6 Burst results for "OZU"

"ozu" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"ozu" Discussed on Filmspotting

"We send out a weekly newsletter and every month you have the opportunity to get a bonus show for April, Adam mentioned it in our mirror discussion. We did dive into spike jonze's her at ten, family members look for that. It is waiting for you in your feed. We've gotten some feedback on it. Michael Phillips, how about this? A blurb from Michael Phillips. A Michael Phillips blurb. That's like gold, man. He said, great at Ben, best film of that year. Okay. Michael was a big her fan, apparently Andrew Howell also said it was a blind spot for me, so perfect timing to catch up with it, great discussion, and Mike merrigan shared this revisit was an outrageously good episode. Well, thank you, Mike. Who's going to argue with The Godfather of film spotting madness, and we're patting ourselves on the back a little bit there, perhaps. They're using other words, but I do think it was a very good discussion. And if you like that film and you're inclined to seek out some additional film spotting every month, her is a good episode to start with if you become a film spotting family member. Now you can also access our archive as a family member. If you go all the way back and I'm not saying anyone should listen to these for the record, but they're there. Andrei Rublev and solaris, Sam and I, we talked about those two movies together, joint tarkovsky discussion as part of our overlooked O tours marathon. So we were admitting then with that name that they were overlooked or tours by us. Three O tours, tarkovsky, ozu, Sam fuller, where the filmmaker. So back in February 2006, we talked about Andrei Rublev and solaris in the same show. Josh, I don't know exactly how long we just spent on mirror, but do you want to guess how long the entire segment was about both of those films? Oh man. I'm going to guess, I'm going to say those were a little more formidable. So you might have gone a tad longer, 14 minutes. Okay, see, I knew you were going to rightfully guess something really low. We were actually over 25. Okay. But it was both of those films. And it's kind of funny to think about. We also did a top 5 on that show. The entire episode was about 51 minutes. Inconceivable today. Inconceivable. Now, before we finally close out this show, I do want to mention how good a film solaris is and how much it's come up over the course of this show's history. We have to thank for this knowledge. Bill McLaughlin, a listener who embarked on a project Josh to listen to every show in the archive and make a letter box list of every movie that's ever been mentioned. Now, not only that, he would list in the notes, the show it was talked about on the date and why. Why it came up. I've mentioned this before or plugged it before, but it was maybe a couple months ago, and he was up to 2012 or something. Well, now he's done. The film spotting guide to the archives. That's a letter box. It's insane. It's such a good resource. And I used it today to find out about solaris 3848 individual titles that have been mentioned over the 18 years of film spotting. Quick list, solaris, 88 top 5 dystopias slash visions of the future. One 14 top 5 mindbenders, one 33, top 5 scariest moments. One 71 top 5 movies about memory. Two 34 top 5 movies about mortality. 360 8 top 5 losing my mind movies for 16 top 5 doppelganger movies. Number four 37, top 5 movie locations we wish we could visit. I remember feeling like I was going out on a limb with that one. 5 40 top 5 streaming sci-fi movies and 5 75 top 5 films of 19 72. Sounds like saliva should be in the Pantheon. I was going to say that as well. It probably should be put away, but I also wanted to highlight that letter box list and say our thanks are sincere gratitude to build McLaughlin for taking that time and is devotion to the show. We'll link to that letter box list in the show notes for this episode over at film spotting dot. Ned, again, if you want to check out the film spotting family and all those benefits, go to film spotting family dot com. Streaming, one of the movies that made Josh's list his questions about the summer movie season where you can answer your question about the mother with Jennifer Lopez is a deadly assassin that is out now directed by Nikki Caro. Why? Well, you can also see the other film that came up as part of that question Ben Affleck's hypnotic make your choice bennifer battle. That's correct. I think I should probably jump over here and ask. They're together. I think they're married again. Okay. All right. I think so. That's directed by Robert Rodriguez. Book club is out the next chapter. That's Diane Keaton Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary steenburgen. Fool's Paradise directed by Charlie day, and in limited release, you can see BlackBerry, the social network, but BlackBerry. We'll go with that. Directed by Matt Johnson that did just play the Chicago critics film festival. Next week, a lot of potential films to talk about may have a review roundup of sorts or we might dive in to Paul Schrader's master gardener with Joel Edgerton and Sigourney Weaver.

"ozu" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

07:31 min | 5 months ago

"ozu" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Appear in the play at all. It's just a theme of the participants in the plays how the participants view their lives for the gods don't actually appear. And then I think the sense of general weirdness in Thebes, which is something that would be apparent to an Athenian audience of the plays that Thebes would be like some other backwards like Appalachia for us where family relations are chaos. Anything can emerge from this. You'll be like going to Thebes to submit like the novel of the movie deliverance. You're going down into the depths into someplace. You don't know how people relate to you. You don't know what people are. Their primal. And so that I think is both off the times, but also perennial. So Thebes just place that you feel where things got mixed up. And there are depths that come out in Thebes. When trying to explore universal themes like this, it helps to look at radically different times and places to help gauge what's similar and what's different. And the example that you offered in the series was a film by yasujiro ozu, a Japanese director. The film, in particular, he talked about was late spring. So first of all, do you see differences broadly speaking in eastern culture on these types of family drama and family dynamics and then could you also talk specifically about this film? Yeah. There were big differences. In general, the Confucian societies which are most East Asian societies tend to be societies that subordinate the individual to the family unit, even subordinate children to parents. So filiality is a huge thing, maybe the most important aspect of East Asian culture. So there's a kind of reverse from what we've seen in the west. Those cultures have gone a different way. And this hasn't always been the case. I mean, you see this in ancient Chinese history when you read you probably familiar with as so much the records of the historian first century VC masterwork kind of vast must work one of the great historical works in the world, where you see in that as he gives a description of emperors of the different rings from the beginning, and of the different dynasties from the beginning you see how filiality emerges as the central thread of what became Chinese culture. You know, it wasn't there from the beginning. You know, it was something that was created as being ethically the most important shaping influence in human life. And that lodged politely. And so the struggle for individuation in East Asian cultures is somewhat different from what we see in the west. And of course, you know, in modern times, especially in Japan and the films of orzu where after World War II, the U.S. has taken charge of the country and even before World War II you have from 1900 on also you have a lot of western insurance in Japan and China, then you start seeing the modern Asian wrestling with an alternative. Like is there an alternative to filiality? And they're attracted by the individualism of the west. So in modern Asian culture, you start seeing a conflict between filiality and individualism. And it's a difficult conflict. It's not just a philosophical conflict, because I think what many westerners don't understand about East Asian is that full reality is as much a feeling or an aesthetic as it is an ethical virtue. So children in East Asian societies actually feel different towards their parents than children in the west too. There's a sweetness to it. There's a fondness that you don't really get here. And it's partly because in the East Asian society is kind of the traditional relationship of parents to children doesn't involve a kind of competition that you see between individuals when you get individualistic societies. So parents have to prove themselves to the children, children have to prove themselves to the parents. Children of the parents that they respect them as individuals, as human beings, you don't have that in traditional East Asian societies. Parents give children affection, they take care of them, and children respect parents as their parents, there's no kind of egalitarian demand for universal respect. So I've often thought about this because I want to buy with my friends in China, you know, I taught in China 30 years ago and many of my friends are now my students and almost my age, but they're living three generations under the same roof even in the same smaller apartment and seemingly harmoniously, and I know looking at my western Friends that if we tried that, you know, somebody would die within two weeks. So there isn't that Internet conflict. And it's an interesting, it's a wonderfully fascinating mystery to me. And it's not that, you know, in the east, they don't know bad parents or that in the east, they don't know abuse or humiliation, but they found a different way of dealing with it. So in particular, the movie late spring, how do you see these scenes play out that you described? Late spring is the story of a widowed father played by tissue Rio great Japanese actor, and his grown-up daughter was about 30, I guess, played by the great actress sets kohara. And they live together. And they've lived together since the war. I think it's suggested that the mother died during the war. But it's a father and daughter team that is extremely harmonious, extremely sweet, and this father then gets pleasure from family members that he needs to marry off his daughter because what's going to happen when he gets too old and she's going to be too old to marry and she won't have her own life she won't have her own family. So isn't it incumbent on him to find her husband and she is then also pressured to take on her husband. So the story of the film is basically I mean it's very simple is that the husband is bound for her and by the end of the film she's married and the father is left alone. That's the storyline of the film. The film is set in late 1940s Japan, a Japan under American occupation. This is hinted at in the film but never explicit. And I said, Japan where the U.S. has written the constitution. And the constitution has incorporated democratic principles like gender equality, and so now divorce is possible. And women can divorce their husbands. And so some new ideas have crept into a very traditional society. And the young woman's young daughter's best friend is a divorced woman with a job with a career and a strong personality of her own. So you have that element of modern society that is a main thread in this film too. Marriages and everything that families and everything. So there's the sense that things are changing. Nonetheless, the daughter gets married off in a traditional Japanese wedding. And or fusion of traditional Japanese wedding and western marriage, and the last shots of the film are of the father alone at home. It's very sad movie. It's a profoundly sad movie. Have you seen it? I have not. So this is an area where I really can't contribute a whole lot to the conversation. That happens quite a bit, and this is one of those moments. Yeah, you should see it. Everybody should see it. I think ozu maybe is one of the greatest 5 directors of the world. In fact, his film Tokyo story is the one that is best known in the western is also of intergenerational issues and Tokyo story regularly comes up as the greatest film of all time. So I think that also just one of the great directors. So if you have the time, he's really got his son or family dynamics

"ozu" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

09:03 min | 7 months ago

"ozu" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Pretty respectable bout, but umbrellas only getting 46%. Does that mean we're out of musicals? Or is there one left? We must be. We must be. Well, that's just a crime. You can see all the round two results at film spotting madness dot com. Also have a link to the bracket there where you can see how everything is shaping up and we are down to the sweet 16. So just 8 matchups left and we are truly getting to the point Josh where all of these films could make a reasonable claim as the best of the 1960s as usual. We'll run through this where I'll give you some of my easiest and some of my toughest and we'll talk them through in real time. Sound good? Let's do it and I'm gonna vote. So I had of these 8 matchups, I only had three that really gave me fits. That doesn't mean any of them were super easy, but here are the ones that I didn't hesitate much on. The first easy pick, doctor strangelove, going up against Ingmar Bergman's persona. And this is where if I haven't said it already here in madness, I'm gonna say it one last time. I love Bergman and I haven't seen persona since the one time I saw it. As maybe a sophomore in college, which I am said to inform everyone was quite a while ago. And it was my first bergmann, Josh. So I wouldn't recommend that to anybody having now seen a fair amount of bergmann persona would be in the 5 to 7 range in terms of when you should see it. You gotta build up to persona. I was definitely not ready for persona. But even confessing that, I'm still gonna go with strange love. I can corroborate that because I just watched persona, believe it or not, for this tournament. And so yes, I'd seen a handful of bergmann before and I'm glad I did because it's a challenge. Yes. I mean, that makes it sound inscrutable, and I don't know if it's inscrutable, but just formally. It's a challenge. And recency bias may be a play here. I'm lower on strange love than most people, so that's also at play, though I do like it. I think I'm gonna go with persona on this one. No kidding. Yep. Okay. That formal audacity is certainly why it was a top 20 seat. Speaking of recency bias, as much as I do, love Paul Newman and cool hand Luke. We just revisited psycho. That's a pretty clear choice going without for Hitchcock there. Yeah, I mean, cool hand Luke in terms of just looking at star ratings where I give movies sometimes four to four or 5 to four for both of these, but that doesn't indicate that I agree. There's still a significant gap between these two films, psycho for me. La samurai, very good film. From Jean Pierre Melville, starring the incredible land a law. But his piercing eyes going up against Peter O'Toole's piercing eyes against the desert as David Lean depicts it. That's a pretty easy one for me, going Lawrence. And I'm voting against the samurai just because it took out hard day's night. So this is a punishment vote for me, as well as the fact that Lawrence of Arabia is amazing. So I love all four of these movies I'm about to mention. I actually love all of the movies I've mentioned so far. So I'll ten of these easy choices, even if I did admit I really badly need to revisit persona. But that doesn't mean these were as tough as some others for me. Because of how strongly I feel about the film that is the higher seed. 8 and a half in Bonnie and Clyde should be extremely hard. Except, I love 8 and a half so much that there's really only one or two or three, maybe at the most titles in the entire bracket that I'm gonna pick over 8 and a half. So sorry Bonnie and Clyde, you're just the next victim for that fellini film for me. So we're out of fellini if 8 and a half goes. Is that correct? That's correct. I don't like that. But I do like other fellini films better than 8 and a half. So I don't know if I can do just a save fellini vote here when it's up against something that we've talked about this, what represents the era better, not that 8 and a half doesn't, but in terms of the era and the transitions that were happening in American cinema at least and how Bonnie and Clyde stands for so much of that. So given that and my love for other fellini films more, I'm going to go by incline. You know how people in the 80s and you can still buy them, I think they made those save Ferris t-shirts. We'll make film spotting save fellini t-shirts. Okay, good. Thank you. 2001, the number one overall seed is going up against. Once upon a time in the west here, if you're going punishment, I know you're definitely going for 2001 since west took out the umbrellas of Cherbourg. Get love, love once upon a time in the west. But it's going down if it's facing Stanley Kubrick's masterpiece. Yeah, I mean, this is a clear one. 2001 has a chance of taking this whole thing and should have a chance of taking this whole thing. And maybe this will go into your next pairing, but I prefer the good, the bad and the ugly. I think it's the better film. And if there's going to be a Leone that proceeds, it should be this one. I love that you said that because I'll make another confession, which is, my gut, whenever once upon a time in the west, and the good, bad and the ugly are talked about, is to favor my instinct is to favor once upon a time in the west for some reason, even though I love that man with no name trilogy, and I love the good the bad and the ugly. I always, for some reason in my mind, put it slightly higher, even though I saw the films with a huge gap of time between them. I've never really been able to compare them right up against each other. But the good the bad and the ugly is for me, one of the three matchups in this sweet 16. They really gave me pause. It's going up against rosemary's baby. The Polanski thriller starting Mia Farrow, John cassavetes, one of my all time favorite horror films. And as much as I do appreciate that Leone western and as much as I'd love to see one of those Leone westerns advance, I'm voting against both of them. I just love that film too much. See, and this is where looking at the film's remaining as a whole is helping me out because I'm voting for the good the bad and the ugly then I'm going to look ahead and vote for night of the living dead as the horror. I just think it's the better film compared to rosemary's baby, which I do love a lot and here I'm arguing against myself in some ways because rosemary's baby very much of its time, right? In terms of the themes it's exploring. But as we talked about last show, so is night of the living dead and that one is in my top ten horror films of all time. So that's why clicking on good bad and the ugly. In this case and yeah, night of the living dead over the graduate. 60s film. The graduate. This is not easy at all. You see I've had to employ some tortured logic to get there. I think if you ask me which film I want to watch again, think about more, explore more deeply, actually between these two, it would be neither the living dead over the graduate, which I do love. It's my number one toughest matchup. It's the one I held off the longest in voting in, but you know me, Josh, up to this point, I have advanced both horror films every round. And I'm doing it again. I would have thought that impossible. Certainly before we talked about night of the living dead on the show a few years back when we gave it the sacred cow treatment, I want to say around Halloween. It was the Halloween special here on the show. They're both great films. I do love the graduate. But that a living dead is the more significant film. Music to my ears. My last one that was really hard. We're going to talk about a Japanese master here in a moment. One who has been overlooked for the most part over the past 60 years or so of cinema. Largely in favor of other Japanese masters, yasujiro ozu, and of course Akira Kurosawa, and Kurosawa was yojimbo, a film that of course feels nicely connected to some of those Leone films we talked about because it was the inspiration for the man with no name, trilogy, at least that first film, a fistful of dollars, explicitly, but

"ozu" Discussed on The Christian O’Connell Show

The Christian O’Connell Show

08:19 min | 7 months ago

"ozu" Discussed on The Christian O’Connell Show

"Russell Hobbs, the Christian O'Connell show, gold one O 4.3. Good morning Patsy. Morning. Good morning, Jackie boy. Good to see you guys. That's what your loved one chatted yesterday. You'll tune in parenthood, you'll find that you're in the part of parents in the early years where it's an endless scene sort of a bit of bursts. There's lots and lots of fun. And then when you get to like my part of it, when they're 16 and 18, it's suddenly a lot of laughs and then first. But you did an amazing thing yesterday suns out, what do you do now? Your boys won. We blew up the air first, they have a kiddie pool. Yeah, you're so loved that as a kid. It's in plain and paddling pools. That was like the summer was in the UK and you'd only have that paddling pool out for a day because the summoners were not long, so I spent grew up a lot of time in freezing cold tepid pools. Our Australian summers how I remember it is we'd fill it up at the start of summer and then it would slowly get sticky and gunky. It's the grass that gets in there and stays in there and that sort of film as well. I guess the bacteria that you don't know chlorine in there. It's just hose water. Did you also do like the slip N slide as well? No, one thing at a time. Now what I meant for you, you've got to show him show him what he can upgrade to in the next couple of years is that slip N slide. The slipper slide into lepore. No, I haven't even been in the kiddie pool myself yet. But you write a show. What are you like a lifeguard? Sat there. On the outside. Supervising. Of course. Patsy, how was your day? As you go excited about a lunchtime invitation. This is K two. Once you're 50, you know you're getting old, is when you get an invitation like weighted yesterday to a friend's 50th to a very nice venue. And we were like punching our fists in the air because it's a lunchtime date. It's not an evening. Dinner, and we're like, yes. That means, and it seemed winter. That means we get home in time for Netflix and jammies. The hater on. The over 50s next Netflix show. We were so excited. Oh my God, lunchtime birthday is that the phase of life that I'm heading to in 15 years. Yeah, I think this is going to be like a new thing is everyone's having lunchtime dos with soup which suits me, getting up at the air ride. Would you guys rather duke have a good long launch or dinner with Friends? No, no longer either, no longer. I'm sure the wrong person, I don't know. Let me just adjust my chance Apache. Definitely. You are so social when you like mankind. What would you rather what would you prefer? Long lunch or a dinner. Definitely long live. Yeah, far more enjoyable because it's not the pressure of, oh God, it's 8 o'clock I'm actually 'cause you know when you seasoned like us to getting up early. Your body clock doesn't know it's the weekend. It's like, hey, it's 8 o'clock. We should be gone a bit soon. Yeah, I love that feeling sometimes when you see, oh, it's caught to 5 ounces afterwards. You got it. Oh, God. We're suddenly when it's like four or 5 hours into a dinner on that, you really are trying to eat that yawn. You know, when you're pushing it, well, someone's going on and telling you that story about the third time. When can we go now? He's been even saying four hour dinner is scares the hell out of me. You all went to dinner by myself last night, 24 minutes I was there, Japanese restaurant. Yeah, no, but I love to know. Kind of general lunch myself. On my own, I'm so gross. Yeah, I'm going to a preview to our John Wick four. My to my wife yesterday. I said, oh yeah, I'm not here tomorrow night. And so I'm going to go and see John Wick for sure. Oh, great. Who are you going with by myself? Do you want to take anywhere? No. Could have dinner before, but myself. Watch a movie by myself. I said, I can not wait. This is my favorite date night. It's actually just by myself. But Christian O'Connell show podcast. That's he just talking about the joy of invited to a birthday party that is at lunchtime reminds me of this recent clip from great actress Jamie Lee Curtis. I've long thought that rock and roll band should do matinee tours. Especially if you look at the average age now, gig fans, you're going to see some of the Foo Fighters or Billy Joel. A lunchtime show, what are the one in the evening? Cheaper on babysitting as well. I am going to just say this now as a taunt and as a suggestion. You too. Doing that. Coldplay. Do a matinee. What about a 12 noon concert Coldplay? What about it? Bruce Springsteen. Do a matinee. I wouldn't you let me come see you, Bruce Springsteen in your glory days. Pun intended. And do it at noon or 1 o'clock 2 o'clock. I will come and hear your 5 hour concert Bruce at 2 o'clock, and I'm going to be home and in bed by 7 30. See, that's why it's worse than Jamie Lee Curtis there. I think that's an awesome idea. This year we should put on a Matt knife festival. Yes. For everybody who can make it 12 p.m. show. Do you think there are any shows at the Melbourne comedy festival that are matinee shows? They all start in the nighttime. What are we like to try and do stand up like midday in the sun? In the sun who was eyes blinking I could see that working, but the matinee for music shows. Let's definitely do a mat and I show you how this year definitely. That doesn't just get more excited about going to see something in the middle of the day. Yes. Knowing that you'll be home. All right, time waster extra time is to put a celebrity in a movie. Let's start easy. The Lionel Richie king, the Lionel Richie king. Civil plus. One for the kids. Drake solar plague. Watch out and over. Titanic cave, Titanic cave bronze silver. Stevie Wonder Woman. Did you have grind your own? Yeah, I did, yeah. Stevie Wonder Woman. That's a gold. And driving miss Jay-Z. Oh, that's very clever. Sir. That's right. Gold. All right, check your boy, what have you got then? Put a celebrity in a movie. 50 cent of a woman. Oh, Jack, you still win duck club. Or some drop in Drake. Ben aff Shrek. It's rarely makes me laugh, but that is first, like I said, you know. That's God bless. The wolf of Robert Wall Street. And the perks of being a Wahlberg. But Christian O'Connell show, podcast. So extra time, put a celebrity in a movie, text it over to 047-503-1043. Jack it she would go. You get a Chopin. This morning I asked you to put a 17 in a medium. Jack, you ready tomorrow? Let's do it. Jim O and G, Jim O and G well hard to beat that gold plus. That is a strong start from John this morning. Good morning, John Boggs. That's very good. Jim O and cheese very, very, very good. It feels like a title of a show and a joke. The wizard of ozu was born. Gold also good. Wow, this is a very good Jake Scott. We bought a Tim zoo. Oh God. Huge father weekend. What a Jacob Melton. Sally Field of dreams. Silver. Grand Tarantino. Silver. Katrina Jones diary, gold. Everything about it go. Rose Byrne after reading. Civil plus, finding sco mo, gold. Ferris Bueller's David Hasselhoff. Silver? Puff daddy day care. What a concept. Make the movie. I know what you did, Donna Summer. Gold. That's very smart. Well done, Marty. The sly that schacht me. Sylvester sly. You got it, my friend. Prawns, this guy.

"ozu" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"ozu" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Me that this trophy was disgraced and disrespected by being thrown as if it was a real football. I didn't sleep for the past two nights because of this, I was that upset. Because I know the passion that goes into this trophy and how my dad and all his fellow silver Smiths are so proud to make this I personally would like An apology. Not just to me and my family and the other silversmiths but to the fans. So that was Lorraine. Gross. Okay, let me just frame this with some perspective. Don't think that she needed to lose sleep for two days. Okay, that does feel a little melodramatic. It does feel little melodramatic that she would lose sleep or not sleep for two days. And demanding an apology is a little hottie here. I mean, it's one thing to criticize the behavior. Don't know Tom Brady Ozu a personal apology. Okay, so it's kind of making it about you of you need a personal apology. But I saw this video And I started looking at the comments. And everybody absolutely annihilated her. I mean, just One after another annihilated her Everybody. I was like, man, This is kind of unfortunate. No, The Twitter could be vicious. And I know there's a mob mentality that happens at the same time. I would think somebody would be like, Yeah, I could see your point. And I just tweeted. Wow. So there's not one person in these mentions that will support Lorraine. I said, I think she has a point. In 01 Tampa for Tom Brady cherishes that trophy in 2021 in Tampa Bay. He doesn't care if it hits the bottom of the river. I think that's an arguable. His first championship. That trophy's everything he would never throw that trophy to a different boat by 2021. It's the seventh It's one big, fat party. Now you can say, Well, that's what happens with perspective. D A. That's fine. But there's no doubt it's inarguable that he doesn't value the piece of metal the same way that he did 20 years ago. So there's nobody that could understand where Lorraine Gross is coming from that Lorraine grows. Her family designed and created the Vince Lombardi Trophy. That's her family's claim to fame. This is their passion. And she's like, Yeah. You know what I mean? Would be nice, too, but they didn't treat it like a beer can And she's totally in the wrong So you should have seen. When they say you get ratio. It means your comments are really, really high because everyone slamming you and your retweets or likes a really low because nobody agrees with you. So that's the ratio. I got ratio. I then followed up with? Well, you know what? Look, sometimes being popular isn't always right and being right. Isn't always popular. Of course, that only stoke the flames and then After I just kept getting hammered. A said, Look just as a different viewpoint. This woman's family spends her life perfecting their lives perfecting this craft, and every player coach ever has viewed it as a near sacred object. So can't you see her point? Being sleepless about it. That's a little much demanding an apology. That's a little much, but I could understand her being uncomfortable. Forget it. Forget it. Fangs were out by everybody. And so It is time to read D a show mean tweaks..

Lorraine Tom Brady Tampa Bay two days 2021 Lorraine Gross Tom Brady Ozu Twitter 20 years ago first championship seventh Vince Lombardi Trophy one person one thing two nights One apology one every player Tampa
"ozu" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"ozu" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"First hour here of the money Monday edition and talking about your money can't do much better to kick off your week than Stephen Moore, chief economist Donald Trump, one of the architects of Donald Trump's greatest Just economies in the world. But you can do pretty darn good with this guy Who's a dear friend of mine. One of the best broadcasters, I know, certainly out in New Jersey, whose show up Politically direct podcast on insider and J is killing it. Numbers are going up at all times. And Fernando, you re page Hey, How are you? John. All right. Hope you enjoyed the Super Bowl. It was all right. I had a good time with my friends had a few cocktails, but nothing. Nothing really crazy that you know, I kind of I bet the game. I'm a big gambler. I bet the game. I bet Tom Brady and the page and the bucks to win outright. No money. I took him on them. Will plus 1 50 to win the game outright, which I won that one, but I thought it might go over. I thought they'd be more scoring, But the Tampa defense really brought the heat yesterday. Remember that? So, um, lots of debate out there. Um, about this new stimulus check the new $1400. The unlike the first ones, this comes with some conditions. If you make XY Ozu don't get the whole thing. And Bernie Sanders is livid about it. It appears. What do you make of this? What's interesting is first of all the fact that you know Bernie Sanders, the chairman of the Budget Committee, we got doesn't know anything about budget to begin with. So it's kind of ironic. Because even you know, Joe Manchin from West Virginia who's you know, known as the most conservative member of the U. S. Senate is concerned about some of these chicks going out. High income earners who send them did not lose employment during the pandemic, So I think what we're gonna have here The first of the next few weeks is Democrats, both sort of And they're really far left one's arguing about what income threshold should be eligible for these stimulus checks, And in the meantime, Americans are still struggling. Johnson just seems like it's a lot of You know, philandering, Just a lot of semantics. Right now. You know the day it's taxpayers that are getting the short end of the stick, and I think that's what we should really upset people. I mean the amount of something that we decided it's all of this just posturing within the Democratic Party specific since they have majority site majorities in both chambers to get this done, and I just think it's disappointing overall right now for Americans Yeah, I'm with you. And now, um, you know also, I don't have a problem with people who aren't affected, not get You know, I I don't disagree with Bernie Sanders on that. Um, but now they're talking about this new child tax credit that's coming coming down the pipe of something. What's this new tax reform yet? Well, it's interesting, though, John, because when we look it against some of these numbers, and just for our audience, you know they have it. Really? I mean, we're talking about $3000 per child. And, of course, in certain age demographics here that will be part of the package, for example, you know, good between you know up until brother up into the age of six. We're looking at You know, $3600, but any any child between 16 17 I was, and I think that first of all if you looked at National standards. People are sure having less kids, John, I think even before the pandemic, we started seeing many Americans in couples specifically, we're looking to Child, No child rearing as a very expensive avenue. I know it sounds kind of like everybody for me to say that, but believe it or not. You were down in the last couple of years. So I think couples around the country of seeing that having a child is expense having more than one child expensive, especially in this economy. Now, with coded it sort of amplified morn. Again. I think it reminds us about this president and how he feels that. Hey, we can just throw money at a problem and it goes away in John, Listen. President Johnson back in 1968 allow Congress created, You know the great society. Remember that the war on poverty started, and since then we've had over a trillion dollars of federal money. Going to poverty programs reducing poverty, right. We've seen an increase in Medicaid and other programs and John get In percentage of people living in poverty today is commensurate with what was going on in 1968. So these programs haven't worked, and I just think the Democrats are falling to this whole of just throwing in some sort of, you know, money at a problem that quite frankly, I think Needs to be addressed at the state level. I want to appease a lot of the progressive wing. He wants to appease a lot of the liberals within the party of saying, Hey, listen, we need a child tax credit. We need a bond. We need this stimulus. Check her. That's similar check. John. I think it's just scary when we think that Throwing money at problems solve them when we know that for over 50 years, poverty has not been southern United States shop. No. And by the way, these, you know, arbitrary lockdowns kind of even making poverty worse because you got small business owners, especially like restaurants and bar owners. Who have a lot of 10 99 workers. They weren't even eligible for the P P P. Some of these people have a hard time getting even unemployment. Aren't necessarily even going in my view to the people who need the most. So you know, Stephen Moore said. There's still like 500 million left from the last stimulus that we haven't even used yet. Maybe. You know, I had an old boss when I used to say, Hey, I need bigger credit lines with my clients. I got to do more business. You got 100 million with this guy and you got 40 million left on. I said, no, I need more. But he would say, Well, why don't you use the other 40 and fill it up and then come back and make the case to me. Let's maybe use the money we got before we start spending more. It's almost like a drunken sailor. John, you actually write about that? Here's something else about this upcoming simplest. Worry all of us. I mean, I live here in New Jersey. And just like you in New York, you know, it's just it's become very evident that Governor's Cuomo and Murphy, for example, our governor Wittmer in Michigan. You know Democratic governors who have just spent the responsible in their states. We're not managing their state. It's you know, in a very physically responsible manner. Mistreating to build him out with some of these, you know, ridiculous aid packages at the state you're demanding. It's sort of like we're rewarding bad spending with Hey, let's just kick the can down the road, and that's just a bad message. And right now again with this administration that seems like you know, they think that we're printing money. It's just that you're responsible. Somebody keep an eye out for Years because again, these states are spending their responsibly. No more Muffy are doing our secret service and they want the better going to build them out. I just think it's wrong. I think people hopefully will wake up to it, especially this year giant New Jersey, where Governor Murphy is up for re election. And by the way, history is not on this side, where a Democrat is not won re election as governor since He's a Brendan Byrne. That's a long time ago. John and I'm sorry. It's these Democratic governors. They're putting themselves in a really bad position by sort of having their hand out, saying President Biden. Democrats in Congress, Please bail us out. It's just the wrong message, Child. Yeah, there's no doubt about it. I mean, you know these governors they've they've caused some of this. Jersey and New York Bolt have deficits in their pension plans, which is another ticking time bomb. And I really wish this money will get into the right people instead of bailing out poor leadership, but Not the poor about your leadership, certainly on politically direct on eyes on and J and all the great things you do in New Jersey. Always there for me on Monday and any time I need you, Thank you. My brother appreciate it. Thank you more. John. Stay safe. All right. That's Fernando. You rebate. He's the host of politically direct on eyes on N. J. You got to check him out the guys on the money..

John New Jersey Bernie Sanders Stephen Moore Donald Trump New York Johnson Congress Governor Murphy Fernando Tom Brady Tampa Joe Manchin United States Democratic Party president