of those things happen. Not it is not normal to get incontinent. So eat back east happening. Medical attention should be sought because yes of course. We're experiencing certain down that in terms of our blige urination bottles of apple. Talk about this zoological. Changing changes in our water systems. However incontinence is abnormal. The sun at the second thing is it can happen at any age at fifty year old can be incumbent yet and nineteen year old lady campbell accidentally fine with the gains so these are the two important facts to consider what it comes to the aging changes incontinence. I will mean we will be talking about blood today. I think it will be too much. We'll maybe talk about bowels. If you have any questions but let's concentrate on the blood or in today's podcast. So when it comes to changes in changes of cools the bladder muscle which will detroit muscle does get a little bit on a mind of its own and will get more contractions mowing one in trade contractions and sunday out the blue. You might have been the toilet over half an hour ago and you saw yet energy. So that's one of the changes way experience. The capacity will how much you the blubber can hold before it Tells your brain that you need to empty your blood. That capacity goes down as well and then of course. Let's not forget as we grow all debit develop problems. Most commonly mobility problems arthritis muscle weakness. And of course the pure ability to go to that will becomes a challenge. And we'll get back in. Time sometimes can lead to their little accidents piece of the main agent changes when he to know about amicus please coupled weight changes in their body for example aud as the old abbey develop sound failing and harmon of the blood vessels are on the brain. Will that small vessel. Schemic changes are Disease that of course has an impact was won't our bodies regulated by multiple mechanisms up mainly by the brain. If you had the blood vessels of the brain for that will have impact on your brother and the blood to contracting voluntarily So these these are the main main aging changes. They need to be arou- make sense so we need to take care of our brains that we don't have bathroom issues. All that's that's most set jerry and go for a danger. They you a good point because we need to take account of our brain people with strokes people who go wall man Let's say that there are many reasons for strokes. Most common causes smoking diabetes. Obesity and sold this risk factors lead has had have recovered strokes and of course strokes is one of the main risk factors developing bladder problems as well. So what patients. With stroke do developing continous do develop imola These involuntary contractions which in medical terms were cool. All were active blooded syndrome so it leads to urge incontinence simple mechanism as imagine he'll blah. It consists of one muscle which is called the truth himself and he just contracts might warns involuntarily. So that's a basic sob- ov- that always active syndrome in swam back communist conditions which we see in our post stroke patients

Dr Aleida Mucci Smile American College Of Phys Danny Wed Arthritis Muscle Jerry Europe UK Campbell Apple Detroit Harmon Obesity Diabetes
Accidents And Aging: Learn How To Avoid Them

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:45 min | Last month

Accidents And Aging: Learn How To Avoid Them

"Last month we talked on Frailty what it is how to prevent them or prevent it from getting worse. And what's on on topic for incontinence today. How is that tied into aging? Well, where do I start work anymore massage? And the very important and interesting one and I think as we get into the conversation, I'd like to get couple of things out there straight away. And the first thing is incontinence and aging are not the same thing incontinence at any age is not normal as we get older and if we start experiencing incontinence episodes, we shouldn't just say well, what do you expect? I'm eighty-five. I'm ninety, of course big things happen. No, it is not normal to get incontinence. So if that is happening medical attention should be sought because yes, of course we experience in certain changes down there in terms of our blood urination powers that are all talk about these physiological changing changes in our body systems. However, incontinence is abnormal. The second the second thing is it can happen at any age Adventure year old can be incontinent yet. A ninety-year-old lady can be absolutely fine with her countenance. So these are the two important facts to consider when it comes to the engine changes incontinence. I think we're mainly will be talking about bloggers today. I think it would be too much we will maybe talk about bowels if you have any questions, but let's concentrate on the bladder or in today's podcast. So wage it comes to changes aging changes, of course their bladder muscle which recalled the truth and muscle does get a little bit of a mind of its own and often get more contractions more involuntary contractions and suddenly out of the blue you might have been to the toilet only half an hour ago and you start getting urges. So that's one of birth. Changes we experience the capacity or how much urine the bladder can hold before. It tells your brain that you need to empty your bladder that capacity goes down as well. And then of course, let's not forget this way grow older. We develop other problems most commonly Mobility problems arthritis muscle weakness. And of course the pure ability to go to the toilet becomes a challenge and not getting there in time. Sometimes can lead to them little accident. So these are off main page and changes we need to know about and of course these couples ways either changes in their body. For example, as we grow older we develop some Faron and hardening of the blood vessels on the brain will call that small vessel ischemic changes of small vessel disease and that of course has an impact of course wage. Our blood is regulated by multiple mechanisms. But mainly by the brain if you get the blood vessels of the brain fed up that will have impact on your blood on and so forth cause the blood it to a contract involuntarily. So these These are the main main engine changes we need to be aware of makes sense. So we need to take care of our brains that we don't have or bathroom issues that small site Jimmy and if we go further into the you made a really good point there because we need to take account of our brain people with Strokes people who go home and let's say there are many of the reasons for strokes but the most common causes smoking crack diabetes obesity. And so this risk factors lead us to have recovered strokes. And of course Strokes is one of the main risk factors for developing blood problems as well. A lot of patience with stroke do develop incontinence do develop these involuntary contractions which in medical terms of recall all were active bladder syndrome. So it leads to urge incontinence but they're simple mechanism is imagine your bladder it consists of one muscle which is called the truth of muscle and it just contracts went down involuntarily. So that's a basic so of that overactive bladder syndrome is one of the commonest conditions which we see in our poor stroke patients. So absolutely take care of your brain. That's the one thing doctors don't seem to know how to fix too. Well, so preventive measures are definitely a good idea. I'm talking about the nerves. I mean we touched on the brain but talking about the nerves, of course, there is a I mean the blood is no regulated, of course amongst many other dog. Mechanisms other you illogical conditions are common causes for all worked up blood and generally blood of problems countenance problems. It's a multiple sclerosis for example and Walterboro, Ms. Patients experienced problems with continents. And of course, let's not forget dementia acute delirium episodes. She consents disease beliefs goes on.

Arthritis Muscle Weakness Faron Bladder Syndrome Diabetes Obesity Jimmy Stroke Walterboro Sclerosis Dementia
More Californians Are Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:47 sec | Last month

More Californians Are Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine

"If you are 16 or older and you have certain health conditions you actually qualify for a vaccine Doctor. Robert Schooley is a professor of medicine in the infectious disease division at UC San Diego. He tells KOGO news. It's complicated to decide who's in the category. Some are wondering why Type Two diabetes is included, but not Type One. The reason for that is the Type two diabetes is adult onset diabetes. It's often associated with obesity and can be associated with heart disease. These patients with diabetes being in it Get her disease, the one to get into trouble with covert type One diabetes is juvenile onset diabetes, often with younger, skinnier people. Dr. Scully also says, Well, some heart issues qualify. Hypertension does not know the county says that is the number one condition among most hospitalized covert patients. Marilyn Haider KOGO News, the

Robert Schooley Kogo News Diabetes Adult Onset Diabetes Juvenile Onset Diabetes San Diego Dr. Scully Obesity Heart Disease Marilyn Haider
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 2 months ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Study Finds Severe Obesity Raises Risk of Covid-19 Hospitalization and Death

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Study Finds Severe Obesity Raises Risk of Covid-19 Hospitalization and Death

"We have the full interview on the W T o P app. Government researchers find a strong link between obesity and the risk of hospitalization and death among people who get covert 19 The New York Times reports. The CDC studied nearly 149,000 adults that more than 200 hospitals across the country. They say the risk increases as a person's ratio of weight to hide. Her body mass index goes up severely obese people were 33% more likely to be hospitalized. And 61% more likely to die than people who are not overweight and of patients are over

Obesity CDC The New York Times
The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:58 min | 2 months ago

The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"We're gonna be talking about conditions pretty common This one hundred percent preventable. A hundred percent reversible that is managed often in very weird ways by traditional medicine and something that's called just station diabetes which is essentially diabetes of pregnancy. So liz tell us how common is this problem. And why should we even care. Be worried about it. Yeah well thanks mark. thanks for having me. It's great to be on with you again and It's really common actually say up to ten percent of women have diabetes which means their blood. Sugar is too high during pregnancy and as a result. What happens when their blood sugar too high during pregnancy is the babies grow too big right so they will get. They will get over weight when they're born so they can grow big. Those offspring often have increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes and waking when they're adults so when women have just diabetes during their pregnancy. It makes it harder for that baby to maintain healthy weight. When they're an adult so it's trans-generational absolutely not only. Is it dangerous for the baby. During that pregnancy they have a higher rate of of problems with birth. They've increased rate of c-section but their metabolism is damaged. So they have a harder. Time with maintaining normal weight as an adult. They have an increased risk of obesity. They have an increased risk of insulin. Resistance and For that mother to if they had just stations diabetes they have a much higher rates of diabetes post pregnancy. Both type one and type two which is interesting. So they also have a higher rate of cardiovascular disease. they say that a third will develop metabolic syndrome when the within the next five years. So you know it's it is definitely a risk so if if you were told during your pregnancy that you had just diabetes or you you're at risk for just station diabetes. It's important that you are paying attention to your blood sugar to your insulin level to that waist to hip ratio postpartum. Because because you don't want you wanna be be picking this up early. 'cause it's really much easier to reverse if you pick it up early. Imposed ten percent of women who have pregnancies have this problem which is a lot At but when you think about the fact that one and two americans has prediabetes or type two diabetes. You know that's pretty significant. And the question i am is if ten percent have actual just diabetes which means your blood sugar is over a hundred forty after a glucose tolerance test one hundred. Twenty six fasting. How many have prediabetes. Who are pregnant. Yeah because it might be the same ratio as with regular dhabi might be like ten percent and another forty percent of the population might have prediabetes pregnant and that also comes with risks.

Diabetes LIZ Insulin Resistance Obesity Cardiovascular Disease Dhabi
'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

WGN Programming

03:18 min | 2 months ago

'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

"State leaders make their own decisions on wind groups or eligible, but many people are not happy about obesity being considered a risk factor that should get early dibs at the vaccine joins us now to talk about this Dr Fatima Cody Stanford, She's an assistant professor of medicine in Massachusetts General Hospital. She's also in obesity, medicine, physician and adults, Adolescence and Children and MGH Wait center. Thanks for joining us tonight, Doctor. Thank you for having me. I guess the first question becomes one of the risk factors for those who are overweight when we're talking about Cove it so it's important for us to recognize that obesity is an actual disease, and I think one of the things that people don't realize is that it's the disease is not just how you look. It's actual, a disease process characterized by a high degree of inflammation. And so when we have that high degree of chronic inflammation associated with obesity, the disease it doesn't play well with the acute inflammation of covert 19. As such patients that have the disease of obesity do have a risk of dying. That's much higher, sometimes 3 to 4 times the likelihood of those that are leaner and wait. So it's important for us to recognize that this is important. We need persons with obesity to be vaccinated. We want them to live. We want them not to need ICU care and be on the ventilator. And that's why I think that this really is a prudent and a really important step for those that have the disease of obesity. Doctor. I want to read a quote from the chairwoman of the Obesity Action Co Elite coalition, who was featured in the USA Today article, she said, Wait isn't always within your control. With that in mind, and what we know about the risk of obesity and Kobe complications is the right move to get obese Americans in this next phase of the vaccine. One thing I'm gonna change I don't want to call people will be so this is a label. Obesity is a disease. And so that language can be highly stigmatizing for my patients that actually have this disease of obesity, but hands down. It's the right move to get patients with obesity vaccinated when we're looking at the vaccines, the fires of modern of particularly we saw that patients with obesity had a similar level of immunity with regards to the vaccines as persons that were leaner and wait status. So if we know that they're dying quicker. We know they're getting sicker and having much more Colton disease processes associated with covert. We need to make sure that they're getting vaccinated. Have you had a chance to talk to any of your patients? What was their response when the news broke that the possibility of them being moved to the next group? They're up to get the vaccine. What was that thought process. What was their feelings about that? There were some that felt you know a little bit guilty that their weight status would cause them a higher likelihood of getting the vaccine sooner than others. But many of my patients were actually very pleased, actually finally be able to get this vaccine so that we can return to some sense of normalcy here in the United States and around the world as we try to navigate these issues with social distancing physical, do, insisting and getting back to work, So I think that it's important to see that there's different camps in terms of what people think. But overall for my patients that have a B C that Aaron care they were very relieved to see that they were moving up in the ranks of the consideration for the vaccine. Alright,

Obesity Dr Fatima Cody Stanford Obesity Action Co Elite Coalit Massachusetts General Hospital Chronic Inflammation Usa Today Colton United States Aaron
BBC Three is Coming Back to TV

The Media Podcast with Olly Mann

07:13 min | 2 months ago

BBC Three is Coming Back to TV

"Let's talk about tv and bbc. Three which will be returning to the fusty old fashioned airwaves. After an absence of nearly six years. It's going to be back on. Tv sets in january maggie Will you be watching things target demographic but will you be watching your the target demographic but i'm very piece it's coming back I think he shouldn't've gone away in the fest place. I also like the fact that it's also going to be a following on from cbc so the one of the aims of the bbc. One of the failures of the bbc has been fantastic children's programming. The seabees thought graduating through to see bbc. So we can think of horrible histories strict sonko great great shows but then they lost that advantage and i think now that they're going to take an hour of cbc and move into bbc straight. And i think this is actually a potentially good way of rebuilding interest because they can actually put forward some some grapes. Some great shows whether they'll be watched. I didn't know they can be caught up with but the thing is really spoiled for choice now and to actually just rope a group of a tv channel. Just seems to me to have been a very bad idea. But on the other hand what she see is that the regulators have been nagging away the producers because on the exec because that losing the younger views in but it's a very competitive market so the more outlets you have the best staff is. It's been obvious to real professionals in television including the control of bbc. Three that the decision five years ago it was wrong and so they're finally Reversing it may be too late. But i'm glad that june yes interesting. Jake look back actually or listened back. I should say to what our panelists said here on the media. Podcast when the move was announced that bbc's be bbc three would be moving online because we were on abbott van in two thousand fifteen Leon wilson said on the show to me. It's a huge mistake. It will probably be a qualified. Success will be one or two programs that pumps through online. But it'll be harder for us to be seen and for asthma and said this is nonsense. I can't believe this is happening. Television has an important canvas. That young people under served in time has proven right really. Hasn't it was always a mistake to put bbc three on mine. Can we just say that. Now i think the fact that the bbc's made this decision is a tacit acknowledgement that. It was a mistake. But i also don't think that it was a failure. Bbc three unshackled from the jill did reasonably. Well did very well. In fact some fantastic shows came through within online environment. I'm thinking that alexa flee back which has gone on to huge international success and won emmys and landed phoebe waller bridge a huge deal with amazon. And then you look at things like normal people which came last year plasma successful show Austria and beyond. I think ever Things like this country just quality quality programming now that that's not to say that those shows would not been commissioned if bbc. Three's on television. But i do think there was a creative freedom that came with being online and i hope that that remains that creative freedom continues and the bbc three doesn't have to spend money on shedule filling content like family. Guy like eastenders repeats because that you know that comes with a cost it still comes with. The cost is all repeats but they they still come with a cost shows. So why don't save the cash because all of those shows that jake just listed. Maggie had outings bbc one obesity too anyway. So they did get linear outing. And arguably would have been commissioned even bbc three haven't been an existed somewhere else on the bbc. I'm sure of course feedback with a bit of. The thing is really that that they had a late slot. Which is off to a the news helpless ten which is fine. I suppose but if a peanut the younger teenage area maybe it's better to be a bit more funky roundabout survey to talk of people who've had softened the home what they're looking for some entertainment secondly even if this is a qualified success. It's not you're not saying that. The programming copy shot on another channel. What you'll saying is going to premiere on bbc. Three and the seats will have its own form of promotions. General Ambience and i think that that shows the bbc has about the singer. Bob this past yet really opinion is that we really do well. What what is really happened is despite all channels. Having a terrible television broncos mutawa time in order to make programs have if you had to tear up hills the shadows. I didn't know how they will manage to keep going. It's been a very very very difficult. But they have performed. I think really well. And one of the aspects of it is the the Regulations and the quotas and on the agreements that they strike can have a run the channels what we put in the amount of circle public service will costing lawyers moods of of quotas and measurements to us forty two inches ready test channel phone over a hundred for the for the. They been relaxed because they had to. They had to be what they could be given the circumstances and i think they've done brilliantly and so i do think that another kind of channel to pay rounded up trusting. The bulk custos is at this point. Really good thing. I think that if you look at the energy is gone into some of the changes in just the the kind of logos and all the rest of that using the gen will the bits between the programs. they advertise that pregnancy will be very jazzy. I'm very keen an above all to. They've they've understood what the nation wants so we want more outdoor kind of things. We've had the the devon's on the komo's in the countryside programming that you could possibly drum up and it's been like that too with children Having the the bbc by sesame the government didn't say to bbc in in february across Help children home educate. They just did the juicy and they came up by april with with a complete scheme and then they re extended it. They used radio for Things so i think. Now it's the bbc is about to be besieged on despite order the gloom about since fees advertising and blah blah blah off broke custos. Domestic focuses are ashamed themselves to be foot of grits. And and. I'm beijing

BBC CBC Leon Wilson Phoebe Waller Maggie Abbott Jake Asthma Alexa Jill Austria Amazon Obesity Broncos BOB Komo Beijing
California Extends Vaccine Access to People With Disabilities

All Things Considered

02:37 min | 3 months ago

California Extends Vaccine Access to People With Disabilities

"Starting March. 15th younger Californian to have disabilities or severe underlying health conditions will be next in line for vaccinations against covert 19. State health officials say the plan will open access to vaccines to another 4 to 6 million people. Joining me now to talk about this is KQED science reporter Molly Peterson. And Molly. What health conditions is the state listing that will make people eligible for vaccinations. And do they have any idea how long it will take to get through this next group? Let's start with the health conditions. The state's new directive to providers lists cancer, chronic kidney disease, It's stage four or higher. Chronic lung disease Down syndrome, having a weakened immune condition from an organ transplant, sickle cell, some heart conditions, severe obesity and very high type two diabetes as The health conditions that will make people eligible for vaccinations and as for how long it will take to get this next group vaccinated literally. The state does not know in part because the states as it could only see supplies three weeks into the future with federal partners. So far, state and federal data show. There have been 5.5 Million doses given 7.9 million doses have been have arrived in the state. But we've had some hiccups with that Napa in Los Angeles this week paused first doses to make sure that they had enough second doses for everyone who had gotten the first dose earlier. Counties and their health officials also speak often about being on wait list to get more vaccine Now, Disability rights advocates have been pushing really hard for people with underlying conditions. To be moved. Moved up in line. How are they responding to this announcement? Well, some people say they are happy. Just go lame and talk to one of our KQED colleagues. She's with San Francisco Senior and Disability Action group. And she says Essentially the march 15th is too late and that countless people will die needlessly and will make it hard for people with disabilities who aren't on this list, and people who don't have regular medical care to access the vaccine. I should say they don't know exactly how many people there. Adding 4 to 6 Million people is the range and that's because some folks with disabilities or severe health conditions are already in groups, including job specified groups and age specified groups. That are already eligible. There are a lot of questions left to answer, like Will people be able to do this at mass vaccination sites or will verify and things that like a mass vaccination site? Slow Everything

Molly Peterson Chronic Lung Disease Down Synd Kqed Chronic Kidney Disease Sickle Cell Molly San Francisco Senior And Disab Obesity Diabetes Cancer Napa Los Angeles
Obesity: Appetite drug could mark 'new era' in tackling condition

The KFBK Morning News

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Obesity: Appetite drug could mark 'new era' in tackling condition

"By researchers and great Britain are showing that a new obesity fighting drug it's called Sema Glue Tide could cut your body weight by up to 20% this new drugs being called a game changer by researchers. More than a third about 35% of the people who took this new drug for treating the condition lost more than 1/5 of their total body weight. This is according to a global study that researchers and great Britain conducted. So now there are, of course, other weight loss pills that are available on the market. Currently, they work differently. Dr Aretha Cas. Ooh, boy is with WebMD and she tackles right now. This question that many people who are looking to lose weight Russell with on a frequent basis, So the question is Should you try one? The truth is weight loss. Drugs can help. You may want to try one of your obese or if you're overweight, with a condition, like type two diabetes or high blood pressure, So

Britain Dr Aretha Cas Obesity Webmd Russell Diabetes High Blood Pressure
"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Think it'd be more suburban. Chicago'S A little bit too. If you hate big cities. I'll say that what we should go if we go. The annoy is Reagan went to college. Steve hasn't even that school. Although Steve Kamara Eureka Eureka correct. Yeah Rica College. Town populations five thousand two hundred ninety five. Yeah it's us we honed. His comedic chops probably strange. How big is that school? Five hundred sixty seven students so actually there. We could do a live show recall. Kids love us. Yeah we could do that. You want us to do that. How far is that for you? Ooh That's about that's about an hour and a half two hours. You can write nothing all right. Thank you very much Steve. Abraham Lincoln spoke on the campus Nathan Eighteen fifty six and Ronald. Reagan graduated there in one thousand thirty two. Wow that's some history a hotbed of presence. I say that you can have Steve's history tour where he takes you to all the places that when Ronald Reagan do at Eureka College clubs was chasing trimming and beavers. Mike was the thirty clouds open. Eight am on Monday a museum there already Museum Steve. Now that would be fun. Would be sure would be. Was those religious college perfect. Steve Reagan's probably going with the better museums. I would think that's not interesting. Wasn't that one big one in California. Oh it's on the music every four years that big Republican debate there with the big plane all fresh raw right now. We'll talk about great Reagan's just like you have to do that. Or You. Kicked out the party. Steve Progress a thriller. All right. Good evening hello no calls phones if I may explain. I know you're taking Jemmy but was happening. Is Justin said awesome? Why he was saying that.

Ronald Reagan Steve Reagan Steve Steve Kamara Museum Steve Steve Progress Eureka College clubs Rica College Justin Chicago Jemmy Abraham Lincoln Mike Nathan Eighteen California
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"All right. So I think is how I'm going to frame. It obesity is not really as bad for bodies. As we've been led to believe. I think that that's bullshit because I do think obesity is pretty bad for bodies. And there's a lot of consensus around the fact that obesity, and let's let's say that it is bullshit to have these strict definitions that we need to figure out a way to define obesity. Yes. And a way to dip define metabolic community agrees on obesity can be defined incorrectly and as bad can be defined incorrectly. But that's true. Good definition of. Yes. If you have good definitions of obesity and good definitions of metabolic health. I think that it is not bullshit that those things are bad for your health because we do have a lot of evidence. A lot of longitudinal studies that show that obesity assume we define it. Correctly is linked to cardiovascular health is linked to diabetes is linked to certain types of cancers is linked to sleep apnea is linked to arthritis has linked to. A lot of conditions that you would rather not have your I'm so I think that that is absolutely not bullshit. And the bullshit parts of those are that we don't have good definitions good measures of obesity, and we don't always have agreed upon definitions of metabolic health. We'll fake you Maria kind Cova, and we should disclose that. This segment has been underwritten by fun dip and cinnabon. Yes. And I'm about to have a cinnabon right now. It's going to be heavy cinnabon with extra frosting and many airports near you Maria kind of Cova is the author of the confidence game. And the biggest bluff it's quite a bluff you'll want to read about that. Thank you Maria. Thank you, Mike..

obesity Cova Maria Mike
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"The same things we're seeing plus go and in the eighteen ninety two book which became pretty famous in medicine principles and practice of medicine by William also, titled like that how could it have come? This was the first time that we actually see obesity put in a negative light in a medical textbook neutral. So he writes, he says that obesity is attributed to quote over eating a vice which is more prevalent than an only a little behind overdrinking, and it's disastrous effects. So this is the first time that we actually start seeing people put a judgment on. Why not just like this is this is medical? But, but this is a vice well, we didn't have the knowledge as a medical practitioner at the time. He didn't have the knowledge that words cause injury. Yes. He did. Not right. You did not. So in the in the early twentieth century, we finally see some epidemiological stuff where it's actually starting to be linked to increased mortality. So this is kind of the volition. And then we suddenly start having people saying, uh-huh. Maybe there problems with being overweight. But here was one of my problems with this article that saying everything that we thought is wrong. Because one of the things he saying is wait is not health in nineteen forty seven. This French guy Joan thug at first I thought he was English and his last name was vague. And I was like realized that he was French. That is kind of cool to. Yeah. He actually this is nine hundred forty seven says, actually, wait. Wait, wait, not all wait is created equal. And he's the first one who actually starts saying we should look at where the weight is on the body. Cool some comes with bad health effects, and others is just as he said in French. So it didn't sound quite as bad or maybe it sounded much worse unsightly. Yes. But not but not actually causing any health problems. What is French for junk in the trunk? I'm gonna look this up as we talk. So he so he distinguished between Android ABI city which was upper body obesity, Android, Android. Yes. Let me guy. Kind of quite a b- city or lower body. He said that the upper body, which is what you were talking about with kind of belly fat and all of that that's linked to metabolic and cardiovascular disease, but guide is not. And so now, it gets us to kind of to this question of okay. What do we even need to look at when we're talking about weight? And is there such thing as healthy obesity? And so there's this relatively new concept stems back to nineteen forty seven called metabolic, the healthy obesity. So the original the original idea was that. Okay. When you have a certain BMI, and which is gonna knowledge that their problems with every single one of these measurements a certain percentage body fat. Then all of a sudden you have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. You have a higher risk of dying at a younger age higher risks of type two diabetes, higher risk of stroke higher risk of a lot of. Those types of things and of certain types of cancers. But now, but some people are saying is, okay. No, actually, it's not wait. There are metabolic healthy obese individuals and metabolic unhealthy obese. Okay. So it's not the weight. Yeah. It's your metabolism. And for some bodies, you might be obese by every single criterion. And yet your metabolism is still healthy. And so one would think your risk for all of these things would be normal. Whereas someone could be skinny and actually be metabolic unhealthy that seemed the second part of that is seems obvious. Now, the first part, I wonder this must only exist at the lower ends of the definition of obesity. So so in the last five years, that's when research on this has really picked up it exists at every point and obesity. But it seems that it's not something. That's actually long-term true. Yeah. So I I was able to..

obesity William Joan thug younger age five years
"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"And provide the body enough you'll to perform physical feats, although from what I understand sometimes. The eating does go on a bit beyond the necessary. And sometimes the burning of calories doesn't match the ingestion of calories. And then we've got a situation where maybe we don't maybe everything that I think about obesity is wrong or maybe maybe hear me out here. The backlash to the potato. Mash is some bullshit Maria Konakov is here to load our plates with knowledge. You're probably loyal to certain brands. But do you ever wonder about the businesses behind them? I'm Seth Stevenson an enslaved new podcast who runs that. I'll talk to the CEO's fascinating companies that create things people love, what is the impact of having Meghan Markle photograph, one of your products. We see the bump we see the bump. So I won't be able to that on next week's weather with governments in the immediate future. They're not immediate future. Do you try the products on your own face ideal? Join me for who runs that wherever you listen to podcasts. Recently in the Huffington Post, or as I call it the Huffington Post. There was an article headlined, everything, you know, about obesity is wrong. Now, I went in having these as my priors as they say regarding obesity in general, I think that having a higher then lower BMI correlates to some negative outcomes in terms of cardiovascular health, diabetes also think that so-called belly fat might be worse than other kinds. This is what I thought I knew about obesity, and it turns out after reading this article in the Huffington Post. None of that's wrong. So what is it that? We thought we knew about obesity. That's wrong is obesity bad. I think what I said is true. I can't figure this out. So I'm going to be joined by Maria Konakov. She comes by every few weeks to play. Is that bullshit? She's also the author of the biggest bluff forthcoming fr. Penguin press. Hello. Hello maria. How are you doing? Well, mike. How are you? Well, so does obese even have a meaning is that a useful category? I don't mean does someone describes it as this percent overweight. But if there is such a thing as being too fat. Let's not mince words is that a useful thing to think about that. Someone can be too fat. Yeah. So that's I think a really interesting question that a lot of researchers are asking wait, isn't health and health, isn't wait. So we can't use weight as a proxy for health, which I think a lot of people may very well do because wait a something that's very easy to see. So a lot of markers of health our internal. So I can't tell if you're healthy or not healthy by looking at you, always you can weigh more.

obesity Maria Konakov Huffington Post Seth Stevenson Meghan Markle Penguin press CEO Mash mike
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From two keito l l c gets the obesity code podcast with dr jason fund and meghan romme's each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada i'm carl franklin and on today's show we're talking about one patients struck with kidney disease the obesity code podcast is brought to you by two kito llc who strives to support the low carb community with podcasts in other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriarch deng to keito dot com today show centers around ibm patient john collier who was told by a doctor that he had staved off kidney failure for about five years by using a ketogenic diet i was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1918 nine furious after that my mother was also diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and she died as a result of complications from that in nineteen ninety six john's mother died at a young age typical for those of us with type 2 diabetes she was sixty nine years old when she died we are going through an epidemic of diabetes chronic disease it's unprecedented in human populations that's awardwinning author and science journalist gerry tabs bought it's happening worldwide so this here's a disease at in the 19th century in europe in the us was in exceeding lee rare disease i mean estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and the us in the late nineteenth century in hospitals was may be one in every thousand or three thousand hospital patients had diabetes in the va hospitals in the us today one in four patients have diabetes one in eleven americans have diabetes i mean these are enormous increases if you look at the cdc numbers sincerely 1960s there's been a seven hundred percent increase in the prevalence of diabetes i mean if this was any other disease particularly in infectious disease you would have investigative committee teams of scientists people in white coats with electron akiir walking around our backyard's as we speak trying to figure out what was the cause of this.

dr jason fund meghan romme toronto carl franklin deng john collier europe us diabetes kito llc ibm gerry tabs va cdc seven hundred percent sixty nine years five years
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"In modern life that's not what happens when people are facing legal trouble or marital trouble or a child problems their children are sick or getting into trouble with the law financial problems these never go away and that's the problem so whereas in the past this sort of response was really directed as a one time thing after which you would do vigorous physical activity to burn off all that glucose who remember cortisol is one of the counter regulatory hormones as an activator the sympathetic nervous system yossi push glucose out into the blood so that your muscles can use it but then afterwards as she go down but stresses not like that in the modern day you have chronic financial problems you stressed all day your bosses the nasse though he's always riding years earlier instead under stress all day and it's not like you can run away or do some vigorous physical activity right there in the office so what happens is that this sort of thing builds up in what over time your body is now pushing out the glucose and eventually your insulin hass to respond to bring down the glucose was a very unhealthy sort of system where you're chronically activating a your cortisol response and that we know leads to week game there is a synthetic form of cortisol cold prayed in his own which is used in large doses to treat inflammatory disease and that's richard morris by two kedo dudes cohost if he give that to patients chronically then they almost invariably gang white so we know that quarters all uh is a very powerful mediator obesity and it overlaps very significantly with the insulin response because insulin has to take care of the glucose.

cortisol inflammatory disease richard morris obesity
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"M n everything that was delicious was kind of off limits for me dr fontelles this why not only does this yoyo dieting inhibit us physically but also mentally one of the things that we have to really guard against this is sort of learned helplessness that people who are trying to newsweek cat because they've tried so many diets and because so many of these diets a failed again and again they short learn that there's nothing they can deal and i think that this is because most diets focus on only half of the piece of the puzzle that is the focus on the foods that you should or should not be eating or really pay no attention to the sort of when that is should you eat once a day twice a day three times a day six times a day ten times a day or zero times a day it turns out that when you eat is just as if not more important than what you eat eating all of your daily calories in one smaller window every day gives your body more time to lower insulin and that is the key to undoing insulin resistance if you have in some resistance your body responds by making more insulin that higher level of insulin overtime produces this obesity so it's really important to jason in meghan that their patients don't give up hope they aren't helpless and it will get better but they've just been focusing on the wrong things what to eat and not when.

obesity jason meghan newsweek
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"But if it works it works if it doesn't work it doesn't work so it apparently you can look at the data it with addicted to sweeteners i even done in a little bit of an end when experiment on myself because i mean both the chakma passing insulin as often as i would like and i've taken seed yeah and they measured my insulin response to stevia and compared it to a day where at the same number of hours fast saying that the same diet and macro intake where i haven't had cbn measured my insulin response now of course is not a great and when experiment could sleep been stressing all that plays a big factor but there is that italy and insulin response in what happens when you take somebody and just throw in a whole bunch of artificial sweeteners do they lose weight than the answer clearly is now if it was the answer we wouldn't have an obesity crisis we'd all just drink diet coke and we'd all have artificially sweetened drinks we'd have artificial fats we he can eat all sorts of fake foods and since there is zero calories and all those foods theoretically according to the calories theory we should all get very slim because we've cut all those calories of course it doesn't work anything nearly like that in fact there is a clear correlation between tieins soda and obesity as well as dis soda and heart disease it's possible that these sweeteners cause more disease or it's possible that people who are trying to lose weight tend to eat more of these sweeteners either way the only thing he really say from incorrect experience that clinical experience is that these things don't work and it doesn't matter why they don't work the answer is that they don't work so it doesn't it doesn't matter just don't use them so after losing fifty pounds a net experienced what most of us have experienced after losing considerable weight cutting carbohydrates.

obesity cbn italy zero calories fifty pounds
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"But one thing she struggled with was artificial sweeteners i had a lot of sweeteners like that was how i of shored up my feelings of like differentiation if you want to call it back i really didn't have a lot of cravings or like emotional attachment to all these foods that i was leaving behind by you still i mean i do have a food addiction i know that this is true so you still need need a crutch to chronic get you from 1 to the next phase rate so sweeteners were in the equation and i had a bit of addiction to sweeteners for awhile dr fung and megan ramose explain why artificial sweeteners can be problematic in general i don't recommend artificial sweeteners for fasting or really to be taken at all and the reason is that if you look at the artificial sweeteners in terms of their insulin effect sometimes it's really just as bad as sugar now there's not a lot of data on this but really remember if you're thinking of obesity and type 2 diabetes it's really a disease of hyperinsulinemia it's really too much insulin so even if you have zero calories even if you have zero sugar such as a splendid our aspertain or something that's really the insulin which drives obesity and some of these have just as much insulin the fact so the sweetness itself may make people crave more so some people think that that's the reason that they eat more and it certainly possible as a trigger for food but the bottom line really is to see if these things actually works so it doesn't really matter what the mechanism of sweeteners is.

obesity hyperinsulinemia dr fung megan ramose zero calories
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"But three hundred killer calories per day had as the available calories decreased they consumption of calories shrank by 500 kilic hellish per day they caloric expenditure was changing in response to their viable calories okay so the epa status working to keep your body at a regulated weight how on earth do we hackett so how does our body set weight work well remember what we said is that insulin is one of the main hormones involved in determining your body fat so as you eat insulin goes up enslin tells your body to store body fat to store your food energy on the body so body fat when you're is linked goes down your body then gets the signal to start burning some the start energy or burning some of this body fat so what happens during obesity while insulin goes up you game body fat as your fat cells increase then what happens is that your start to secrete a second hormone called leptin so lapd in is produced by the fat cells and tells your body hey i'm getting too fat is travels to the brain and this leptin then towels the body to stop eating so it really controls your appetite it makes you just not want to eat at all so as you don't eat well insulin goes down insulin goes down the fat cells start to shrink and then the leptin level goes down and then you're back to square once you see this is a feedback mechanism very similar to the thermostat in the house that is if your temperature goes up to majet turns on the air conditioning and then eventually gets back down to normal and that turns off this is the same thing insulin goes up gain body fat bodyfat produces leapt then leptin tells you to stop eating inslee goes back down so very nice inefficient and work very well up until about nineteen seventy seven or so when the obesity epidemic started so what goes on in obesity while the member the the the fundamental problem is too much insulin so insulin goes up.

epa obesity the house
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"And she gives this example of them children they would admit experiment and one carla drink and that to run for an hour and a half to spend all the the calories and that's the reality so the amount of calories expended while exercising really isn't that much however there is an upside to exercise even if it's not weight loss i do think that it helped pull the blood sugar i'll out of my blood um and so it did help and the respect i have i never officially got like a prediabetic diagnosis or anything like that so the exercise helped her burn off glycogen so her blood sugar and never got dangerously high but that wasn't enough for her insulin the plo enough over a sustained period of time therefore she wasn't losing weight we should mention that kim has lost some weight but up until the point she started fasting she found it extremely difficult to shed pounds dr fun goes into a little more detail on why exercise isn't the most efficient way to lose weight remember the core problem with obesity is not one of calories the core problem of obesity is too much insulin which is sometimes also caused by insulin resistance so if you have a lot of insulin resistance you your body will respond by producing more insulin so it's a vicious cycle too much insulin can lead to insulin resistance insulin resistance can lead to too much insulin and too much insulin is really the signal for your body to store fat and the real problem is that exercise does not address these court issues yes it does burn calories although very very inefficiently.

blood sugar kim obesity carla
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From two keito l l c it's the obesity code podcast with dr jason fund and meghan ramose each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada on karl franklin and today on the show nonskilled victories ford benefits of fasting and ketogenic style other than weight loss the obesity could podcast is brought to you by two kito llc who strives to support the low carb community with podcasts and other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriotic two qito dot com this week story centers around patient kimberly dumber s like most dividing ends patients kim's been on roller coaster dieting her whole life her mother is one of seven each of which has type 2 diabetes kim is one of four all but one of her siblings has type 2 diabetes and soul ever since they 20s or so i've been struggling against that and trying to do everything i possibly can do to prevent that from happening her undergraduate degree is in biology and chemistry so she naturally thought about modifying her diet at the young age of twenty two kims started a programme called natural hormonal enhancement which was mostly low carb with carbs cycling this approach worked for weight loss but she allowed herself to be talked out of it by just about everybody i got talked out of that by society essentially her mother had done lowcarbon controller diabetes for a while but probably eight too much protein and got stuck.

dr jason fund meghan ramose karl franklin undergraduate degree toronto kito llc kim
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Then if they were to to not have had that problem until they're kind of midthirties kind of thing so this is why childhood obesity is such a problem because it is going to be in the future an even bigger problem because that sort of obesity almost drives itself that is when you become insulin resistance that's going to lead to higher levels which is going to lead to more we game which is going to lead to more insulin resistance so you need to break that cycle in one of the ways to break that cycle is through the practice of fast and being a good friend of mine who's sugar was over six hundred told me he couldn't go low carb because it was hard on the kidneys in his kidney numbers were abnormal likewise when i was in my 20s i was told by a nurse that low carb works but the longterm effects on the kidneys quote were not known unquote that was enough to scare me away from low carb for a long time so let's ask dr fung a kidney doctor what are the effects of a low carb diet on kidneys one of the questions that we always get is a question about chronic kidney disease flee in army kidney specialist them in a kidney specialist for about twenty years now and this question has been really look that in fairly extensive detail but nevertheless is one of the big concerns so let's go back and see when the the problem is in people with chronic kidney disease we often recommend that they avoid eating extremely high protein dieins and there's a number of fear radical reasons why that may be true it may be that for example the excess dietary protein creates a lot of these these waste products to use excess amino acids for energy we have to first turn them into carbohydrates so we need to remove the atoms that not carbon hydrogen and oxygen.

obesity dr fung kidney disease twenty years
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"From to kedo l l c it's the obesity code podcast with dr jason fong and reagan ramose each week we bring you lessons and stories from the intensive dietary management program in toronto canada on karl franklin get out dr fung meghan ramose and the entire idm staff are constantly answering questions about fasting ketogenic eating and their program since we started the obesity code podcast the volume me these questions has increased dramatically so this week we've picked a few very popular questions for them to answer the obesity code podcast is brought to you by two kito l l c who strives to support the low carb community with podcast and other publications and you can support our mission by making a monthly pledge no matter how small at patriarch cato dot com before we get started with the qna i need to tell you where these questions come from richard morris that's me with the osce accent my two kito dudes cohost in i operate a free keita genic form with about ten thousand members were you can search for answers and direct questions to jason a meghan you'll have to register with the form to ask a question but it's free and easy just go to questions dot obesity code podcast dot com our first question is from a lane who says i see a lot of type 2 diabetes in remission but his insulin resistance forever till death do us part problem the short answer is no insulin resistance is not forever but in order to explain dr fung unpacked the term insulin resistance and what it actually refers to.

dr jason fong reagan karl franklin dr fung meghan ramose richard morris dr fung toronto idm osce
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Gary goes on with his history lesson by the early nineteenth 60s we had the technology available to measure in from insulin levels from the bloodstream miss had never been possible to be done before and as physicians researchers started doing this they realized that obese people and the kind of diabetes that associates with obesity known as type 2 diabetes that these individuals had high levels of insulin that they were in effect the insulin resistance and if they were insulin resistance that men that they couldn't use the insulin they were secreting of a could use it as effectively so this insulin resistance could therefore explain obesity and type 2 diabetes because more insulin is secreted and more insulin is needed to do the same job as a noninsulin resistant person and at the same time that high insulin is blocking you from utilizing body fat for fuel mooney the new a new food as insulin levels go up as you become more influence resistant you are going to become more of a fat store than a fatburner one way to think about it in your body is going to be on blocked into a hormonal state where you're storing fat and continuing to storing fad rather than to use wood for fuel and so this was an alternative hypothesis for obesity that emerged in the early 1960s and that the researchers and simply quinn wrapped their heads around because they had already been convince themselves at the problems gluckman sloth.

Gary obesity quinn
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"And again the researchers many of them were medical doctors who just in weren trained can be scientists in annoying thing critic loyd so they got this idea that obesity was in eating disorder with a what me and sloth disorder a calories than calories out disorder mets only way they thought about it whereas simultaneously researchers around the world were studying a cluster of metabolic disorders that ended up being a dent the fight is being caused by a condition called insulin resistance so you could the infamous a hormone that we think of his own fundamentally working at secreted by your pancreas and it works to make our body ourselves in our body take a blood sugar blood glucose and use that glucose for fuel and that's how the medical community pence the think about it but deter insulin have a lot of roles from the human body those enormous number of things and the general role was at a partitions how we use the fuel we consume so tells our fat cells to store fat it tells her muscle cells to burn glucose who tells our muscle cells to use protein four aurora reconstructing cells and rebuilding the so long and short of it is you don't want too much insulin hanging around in your bloodstream it's a fat storage hormone and when it's high you can access body fat in when it's low you can so insulin seems to be a key player in the role of diabetes and obesity.

loyd obesity blood glucose diabetes mets blood sugar
"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"obesity" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"Huge randomized controlled clinical trials costing hundreds of millions of dollars and none of those trials on tens of thousands of people now this traffic could show that saturated fats has any effect on cardiovascular mortality any effect on total mortality and it doesn't seem to have any effect on heart disease as measured by anything that is you know that we consider to be a reliable so no saturated fats do not cause heart disease so marie obviously had the message heat more vegetables and doni in animal fat vegan by the 1970s we had this dietary guidelines for americans which really came down very hard on dietary fat and one of the foods of course that contains a lot of fat are animal products no meat no milk no dairy no eggs in for god's sake don't eat bacon nevertheless you can look at todd nations such as india where there are a lot of vegetarians and dumb well this is sort of in perfect data it doesn't suggest that there were protected from diabetes whatsoever in fact it's wanted a country that has an extremely high prevalence of type 2 diabetes so what's wrong with being a vegetarian there's nothing really rothwell ethical standpoint of really the major flaw in its reasoning is that dietary fat was never really the cause of type 2 diabetes or kidney disease so even as people cut down their dietary fat versus sort of explosion of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

animal products india obesity marie milk